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1.  Microseminoprotein-Beta Expression in Different Stages of Prostate Cancer 
PLoS ONE  2016;11(3):e0150241.
Microseminoprotein-beta (MSMB, MSMB) is an abundant secretory protein contributed by the prostate, and is implicated as a prostate cancer (PC) biomarker based on observations of its lower expression in cancerous cells compared with benign prostate epithelium. However, as the current literature on MSMB is inconsistent, we assessed the expression of MSMB at the protein and mRNA levels in a comprehensive set of different clinical stages of PC. Immunohistochemistry using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against MSMB was used to study protein expression in tissue specimens representing prostatectomies (n = 261) and in diagnostic needle biopsies from patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) (n = 100), and in locally recurrent castration-resistant PC (CRPC) (n = 105) and CRPC metastases (n = 113). The transcript levels of MSMB, nuclear receptor co-activator 4 (NCOA4) and MSMB-NCOA4 fusion were examined by qRT-PCR in prostatectomy samples and by RNA-sequencing in benign prostatic hyperplasia, PC, and CRPC samples. We also measured serum MSMB levels and genotyped the single nucleotide polymorphism rs10993994 using DNA from the blood of 369 PC patients and 903 controls. MSMB expression in PC (29% of prostatectomies and 21% of needle biopsies) was more frequent than in CRPC (9% of locally recurrent CRPCs and 9% of CRPC metastases) (p<0.0001). Detection of MSMB protein was inversely correlated with the Gleason score in prostatectomy specimens (p = 0.024). The read-through MSMB-NCOA4 transcript was detected at very low levels in PC. MSMB levels in serum were similar in cases of PC and controls but were significantly associated with PC risk when adjusted for age at diagnosis and levels of free or total PSA (p<0.001). Serum levels of MSMB in both PC patients and controls were significantly associated with the rs10993994 genotype (p<0.0001). In conclusion, decreased expression of MSMB parallels the clinical progression of PC and adjusted serum MSMB levels are associated with PC risk.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0150241
PMCID: PMC4777373  PMID: 26939004
2.  Feature-based analysis of mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in histological tissue sections 
This paper describes work presented at the Nordic Symposium on Digital Pathology 2015, in Linköping, Sweden. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) represents premalignant tissue involving epithelial growth confined in the lumen of prostatic acini. In the attempts to understand oncogenesis in the human prostate, early neoplastic changes can be modeled in the mouse with genetic manipulation of certain tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. As with many early pathological changes, the PIN lesions in the mouse prostate are macroscopically small, but microscopically spanning areas often larger than single high magnification focus fields in microscopy. This poses a challenge to utilize full potential of the data acquired in histological specimens. We use whole prostates fixed in molecular fixative PAXgene™, embedded in paraffin, sectioned through and stained with H&E. To visualize and analyze the microscopic information spanning whole mouse PIN (mPIN) lesions, we utilize automated whole slide scanning and stacked sections through the tissue. The region of interests is masked, and the masked areas are processed using a cascade of automated image analysis steps. The images are normalized in color space, after which exclusion of secretion areas and feature extraction is performed. Machine learning is utilized to build a model of early PIN lesions for determining the probability for histological changes based on the calculated features. We performed a feature-based analysis to mPIN lesions. First, a quantitative representation of over 100 features was built, including several features representing pathological changes in PIN, especially describing the spatial growth pattern of lesions in the prostate tissue. Furthermore, we built a classification model, which is able to align PIN lesions corresponding to grading by visual inspection to more advanced and mild lesions. The classifier allowed both determining the probability of early histological changes for uncategorized tissue samples and interpretation of the model parameters. Here, we develop quantitative image analysis pipeline to describe morphological changes in histological images. Even subtle changes in mPIN lesion characteristics can be described with feature analysis and machine learning. Constructing and using multidimensional feature data to represent histological changes enables richer analysis and interpretation of early pathological lesions.
doi:10.4103/2153-3539.175378
PMCID: PMC4763506  PMID: 26955503
Histopathological image analysis; machine learning; prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia
3.  The Evolutionary History of Lethal Metastatic Prostate Cancer 
Nature  2015;520(7547):353-357.
Cancers emerge from an on-going Darwinian evolutionary process, often leading to multiple competing subclones within a single primary tumour1-4. This evolutionary process culminates in the formation of metastases, which is the cause of 90% of cancer-related deaths5. However, despite its clinical importance, little is known about the principles governing the dissemination of cancer cells to distant organs. Although the hypothesis that each metastasis originates from a single tumour cell is generally supported6-8, recent studies using mouse models of cancer demonstrated the existence of polyclonal seeding from and inter-clonal cooperation between multiple subclones9,10. In this study, we sought definitive evidence for the existence of polyclonal seeding in human malignancy and to establish the clonal relationship among different metastases in the context of androgen-deprived metastatic prostate cancer. Using whole genome sequencing, we characterised multiple metastases arising from prostate tumours in ten patients. Integrated analyses of subclonal architecture revealed the patterns of metastatic spread in unprecedented detail. Metastasis-to-metastasis spread was found to be common, either through de novo monoclonal seeding of daughter metastases or, in five cases, through the transfer of multiple tumour clones between metastatic sites. Lesions affecting tumour suppressor genes usually occur as single events, whereas mutations in genes involved in androgen receptor signalling commonly involve multiple, convergent events in different metastases. Our results elucidate in detail the complex patterns of metastatic spread and further our understanding of the development of resistance to androgen deprivation therapy in prostate cancer.
doi:10.1038/nature14347
PMCID: PMC4413032  PMID: 25830880
4.  Epigenetically altered miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in prostate cancer 
Cancer Medicine  2015;4(9):1417-1425.
Micro-RNAs (miRNA) are important regulators of gene expression and often differentially expressed in cancer and other diseases. We have previously shown that miR-193b is hypermethylated in prostate cancer (PC) and suppresses cell growth. It has been suggested that miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in several malignancies. Here, our aim was to determine if miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in prostate cancer. Our data show that miR-193b is commonly methylated in PC samples compared to benign prostate hyperplasia. We found reduced miR-193b expression (P < 0.05) in stage pT3 tumors compared to pT2 tumors in a cohort of prostatectomy specimens. In 22Rv1 PC cells with low endogenous miR-193b expression, the overexpression of miR-193b reduced CCND1mRNA levels and cyclin D1 protein levels. In addition, the exogenous expression of miR-193b decreased the phosphorylation level of RB, a target of the cyclin D1-CDK4/6 pathway. Moreover, according to a reporter assay, miR-193b targeted the 3’UTR of CCND1 in PC cells and the CCND1 activity was rescued by expressing CCND1 lacking its 3’UTR. Immunohistochemical analysis of cyclin D1 showed that castration-resistant prostate cancers have significantly (P = 0.0237) higher expression of cyclin D1 compared to hormone-naïve cases. Furthermore, the PC cell lines 22Rv1 and VCaP, which express low levels of miR-193b and high levels of CCND1, showed significant growth retardation when treated with a CDK4/6 inhibitor. In contrast, the inhibitor had no effect on the growth of PC-3 and DU145 cells with high miR-193b and low CCND1 expression. Taken together, our data demonstrate that miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in prostate cancer.
doi:10.1002/cam4.486
PMCID: PMC4567026  PMID: 26129688
Cyclin D1; micro-RNA; prostate cancer
5.  CIP2A is a candidate therapeutic target in clinically challenging prostate cancer cell populations 
Oncotarget  2015;6(23):19661-19670.
Residual androgen receptor (AR)-signaling and presence of cancer stem-like cells (SCs) are the two emerging paradigms for clinically challenging castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Therefore, identification of AR-target proteins that are also overexpressed in the cancer SC population would be an attractive therapeutic approach.
Our analysis of over three hundred clinical samples and patient-derived prostate epithelial cultures (PPECs), revealed Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) as one such target. CIP2A is significantly overexpressed in both hormone-naïve prostate cancer (HN-PC) and CRPC patients. CIP2A is also overexpressed, by 3- and 30-fold, in HN-PC and CRPC SCs respectively. In vivo binding of the AR to the intronic region of CIP2A and its functionality in the AR-moderate and AR-high expressing LNCaP cell-model systems is also demonstrated. Further, we show that AR positively regulates CIP2A expression, both at the mRNA and protein level. Finally, CIP2A depletion reduced cell viability and colony forming efficiency of AR-independent PPECs as well as AR-responsive LNCaP cells, in which anchorage-independent growth is also impaired.
These findings identify CIP2A as a common denominator for AR-signaling and cancer SC functionality, highlighting its potential therapeutic significance in the most clinically challenging prostate pathology: castration-resistant prostate cancer.
PMCID: PMC4637312  PMID: 25965834
CIP2A; androgen receptor; castration-resistant prostate cancer; cancer stem-like cells
6.  C/D-box snoRNA-derived RNA production is associated with malignant transformation and metastatic progression in prostate cancer 
Oncotarget  2015;6(19):17430-17444.
Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) are dynamically regulated in different tissues and affected in disease. SnoRNAs are processed further to stable smaller RNAs. We sequenced the small RNA transcriptome of prostate cancer (PCa) at different PCa stages and generated a quantified catalogue of 3927 small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) detected in normal and malignant prostate tissue. From these, only 1524 are microRNAs. The remaining 2401 sncRNAs represent stable sncRNAs species that originate from snoRNA, tRNA and other sncRNAs. We show that snoRNA-derived RNAs (sdRNAs) display stronger differential expression than microRNAs and are massively upregulated in PCa. SdRNAs account for at least one third of all small RNAs with expression changes in tumor compared to normal adjacent tissue. Multiple sdRNAs can be produced from one snoRNA in a manner related to the conservation of structural snoRNA motifs. Q-PCR analysis in an independent patient cohort (n=106) confirmed the processing patterns of selected snoRNAs (SNORD44, SNORD78, SNORD74 and SNORD81) and the cancer-associated up-regulation of their sdRNAs observed in sequencing data. Importantly, expression of SNORD78 and its sdRNA is significantly higher in a subset of patients that developed metastatic disease demonstrating that snoRNA and sdRNAs may present as novel diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarkers for PCa.
PMCID: PMC4627319  PMID: 26041889
snoRNA; sdRNA; SNORD78; GAS5; prostate cancer
7.  Myc-dependent purine biosynthesis affects nucleolar stress and therapy response in prostate cancer 
Oncotarget  2015;6(14):12587-12602.
The androgen receptor is a key transcription factor contributing to the development of all stages of prostate cancer (PCa). In addition, other transcription factors have been associated with poor prognosis in PCa, amongst which c-Myc (MYC) is a well-established oncogene in many other cancers. We have previously reported that the AR promotes glycolysis and anabolic metabolism; many of these metabolic pathways are also MYC-regulated in other cancers. In this study, we report that in PCa cells de novo purine biosynthesis and the subsequent conversion to XMP is tightly regulated by MYC and independent of AR activity. We characterized two enzymes, PAICS and IMPDH2, within the pathway as PCa biomarkers in tissue samples and report increased efficacy of established anti-androgens in combination with a clinically approved IMPDH inhibitor, mycophenolic acid (MPA). Treatment with MPA led to a significant reduction in cellular guanosine triphosphate (GTP) levels accompanied by nucleolar stress and p53 stabilization. In conclusion, targeting purine biosynthesis provides an opportunity to perturb PCa metabolism and enhance tumour suppressive stress responses.
PMCID: PMC4494960  PMID: 25869206
prostate; cancer; nucleotide; transcription; metabolism
8.  A meta-analysis of 87,040 individuals identifies 23 new susceptibility loci for prostate cancer 
Al Olama, Ali Amin | Kote-Jarai, Zsofia | Berndt, Sonja I. | Conti, David V. | Schumacher, Fredrick | Han, Ying | Benlloch, Sara | Hazelett, Dennis J. | Wang, Zhaoming | Saunders, Ed | Leongamornlert, Daniel | Lindstrom, Sara | Jugurnauth-Little, Sara | Dadaev, Tokhir | Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata | Stram, Daniel O. | Rand, Kristin | Wan, Peggy | Stram, Alex | Sheng, Xin | Pooler, Loreall C. | Park, Karen | Xia, Lucy | Tyrer, Jonathan | Kolonel, Laurence N. | Le Marchand, Loic | Hoover, Robert N. | Machiela, Mitchell J. | Yeager, Merideth | Burdette, Laurie | Chung, Charles C. | Hutchinson, Amy | Yu, Kai | Goh, Chee | Ahmed, Mahbubl | Govindasami, Koveela | Guy, Michelle | Tammela, Teuvo L.J. | Auvinen, Anssi | Wahlfors, Tiina | Schleutker, Johanna | Visakorpi, Tapio | Leinonen, Katri A. | Xu, Jianfeng | Aly, Markus | Donovan, Jenny | Travis, Ruth C. | Key, Tim J. | Siddiq, Afshan | Canzian, Federico | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Takahashi, Atsushi | Kubo, Michiaki | Pharoah, Paul | Pashayan, Nora | Weischer, Maren | Nordestgaard, Borge G. | Nielsen, Sune F. | Klarskov, Peter | Røder, Martin Andreas | Iversen, Peter | Thibodeau, Stephen N. | McDonnell, Shannon K | Schaid, Daniel J | Stanford, Janet L. | Kolb, Suzanne | Holt, Sarah | Knudsen, Beatrice | Coll, Antonio Hurtado | Gapstur, Susan M. | Diver, W. Ryan | Stevens, Victoria L. | Maier, Christiane | Luedeke, Manuel | Herkommer, Kathleen | Rinckleb, Antje E. | Strom, Sara S. | Pettaway, Curtis | Yeboah, Edward D. | Tettey, Yao | Biritwum, Richard B. | Adjei, Andrew A. | Tay, Evelyn | Truelove, Ann | Niwa, Shelley | Chokkalingam, Anand P. | Cannon-Albright, Lisa | Cybulski, Cezary | Wokołorczyk, Dominika | Kluźniak, Wojciech | Park, Jong | Sellers, Thomas | Lin, Hui-Yi | Isaacs, William B. | Partin, Alan W. | Brenner, Hermann | Dieffenbach, Aida Karina | Stegmaier, Christa | Chen, Constance | Giovannucci, Edward L. | Ma, Jing | Stampfer, Meir | Penney, Kathryn L. | Mucci, Lorelei | John, Esther M. | Ingles, Sue A. | Kittles, Rick A. | Murphy, Adam B. | Pandha, Hardev | Michael, Agnieszka | Kierzek, Andrzej M. | Blot, William | Signorello, Lisa B. | Zheng, Wei | Albanes, Demetrius | Virtamo, Jarmo | Weinstein, Stephanie | Nemesure, Barbara | Carpten, John | Leske, Cristina | Wu, Suh-Yuh | Hennis, Anselm | Kibel, Adam S. | Rybicki, Benjamin A. | Neslund-Dudas, Christine | Hsing, Ann W. | Chu, Lisa | Goodman, Phyllis J. | Klein, Eric A | Zheng, S. Lilly | Batra, Jyotsna | Clements, Judith | Spurdle, Amanda | Teixeira, Manuel R. | Paulo, Paula | Maia, Sofia | Slavov, Chavdar | Kaneva, Radka | Mitev, Vanio | Witte, John S. | Casey, Graham | Gillanders, Elizabeth M. | Seminara, Daniella | Riboli, Elio | Hamdy, Freddie C. | Coetzee, Gerhard A. | Li, Qiyuan | Freedman, Matthew L. | Hunter, David J. | Muir, Kenneth | Gronberg, Henrik | Neal, David E. | Southey, Melissa | Giles, Graham G. | Severi, Gianluca | Cook, Michael B. | Nakagawa, Hidewaki | Wiklund, Fredrik | Kraft, Peter | Chanock, Stephen J. | Henderson, Brian E. | Easton, Douglas F. | Eeles, Rosalind A. | Haiman, Christopher A.
Nature genetics  2014;46(10):1103-1109.
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 76 variants associated with prostate cancer risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify additional susceptibility loci for this common cancer, we conducted a meta-analysis of >10 million SNPs in 43,303prostate cancer cases and 43,737 controls from studies in populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry. Twenty-three novel susceptibility loci were revealed at P<5×10-8; 15 variants were identified among men of European ancestry, 7 from multiethnic analyses and one was associated with early-onset prostate cancer. These 23 variants, in combination with the known prostate cancer risk variants, explain 33% of the familial risk of the disease in European ancestry populations. These findings provide new regions for investigation into the pathogenesis of prostate cancer and demonstrate the utility of combining ancestrally diverse populations to discover risk loci for disease.
doi:10.1038/ng.3094
PMCID: PMC4383163  PMID: 25217961
9.  Extensive transduction of nonrepetitive DNA mediated by L1 retrotransposition in cancer genomes 
Science (New York, N.Y.)  2014;345(6196):1251343.
Long interspersed nuclear element–1 (L1) retrotransposons are mobile repetitive elements that are abundant in the human genome. L1 elements propagate through RNA intermediates. In the germ line, neighboring, nonrepetitive sequences are occasionally mobilized by the L1 machinery, a process called 3′ transduction. Because 3′ transductions are potentially mutagenic, we explored the extent to which they occur somatically during tumorigenesis. Studying cancer genomes from 244 patients, we found that tumors from 53% of the patients had somatic retrotranspositions, of which 24% were 3′ transductions. Fingerprinting of donor L1s revealed that a handful of source L1 elements in a tumor can spawn from tens to hundreds of 3′ transductions, which can themselves seed further retrotranspositions. The activity of individual L1 elements fluctuated during tumor evolution and correlated with L1 promoter hypomethylation. The 3′ transductions disseminated genes, exons, and regulatory elements to new locations, most often to heterochromatic regions of the genome.
doi:10.1126/science.1251343
PMCID: PMC4380235  PMID: 25082706
10.  Recurrent SKIL-activating rearrangements in ETS-negative prostate cancer 
Oncotarget  2015;6(8):6235-6250.
Prostate cancer is the third most common cause of male cancer death in developed countries, and one of the most comprehensively characterized human cancers. Roughly 60% of prostate cancers harbor gene fusions that juxtapose ETS-family transcription factors with androgen regulated promoters. A second subtype, characterized by SPINK1 overexpression, accounts for 15% of prostate cancers. Here we report the discovery of a new prostate cancer subtype characterized by rearrangements juxtaposing the SMAD inhibitor SKIL with androgen regulated promoters, leading to increased SKIL expression. SKIL fusions were found in 6 of 540 (1.1%) prostate cancers and 1 of 27 (3.7%) cell lines and xenografts. 6 of 7 SKIL-positive cancers were negative for ETS overexpression, suggesting mutual exclusivity with ETS fusions. SKIL knockdown led to growth arrest in PC-3 and LNCaP cell line models of prostate cancer, and its overexpression led to increased invasiveness in RWPE-1 cells. The role of SKIL as a prostate cancer oncogene lends support to recent studies on the role of TGF-β signaling as a rate-limiting step in prostate cancer progression. Our findings highlight SKIL as an oncogene and potential therapeutic target in 1-2% of prostate cancers, amounting to an estimated 10,000 cancer diagnoses per year worldwide.
PMCID: PMC4467434  PMID: 25749039
prostate cancer; sequencing; fusion gene; SKIL
11.  The Mutational Landscape of Prostate Cancer 
European urology  2013;64(4):567-576.
Context
Prostate cancer is a clinically heterogeneous disease with marked variability in patient outcomes. Molecular characterization has revealed striking mutational heterogeneity that may underlie the variable clinical course of the disease.
Objective
In this review, we discuss the common genomic alterations that form the molecular basis of prostate cancer, their functional significance, and potential to translate this knowledge toward patient care.
Evidence Acquisition
We reviewed the relevant literature, with a particular focus on recent studies on somatic alterations in prostate cancer.
Evidence Synthesis
Advances in sequencing technology have resulted in an explosion of data regarding the mutational events underlying the development and progression of prostate cancer. Heterogeneity is the norm; few abnormalities in specific genes are highly recurrent, but alterations in certain signaling pathways do predominate. These include pathways known to affect tumorigenesis in a wide spectrum of tissues, such as PI3K/PTEN/AKT, cell cycle regulation, and chromatin regulation. Alterations more specific to prostate cancer are also observed, particularly gene fusions of ETS transcription factors and alterations in androgen signaling. Mounting data suggests that prostate cancer can be subdivided based on a molecular profile of genetic alterations.
Conclusions
Major advances have been made in cataloguing the genomic alterations in prostate cancer and understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. These findings raise the possibility that prostate cancer could soon transition from a poorly understood, heterogeneous disease with a variable clinical course to a collection of homogenous subtypes, identifiable by molecular criteria, associated with distinct risk profiles, and perhaps amenable to specific management strategies or targeted therapies.
doi:10.1016/j.eururo.2013.05.029
PMCID: PMC4342117  PMID: 23759327
12.  USP22 Regulates Oncogenic Signaling Pathways to Drive Lethal Cancer Progression 
Cancer research  2013;74(1):272-286.
Increasing evidence links deregulation of the USP22 deubitiquitylase to cancer development and progression in a select group of tumor types, but its specificity and underlying mechanisms of action are not well-defined. Here we show that USP22 is a critical promoter of lethal tumor phenotypes that acts by modulating nuclear receptor and oncogenic signaling. In multiple xenograft models of human cancer, modeling of tumor-associated USP22 deregulation demonstrated that USP22 controls androgen receptor (AR) accumulation and signaling, and that it enhances expression of critical target genes co-regulated by AR and MYC. USP22 not only reprogrammed AR function, but was sufficient to induce the transition to therapeutic resistance. Notably, in vivo depletion experiments revealed that USP22 is critical to maintain phenotypes associated with end-stage disease. This was a significant finding given clinical evidence that USP22 is highly deregulated in tumors which have achieved therapeutic resistance. Taken together, our findings define USP22 as a critical effector of tumor progression whcih drives lethal phenotypes, rationalizing this enzyme as an appealing therapeutic target to treat advanced disease.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-13-1954
PMCID: PMC3947329  PMID: 24197134
Androgen receptor; Castration-resistant prostate cancer; Oncogene; Deubiquitylase; prostate cancer
13.  Chk1 targeting reactivates PP2A tumor suppressor activity in cancer cells 
Cancer research  2013;73(22):10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-13-1002.
Checkpoint kinase Chk1 is constitutively active in many cancer cell types and new generation Chk1 inhibitors show marked antitumor activity as single agents. Here we present a hitherto unrecognized mechanism that contributes to the response of cancer cells to Chk1 targeted therapy. Inhibiting chronic Chk1 activity in cancer cells induced the tumor suppressor activity of protein phosphatase PP2A, which by dephosphorylating MYC serine 62, inhibited MYC activity and impaired cancer cell survival. Mechanistic investigations revealed that Chk1 inhibition activated PP2A by decreasing the transcription of CIP2A, a chief inhibitor of PP2A activity. Inhibition of cancer cell clonogenicity by Chk1 inhibition could be rescued in vitro either by exogenous expression of CIP2A or by blocking the CIP2A-regulated PP2A complex. Chk1-mediated CIP2A regulation was extended in tumor models dependent on either Chk1 or CIP2A. The clinical relevance of CIP2A as a Chk1 effector protein was validated in several human cancer types, including neuroblastoma where CIP2A was identified as a NMYC-independent prognostic factor. Since the Chk1-CIP2A-PP2A pathway is driven by DNA-PK activity, functioning regardless of p53 or ATM/ATR status, our results offer explanative power for understand how Chk1 inhibitors mediate single-agent anticancer efficacy. Further, they define CIP2A-PP2A status in cancer cells as a pharmacodynamic marker for their response to Chk1-targeted therapy.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-13-1002
PMCID: PMC3870284  PMID: 24072747
Claspin; PPP2R2A; Chk1 serine 345
14.  Origins and functional consequences of somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations in human cancer 
eLife  null;3:e02935.
Recent sequencing studies have extensively explored the somatic alterations present in the nuclear genomes of cancers. Although mitochondria control energy metabolism and apoptosis, the origins and impact of cancer-associated mutations in mtDNA are unclear. In this study, we analyzed somatic alterations in mtDNA from 1675 tumors. We identified 1907 somatic substitutions, which exhibited dramatic replicative strand bias, predominantly C > T and A > G on the mitochondrial heavy strand. This strand-asymmetric signature differs from those found in nuclear cancer genomes but matches the inferred germline process shaping primate mtDNA sequence content. A number of mtDNA mutations showed considerable heterogeneity across tumor types. Missense mutations were selectively neutral and often gradually drifted towards homoplasmy over time. In contrast, mutations resulting in protein truncation undergo negative selection and were almost exclusively heteroplasmic. Our findings indicate that the endogenous mutational mechanism has far greater impact than any other external mutagens in mitochondria and is fundamentally linked to mtDNA replication.
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02935.001
eLife digest
The DNA in a cell's nucleus must be copied faithfully, and divided equally, when a cell divides to produce two new cells. Mistakes—or mutations—are sometimes made during the copying process, and mutations can also be introduced by exposing DNA to damaging agents known as mutagens, such as UV light or cigarette smoke. These mutations are then maintained in all of the descendants of the cell. Most of these mutations have no impact on the cell's characteristics (‘passenger mutations’). However, ‘driver mutations’ that allow cells to divide uncontrollably and spread to other body sites can lead to cancer.
Mitochondria are cellular compartments that are responsible for generating the energy a cell needs to survive and are also responsible for initiating programmed cell death. Mitochondria contain their own DNA—entirely separate from that in the nucleus of the cell—that encodes the proteins most essential for energy production. Mitochondrial DNA molecules are frequently exposed to damaging molecules called reactive oxygen species that are produced by the mitochondria. Therefore, these reactive oxygen species have been thought to be one of the most important causes of mitochondrial DNA mutations. In addition, because cancer cells produce energy differently to normal cells, mutations in the mitochondrial DNA that change the ability of the mitochondria to produce energy have been conventionally thought to help normal cells to become cancerous. However, conclusive evidence for a link between cancer and mitochondrial DNA mutations is lacking.
Ju et al. examined the mitochondrial DNA sequences taken from 1675 cancer biopsies from over thirty different types of cancer and compared these to normal tissue from the same patients. This revealed 1907 mutations in the mitochondrial DNA taken from the cancer cells. The pattern of the mutations suggests that the majority of the mutations are not introduced from reactive oxygen species, but from the errors the mitochondria themselves make in the process of duplicating their DNA when a cell divides. Unexpectedly, known mutagens, such as cigarette smoke or UV light, had a negligible effect on mitochondrial DNA mutations.
Contrary to conventional wisdom, Ju et al. found no evidence that the mitochondrial DNA mutations help cancer to develop or spread. Instead, like passenger mutations found in the DNA in the cell nucleus, most mitochondrial genome mutations have no discernible effect. However, Ju et al. revealed that DNA mutations that damage normal mitochondrial activity are less likely to be maintained in cancer cells. Presumably, mitochondria containing these proteins produce less energy, and so a cell containing too many of these mutations will find it harder to survive. This shows that having enough correctly functioning mitochondria is essential for even cancer cells to thrive.
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02935.002
doi:10.7554/eLife.02935
PMCID: PMC4371858  PMID: 25271376
mitochondrial DNA; somatic mutation; mutational signature; cancer genome; evolution; sequencing; human
16.  Mapping of the chromosomal amplification 1p21-22 in bladder cancer 
BMC Research Notes  2014;7:547.
Background
The aim of the study was to characterize a recurrent amplification at chromosomal region 1p21-22 in bladder cancer.
Methods
ArrayCGH (aCGH) was performed to identify DNA copy number variations in 7 clinical samples and 6 bladder cancer cell lines. FISH was used to map the amplicon at 1p21-22 in the cell lines. Gene expression microarrays and qRT-PCR were used to study the expression of putative target genes in the region.
Results
aCGH identified an amplification at 1p21-22 in 10/13 (77%) samples. The minimal region of the amplification was mapped to a region of about 1 Mb in size, containing a total of 11 known genes. The highest amplification was found in SCaBER squamous cell carcinoma cell line. Four genes, TMED5, DR1, RPL5 and EVI5, showed significant overexpression in the SCaBER cell line compared to all the other samples tested. Oncomine database analysis revealed upregulation of DR1 in superficial and infiltrating bladder cancer samples, compared to normal bladder.
Conclusions
In conclusions, we have identified and mapped chromosomal amplification at 1p21-22 in bladder cancer as well as studied the expression of the genes in the region. DR1 was found to be significantly overexpressed in the SCaBER, which is a model of squamous cell carcinoma. However, the overexpression was found also in a published clinical sample cohort of superficial and infiltrating bladder cancers. Further studies with more clinical material are needed to investigate the role of the amplification at 1p21-22.
doi:10.1186/1756-0500-7-547
PMCID: PMC4143550  PMID: 25135188
Gene amplification; Bladder cancer; DR1; aCGH
17.  Loss of PTEN Is Associated with Aggressive Behavior in ERG-Positive Prostate Cancer 
Background
The associations of ERG overexpression with clinical behavior and molecular pathways of prostate cancer are incompletely known. We assessed the association of ERG expression with AR, PTEN, SPINK1, Ki-67, and EZH2 expression levels, deletion, and mutations of chromosomal region 3p14 and TP53, and clinicopathologic variables.
Methods
The material consisted of 326 prostatectomies, 166 needle biopsies from men treated primarily with endocrine therapy, 177 transurethral resections of castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPC), and 114 CRPC metastases obtained from 32 men. Immunohistochemistry, FISH, and sequencing was used for the measurements.
Results
ERG expression was found in about 45% of all patient cohorts. In a multivariate analysis, ERG expression showed independent value of favorable prognosis (P = 0.019). ERG positivity was significantly associated with loss of PTEN expression in prostatectomy (P = 0.0348), and locally recurrent CRPCs (P = 0.0042). Loss of PTEN expression was associated (P = 0.0085) with shorter progression-free survival in ERG-positive, but not in negative cases. When metastases in each subject were compared, consistent ERG, PTEN, and AR expression as well as TP53 mutations were found in a majority of subjects.
Conclusions
A similar frequency of ERG positivity from early to late stage of the disease suggests lack of selection of ERG expression during disease progression. The prognostic significance of PTEN loss solely in ERG-positive cases indicates interaction of these pathways. The finding of consistent genetic alterations in different metastases suggests that the major genetic alterations take place in the primary tumor.
Impact
Interaction of PTEN and ERG pathways warrants further studies.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0333-T
PMCID: PMC4086660  PMID: 24083995
18.  Bcl-2 associated athanogene 5 (Bag5) is overexpressed in prostate cancer and inhibits ER-stress induced apoptosis 
BMC Cancer  2013;13:96.
Background
The Bag (Bcl-2 associated athanogene) family of proteins consists of 6 members sharing a common, single-copied Bag domain through which they interact with the molecular chaperone Hsp70. Bag5 represents an exception in the Bag family since it consists of 5 Bag domains covering the whole protein. Bag proteins like Bag1 and Bag3 have been implicated in tumor growth and survival but it is not known whether Bag5 also exhibits this function.
Methods
Bag5 mRNA and protein expression levels were investigated in prostate cancer patient samples using real-time PCR and immunoblot analyses. In addition immunohistological studies were carried out to determine the expression of Bag5 in tissue arrays. Analysis of Bag5 gene expression was carried out using one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni’s Multiple Comparison test. The mean values of the Bag5 stained cells in the tissue array was analyzed by Mann-Whitney test. Functional studies of the role of Bag5 in prostate cancer cell lines was performed using overexpression and RNA interference analyses.
Results
Our results show that Bag5 is overexpressed in malignant prostate tissue compared to benign samples. In addition we could show that Bag5 levels are increased following endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress induction, and Bag5 relocates from the cytoplasm to the ER during this process. We also demonstrate that Bag5 interacts with the ER-resident chaperone GRP78/BiP and enhances its ATPase activity. Bag5 overexpression in 22Rv.1 prostate cancer cells inhibited ER-stress induced apoptosis in the unfolded protein response by suppressing PERK-eIF2-ATF4 activity while enhancing the IRE1-Xbp1 axis of this pathway. Cells expressing high levels of Bag5 showed reduced sensitivity to apoptosis induced by different agents while Bag5 downregulation resulted in increased stress-induced cell death.
Conclusions
We have therefore shown that Bag5 is overexpressed in prostate cancer and plays a role in ER-stress induced apoptosis. Furthermore we have identified GRP78/BiP as a novel interaction partner of Bag5.
doi:10.1186/1471-2407-13-96
PMCID: PMC3598994  PMID: 23448667
Unfolded protein response; Cell stress; Endoplasmic reticulum; Apoptosis; Molecular chaperones; Refolding
19.  The tumorigenic FGFR3-TACC3 gene fusion escapes miR-99a regulation in glioblastoma  
Fusion genes are chromosomal aberrations that are found in many cancers and can be used as prognostic markers and drug targets in clinical practice. Fusions can lead to production of oncogenic fusion proteins or to enhanced expression of oncogenes. Several recent studies have reported that some fusion genes can escape microRNA regulation via 3′–untranslated region (3′-UTR) deletion. We performed whole transcriptome sequencing to identify fusion genes in glioma and discovered FGFR3-TACC3 fusions in 4 of 48 glioblastoma samples from patients both of mixed European and of Asian descent, but not in any of 43 low-grade glioma samples tested. The fusion, caused by tandem duplication on 4p16.3, led to the loss of the 3′-UTR of FGFR3, blocking gene regulation of miR-99a and enhancing expression of the fusion gene. The fusion gene was mutually exclusive with EGFR, PDGFR, or MET amplification. Using cultured glioblastoma cells and a mouse xenograft model, we found that fusion protein expression promoted cell proliferation and tumor progression, while WT FGFR3 protein was not tumorigenic, even under forced overexpression. These results demonstrated that the FGFR3-TACC3 gene fusion is expressed in human cancer and generates an oncogenic protein that promotes tumorigenesis in glioblastoma.
doi:10.1172/JCI67144
PMCID: PMC3561838  PMID: 23298836
20.  Convergence of oncogenic and hormone receptor pathways promotes metastatic phenotypes 
Cyclin D1b is a splice variant of the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 and is known to harbor divergent and highly oncogenic functions in human cancer. While cyclin D1b is induced during disease progression in many cancer types, the mechanisms underlying cyclin D1b function remain poorly understood. Herein, cell and human tumor xenograft models of prostate cancer were utilized to resolve the downstream pathways that are required for the protumorigenic functions of cyclin D1b. Specifically, cyclin D1b was found to modulate the expression of a large transcriptional network that cooperates with androgen receptor (AR) signaling to enhance tumor cell growth and invasive potential. Notably, cyclin D1b promoted AR-dependent activation of genes associated with metastatic phenotypes. Further exploration determined that transcriptional induction of SNAI2 (Slug) was essential for cyclin D1b–mediated proliferative and invasive properties, implicating Slug as a critical driver of disease progression. Importantly, cyclin D1b expression highly correlated with that of Slug in clinical samples of advanced disease. In vivo analyses provided strong evidence that Slug enhances both tumor growth and metastatic phenotypes. Collectively, these findings reveal the underpinning mechanisms behind the protumorigenic functions of cyclin D1b and demonstrate that the convergence of the cyclin D1b/AR and Slug pathways results in the activation of processes critical for the promotion of lethal tumor phenotypes.
doi:10.1172/JCI64750
PMCID: PMC3533295  PMID: 23257359
21.  Contribution of ARLTS1 Cys148Arg (T442C) Variant with Prostate Cancer Risk and ARLTS1 Function in Prostate Cancer Cells 
PLoS ONE  2011;6(10):e26595.
ARLTS1 is a recently characterized tumor suppressor gene at 13q14.3, a region frequently deleted in both sporadic and hereditary prostate cancer (PCa). ARLTS1 variants, especially Cys148Arg (T442C), increase susceptibility to different cancers, including PCa. In this study the role of Cys148Arg substitution was investigated as a risk factor for PCa using both genetic and functional analysis. Cys148Arg genotypes and expression of the ARLTS1 were explored in a large set of familial and unselected PCa cases, clinical tumor samples, xenografts, prostate cancer cell lines and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) samples. The frequency of the variant genotype CC was significantly higher in familial (OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.08–2.56, P = 0.019) and unselected patients (OR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.18–1.97, P = 0.001) and the overall risk was increased (OR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.20–1.98, P = 0.0007). Additional analysis with clinicopathological data revealed an association with an aggressive disease (OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.05-∞, P = 0.02). The CC genotype of the Cys148Arg variant was also contributing to the lowered ARLTS1 expression status in lymphoblastoid cells from familial patients. In addition significantly lowered ARLTS1 expression was observed in clinical tumor samples compared to BPH samples (P = 0.01). The ARLTS1 co-expression signature based on previously published microarray data was generated from 1587 cancer samples confirming the low expression of ARLTS1 in PCa and showed that ARLTS1 expression was strongly associated with immune processes. This study provides strong confirmation of the important role of ARLTS1 Cys148Arg variant as a contributor in PCa predisposition and a potential marker for aggressive disease outcome.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0026595
PMCID: PMC3197657  PMID: 22028916
22.  Overall and worst gleason scores are equally good predictors of prostate cancer progression 
BMC Urology  2011;11:21.
Background
Gleason scoring has experienced several modifications during the past decade. So far, only one study has compared the prognostic abilities of worst (WGS) and overall (OGS) modified Gleason scores after the ISUP 2005 conference. Prostatic needle biopsies are individually paraffin-embedded in 57% of European pathology laboratories, whereas the rest of laboratories embed multiple (2 - 6) biopsies per one paraffin-block. Differences in the processing method can have a far-reaching effect, because reporting of the Gleason score (GS) is different for individually embedded and pooled biopsies, and GS is one of the most important factors when selecting treatment for patients.
Methods
The study material consisted of needle biopsies from 236 prostate cancer patients that were endocrine-treated in 1999-2003. Biopsies from left side and right side were embedded separately. Haematoxylin-eosin-stained slides were scanned and analyzed on web-based virtual microscopy. Worst and overall Gleason scores were assessed according to the modified Gleason score schema after analyzing each biopsy separately. The compound Gleason scores (CGS) were obtained from the original pathology reports. Two different grade groupings were used: GS 6 or less vs. 7 vs. 8 or above; and GS 7(3 + 4) or less vs. 7(4 + 3) and 8 vs. 9-10. The prognostic ability of the three scoring methods to predict biochemical progression was compared with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses.
Results
The median follow-up time of the patients was 64.5 months (range 0-118). The modified GS criteria led to upgrading of the Gleason sums compared to the original CGS from the pathology reports 1999-2003 (mean 7.0 for CGS, 7.5 for OGS, 7.6 for WGS). In 43 cases WGS was > OGS. In a univariate analysis the relative risks were 2.1 (95%-confidence interval 1.8-2.4) for CGS, 2.5 (2.1-2.8) for OGS, and 2.6 (2.2-2.9) for WGS. In a multivariate analysis, OGS was the only independent prognostic factor.
Conclusions
All of the three Gleason scoring methods are strong predictors of biochemical recurrence. The use of modified Gleason scoring leads to upgrading of GS, but also improves the prognostic value of the scoring. No significant prognostic differences between OGS and WGS could be shown, which may relate to the apparent narrowing of the GS scale from 2-10 to 5-10 due to the recent modifications.
doi:10.1186/1471-2490-11-21
PMCID: PMC3193164  PMID: 21978318
23.  ETS1 Mediates MEK1/2-Dependent Overexpression of Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) in Human Cancer Cells 
PLoS ONE  2011;6(3):e17979.
EGFR-MEK-ERK signaling pathway has an established role in promoting malignant growth and disease progression in human cancers. Therefore identification of transcriptional targets mediating the oncogenic effects of the EGFR-MEK-ERK pathway would be highly relevant. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is a recently characterized human oncoprotein. CIP2A promotes malignant cell growth and is over expressed at high frequency (40–80%) in most of the human cancer types. However, the mechanisms inducing its expression in cancer still remain largely unexplored. Here we present systematic analysis of contribution of potential gene regulatory mechanisms for high CIP2A expression in cancer. Our data shows that evolutionary conserved CpG islands at the proximal CIP2A promoter are not methylated both in normal and cancer cells. Furthermore, sequencing of the active CIP2A promoter region from altogether seven normal and malignant cell types did not reveal any sequence alterations that would increase CIP2A expression specifically in cancer cells. However, treatment of cancer cells with various signaling pathway inhibitors revealed that CIP2A mRNA expression was sensitive to inhibition of EGFR activity as well as inhibition or activation of MEK-ERK pathway. Moreover, MEK1/2-specific siRNAs decreased CIP2A protein expression. Series of CIP2A promoter-luciferase constructs were created to identify proximal −27 to −107 promoter region responsible for MEK-dependent stimulation of CIP2A expression. Additional mutagenesis and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed ETS1 as the transcription factor mediating stimulation of CIP2A expression through EGFR-MEK pathway. Thus, ETS1 is probably mediating high CIP2A expression in human cancers with increased EGFR-MEK1/2-ERK pathway activity. These results also suggest that in addition to its established role in invasion and angiogenesis, ETS1 may support malignant cellular growth via regulation of CIP2A expression and protein phosphatase 2A inhibition.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0017979
PMCID: PMC3062549  PMID: 21445343
24.  Allelic Variation at the 8q23.3 Colorectal Cancer Risk Locus Functions as a Cis-Acting Regulator of EIF3H 
PLoS Genetics  2010;6(9):e1001126.
Common genetic variation at human 8q23.3 is significantly associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. To elucidate the basis of this association we compared the frequency of common variants at 8q23.3 in 1,964 CRC cases and 2,081 healthy controls. Reporter gene studies showed that the single nucleotide polymorphism rs16888589 acts as an allele-specific transcriptional repressor. Chromosome conformation capture (3C) analysis demonstrated that the genomic region harboring rs16888589 interacts with the promoter of gene for eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3, subunit H (EIF3H). We show that increased expression of EIF3H gene increases CRC growth and invasiveness thereby providing a biological mechanism for the 8q23.3 association. These data provide evidence for a functional basis for the non-coding risk variant rs16888589 at 8q23.3 and provides novel insight into the etiological basis of CRC.
Author Summary
Common inherited variation on human chromosome 8q23 influences the risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). To understand the basis of this association we have compared the frequency of common genetic variants at 8q23 in ∼2,000 CRC cases and ∼2,000 healthy controls. Functional analyses of variants strongly associated with CRC risk showed that the single nucleotide polymorphism rs16888589 underscores the 8q23.3 association. The region of the genome harboring rs16888589 increases the expression of the gene for eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3, subunit H. We show that increased expression of this gene increases CRC growth thereby providing a biological mechanism for the 8q23.3 association. This finding is of particular importance in elucidating the etiological basis of CRC.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1001126
PMCID: PMC2940760  PMID: 20862326
25.  Probabilistic analysis of gene expression measurements from heterogeneous tissues 
Bioinformatics  2010;26(20):2571-2577.
Motivation: Tissue heterogeneity, arising from multiple cell types, is a major confounding factor in experiments that focus on studying cell types, e.g. their expression profiles, in isolation. Although sample heterogeneity can be addressed by manual microdissection, prior to conducting experiments, computational treatment on heterogeneous measurements have become a reliable alternative to perform this microdissection in silico. Favoring computation over manual purification has its advantages, such as time consumption, measuring responses of multiple cell types simultaneously, keeping samples intact of external perturbations and unaltered yield of molecular content.
Results: We formalize a probabilistic model, DSection, and show with simulations as well as with real microarray data that DSection attains increased modeling accuracy in terms of (i) estimating cell-type proportions of heterogeneous tissue samples, (ii) estimating replication variance and (iii) identifying differential expression across cell types under various experimental conditions. As our reference we use the corresponding linear regression model, which mirrors the performance of the majority of current non-probabilistic modeling approaches.
Availability and Software: All codes are written in Matlab, and are freely available upon request as well as at the project web page http://www.cs.tut.fi/∼erkkila2/. Furthermore, a web-application for DSection exists at http://informatics.systemsbiology.net/DSection.
Contact: timo.p.erkkila@tut.fi; harri.lahdesmaki@tut.fi
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btq406
PMCID: PMC2951082  PMID: 20631160

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