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1.  Neuroimaging comparison of Primary Progressive Apraxia of Speech & Progressive Supranuclear Palsy 
Background
Primary progressive apraxia of speech, a motor speech disorder of planning and programming is a tauopathy that has overlapping histological features with progressive supranuclear palsy. We aimed to compare, for the first time, atrophy patterns, as well as white matter tract degeneration, between these two syndromes.
Methods
Sixteen primary progressive apraxia of speech subjects were age and gender-matched to 16 progressive supranuclear palsy subjects and 20 controls. All subjects were prospectively recruited, underwent neurological and speech evaluations, and 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. Grey and white matter atrophy was assessed using voxel-based morphometry and atlas-based parcellation, and white matter tract degeneration was assessed using diffusion tensor imaging.
Results
All progressive supranuclear palsy subjects had typical occulomotor/gait impairments but none had speech apraxia. Both syndromes showed grey matter loss in supplementary motor area, white matter loss in posterior frontal lobes and degeneration of the body of the corpus callosum. While lateral grey matter loss was focal, involving superior premotor cortex, in primary progressive apraxia of speech, loss was less focal extending into prefrontal cortex in progressive supranuclear palsy. Caudate volume loss and tract degeneration of superior cerebellar peduncles was also observed in progressive supranuclear palsy. Interestingly, area of the midbrain was reduced in both syndromes compared to controls, although this was greater in progressive supranuclear palsy.
Discussion
Although neuroanatomical differences were identified between these distinctive clinical syndromes, substantial overlap was also observed, including midbrain atrophy, suggesting these two syndromes may have common pathophysiological underpinnings.
doi:10.1111/ene.12004
PMCID: PMC3556348  PMID: 23078273
Progressive supranuclear palsy; apraxia of speech; voxel-based morphometry; diffusion tensor imaging; midbrain
2.  Clinical Pearls in Neurology 
Mayo Clinic Proceedings  2012;87(3):280-285.
doi:10.1016/j.mayocp.2011.10.009
PMCID: PMC3540395  PMID: 22386183
3.  Clinical correlates of white matter tract degeneration in PSP 
Archives of Neurology  2011;68(6):753-760.
Objective
Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is associated with degeneration of white matter tracts that can be detected using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). However, little is known about whether tract degeneration is associated with the clinical symptoms of PSP. The aim of this study was to use DTI to assess white matter tract degeneration in PSP and to investigate correlates, between tract integrity and clinical measures.
Design
Case-control study
Setting
Tertiary care medical centre
Patients
Twenty subjects with probable PSP and 20 age and gender-matched healthy controls. All PSP subjects underwent standardized clinical testing, including the Frontal Behavioral Inventory and Frontal Assessment Battery to assess behavioral change; the PSP Rating Scale to measure disease severity, the Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (parts I, II and III) to measure motor function, and the PSP Saccadic Impairment Scale to measure eye movement abnormalities.
Main outcome measures
Fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity measured using both region-of-interest analysis and Track Based Spatial Statistics.
Results
Abnormal diffusivity was observed predominantly in superior cerebellar peduncles, body of the corpus callosum, inferior longitudinal fasciculus and superior longitudinal fasciculus in PSP compared to controls. Fractional anisotropy values in the superior cerebellar peduncles correlated with disease severity; inferior longitudinal fasciculus correlated with motor function, and superior longitudinal fasciculus correlated with severity of saccadic impairments.
Conclusions
These results demonstrate that PSP is associated with degeneration of brainstem, association and commissural fibers and that this degeneration likely plays an important role in clinical dysfunction.
doi:10.1001/archneurol.2011.107
PMCID: PMC3401587  PMID: 21670399

Results 1-3 (3)