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1.  WormQTLHD—a web database for linking human disease to natural variation data in C. elegans 
Nucleic Acids Research  2013;42(D1):D794-D801.
Interactions between proteins are highly conserved across species. As a result, the molecular basis of multiple diseases affecting humans can be studied in model organisms that offer many alternative experimental opportunities. One such organism—Caenorhabditis elegans—has been used to produce much molecular quantitative genetics and systems biology data over the past decade. We present WormQTLHD (Human Disease), a database that quantitatively and systematically links expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL) findings in C. elegans to gene–disease associations in man. WormQTLHD, available online at http://www.wormqtl-hd.org, is a user-friendly set of tools to reveal functionally coherent, evolutionary conserved gene networks. These can be used to predict novel gene-to-gene associations and the functions of genes underlying the disease of interest. We created a new database that links C. elegans eQTL data sets to human diseases (34 337 gene–disease associations from OMIM, DGA, GWAS Central and NHGRI GWAS Catalogue) based on overlapping sets of orthologous genes associated to phenotypes in these two species. We utilized QTL results, high-throughput molecular phenotypes, classical phenotypes and genotype data covering different developmental stages and environments from WormQTL database. All software is available as open source, built on MOLGENIS and xQTL workbench.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkt1044
PMCID: PMC3965109  PMID: 24217915
2.  WormQTL—public archive and analysis web portal for natural variation data in Caenorhabditis spp 
Nucleic Acids Research  2012;41(D1):D738-D743.
Here, we present WormQTL (http://www.wormqtl.org), an easily accessible database enabling search, comparative analysis and meta-analysis of all data on variation in Caenorhabditis spp. Over the past decade, Caenorhabditis elegans has become instrumental for molecular quantitative genetics and the systems biology of natural variation. These efforts have resulted in a valuable amount of phenotypic, high-throughput molecular and genotypic data across different developmental worm stages and environments in hundreds of C. elegans strains. WormQTL provides a workbench of analysis tools for genotype–phenotype linkage and association mapping based on but not limited to R/qtl (http://www.rqtl.org). All data can be uploaded and downloaded using simple delimited text or Excel formats and are accessible via a public web user interface for biologists and R statistic and web service interfaces for bioinformaticians, based on open source MOLGENIS and xQTL workbench software. WormQTL welcomes data submissions from other worm researchers.
doi:10.1093/nar/gks1124
PMCID: PMC3531126  PMID: 23180786
3.  xQTL workbench: a scalable web environment for multi-level QTL analysis 
Bioinformatics  2012;28(7):1042-1044.
Summary: xQTL workbench is a scalable web platform for the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) at multiple levels: for example gene expression (eQTL), protein abundance (pQTL), metabolite abundance (mQTL) and phenotype (phQTL) data. Popular QTL mapping methods for model organism and human populations are accessible via the web user interface. Large calculations scale easily on to multi-core computers, clusters and Cloud. All data involved can be uploaded and queried online: markers, genotypes, microarrays, NGS, LC-MS, GC-MS, NMR, etc. When new data types come available, xQTL workbench is quickly customized using the Molgenis software generator.
Availability: xQTL workbench runs on all common platforms, including Linux, Mac OS X and Windows. An online demo system, installation guide, tutorials, software and source code are available under the LGPL3 license from http://www.xqtl.org.
Contact: m.a.swertz@rug.nl
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/bts049
PMCID: PMC3315722  PMID: 22308096
4.  R/qtl: high-throughput multiple QTL mapping 
Bioinformatics  2010;26(23):2990-2992.
Motivation: R/qtl is free and powerful software for mapping and exploring quantitative trait loci (QTL). R/qtl provides a fully comprehensive range of methods for a wide range of experimental cross types. We recently added multiple QTL mapping (MQM) to R/qtl. MQM adds higher statistical power to detect and disentangle the effects of multiple linked and unlinked QTL compared with many other methods. MQM for R/qtl adds many new features including improved handling of missing data, analysis of 10 000 s of molecular traits, permutation for determining significance thresholds for QTL and QTL hot spots, and visualizations for cis–trans and QTL interaction effects. MQM for R/qtl is the first free and open source implementation of MQM that is multi-platform, scalable and suitable for automated procedures and large genetical genomics datasets.
Availability: R/qtl is free and open source multi-platform software for the statistical language R, and is made available under the GPLv3 license. R/qtl can be installed from http://www.rqtl.org/. R/qtl queries should be directed at the mailing list, see http://www.rqtl.org/list/.
Contact: kbroman@biostat.wisc.edu
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btq565
PMCID: PMC2982156  PMID: 20966004
5.  Trans-eQTLs Reveal That Independent Genetic Variants Associated with a Complex Phenotype Converge on Intermediate Genes, with a Major Role for the HLA 
PLoS Genetics  2011;7(8):e1002197.
For many complex traits, genetic variants have been found associated. However, it is still mostly unclear through which downstream mechanism these variants cause these phenotypes. Knowledge of these intermediate steps is crucial to understand pathogenesis, while also providing leads for potential pharmacological intervention. Here we relied upon natural human genetic variation to identify effects of these variants on trans-gene expression (expression quantitative trait locus mapping, eQTL) in whole peripheral blood from 1,469 unrelated individuals. We looked at 1,167 published trait- or disease-associated SNPs and observed trans-eQTL effects on 113 different genes, of which we replicated 46 in monocytes of 1,490 different individuals and 18 in a smaller dataset that comprised subcutaneous adipose, visceral adipose, liver tissue, and muscle tissue. HLA single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were 10-fold enriched for trans-eQTLs: 48% of the trans-acting SNPs map within the HLA, including ulcerative colitis susceptibility variants that affect plausible candidate genes AOAH and TRBV18 in trans. We identified 18 pairs of unlinked SNPs associated with the same phenotype and affecting expression of the same trans-gene (21 times more than expected, P<10−16). This was particularly pronounced for mean platelet volume (MPV): Two independent SNPs significantly affect the well-known blood coagulation genes GP9 and F13A1 but also C19orf33, SAMD14, VCL, and GNG11. Several of these SNPs have a substantially higher effect on the downstream trans-genes than on the eventual phenotypes, supporting the concept that the effects of these SNPs on expression seems to be much less multifactorial. Therefore, these trans-eQTLs could well represent some of the intermediate genes that connect genetic variants with their eventual complex phenotypic outcomes.
Author Summary
Many genetic variants have been found associated with diseases. However, for many of these genetic variants, it remains unclear how they exert their effect on the eventual phenotype. We investigated genetic variants that are known to be associated with diseases and complex phenotypes and assessed whether these variants were also associated with gene expression levels in a set of 1,469 unrelated whole blood samples. For several diseases, such as type 1 diabetes and ulcerative colitis, we observed that genetic variants affect the expression of genes, not implicated before. For complex traits, such as mean platelet volume and mean corpuscular volume, we observed that independent genetic variants on different chromosomes influence the expression of exactly the same genes. For mean platelet volume, these genes include well-known blood coagulation genes but also genes with still unknown functions. These results indicate that, by systematically correlating genetic variation with gene expression levels, it is possible to identify downstream genes, which provide important avenues for further research.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1002197
PMCID: PMC3150446  PMID: 21829388
6.  Bioinformatics tools and database resources for systems genetics analysis in mice—a short review and an evaluation of future needs 
Briefings in Bioinformatics  2011;13(2):135-142.
During a meeting of the SYSGENET working group ‘Bioinformatics’, currently available software tools and databases for systems genetics in mice were reviewed and the needs for future developments discussed. The group evaluated interoperability and performed initial feasibility studies. To aid future compatibility of software and exchange of already developed software modules, a strong recommendation was made by the group to integrate HAPPY and R/qtl analysis toolboxes, GeneNetwork and XGAP database platforms, and TIQS and xQTL processing platforms. R should be used as the principal computer language for QTL data analysis in all platforms and a ‘cloud’ should be used for software dissemination to the community. Furthermore, the working group recommended that all data models and software source code should be made visible in public repositories to allow a coordinated effort on the use of common data structures and file formats.
doi:10.1093/bib/bbr026
PMCID: PMC3294237  PMID: 22396485
QTL mapping; database; mouse; systems genetics
7.  The MOLGENIS toolkit: rapid prototyping of biosoftware at the push of a button 
BMC Bioinformatics  2010;11(Suppl 12):S12.
Background
There is a huge demand on bioinformaticians to provide their biologists with user friendly and scalable software infrastructures to capture, exchange, and exploit the unprecedented amounts of new *omics data. We here present MOLGENIS, a generic, open source, software toolkit to quickly produce the bespoke MOLecular GENetics Information Systems needed.
Methods
The MOLGENIS toolkit provides bioinformaticians with a simple language to model biological data structures and user interfaces. At the push of a button, MOLGENIS’ generator suite automatically translates these models into a feature-rich, ready-to-use web application including database, user interfaces, exchange formats, and scriptable interfaces. Each generator is a template of SQL, JAVA, R, or HTML code that would require much effort to write by hand. This ‘model-driven’ method ensures reuse of best practices and improves quality because the modeling language and generators are shared between all MOLGENIS applications, so that errors are found quickly and improvements are shared easily by a re-generation. A plug-in mechanism ensures that both the generator suite and generated product can be customized just as much as hand-written software.
Results
In recent years we have successfully evaluated the MOLGENIS toolkit for the rapid prototyping of many types of biomedical applications, including next-generation sequencing, GWAS, QTL, proteomics and biobanking. Writing 500 lines of model XML typically replaces 15,000 lines of hand-written programming code, which allows for quick adaptation if the information system is not yet to the biologist’s satisfaction. Each application generated with MOLGENIS comes with an optimized database back-end, user interfaces for biologists to manage and exploit their data, programming interfaces for bioinformaticians to script analysis tools in R, Java, SOAP, REST/JSON and RDF, a tab-delimited file format to ease upload and exchange of data, and detailed technical documentation. Existing databases can be quickly enhanced with MOLGENIS generated interfaces using the ‘ExtractModel’ procedure.
Conclusions
The MOLGENIS toolkit provides bioinformaticians with a simple model to quickly generate flexible web platforms for all possible genomic, molecular and phenotypic experiments with a richness of interfaces not provided by other tools. All the software and manuals are available free as LGPLv3 open source at http://www.molgenis.org.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-11-S12-S12
PMCID: PMC3040526  PMID: 21210979
8.  XGAP: a uniform and extensible data model and software platform for genotype and phenotype experiments 
Genome Biology  2010;11(3):R27.
XGAP, a software platform for the integration and analysis of genotype and phenotype data.
We present an extensible software model for the genotype and phenotype community, XGAP. Readers can download a standard XGAP (http://www.xgap.org) or auto-generate a custom version using MOLGENIS with programming interfaces to R-software and web-services or user interfaces for biologists. XGAP has simple load formats for any type of genotype, epigenotype, transcript, protein, metabolite or other phenotype data. Current functionality includes tools ranging from eQTL analysis in mouse to genome-wide association studies in humans.
doi:10.1186/gb-2010-11-3-r27
PMCID: PMC2864567  PMID: 20214801

Results 1-8 (8)