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author:("Roy, madhura")
1.  Induced chromosome deletions cause hypersociability and other features of Williams–Beuren syndrome in mice 
EMBO Molecular Medicine  2009;1(1):50-65.
The neurodevelopmental disorder Williams–Beuren syndrome is caused by spontaneous ∼1.5 Mb deletions comprising 25 genes on human chromosome 7q11.23. To functionally dissect the deletion and identify dosage-sensitive genes, we created two half-deletions of the conserved syntenic region on mouse chromosome 5G2. Proximal deletion (PD) mice lack Gtf2i to Limk1, distal deletion (DD) mice lack Limk1 to Fkbp6, and the double heterozygotes (D/P) model the complete human deletion. Gene transcript levels in brain are generally consistent with gene dosage. Increased sociability and acoustic startle response are associated with PD, and cognitive defects with DD. Both PD and D/P males are growth-retarded, while skulls are shortened and brains are smaller in DD and D/P. Lateral ventricle (LV) volumes are reduced, and neuronal cell density in the somatosensory cortex is increased, in PD and D/P. Motor skills are most impaired in D/P. Together, these partial deletion mice replicate crucial aspects of the human disorder and serve to identify genes and gene networks contributing to the neural substrates of complex behaviours and behavioural disorders.
doi:10.1002/emmm.200900003
PMCID: PMC3378107  PMID: 20049703
genomic disorder; haploinsufficiency phenotypes; mouse chromosome deletion models; Williams syndrome
2.  Viral caspase inhibitor p35, but not crmA, is neuroprotective in the ischemic penumbra following experimental stroke 
Neuroscience  2007;149(4):804-812.
Apoptosis, a predominant cause of neuronal death after stroke, can be executed in a caspase-dependent or apoptosis inducing factor (AIF)-dependent manner. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) vectors expressing caspase inhibitors p35 and crmA have been shown to be neuroprotective against various excitotoxic insults. Here we further evaluated the possible neuroprotective role of p35 and crmA in a rat stroke model. Overexpression of p35, but not crmA, significantly increased neuronal survival. Results of double immunofluorescence staining indicate that compared with neurons infected with crmA or control vectors, p35-infected neurons had less active caspase-3 expression, cytosolic cytochrome c and nuclear AIF translocation.
doi:10.1016/j.neuroscience.2007.07.030
PMCID: PMC2144739  PMID: 17945431
cerebral ischemia; apoptosis; caspase inhibitor; crmA; p35; gene therapy; stroke

Results 1-2 (2)