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1.  Multiple Proteins Implicated in Neurodegenerative Diseases Accumulate in Axons After Brain Trauma in Humans 
Experimental neurology  2007;208(2):185-192.
Studies in animal models have shown that traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces the rapid accumulation of many of the same key proteins that form pathologic aggregates in neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we examined whether this rapid process also occurs in humans after TBI. Brain tissue from 18 cases who died after TBI and from 6 control cases was examined using immunohistochemistry. Following TBI, widespread axonal injury was persistently identified by the accumulation of neurofilament protein and amyloid precursor protein (APP) in axonal bulbs and varicosities. Axonal APP was found to co-accumulate with its cleavage enzymes, beta-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE), presenilin-1 (PS1) and their product, amyloid-β (Aβ). In addition, extensive accumulation of α-synuclein (α-syn) was found in swollen axons and tau protein was found to accumulate in both axons and neuronal cell bodies. These data show rapid axonal accumulation of proteins implicated in neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease and the synucleinopathies. The cause of axonal pathology can be attributed to disruption of axons due to trauma, or as a secondary effect of raised intracranial pressure or hypoxia. Such axonal pathology in humans may provide a unique environment whereby co-accumulation of APP, BACE, and PS1 leads to intra-axonal production of Aβ as well as accumulation of α-syn and tau. This process may have important implications for survivors of TBI who have been shown to be at greater risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases.
doi:10.1016/j.expneurol.2007.06.018
PMCID: PMC3979356  PMID: 17826768
Traumatic brain injury; TBI; axonal injury; amyloid β; APP; BACE; PS-1; α-synuclein; tau
2.  Hemostatic and neuroprotective effects of human recombinant activated factor VII therapy after traumatic brain injury in pigs 
Experimental neurology  2008;210(2):645-655.
Human recombinant activated factor-VII (rFVIIa) has been used successfully in the treatment of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. In addition, there is increasing interest in its use to treat uncontrolled bleeding of other origins, including trauma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and potential effectiveness of rFVIIa to mitigate bleeding using a clinically relevant model of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the pig. A double injury model was chosen consisting of (1) an expanding cerebral contusion induced by the application of negative pressure to the exposed cortical surface and (2) a rapid rotational acceleration of the head to induce diffuse axonal injury (DAI). Injuries were performed on 10 anesthetized pigs. Five minutes after injury, 720 μg/kg rFVIIa (n = 5) or vehicle control (n = 5) was administered intravenously. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies were performed within 30 min and at 3 days post-TBI to determine the temporal expansion of the cerebral contusion. Euthanasia and histopathologic analysis were performed at day 3. This included observations for hippocampal neuronal degeneration, axonal pathology and microclot formation. The expansion of contusion volume over the 3 days post-injury period was reduced significantly in animals treated with rFVIIa compared to vehicle controls. Surprisingly, immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the number of dead/dying hippocampal neurons and axonal pathology was reduced substantially by rFVIIa treatment compared to vehicle. In addition, there was no difference in the extent of microthrombi between groups. rFVIIa treatment after TBI in the pig reduced expansion of hemorrhagic cerebral contusion volume without exacerbating the severity of microclot formation. Finally, rFVIIa treatment provided a surprising neuroprotective effect by reducing hippocampal neuron degeneration as well as the extent of DAI.
doi:10.1016/j.expneurol.2007.12.019
PMCID: PMC3979422  PMID: 18291370
Traumatic brain injury; TBI; rFVIIa; Cerebral contusion; Recombinant Activated Factor VII; Hemostasis; Diffuse axonal injury; Neuroprotection
3.  Signaling, Delivery and Age as Emerging Issues in the Benefit/Risk Ratio Outcome of tPA For Treatment of CNS Ischemic Disorders 
Journal of neurochemistry  2010;113(2):303-312.
Stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. While tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) remains the only FDA approved treatment for ischemic stroke, clinical use of tPA has been constrained to roughly 3% of eligible patients because of the danger of intracranial hemorrhage and a narrow 3h time window for safe administration. Basic science studies indicate that tPA enhances excitotoxic neuronal cell death. In this review, the beneficial and deleterious effects of tPA in ischemic brain are discussed along with emphasis on development of new approaches towards treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke. In particular, roles of tPA induced signaling and a novel delivery system for tPA administration based on tPA coupling to carrier red blood cells will be considered as therapeutic modalities for increasing tPA benefit/risk ratio. The concept of the neurovascular unit will be discussed in the context of dynamic relationships between tPA-induced changes in cerebral hemodynamics and histopathologic outcome of CNS ischemia. Additionally, the role of age will be considered since thrombolytic therapy is being increasingly used in the pediatric population, but there are few basic science studies of CNS injury in pediatric animals.
PMCID: PMC3467975  PMID: 20405577
stroke; tissue plasminogen activator; cerebral ischemia; pediatric; neurovascular unit; signaling
4.  Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Diffuse Axonal Injury in Swine 
Journal of Neurotrauma  2011;28(9):1747-1755.
Abstract
Until recently, mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or “concussion” was generally ignored as a major health issue. However, emerging evidence suggests that this injury is by no means mild, considering it induces persisting neurocognitive dysfunction in many individuals. Although little is known about the pathophysiological aspects of mTBI, there is growing opinion that diffuse axonal injury (DAI) may play a key role. To explore this possibility, we adapted a model of head rotational acceleration in swine to produce mTBI by scaling the mechanical loading conditions based on available biomechanical data on concussion thresholds in humans. Using these input parameters, head rotational acceleration was induced in either the axial plane (transverse to the brainstem; n=3), causing a 10- to 35-min loss of consciousness, or coronal plane (circumferential to the brainstem; n=2), which did not produce a sustained loss of consciousness. Seven days following injury, immunohistochemical analyses of the brains revealed that both planes of head rotation induced extensive axonal pathology throughout the white matter, characterized as swollen axonal bulbs or varicosities that were immunoreactive for accumulating neurofilament protein. However, the distribution of the axonal pathology was different between planes of head rotation. In particular, more swollen axonal profiles were observed in the brainstems of animals injured in the axial plane, suggesting an anatomic substrate for prolonged loss of consciousness in mTBI. Overall, these data support DAI as an important pathological feature of mTBI, and demonstrate that surprisingly overt axonal pathology may be present, even in cases without a sustained loss of consciousness.
doi:10.1089/neu.2011.1913
PMCID: PMC3172883  PMID: 21740133
concussion; diffuse axonal injury; head rotational acceleration; head rotational velocity; mild traumatic brain injury; post-concussion syndrome; traumatic axonal injury
5.  A Lack of Amyloid β Plaques Despite Persistent Accumulation of Amyloid β in Axons of Long-Term Survivors of Traumatic Brain Injury 
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Additionally, TBI induces AD-like amyloid β (Aβ) plaque pathology within days of injury potentially resulting from massive accumulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in damaged axons. Here, progression of Aβ accumulation was examined using brain tissue from 23 cases with post-TBI survival of up to 3 years. Even years after injury, widespread axonal pathology was consistently observed and was accompanied by intra-axonal co-accumulations of APP with its cleavage enzymes, beta-site APP cleaving enzyme and presenilin-1 and their product, Aβ. However, in marked contrast to the plaque pathology noted in short-term cases post TBI, virtually no Aβ plaques were found in long-term survivors. A potential mechanism for Aβ plaque regression was suggested by the post-injury accumulation of an Aβ degrading enzyme, neprilysin. These findings fail to support the premise that progressive plaque pathology after TBI ultimately results in AD.
doi:10.1111/j.1750-3639.2008.00176.x
PMCID: PMC3014260  PMID: 18492093
amyloid-precursor protein; BACE; beta-amyloid; diffuse axonal injury; dystrophic neurites; human; kinesin; neprilysin; PS-1; traumatic brain injury
6.  Erythrocyte-Bound Tissue Plasminogen Activator is Neuroprotective in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury 
Journal of Neurotrauma  2009;26(9):1585-1592.
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to test the effects of exogenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in traumatic brain injury (TBI). We tested two different tPA formulations, free tPA and tPA bound to erythrocytes (RBC/tPA). Vehicle and each of the tPA treatments were injected intravenously into anesthetized rats 15 min after moderate lateral fluid percussion injury. The animals were sacrificed at 2 days for calculating microclot burden (n = 13) and IgG staining area (n = 13) in the brain sections as indicators of post-traumatic thrombosis and blood–brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, respectively. Another set of injured animals treated in the same way were sacrificed at 7 days to compare cortical lesion volumes (n = 28) and CA3 hippocampal cell loss (n = 24). All evaluations were done blinded with respect to treatment. No significant differences were found with respect to microclot burden or IgG staining volume. Injection of wild-type tPA caused significantly (p < 0.05) larger cortical injuries and greater cerebral hemorrhage. In contrast, there was significantly less cortical injury (p < 0.01) and hippocampal cell loss (p < 0.01) in the RBC/tPA group than in all other groups. These results reveal that RBC/tPA is more neuroprotective in experimental TBI than is unbound tPA.
doi:10.1089/neu.2008.0720
PMCID: PMC2766435  PMID: 19331516
blood–brain barrier; microclots; tissue plasminogen activator; traumatic brain injury
7.  Acute functional recovery of cerebral blood flow after forebrain ischemia in rat 
After complete cerebral ischemia, the postischemic blood flow response to functional activation is severely attenuated for several hours. However, little is known about the spatial and temporal extent of the blood flow response in the acute postischemic period after incomplete cerebral ischemia. To investigate the relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) response in the somatosensory cortex of rat to controlled vibrissae stimulation after transient incomplete ischemia (15-min bilateral common carotid artery occlusion + hypotension), we employed laser speckle imaging combined with statistical parametric mapping. We found that the ischemic insult had a significant impact on the baseline blood flow (P < 0.005) and the activation area in response to functional stimulation was significantly reduced after ischemia (P < 0.005). The maximum rCBF response in the activation area determined from the statistical analysis did not change significantly up to 3 h after ischemia (P > 0.1). However, the time when rCBF response reached its maximum was significantly delayed (P < 0.0001) from 2.4 ± 0.2 secs before ischemia to 3.6 ± 0.1 secs at 20 mins into reperfusion (P < 0.001); the delay was reduced gradually to 2.9 ± 0.2 secs after 3 h, which was still significantly greater than that observed before the insult (P = 0.04).
doi:10.1038/jcbfm.2008.21
PMCID: PMC2771551  PMID: 18382471
cerebral blood flow; cerebral ischemia; functional activation; functional recovery; laser speckle imaging; statistical parametric map
8.  Erythrocyte-bound Tissue Plasminogen Activator (tPA) is Neuroprotective in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury 
Journal of neurotrauma  2009;26(9):1585-1592.
The purpose of this study was to test effects of exogenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) in traumatic brain injury (TBI). We tested two different tPA formulations, free tPA and tPA bound to erythrocytes (RBC/tPA). Vehicle and each of the tPA treatments were injected intravenously in anesthetized rats 15 minutes after moderate lateral fluid percussion injury. Animals were sacrificed at two days for calculating microclot burden (n = 13) and IgG staining area (n = 13) in the brain sections as indicators of post-traumatic thrombosis and blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, respectively. Another set of injured animals treated in the same way were sacrificed at 7 days to compare cortical lesion volumes (n = 28) and CA3 hippocampal cell loss (n = 24). All evaluations were done blinded with respect to treatment.
No significant differences were found with respect to microclot burden or IgG staining volume. Injection of wild-type tPA caused significantly (p < .05) larger cortical injuries and greater cerebral hemorrhage. In contrast, there was significantly less cortical injury (p < .01) and hippocampal cell loss (p < .01) in RBC/tPA group than in all other groups. These results reveal that the RBC/tPA is neuroprotective in experimental TBI, compared to unbound tPA.
doi:10.1089/neu.2008-0720
PMCID: PMC2766435  PMID: 19331516
traumatic brain injury; microclots; tissue plasminogen activator; blood-brain barrier
9.  RBC-coupled tPA Prevents Impairment of Cerebral Vasodilatory Responses and Tissue Injury In Pediatric Cerebral Hypoxia/Ischemia Through Inhibition of ERK MAPK Activation 
Babies experience hypoxia (H) and ischemia (I) from stroke. The only approved treatment for stroke is fibrinolytic therapy with tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA). However, tPA potentiates H/I-induced impairment of responses to cerebrovasodilators such as hypercapnia and hypotension, and blockade of tPA-mediated vasoactivity prevents this deleterious effect. Coupling tPA to RBCs reduces its CNS toxicity through spatially confining the drug to the vasculature. Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), a family of at least 3 kinases, is upregulated after H/I. In this study we determined if RBC-tPA given before or after cerebral H/I would preserve responses to cerebrovasodilators and prevent neuronal injury mediated through the ERK MAPK pathway. Animals given RBC-tPA maintained responses to cerebrovasodilators at levels equivalent to pre-H/I values. CSF and brain parenchymal ERK MAPK was elevated by H/I and this upregulation was potentiated by tPA, but blunted by RBC-tPA. U 0126, an ERK MAPK antagonist, also maintained cerebrovasodilation post H/I. Neuronal degeneration in CA1 hippocampus and parietal cortex after H/I was exacerbated by tPA, but ameliorated by RBC-tPA and U 0126. These data suggest that coupling tPA to RBCs may offer a novel approach towards increasing the benefit/risk ratio of thrombolytic therapy for CNS disorders associated with H/I.
doi:10.1038/jcbfm.2009.61
PMCID: PMC2719676  PMID: 19436314
autoregulatory vasodilation; autoregulation; cerebral arteries; dilation; cerebral arteries; cerebral ischemia and/or reperfusion; ischemia; cerebral vascular response to carbon dioxide; cerebral vascular biology; cerebrovascular reactivity; cerebral vasculature; pig; experimental system; neonates; experimental system; hypercapnia; reperfusion injury; injury; ERK (extracellular signalregulated kinase); kinases; MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase); microvasculature; pial artery; pial vessels; global cerebral ischemia; ischemia

Results 1-9 (9)