PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-8 (8)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Optical Monitoring and Detection of Spinal Cord Ischemia 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(12):e83370.
Spinal cord ischemia can lead to paralysis or paraparesis, but if detected early it may be amenable to treatment. Current methods use evoked potentials for detection of spinal cord ischemia, a decades old technology whose warning signs are indirect and significantly delayed from the onset of ischemia. Here we introduce and demonstrate a prototype fiber optic device that directly measures spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. This technical advance in neurological monitoring promises a new standard of care for detection of spinal cord ischemia and the opportunity for early intervention. We demonstrate the probe in an adult Dorset sheep model. Both open and percutaneous approaches were evaluated during pharmacologic, physiological, and mechanical interventions designed to induce variations in spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. The induced variations were rapidly and reproducibly detected, demonstrating direct measurement of spinal cord ischemia in real-time. In the future, this form of hemodynamic spinal cord diagnosis could significantly improve monitoring and management in a broad range of patients, including those undergoing thoracic and abdominal aortic revascularization, spine stabilization procedures for scoliosis and trauma, spinal cord tumor resection, and those requiring management of spinal cord injury in intensive care settings.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0083370
PMCID: PMC3865183  PMID: 24358279
2.  Influence of probe pressure on the diffuse correlation spectroscopy blood flow signal: extra-cerebral contributions 
Biomedical Optics Express  2013;4(7):978-994.
A pilot study explores relative contributions of extra-cerebral (scalp/skull) versus brain (cerebral) tissues to the blood flow index determined by diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS). Microvascular DCS flow measurements were made on the head during baseline and breath-holding/hyperventilation tasks, both with and without pressure. Baseline (resting) data enabled estimation of extra-cerebral flow signals and their pressure dependencies. A simple two-component model was used to derive baseline and activated cerebral blood flow (CBF) signals, and the DCS flow indices were also cross-correlated with concurrent Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound (TCD) blood velocity measurements. The study suggests new pressure-dependent experimental paradigms for elucidation of blood flow contributions from extra-cerebral and cerebral tissues.
doi:10.1364/BOE.4.000978
PMCID: PMC3704102  PMID: 23847725
(170.3880) Medical and biological imaging; (170.2655) Functional monitoring and imaging; (170.3660) Light propagation in tissues; (170.6480) Spectroscopy, speckle
3.  O2 Regulates Skeletal Muscle Progenitor Differentiation through Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase/AKT Signaling 
Molecular and Cellular Biology  2012;32(1):36-49.
Skeletal muscle stem/progenitor cells, which give rise to terminally differentiated muscle, represent potential therapies for skeletal muscle diseases. Delineating the factors regulating these precursors will facilitate their reliable application in human muscle repair. During embryonic development and adult regeneration, skeletal muscle progenitors reside in low-O2 environments before local blood vessels and differentiated muscle form. Prior studies established that low O2 levels (hypoxia) maintained muscle progenitors in an undifferentiated state in vitro, although it remained unclear if progenitor differentiation was coordinated with O2 availability in vivo. In addition, the molecular signals linking O2 to progenitor differentiation are incompletely understood. Here we show that the muscle differentiation program is repressed by hypoxia in vitro and ischemia in vivo. Surprisingly, hypoxia can significantly impair differentiation in the absence of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), the primary developmental effectors of O2. In order to maintain the undifferentiated state, low O2 levels block the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT pathway in a predominantly HIF1α-independent fashion. O2 deprivation affects AKT activity by reducing insulin-like growth factor I receptor sensitivity to growth factors. We conclude that AKT represents a key molecular link between O2 and skeletal muscle differentiation.
doi:10.1128/MCB.05857-11
PMCID: PMC3255700  PMID: 22006022
4.  Tumor Blood Flow Differs between Mouse Strains: Consequences for Vasoresponse to Photodynamic Therapy 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(5):e37322.
Fluctuations in tumor blood flow are common and attributed to factors such as vasomotion or local vascular structure, yet, because vessel structure and physiology are host-derived, animal strain of tumor propagation may further determine blood flow characteristics. In the present report, baseline and stress-altered tumor hemodynamics as a function of murine strain were studied using radiation-induced fibrosacomas (RIF) grown in C3H or nude mice. Fluctuations in tumor blood flow during one hour of baseline monitoring or during vascular stress induced by photodynamic therapy (PDT) were measured by diffuse correlation spectroscopy. Baseline monitoring revealed fluctuating tumor blood flow highly correlated with heart rate and with similar median periods (i.e., ∼9 and 14 min in C3H and nudes, respectively). However, tumor blood flow in C3H animals was more sensitive to physiologic or stress-induced perturbations. Specifically, PDT-induced vascular insults produced greater decreases in blood flow in the tumors of C3H versus nude mice; similarly, during baseline monitoring, fluctuations in blood flow were more regular and more prevalent within the tumors of C3H mice versus nude mice; finally, the vasoconstrictor L-NNA reduced tumor blood flow in C3H mice but did not affect tumor blood flow in nudes. Underlying differences in vascular structure, such as smaller tumor blood vessels in C3H versus nude animals, may contribute to strain-dependent variation in vascular function. These data thus identify clear effects of mouse strain on tumor hemodynamics with consequences to PDT and potentially other vascular-mediated therapies.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0037322
PMCID: PMC3356280  PMID: 22624014
5.  Endothelial HIF-2α regulates murine pathological angiogenesis and revascularization processes 
The Journal of Clinical Investigation  2012;122(4):1427-1443.
Localized tissue hypoxia is a consequence of vascular compromise or rapid cellular proliferation and is a potent inducer of compensatory angiogenesis. The oxygen-responsive transcriptional regulator hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α) is highly expressed in vascular ECs and, along with HIF-1α, activates expression of target genes whose products modulate vascular functions and angiogenesis. However, the mechanisms by which HIF-2α regulates EC function and tissue perfusion under physiological and pathological conditions are poorly understood. Using mice in which Hif2a was specifically deleted in ECs, we demonstrate here that HIF-2α expression is required for angiogenic responses during hindlimb ischemia and for the growth of autochthonous skin tumors. EC-specific Hif2a deletion resulted in increased vessel formation in both models; however, these vessels failed to undergo proper arteriogenesis, resulting in poor perfusion. Analysis of cultured HIF-2α–deficient ECs revealed cell-autonomous increases in migration, invasion, and morphogenetic activity, which correlated with HIF-2α–dependent expression of specific angiogenic factors, including delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4), a Notch ligand, and angiopoietin 2. By stimulating Dll4 signaling in cultured ECs or restoring Dll4 expression in ischemic muscle tissue, we rescued most of the HIF-2α–dependent EC phenotypes in vitro and in vivo, emphasizing the critical role of Dll4/Notch signaling as a downstream target of HIF-2α in ECs. These results indicate that HIF-1α and HIF-2α fulfill complementary, but largely nonoverlapping, essential functions in pathophysiological angiogenesis.
doi:10.1172/JCI57322
PMCID: PMC3314446  PMID: 22426208
6.  Direct measurement of tissue blood flow and metabolism with diffuse optics 
Diffuse optics has proven useful for quantitative assessment of tissue oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations and, more recently, for measurement of microvascular blood flow. In this paper, we focus on the flow monitoring technique: diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS). Representative clinical and pre-clinical studies from our laboratory illustrate the potential of DCS. Validation of DCS blood flow indices in human brain and muscle is presented. Comparison of DCS with arterial spin-labelled MRI, xenon-CT and Doppler ultrasound shows good agreement (0.50
doi:10.1098/rsta.2011.0232
PMCID: PMC3263785  PMID: 22006897
diffuse correlation spectroscopy; blood flow; cerebral blood flow; oxygen metabolism; brain; cancer
Biomedical Optics Express  2010;1(4):1173-1187.
Murine hindlimb ischemia is a useful model for investigation of the mechanisms of peripheral arterial disease and for understanding the role of endothelial cells and generic factors affecting vascular regeneration or angiogenesis. To date, important research with these models has explored tissue reperfusion following ischemia with Laser Doppler methods, methods which provide information about superficial (~mm) vascular regeneration. In this work, we employ diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) and diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) in mice after hindlimb ischemia. We hypothesize that vascular re-growth is not uniform in tissue, and therefore, since diffuse optical methods are capable of probing deep tissues, that the diffuse optics approach will provide a more complete picture of the angiogenesis process throughout the whole depth profile of the limb. Besides increased depth penetration, the combined measurements of DCS and DOS enable all-optical, noninvasive, longitudinal monitoring of tissue perfusion and oxygenation that reveals the interplay between these hemodynamic parameters during angiogenesis. Control mice were found to reestablish 90% of perfusion and oxygen consumption during this period, but oxygen saturation in the limb only partially recovered to about 30% of its initial value. The vascular recovery of mice with endothelial cell-specific deletion of HIF-2α was found to be significantly impaired relative to control mice, indicating that HIF-2α is important for endothelial cell functions in angiogenesis. Comparison of DOS/DCS measurements to parallel measurements in the murine models using Laser Doppler Flowmetry reveal differences in the reperfusion achieved by superficial versus deep tissue during neoangiogenesis; findings from histological analysis of blood vessel development were further correlated with these differences. In general, the combination of DCS and DOS enables experimenters to obtain useful information about oxygenation, metabolism, and perfusion throughout the limb. The results establish diffuse optics as a practical noninvasive method to evaluate the role of transcription factors, such as the endothelial cell-specific HIF-2α, in genetic ally modified mice.
doi:10.1364/BOE.1.001173
PMCID: PMC3018079  PMID: 21258539
(170.3880) Medical and biological imaging; (170.1420) Biology; (170.3660) Light propagation in tissues; (170.5380) Physiology
Biomedical Optics Express  2010;1(1):324-336.
Resting state connectivity aims to identify spontaneous cerebral hemodynamic fluctuations that reflect neuronal activity at rest. In this study, we investigated the spatial-temporal correlation of hemoglobin concentration signals over the whole head during the resting state. By choosing a source-detector pair as a seed, we calculated the correlation value between its time course and the time course of all other source-detector combinations, and projected them onto a topographic map. In all subjects, we found robust spatial interactions in agreement with previous fMRI and NIRS findings. Strong correlations between the two opposite hemispheres were seen for both sensorimotor and visual cortices. Correlations in the prefrontal cortex were more heterogeneous and dependent on the hemodynamic contrast. HbT provided robust, well defined maps, suggesting that this contrast may be used to better localize functional connectivity. The effects of global systemic physiology were also investigated, particularly low frequency blood pressure oscillations which give rise to broad regions of high correlation and mislead interpretation of the results. These results confirm the feasibility of using functional connectivity with optical methods during the resting state, and validate its use to investigate cortical interactions across the whole head.
doi:10.1364/BOE.1.000324
PMCID: PMC3005169  PMID: 21258470
(170.2655) Functional monitoring and imaging; (170.5380) Physiology; (170.3880) Medical and biological imaging

Results 1-8 (8)