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1.  Lack of Specificity of Plasma Concentrations of Inhibin B and Follicle-Stimulating Hormone for Identification of Azoospermic Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report From the St Jude Lifetime Cohort Study 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2013;31(10):1324-1328.
Purpose
Many male survivors of childhood cancer are at risk for azoospermia. Although both the levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and inhibin B are correlated with sperm concentration, their ability to predict azoospermia in survivors of childhood cancer remains uncertain.
Patients and Methods
Semen analysis was performed and serum levels of FSH and inhibin B were measured in 275 adult male survivors of childhood cancer who had received gonadotoxic therapy. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the optimal inhibin B and FSH values for identifying patients with azoospermia. The patient sample was divided into a learning set and a validation set. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value were calculated.
Results
Inhibin B was dichotomized as ≤ 31 ng/L or more than 31 ng/L and FSH was dichotomized as ≤ 11.5 mIU/mL or more than 11.5 mIU/mL based on results of the ROC analysis. Using these values, the specificity of the serum level of inhibin B for identifying azoospermic survivors was 45.0%, and the positive predictive value was 52.1%. The specificity for FSH was 74.1%, and the positive predictive value was 65.1%.
Conclusion
Neither serum inhibin B nor FSH is a suitable surrogate for determination of sperm concentration in a semen sample. Young men and their physicians should be aware of the limitations of these measures for assessment of fertility potential.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2012.43.7038
PMCID: PMC3607671  PMID: 23423746
2.  Relevance of Historical Therapeutic Approaches to the Contemporary Treatment of Pediatric Solid Tumors 
Pediatric blood & cancer  2013;60(7):10.1002/pbc.24487.
Children with solid tumors, most of which are malignant, have an excellent prognosis when treated on contemporary regimens. These regimens, which incorporate chemotherapeutic agents and treatment modalities used for many decades, have evolved to improve relapse-free survival and reduce long-term toxicity. This review discusses the evolution of the treatment regimens employed for management of the most common solid tumors, emphasizing the similarities between contemporary and historical regimens. These similarities allow the use of historical patient cohorts to identify the late effects of successful therapy and to evaluate remedial interventions for these adverse effects.
doi:10.1002/pbc.24487
PMCID: PMC3810072  PMID: 23418018
Childhood cancer therapy; late effects; long-term follow-up
3.  Clinicopathologic Findings Predictive of Relapse in Children With Stage III Favorable-Histology Wilms Tumor 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2013;31(9):1196-1201.
Purpose
Stage III designation in NWTS-5 (National Wilms Tumor Study–5) was determined by four pathologic criteria: positive lymph nodes (LNs), peritoneal implants, residual disease, and tumor rupture. The objective of this study was to determine the prognostic significance of each of the stage III criteria.
Patients and Methods
Children with stage III Wilms tumor (WT) treated in NWTS-5 were assessed for event-free (EFS) and overall survival (OS). Sites of relapse and molecular status of tumors are reported. EFS and OS are reported 8 years after diagnosis.
Results
There were 569 patients with local stage III favorable-histology (FH) WT in this analysis, of whom 109 had overall stage IV disease. LN involvement alone was the most frequent criterion for stage III designation (38%), followed by microscopic residual disease alone (20%), microscopic residual disease and LN involvement (14%), and spill or soilage alone (9%). The 8-year EFS and OS estimates for all patients with local stage III FHWT were 82% and 91%, respectively. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that both LN involvement (relative risk, 1.89; P = .005) and microscopic residual disease (relative risk, 1.87; P = .007) were predictive of EFS, and OS results were similar. There was no apparent difference in pattern of relapse according to stage III subtype. The rate of loss of heterozygosity was higher (6%) for those with positive LNs than for those without (2%; P = .05).
Conclusion
LN involvement and microscopic residual are the stage III criteria highly predictive of EFS and OS for patients with stage III FHWT. It is possible that in future studies, patients with different stage III criteria may receive different therapies.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2011.41.1165
PMCID: PMC3595426  PMID: 23382471
4.  Increased Tricuspid Regurgitant Jet Velocity by Doppler Echocardiography in Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report From the St Jude Lifetime Cohort Study 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2013;31(6):774-781.
Purpose
To determine the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension, a late effect of cancer therapy not previously identified in aging survivors of childhood cancer, and associations with chest-directed radiation therapy (RT) and measures of current cardiac function, lung function, and exercise capacity.
Patients and Methods
Cross-sectional evaluation of 498 survivors at a median age of 38.0 years (range, 20.0 to 59.0 years) and a median of 27.3 years (range, 12.2 to 46.0 years) from primary cancer diagnosis was performed. Abnormal tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRV) was defined as more than 2.8 m/s by Doppler echocardiography.
Results
Increased TRV was identified in 25.2% of survivors who received chest-directed RT and 30.8% of those who received more than 30 Gy. In multivariable models, increased TRV was associated with increasing dose of RT (1 to 19.9 Gy: odds ratio [OR], 2.09; 95% CI, 0.63 to 6.96; 20 to 29.9 Gy: OR, 3.46; 95% CI, 1.59 to 7.54; ≥ 30 Gy: OR, 4.54; 95% CI, 1.77 to 11.64 compared with no RT; P for trend < .001), body mass index more than 40 kg/m2 (OR, 3.89; 95% CI, 1.46 to 10.39), and aortic valve regurgitation (OR, 5.85; 95% CI, 2.05 to 16.74). Survivors with a TRV more than 2.8 m/s had increased odds (OR, 5.20; 95% CI, 2.5 to 11.0) of severe functional limitation on a 6-minute walk compared with survivors with a TRV ≤ 2.8 m/s.
Conclusion
A substantial number of adult survivors of childhood cancer who received chest-directed RT have an increased TRV and may have pulmonary hypertension as a result of both direct lung injury and cardiac dysfunction. Longitudinal follow-up and confirmation by cardiac catheterization are warranted.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2012.43.0702
PMCID: PMC3574270  PMID: 23295810
5.  Lymph node involvement in Wilms tumor: results from National Wilms Tumor Studies 4 and 5 
Journal of pediatric surgery  2012;47(4):700-706.
Purpose
The aim of the study was to determine the prognostic impact of lymph node (LN) involvement and sampling in patients with Wilms tumor (WT) and the minimum number of LNs needed for accurate staging.
Methods
We reviewed all patients with unilateral, nonmetastatic WT enrolled in the National Wilms Tumor Study 4 or 5. Data were abstracted on patient demographics, tumor histology, staging, number of LNs sampled, and disease-specific and overall patient outcomes.
Results
A total of 3409 patients had complete information on LN sampling. Five-year event-free survival (EFS) was lower in patients with nodal disease (P = .001); the effect of LN positivity was greater for patients with anaplastic (P = .047) than with favorable histology (P = .02). The likelihood of obtaining a positive LN was higher when sampling at least 7 LNs. However, after controlling for tumor histology and stage, the number of LNs sampled did not predict EFS variations (P = .75). Among patients with stage II disease, patients with LN sampling (P = .055) had improved EFS, largely reflecting poorer EFS in patients with anaplastic tumors (P = .03).
Conclusions
Lymph node sampling is particularly important for patients with stage II anaplastic WT. Although the likelihood of finding a positive LN was greater when more than 7 LNs were sampled, EFS was not impacted by the number of LNs sampled.
doi:10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2011.08.017
PMCID: PMC3976547  PMID: 22498384
Wilms tumor; Lymph node; Treatment outcome; Child
6.  Neurocognitive Function and CNS Integrity in Adult Survivors of Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma  
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2012;30(29):3618-3624.
Purpose
Long-term survivors of childhood Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) are at risk for cardiopulmonary complications and CNS stroke, although neurocognitive function has not been previously examined. The aim of this study was to examine neurocognitive and brain imaging outcomes in adult survivors of childhood HL.
Patients and Methods
In all, 62 adult survivors (mean age, 42.2 years; standard deviation [SD], 4.77; mean age at diagnosis, 15.1 years; SD, 3.30) were identified by stratified random selection from a large cohort treated with either high-dose (≥ 30 Gy) thoracic radiation (n = 38) or lower-dose (< 30 Gy) thoracic radiation combined with anthracycline (n = 24). Patients underwent neurocognitive evaluations, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), echocardiograms, pulmonary function tests, and physical examinations.
Results
Compared with national age-adjusted norms, HL survivors demonstrated lower performance on sustained attention (P = .004), short-term memory (P = .001), long-term memory (P = .006), working memory (P < .001), naming speed (P < .001), and cognitive fluency (P = .007). MRI revealed leukoencephalopathy in 53% of survivors, and 37% had evidence of cerebrovascular injury. Higher thoracic radiation dose was associated with impaired cardiac diastolic function (E/E′; ratio of peak mitral flow velocity of early rapid filling [E] to early diastolic velocity of the mitral annulus [E′]; P = .003), impaired pulmonary function (diffusing capacity of lungs for carbon monoxide [DLcocorr; P = .04), and leukoencephalopathy (P = .02). Survivors with leukoencephalopathy demonstrated reduced cognitive fluency (P = .001). Working memory impairment was associated with E/E′, although impaired sustained attention and naming speed were associated with DLcocorr. Neurocognitive performance was associated with academic and vocational functioning.
Conclusion
These results suggest that adult long-term survivors of childhood HL are at risk for neurocognitive impairment, which is associated with radiologic indices suggestive of reduced brain integrity and which occurs in the presence of symptoms of cardiopulmonary dysfunction.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2012.42.6841
PMCID: PMC3462045  PMID: 22949149
7.  Psychoactive Medication Use and Neurocognitive Function in Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study 
Pediatric blood & cancer  2012;60(3):486-493.
Background
Adult survivors of childhood cancer are at risk for long-term morbidities, which may be managed pharmacologically. Psychoactive medication treatment has been associated with adverse effects on specific neurocognitive processes in non-cancer populations, yet these associations have not been examined in adult survivors of childhood cancer.
Procedure
Outcomes were evaluated in 7,080 adult survivors from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study using a validated self-report Neurocognitive Questionnaire. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for neurocognitive impairment using demographic and treatment factors and survivors’ report of prescription medication use.
Results
Controlling for cranial radiation, pain, psychological distress, and stroke/seizure, use of antidepressant medications was associated with impaired task efficiency (OR=1.80, 95% CI=1.47–2.21), organization (OR=1.83, 95% CI=1.48–2.25), memory (OR=1.53, 95% CI=1.27–1.84) and emotional regulation (OR=2.06, 95% CI=1.70–2.51). Neuroleptics and stimulants were associated with impaired task efficiency (OR=2.46, 95% CI=1.29–4.69; OR=2.82, 95% CI=1.61–4.93, respectively) and memory (OR=2.08, 95% CI=1.13–3.82; OR=2.69, 95% CI=1.59–4.54, respectively). Anticonvulsants were associated with impaired task efficiency, memory and emotional regulation, although survivors who use these medications may be at risk for neurocognitive impairment on the basis of seizure disorder and/or underlying tumor location (CNS).
Conclusions
These findings suggest that specific psychoactive medications and/or mental health conditions may be associated with neurocognitive function in adult survivors of childhood cancer. The extent to which these associations are causal or indicative of underlying neurological impairment for which the medications are prescribed remains to be ascertained.
doi:10.1002/pbc.24255
PMCID: PMC3494805  PMID: 22848025
psychoactive medication; neurocognition; survivorship
8.  Prevalence and Predictors of Prescription Psychoactive Medication Use in Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study 
Purpose
Childhood cancer survivors are at-risk for late effects which may be managed pharmacologically. The purpose of this study was to estimate and compare the prevalence of psychoactive medication use of adult survivors of childhood cancer and sibling controls, identify predictors of medication use in survivors, and investigate associations between psychoactive medications and health-related quality of life (HRQOL).
Methods
Psychoactive medication use from 1994 to 2010 was evaluated in 10,378 adult survivors from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. A randomly selected subset of 3,206 siblings served as a comparison group. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (OR) for baseline and new onset of self-reported psychoactive medication use and HRQOL.
Results
Survivors were significantly more likely to report baseline (22% vs. 15%, p<0.001) and new onset (31% vs. 25%, p<0.001) psychoactive medication use compared to siblings, as well as use of multiple medications (p<0.001). In multivariable models, controlling for pain and psychological distress, female survivors were significantly more likely to report baseline and new onset use of antidepressants (OR=2.66; 95% CI=2.01–3.52; OR=2.02; 95% CI=1.72–2.38, respectively) and multiple medications (OR=1.80; 95% CI=1.48–2.19; OR=1.77; 95% CI=1.48–2.13, respectively). Non-cranial radiation and amputation predicted incident use of analgesics >15 years following diagnosis. Antidepressants were associated with impairment across all domains of HRQOL, with the exception of physical function.
Conclusions
Prevalence of psychoactive medication use was higher among survivors for most medication classes, as was the use of multiple medications. Clinicians should be aware of the possible contribution of psychoactive medications to HRQOL.
doi:10.1007/s11764-012-0250-x
PMCID: PMC3568188  PMID: 23224753
psychoactive medication; quality of life; survivorship
9.  Risk Factors for Obesity in Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2011;30(3):246-255.
Purpose
Many Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) participants are at increased risk for obesity. The etiology of their obesity is likely multifactorial but not well understood.
Patients and Methods
We evaluated the potential contribution of demographic, lifestyle, treatment, and intrapersonal factors and self-reported pharmaceutical use to obesity (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2) among 9,284 adult (> 18 years of age) CCSS participants. Independent predictors were identified using multivariable regression models. Interrelationships were determined using structural equation modeling (SEM).
Results
Independent risk factors for obesity included cancer diagnosed at 5 to 9 years of age (relative risk [RR], 1.12; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.24; P = .03), abnormal Short Form–36 physical function (RR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.33; P < .001), hypothalamic/pituitary radiation doses of 20 to 30 Gy (RR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.30; P = .01), and paroxetine use (RR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.54; P = .01). Meeting US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for vigorous physical activity (RR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.82 to 0.97; P = .01) and a medium amount of anxiety (RR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.75 to 0.99; P = .04) reduced the risk of obesity. Results of SEM (N = 8,244; comparative fit index = 0.999; Tucker Lewis index = 0.999; root mean square error of approximation = 0.014; weighted root mean square residual = 0.749) described the hierarchical impact of the direct predictors, moderators, and mediators of obesity.
Conclusion
Treatment, lifestyle, and intrapersonal factors, as well as the use of specific antidepressants, may contribute to obesity among survivors. A multifaceted intervention, including alternative drug and other therapies for depression and anxiety, may be required to reduce risk.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2010.34.4267
PMCID: PMC3269951  PMID: 22184380
10.  Screening Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer for Cardiomyopathy: Comparison of Echocardiography and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2012;30(23):2876-2884.
Purpose
To compare two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography, the current method of screening for treatment-related cardiomyopathy recommended by the Children's Oncology Group Guidelines, to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging, the reference standard for left ventricular (LV) function.
Patients and Methods
Cross-sectional, contemporaneous evaluation of LV structure and function by 2D and three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography and CMR imaging in 114 adult survivors of childhood cancer currently median age 39 years (range, 22 to 53 years) exposed to anthracycline chemotherapy and/or chest-directed radiation therapy.
Results
In this survivor population, 14% (n = 16) had an ejection fraction (EF) less than 50% by CMR. Survivors previously undiagnosed with cardiotoxicity (n = 108) had a high prevalence of EF (32%) and cardiac mass (48%) that were more than two standard deviations below the mean of normative CMR data. 2D echocardiography overestimated the mean EF of this population by 5%. Compared with CMR, 2D echocardiography (biplane method) had a sensitivity of 25% and a false-negative rate of 75% for detection of EF less than 50%, although 3D echocardiography had 53% and 47%, respectively. Twelve survivors (11%) had an EF less than 50% by CMR but were misclassified as ≥ 50% (range, 50% to 68%) by 2D echocardiography (biplane method). Detection of cardiomyopathy was improved (sensitivity, 75%) by using a higher 2D echocardiography cutoff (EF < 60%) to detect an EF less than 50% by the reference standard CMR.
Conclusion
CMR identified a high prevalence of cardiomyopathy among adult survivors previously undiagnosed with cardiac disease. 2D echocardiography demonstrated limited screening performance. In this high-risk population, survivors with an EF 50% to 59% by 2D echocardiography should be considered for comprehensive cardiac assessment, which may include CMR.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2011.40.3584
PMCID: PMC3671529  PMID: 22802310
11.  Fractures among long-term survivors of childhood cancer: A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study 
Cancer  2012;118(23):5920-5928.
Background
Although reductions in bone mineral density are well-documented among children during treatment for cancer and among childhood cancer survivors, little is known about the long-term risk of fracture. The aim of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of and risk factors for fractures among individuals participating in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS).
Methods
Analyses included 7414 5+ year survivors of childhood cancer diagnosed between 1970-86 who completed the 2007 CCSS follow-up questionnaire and a comparison group of 2374 siblings. Generalized linear models stratified by sex were used to compare the prevalence of reported fractures between survivors and siblings.
Results
The median ages at follow-up among survivors and siblings were 36.2, (range: 21.2-58.8) and 38.1 years (range: 18.4-62.6), respectively with a median 22.7 years of follow-up after cancer diagnosis for survivors. Approximately 35% of survivors and 39% of siblings reported ≥1 fractures during their lifetime. The prevalence of fractures was lower among survivors than siblings, both in males (prevalence ratio=0.87, 95%CI=0.81-0.94, p<0.001) and females (prevalence ratio=0.94, 95%CI=0.86-1.04, p=0.22). In multivariable analyses, increasing age at follow-up, white race, methotrexate treatment and balance difficulties were associated with increased prevalence of fractures among female survivors (p=0.05). Among males, only smoking history and white race were associated with an increased prevalence of fracture (p<0.001).
Conclusions
Findings from this study indicate that the prevalence of fractures among adult survivors is not increased compared to that of siblings. Additional studies of bone health among aging female cancer survivors may be warranted.
doi:10.1002/cncr.27626
PMCID: PMC3439597  PMID: 22605509
12.  Congenital Anomalies in the Children of Cancer Survivors: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2011;30(3):239-245.
Purpose
Children with cancer receive mutagenic treatments, which raises concern about the potential transmissibility of germline damage to their offspring. This question has been inadequately studied to date because of a lack of detailed individual treatment exposure assessment such as gonadal radiation doses.
Methods
Within the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, we performed a retrospective cohort analysis of validated cases of congenital anomalies among 4,699 children of 1,128 male and 1,627 female childhood cancer survivors. We quantified chemotherapy with alkylating agents and radiotherapy doses to the testes and ovaries and related these exposures to risk of congenital anomalies using logistic regression.
Results
One hundred twenty-nine children had at least one anomaly (prevalence = 2.7%). For children whose mothers were exposed to radiation or alkylating agents versus neither, the prevalence of anomalies was 3.0% versus 3.5% (P = .51); corresponding figures were 1.9% versus 1.7% (P = .79) for the children of male survivors. Neither ovarian radiation dose (mean, 1.19 Gy; odds ratio [OR] = 0.59; 95% CI, 0.20 to 1.75 for 2.50+ Gy) nor testicular radiation dose (mean, 0.48 Gy; OR = 1.01; 95% CI, 0.36 to 2.83 for 0.50+ Gy) was related to risk of congenital anomalies. Treatment with alkylating agents also was not significantly associated with anomalies in the children of male or female survivors.
Conclusion
Our findings offer strong evidence that the children of cancer survivors are not at significantly increased risk for congenital anomalies stemming from their parent's exposure to mutagenic cancer treatments. This information is important for counseling cancer survivors planning to have children.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2011.37.2938
PMCID: PMC3269950  PMID: 22162566
13.  Clinical Significance of Pulmonary Nodules Detected by CT and Not CXR in Patients Treated for Favorable Histology Wilms Tumor on National Wilms Tumor Studies-4 and 5: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group 
Pediatric blood & cancer  2012;59(4):631-635.
Background
Metastatic lung disease in Wilms tumor (WT) patients was traditionally identified by chest radiograph (CXR). It is unclear whether patients with small lesions, detectable only by computed tomography (“CT-only” lesions), require the more intensive therapy, including doxorubicin and lung irradiation, given to patients with metastases detectable by CXR.
Procedures
This study involved 417 patients with favorable histology WT and isolated lung metastases (detected by CXR or CT) who were registered on National Wilms Tumor Study (NWTS)-4 or -5. Outcomes by method of detection (CXR vs. CT only), use of lung radiation, and 2- or 3-drug chemotherapy (dactinomycin and vincristine +/− doxorubicin) were determined and compared using the log-rank test.
Results
There were 231 patients with lung lesions detected by CXR and 186 by CT only. Of the patients with CT-only nodules, 37 received only 2 drugs and 101 did not receive lung radiation. Five-year event-free survival (EFS) was greater for patients receiving 3 drugs (including doxorubicin) with or without lung radiation than for those receiving 2 drugs (80% vs. 56%; p=0.004). There was no difference seen in 5-year overall survival (OS) between the 3-drug and 2-drug subsets (87% vs 86%; p=0.91). There were no significant differences in EFS (82% vs. 72%; p=0.13) or OS (91% vs. 83%; p = 0.46) for patients with CT-only nodules whether they received lung radiation or not.
Conclusions
Our results suggest that patients with CT-only lung lesions may have improved EFS but not OS from the addition of doxorubicin but do not appear to benefit from pulmonary radiation.
doi:10.1002/pbc.24123
PMCID: PMC3397278  PMID: 22422736
Wilms tumor; CT scans; pulmonary metastases; doxorubicin; lung radiation
14.  Clinical Ascertainment of Health Outcomes among Adults Treated for Childhood Cancer: A Report from the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study 
Importance
Adult survivors of childhood cancer are known to be at risk for treatment-related adverse health outcomes. A large population of survivors has not been evaluated using a comprehensive systematic clinical assessment to determine the prevalence of chronic health conditions.
Objective
Following systematic exposure-based medical assessments of a large cohort of adult survivors of childhood cancer, determine the prevalence of adverse health outcomes and the proportion associated with treatment-related exposures.
Design, Setting, and Participants
Presence of health outcomes was ascertained among 1713 adult (median age 32 years, range 18-60) survivors of childhood cancer (median time from diagnosis 25 years, range 10-47) enrolled in the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study since 10/1/2007 and followed through 10/31/2012.
Main Outcome Measures
Age-specific cumulative prevalence of adverse outcomes by organ system and sex-adjusted attributable fraction percentages with 95% confidence intervals were calculated.
Results
Using clinical criteria, the crude prevalence of adverse health outcomes was highest for pulmonary [65.2%(95% CI, 60.4-69.8%)], auditory [62.1%(95% CI, 55.8-68.2%)], endocrine-reproductive [62.0%(95% CI, 59.5-64.6%)], cardiac [56.4(95% CI, 53.5-59.2%)] and neurocognitive [48.0%(95%CI, 44.9-51.0%)] function, whereas abnormalities impacting hepatic [13.0%(95% CI, 10.8-15.3%)], skeletal [9.6%(95% CI, 8.0-11.5%)], renal [5.0%(95% CI, 4.0-6.3%)] and hematopoietic [3.0%(95% CI: 2.1-3.9%)] function were less common. Attributable fractions were highest for endocrine-reproductive disorders [88.4%(95% CI, 80.1-93.3%)] to 100%, but considerably lower for conditions highly prevalent in the general population such as hypertension [9.3%(95%CI, −16.3-29.2%)], dyslipidemia [15.5%(95% CI, 10.2-20.5%)], and obesity [42.1%(95% CI, 34.4-48.9%)]. Among survivors at risk for adverse outcomes following specific cancer treatment modalities, the estimated cumulative prevalence at 50 years of age was 21.6%(95% CI, 19.3-23.9%) for cardiomyopathy, 83.5%(95% CI, 80.2-86.8%) for heart valve disorder, 76.8%(95% CI, 73.6-80.0%) for pituitary dysfunction, 81.3%(95% CI, 77.6-85.0%) for pulmonary dysfunction, 86.5%(95% CI, 82.3-90.7%) for hearing loss, 40.9%(95% CI, 32.0-49.8%) for breast cancer, 31.1%(95% CI, 27.3-34.9%) for Leydig cell failure, and 31.9%(95% CI, 28.0-35.8%) for primary ovarian failure. At age 45 years, the estimated cumulative prevalence of any chronic health condition is 95.2% (95% CI 94.8-98.6%) and 80% (95% CI 73.0-86.6%) for a serious, life-threatening or disabling chronic condition.
Conclusion and Relevance
Systematic risk-based medical assessments of adults treated for childhood cancer identified a substantial number of previously undiagnosed problems that are typically prevalent in an older population underscoring the need for ongoing health monitoring and intervention of this population.
doi:10.1001/jama.2013.6296
PMCID: PMC3771083  PMID: 23757085
Childhood cancer; late effects; long-term follow-up; health screening
15.  Treatments and Outcomes for End Stage Renal Disease Following Wilms Tumor 
Background
Little is known about treatment outcomes for children who have end stage renal disease (ESRD) after treatment for Wilms tumor (WT).
Methods
Time-to-transplant, graft failure and survival outcomes were examined for 173 children enrolled on the National Wilms Tumor Study who developed ESRD.
Results
Fifty-five patients whose ESRD resulted from progressive bilateral WT (PBWT) experienced high early mortality from WT that limited their opportunity for transplant (47% at 5 years) and survival (44% at 10 years) in comparison with population controls. The 118 patients whose ESRD was due to other causes (termed “chronic kidney disease”), many of whom had WT associated congenital anomalies, had transplant (77% at 5 years) and survival (73% at 10 years) outcomes no worse than those for population controls. Graft failure following transplant was comparable for the 2 groups. Minority children had twice the median time to transplant as non-Hispanic whites and twice the mortality rates, also reflecting population trends.
Conclusions
In view of the continuing high mortality in patients with ESRD, and the dramatic improvement in outlook following kidney transplantation, re-evaluation of current guidelines for a 2 year delay in transplant following WT treatment may be warranted.
doi:10.1007/s00467-012-2140-x
PMCID: PMC3383943  PMID: 22430485
Kidney Failure; Chronic; Transplantation; Graft Failure
16.  Lessons from the Past: Opportunities to Improve Childhood Cancer Survivor Care through Outcomes Investigations of Historical Therapeutic Approaches for Pediatric Hematological Malignancies 
Pediatric blood & cancer  2011;58(3):334-343.
Investigations of long-term outcomes have been instrumental in designing safer and more effective contemporary therapies for pediatric hematological malignancies. Despite the significant therapeutic changes that have occurred over the last five decades, therapy modifications largely represent refinements of treatment protocols using agents and modalities that have been available for more than 30 years. This review summarizes major trends in the evolution of treatment of pediatric hematological malignancies since 1960 to support the relevance of the study of late effects of historical therapeutic approaches to the design and evaluation of contemporary treatment protocols and the follow-up of present-day survivors.
doi:10.1002/pbc.23385
PMCID: PMC3256299  PMID: 22038641
Childhood cancer therapy; late effects; long-term follow-up
17.  The Management of Synchronous Bilateral Wilms Tumor: A Report from the National Wilms Tumor Study Group 
Annals of surgery  2011;253(5):1004-1010.
Objective
To provide guidelines for future trials, we reviewed the outcomes of children with synchronous bilateral Wilms tumors (BWT) treated on National Wilms Tumor Study-4 (NWTS-4).
Methods
NWTS-4 enrolled 3,335 patients (pts) including 188 pts with BWT (5.6%). Treatment and outcome data were collected.
Results
Among 188 BWT pts registered with NWTS-4, 195 kidneys in 123 patients had initial open biopsy, 44 kidneys in 31 pts had needle biopsies. Although pre-resection chemotherapy was recommended, 87 kidneys in 83 pts were managed with primary resection: Complete nephrectomy 48 in 48 pts, 31 partial/wedge nephrectomies in 27 pts, enucleations 8 in 8 pts. No initial surgery was performed in 45 kidneys in 43 pts, 5 kidneys in 3 pts not coded. Anaplasia was diagnosed after completion of the initial course of chemotherapy in 14 pts (initial surgical procedure: 9 open biopsies, 4 needle biopsies, 1 partial nephrectomy). The average number of days from the start of chemotherapy to diagnosis of anaplasia was 390 (range 44–1,925 days). Relapse or progression of disease occurred in 54 children. End stage renal failure occurred in 23 children, 6 of whom had bilateral nephrectomies. The 8 year event free survival (EFS) for BWT with favorable histology was 74%, and overall survival (OS) was 89%; while the EFS for BWT with unfavorable histology was 40%, OS was 45%.
Conclusion
The current analysis of patients with BWT treated on NWTS-4 shows that preservation of renal parenchyma is possible in many pts following initial preoperative chemotherapy. The incidence of end-stage renal disease remains significantly higher in children with BWT. Future studies are warranted to address the need for earlier biopsy in non-responsive tumors and earlier definitive surgery to recognize unfavorable histology in these high risk patients.
doi:10.1097/SLA.0b013e31821266a0
PMCID: PMC3701883  PMID: 21394016
18.  DECREASED FERTILITY AMONG FEMALE CHILDHOOD CANCER SURVIVORS WHO RECEIVED 22 TO 27 Gy HYPOTHALAMIC/PITUITARY IRRADIATION. A REPORT FROM THE CHILDHOOD CANCER SURVIVOR STUDY 
Fertility and sterility  2011;95(6):1922-1927.e1.
Objective
To evaluate the effect of hypothalamic/pituitary radiation dose on the occurrence of first pregnancy
Design
Retrospective cohort study of childhood cancer five-year survivors (CCS) diagnosed between 1970 and 1986 prior to 21 years of age at one of 26 North American pediatric cancer treatment centers
Setting
Self-administered questionnaire
Patient(s)
3619 female CCS who participated in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study and received no/scatter (≤ 0.1 Gy) radiation to the ovaries and 2081 female siblings (Sibs) of the participants
Intervention(s)
None
Main Outcome Measure(s)
Self-reported pregnancy events
Result(s)
As a group CCS were as likely to report being pregnant as Sibs (Hazard Ratio (HR), 1.07; 95% Confidence Interval (95%CI), 0.97 to 1.19). Multivariable models showed a significant decrease in the risk of pregnancy with HPT RT doses ≥ 22 Gy compared with those CCS receiving no HPT RT.
Conclusion(s)
These results support the hypothesis that exposures of 22 to 27 Gy HPT RT may be a contributing factor to infertility among female CCS.
doi:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2011.02.002
PMCID: PMC3080448  PMID: 21376314
childhood cancer survivor; hypothalamic irradiation; pituitary irradiation; alkylating agent; pregnancy
19.  Pulmonary Function after Whole Lung Irradiation in Pediatric Patients with Solid Malignancies 
Cancer  2011;118(5):1450-1456.
BACKGROUND
Although whole lung irradiation (WLI) is used to treat pulmonary metastases of pediatric solid malignancies, few studies have addressed its long-term pulmonary consequences.
METHODS
We conducted a retrospective study of longitudinal changes in 171 pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and their relationship with clinical features in 48 survivors of pediatric malignant solid tumors treated with WLI.
RESULTS
Although active respiratory symptoms were seen in only 9 (18.8%) patients, abnormalities in forced vital capacity (FVC; 58.3%), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1; 64.6%), total lung capacity (TLC; 72.9%), and diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide corrected for hemoglobin (DLCOcorr; 70.8%) were common. At a median follow-up of 9.7 years after WLI, FVC, FEV1, and TLC significantly declined longitudinally (P = .04, .03, and .02, respectively). Focal pulmonary boost irradiation was significantly associated with abnormal FEV1/FVC (P = .03), forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% forced vital capacity (FEF25%–75%; P = .005), residual volume (RV; P = .005), and RV/TLC (P = .002). Ten patients had baseline PFTs, and FVC, FEV1, TLC and DLCOcorr worsened immediately after radiation, followed by transient improvement but subsequent decline. Thirteen of 32 (40.6%) patients over the age of 18 were smokers.
CONCLUSIONS
Pulmonary dysfunction, especially in lung volumes, was prevalent after WLI and worsened over time although most patients were asymptomatic. Boost irradiation impaired pulmonary function, and a significant proportion of patients were smokers. Further studies are planned to assess the predictors and clinical consequences of progressive PFT abnormalities and to evaluate educational interventions.
doi:10.1002/cncr.26371
PMCID: PMC3233655  PMID: 21800284
pulmonary function tests; solid tumor; whole lung irradiation; pediatric cancer; follow-up
20.  Neuromuscular impairments in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: associations with physical performance and chemotherapy doses 
Cancer  2011;118(3):828-838.
Introduction
Treatment regimens for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) contain neurotoxic agents that may interfere with neuromuscular health. This study examined associations between neuromuscular impairments and physical function, and between neuromuscular impairments, and doses of vincristine and intrathecal methotrexate used to treat leukemia among survivors of childhood ALL.
Methods
ALL survivors 10+ years from diagnosis participated in neuromuscular performance testing. Treatment data were abstracted from medical records. Regression models were used to evaluate associations between treatment factors, neuromuscular impairments and physical performance.
Results
Among 415 survivors (median age 35 years; range 21–52), balance, mobility and six-minute walk (6MW) distances were 1.3 standard deviations below age- and sex-specific values in 15.4%, 3.6% and 46.5% of participants, respectively. Impairments included absent Achilles tendon reflexes (39.5%), active dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) < 5 degrees (33.5%) and impaired knee extension strength (30.1%). In adjusted models (including cranial radiation), survivors treated with intrathecal methotrexate cumulative doses 215+ mg/m2 were 3.4 (95% CI 1.2–9.8) times more likely than survivors who received no intrathecal methotrexate, and those who received vincristine cumulative doses 39+ mg/m2 1.5 (95% CI 1.0–2.5) times more likely than those who received lower doses to have impaired ROM. Higher intrathecal methotrexate doses were associated with reduced knee extension strength and 6MW distances.
Conclusion
Neuromuscular impairments are prevalent in childhood ALL survivors and interfere with physical performance. Higher cumulative doses of vincristine and/or intrathecal methotrexate are associated with long-term neuromuscular impairments, which have implications on future function as these survivors age.
doi:10.1002/cncr.26337
PMCID: PMC3197897  PMID: 21766297
Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Survivor; Neuromuscular impairment; Function; Physical performance; Intrathecal methotrexate; Vincristine; Late effect
21.  Pregnancy Outcome After Treatment for Wilms Tumor: A Report From the National Wilms Tumor Long-Term Follow-Up Study 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2010;28(17):2824-2830.
Purpose
This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of prior treatment with radiation therapy or chemotherapy for unilateral Wilms tumor (WT) diagnosed during childhood on pregnancy complications, birth weight, and the frequency of congenital malformations in live-born offspring.
Patients and Methods
We reviewed pregnancy outcomes among female survivors and partners of male survivors of WT treated on National Wilms Tumor Studies 1, 2, 3, and 4 by using a maternal questionnaire and a review of both maternal and offspring medical records.
Results
We received reports of 1,021 pregnancies with duration of 20 weeks or longer, including 955 live-born singletons, for whom 700 sets of maternal and offspring medical records were reviewed. Rates of hypertension complicating pregnancy (International Classification of Diseases [ICD] code 642), early or threatened labor (ICD-644) and malposition of the fetus (ICD-652) increased with increasing radiation dose in female patients. The percentages of offspring weighing less than 2,500 g at birth and of those having less than 37 weeks of gestation also increased with dose. There was no significant trend with radiation dose in the number of congenital anomalies recorded in offspring of female patients.
Conclusion
Women who receive flank radiation therapy as part of the treatment for unilateral WT are at increased risk of hypertension complicating pregnancy, fetal malposition, and premature labor. The offspring of these women are at risk for low birth weight and premature (ie, < 37 weeks gestation) birth. These risks must be considered in the obstetrical management of female survivors of WT.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2009.27.2922
PMCID: PMC2903317  PMID: 20458053
22.  Fertility of Male Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2009;28(2):332-339.
Purpose
This study was undertaken to determine the effect of treatment for childhood cancer on male fertility.
Patients and Methods
We reviewed the fertility of male Childhood Cancer Survivor Study survivor and sibling cohorts who completed a questionnaire. We abstracted the chemotherapeutic agents administered, the cumulative dose of drug administered for selected drugs, and the doses and volumes of all radiation therapy from medical records. Risk factors for siring a pregnancy were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models.
Results
The 6,224 survivors age 15 to 44 years who were not surgically sterile were less likely to sire a pregnancy than siblings (hazard ratio [HR], 0.56; 95% CI, −0.49 to 0.63). Among survivors, the HR of siring a pregnancy was decreased by radiation therapy of more than 7.5 Gy to the testes (HR, 0.12; 95% CI, −0.02 to 0.64), higher cumulative alkylating agent dose (AAD) score or treatment with cyclophosphamide (third tertile HR, 0.42; 95% CI, −0.31 to 0.57) or procarbazine (second tertile HR, 0.48; 95% CI, −0.26 to 0.87; third tertile HR, 0.17; 95% CI, −0.07 to 0.41). Compared with siblings, the HR for ever siring a pregnancy for survivors who had an AAD score = 0, a hypothalamic/pituitary radiation dose = 0 Gy, and a testes radiation dose = 0 Gy was 0.91 (95% CI, 0.73 to 1.14; P = .41).
Conclusion
This large study identified risk factors for decreased fertility that may be used for counseling male cancer patients.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2009.24.9037
PMCID: PMC2815721  PMID: 19949008
23.  Fertility of Female Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2009;27(16):2677-2685.
Purpose
This study was undertaken to determine the effect, if any, of treatment for cancer diagnosed during childhood or adolescence on fertility.
Patients and Methods
We reviewed the fertility of female participants in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS), which consisted of 5-year survivors, and a cohort of randomly selected siblings who responded to a questionnaire. Medical records of all members of the cohort were abstracted to obtain chemotherapeutic agents administered; the cumulative dose of drug administered for several drugs of interest; and the doses, volumes, and dates of administration of all radiation therapy.
Results
There were 5,149 female CCSS participants, and there were 1,441 female siblings of CCSS participants who were age 15 to 44 years. The relative risk (RR) for survivors of ever being pregnant was 0.81 (95% CI, 0.73 to 0.90; P < .001) compared with female siblings. In multivariate models among survivors only, those who received a hypothalamic/pituitary radiation dose ≥ 30 Gy (RR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.44 to 0.83) or an ovarian/uterine radiation dose greater than 5 Gy were less likely to have ever been pregnant (RR, 0.56 for 5 to 10 Gy; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.85; RR, 0.18 for > 10 Gy; 95% CI, 0.13 to 0.26). Those with a summed alkylating agent dose (AAD) score of three or four or who were treated with lomustine or cyclophosphamide were less likely to have ever been pregnant.
Conclusion
This large study demonstrated that fertility is decreased among female CCSS participants. The risk factors identified may be utilized for pretreatment counseling of patients and their parents.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2008.20.1541
PMCID: PMC2690392  PMID: 19364965
24.  Ovarian Failure and Reproductive Outcomes After Childhood Cancer Treatment: Results From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2009;27(14):2374-2381.
These studies were undertaken to determine the effect, if any, of treatment for cancer diagnosed during childhood or adolescence on ovarian function and reproductive outcomes. We reviewed the frequency of acute ovarian failure, premature menopause, live birth, stillbirth, spontaneous and therapeutic abortion and birth defects in the participants in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). Acute ovarian failure (AOF) occurred in 6.3% of eligible survivors. Exposure of the ovaries to high-dose radiation (especially over 10 Gy), alkylating agents and procarbazine, at older ages, were significant risk factors for AOF. Premature nonsurgical menopause (PM) occurred in 8% of participants versus 0.8% of siblings (rate ratio = 13.21; 95% CI, 3.26 to 53.51; P < .001). Risk factors for PM included attained age, exposure to increasing doses of radiation to the ovaries, increasing alkylating agent score, and a diagnosis of Hodgkin's lymphoma. One thousand two hundred twenty-seven male survivors reported they sired 2,323 pregnancies, and 1,915 female survivors reported 4,029 pregnancies. Offspring of women who received uterine radiation doses of more than 5 Gy were more likely to be small for gestational age (birthweight < 10 percentile for gestational age; 18.2% v 7.8%; odds ratio = 4.0; 95% CI, 1.6 to 9.8; P = .003). There were no differences in the proportion of offspring with simple malformations, cytogenetic syndromes, or single-gene defects. These studies demonstrated that women treated with pelvic irradiation and/or increasing alkylating agent doses were at risk for acute ovarian failure, premature menopause, and small-for-gestational-age offspring. There was no evidence for an increased risk of congenital malformations. Survivors should be generally reassured although some women have to consider their potentially shortened fertile life span in making educational and career choices.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2008.21.1839
PMCID: PMC2677923  PMID: 19364956
25.  Risk Factors for End Stage Renal Disease in Non-WT1-Syndromic Wilms Tumor 
The Journal of urology  2011;186(2):378-386.
Purpose
We assessed risk factors for end stage renal disease (ESRD) in Wilms Tumor (WT) patients without known WT1-related syndromes. We hypothesized that patients with characteristics suggestive of a WT1 etiology (early onset, stromal predominant histology, intralobar nephrogenic rests) would have a higher risk of ESRD due to chronic renal failure (CRF). We predicted a high risk of ESRD due to progressive bilateral WT (PBWT) in patients with metachronous bilateral disease.
Methods
ESRD was ascertained in 100 of 7,950 non-syndromic patients enrolled on a National Wilms Tumor Study during 1969-2002. Risk factors were evaluated with cumulative incidence curves and proportional hazard regressions.
Results
The cumulative incidence of ESRD due to CRF 20 years after WT diagnosis was 0.7%. For ESRD due to PBWT, it was 4.0% at 3 years post-WT diagnosis in patients with synchronous BWT and 19.3% in patients with metachronous BWT. For ESRD due to CRF, stromal predominant histology had a hazard ratio (HR) of 6.4 relative to mixed (95% CI [3.4 11.9], p <.001); intralobar rests had a HR of 5.9 relative to no rests (95% CI[2.0, 17.3], p = .001); and WT diagnosis <24 months had a HR of 1.7 relative to 24-48 months and 2.8 relative to >48 months (p=.003 for trend).
Conclusions
Metachronous BWT is associated with high rates of ESRD due to surgery for progressive WT. Characteristics associated with a WT1 etiology markedly increased the risk of ESRD due to CRF, despite a low risk in non-WT1 syndromic patients overall.
doi:10.1016/j.juro.2011.03.110
PMCID: PMC3133859  PMID: 21683387
Kidney Failure, Chronic; Nephrectomy; Wilms Tumor; Genes, Wilms Tumor

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