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1.  CHEK2*1100delC Heterozygosity in Women With Breast Cancer Associated With Early Death, Breast Cancer–Specific Death, and Increased Risk of a Second Breast Cancer 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2012;30(35):4308-4316.
Purpose
We tested the hypotheses that CHEK2*1100delC heterozygosity is associated with increased risk of early death, breast cancer–specific death, and risk of a second breast cancer in women with a first breast cancer.
Patients and Methods
From 22 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, 25,571 white women with invasive breast cancer were genotyped for CHEK2*1100delC and observed for up to 20 years (median, 6.6 years). We examined risk of early death and breast cancer–specific death by estrogen receptor status and risk of a second breast cancer after a first breast cancer in prospective studies.
Results
CHEK2*1100delC heterozygosity was found in 459 patients (1.8%). In women with estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer, multifactorially adjusted hazard ratios for heterozygotes versus noncarriers were 1.43 (95% CI, 1.12 to 1.82; log-rank P = .004) for early death and 1.63 (95% CI, 1.24 to 2.15; log-rank P < .001) for breast cancer–specific death. In all women, hazard ratio for a second breast cancer was 2.77 (95% CI, 2.00 to 3.83; log-rank P < .001) increasing to 3.52 (95% CI, 2.35 to 5.27; log-rank P < .001) in women with estrogen receptor–positive first breast cancer only.
Conclusion
Among women with estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer, CHEK2*1100delC heterozygosity was associated with a 1.4-fold risk of early death, a 1.6-fold risk of breast cancer–specific death, and a 3.5-fold risk of a second breast cancer. This is one of the few examples of a genetic factor that influences long-term prognosis being documented in an extensive series of women with breast cancer.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2012.42.7336
PMCID: PMC3515767  PMID: 23109706
2.  Telomere length and common disease: study design and analytical challenges 
Human Genetics  2015;134(7):679-689.
Telomeres, the repetitive sequences that protect the ends of chromosomes, help to maintain genomic integrity and are of key importance to human health. The aim here is to give an overview of the evidence for the importance of telomere length (TL) to the risk of common disease, considering the strengths and weaknesses of different epidemiological study designs. Methods for measuring TL are described, all of which are subject to considerable measurement error. TL declines with age and varies in relation to factors such as smoking and obesity. It is also highly heritable (estimated heritability of ~40 to 50 %), and genome-wide studies have identified a number of associated genetic variants. Epidemiological studies have shown shorter TL to be associated with risk of a number of common diseases, including cardiovascular disease and some cancers. The relationship with cancer appears complex, in that longer telomeres are associated with higher risk of some cancers. Prospective studies of the relationship between TL and disease, where TL is measured before diagnosis, have numerous advantages over retrospective studies, since they avoid the problems of reverse causality and differences in sample handling, but they are still subject to potential confounding. Studies of the genetic predictors of TL in relation to disease risk avoid these drawbacks, although they are not without limitations. Telomere biology is of major importance to the risk of common disease, but the complexities of the relationship are only now beginning to be understood.
doi:10.1007/s00439-015-1563-4
PMCID: PMC4460268  PMID: 25986438
3.  Common germline polymorphisms associated with breast cancer-specific survival 
Pirie, Ailith | Guo, Qi | Kraft, Peter | Canisius, Sander | Eccles, Diana M | Rahman, Nazneen | Nevanlinna, Heli | Chen, Constance | Khan, Sofia | Tyrer, Jonathan | Bolla, Manjeet K | Wang, Qin | Dennis, Joe | Michailidou, Kyriaki | Lush, Michael | Dunning, Alison M | Shah, Mitul | Czene, Kamila | Darabi, Hatef | Eriksson, Mikael | Lambrechts, Dieter | Weltens, Caroline | Leunen, Karin | van Ongeval, Chantal | Nordestgaard, Børge G | Nielsen, Sune F | Flyger, Henrik | Rudolph, Anja | Seibold, Petra | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Blomqvist, Carl | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Fagerholm, Rainer | Muranen, Taru A | Olsen, Janet E | Hallberg, Emily | Vachon, Celine | Knight, Julia A | Glendon, Gord | Mulligan, Anna Marie | Broeks, Annegien | Cornelissen, Sten | Haiman, Christopher A | Henderson, Brian E | Schumacher, Frederick | Le Marchand, Loic | Hopper, John L | Tsimiklis, Helen | Apicella, Carmel | Southey, Melissa C | Cross, Simon S | Reed, Malcolm WR | Giles, Graham G | Milne, Roger L | McLean, Catriona | Winqvist, Robert | Pylkäs, Katri | Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja | Grip, Mervi | Hooning, Maartje J | Hollestelle, Antoinette | Martens, John WM | van den Ouweland, Ans MW | Marme, Federick | Schneeweiss, Andreas | Yang, Rongxi | Burwinkel, Barbara | Figueroa, Jonine | Chanock, Stephen J | Lissowska, Jolanta | Sawyer, Elinor J | Tomlinson, Ian | Kerin, Michael J | Miller, Nicola | Brenner, Hermann | Butterbach, Katja | Holleczek, Bernd | Kataja, Vesa | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Hartikainen, Jaana M | Li, Jingmei | Brand, Judith S | Humphreys, Keith | Devilee, Peter | Tollenaar, Robert AEM | Seynaeve, Caroline | Radice, Paolo | Peterlongo, Paolo | Manoukian, Siranoush | Ficarazzi, Filomena | Beckmann, Matthias W | Hein, Alexander | Ekici, Arif B | Balleine, Rosemary | Phillips, Kelly-Anne | Benitez, Javier | Zamora, M Pilar | Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias | Menéndez, Primitiva | Jakubowska, Anna | Lubinski, Jan | Gronwald, Jacek | Durda, Katarzyna | Hamann, Ute | Kabisch, Maria | Ulmer, Hans Ulrich | Rüdiger, Thomas | Margolin, Sara | Kristensen, Vessela | Nord, Siljie | Evans, D Gareth | Abraham, Jean | Earl, Helena | Poole, Christopher J | Hiller, Louise | Dunn, Janet A | Bowden, Sarah | Yang, Rose | Campa, Daniele | Diver, W Ryan | Gapstur, Susan M | Gaudet, Mia M | Hankinson, Susan | Hoover, Robert N | Hüsing, Anika | Kaaks, Rudolf | Machiela, Mitchell J | Willett, Walter | Barrdahl, Myrto | Canzian, Federico | Chin, Suet-Feung | Caldas, Carlos | Hunter, David J | Lindstrom, Sara | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Couch, Fergus J | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Mannermaa, Arto | Andrulis, Irene L | Hall, Per | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Easton, Douglas F | Bojesen, Stig E | Cox, Angela | Fasching, Peter A | Pharoah, Paul DP | Schmidt, Marjanka K
Introduction
Previous studies have identified common germline variants nominally associated with breast cancer survival. These associations have not been widely replicated in further studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of previously reported SNPs with breast cancer-specific survival using data from a pooled analysis of eight breast cancer survival genome-wide association studies (GWAS) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.
Methods
A literature review was conducted of all previously published associations between common germline variants and three survival outcomes: breast cancer-specific survival, overall survival and disease-free survival. All associations that reached the nominal significance level of P value <0.05 were included. Single nucleotide polymorphisms that had been previously reported as nominally associated with at least one survival outcome were evaluated in the pooled analysis of over 37,000 breast cancer cases for association with breast cancer-specific survival. Previous associations were evaluated using a one-sided test based on the reported direction of effect.
Results
Fifty-six variants from 45 previous publications were evaluated in the meta-analysis. Fifty-four of these were evaluated in the full set of 37,954 breast cancer cases with 2,900 events and the two additional variants were evaluated in a reduced sample size of 30,000 samples in order to ensure independence from the previously published studies. Five variants reached nominal significance (P <0.05) in the pooled GWAS data compared to 2.8 expected under the null hypothesis. Seven additional variants were associated (P <0.05) with ER-positive disease.
Conclusions
Although no variants reached genome-wide significance (P <5 x 10−8), these results suggest that there is some evidence of association between candidate common germline variants and breast cancer prognosis. Larger studies from multinational collaborations are necessary to increase the power to detect associations, between common variants and prognosis, at more stringent significance levels.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13058-015-0570-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s13058-015-0570-7
PMCID: PMC4484708  PMID: 25897948
4.  Parent-of-origin specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche 
Perry, John RB | Day, Felix | Elks, Cathy E | Sulem, Patrick | Thompson, Deborah J | Ferreira, Teresa | He, Chunyan | Chasman, Daniel I | Esko, Tõnu | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Albrecht, Eva | Ang, Wei Q | Corre, Tanguy | Cousminer, Diana L | Feenstra, Bjarke | Franceschini, Nora | Ganna, Andrea | Johnson, Andrew D | Kjellqvist, Sanela | Lunetta, Kathryn L | McMahon, George | Nolte, Ilja M | Paternoster, Lavinia | Porcu, Eleonora | Smith, Albert V | Stolk, Lisette | Teumer, Alexander | Tšernikova, Natalia | Tikkanen, Emmi | Ulivi, Sheila | Wagner, Erin K | Amin, Najaf | Bierut, Laura J | Byrne, Enda M | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Koller, Daniel L | Mangino, Massimo | Pers, Tune H | Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M | Zhao, Jing Hua | Andrulis, Irene L | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Atsma, Femke | Bandinelli, Stefania | Beckmann, Matthias W | Benitez, Javier | Blomqvist, Carl | Bojesen, Stig E | Bolla, Manjeet K | Bonanni, Bernardo | Brauch, Hiltrud | Brenner, Hermann | Buring, Julie E | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Chanock, Stephen | Chen, Jinhui | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Collée, J. Margriet | Couch, Fergus J | Couper, David | Coveillo, Andrea D | Cox, Angela | Czene, Kamila | D’adamo, Adamo Pio | Smith, George Davey | De Vivo, Immaculata | Demerath, Ellen W | Dennis, Joe | Devilee, Peter | Dieffenbach, Aida K | Dunning, Alison M | Eiriksdottir, Gudny | Eriksson, Johan G | Fasching, Peter A | Ferrucci, Luigi | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Flyger, Henrik | Foroud, Tatiana | Franke, Lude | Garcia, Melissa E | García-Closas, Montserrat | Geller, Frank | de Geus, Eco EJ | Giles, Graham G | Gudbjartsson, Daniel F | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Guénel, Pascal | Guo, Suiqun | Hall, Per | Hamann, Ute | Haring, Robin | Hartman, Catharina A | Heath, Andrew C | Hofman, Albert | Hooning, Maartje J | Hopper, John L | Hu, Frank B | Hunter, David J | Karasik, David | Kiel, Douglas P | Knight, Julia A | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Kutalik, Zoltan | Lai, Sandra | Lambrechts, Diether | Lindblom, Annika | Mägi, Reedik | Magnusson, Patrik K | Mannermaa, Arto | Martin, Nicholas G | Masson, Gisli | McArdle, Patrick F | McArdle, Wendy L | Melbye, Mads | Michailidou, Kyriaki | Mihailov, Evelin | Milani, Lili | Milne, Roger L | Nevanlinna, Heli | Neven, Patrick | Nohr, Ellen A | Oldehinkel, Albertine J | Oostra, Ben A | Palotie, Aarno | Peacock, Munro | Pedersen, Nancy L | Peterlongo, Paolo | Peto, Julian | Pharoah, Paul DP | Postma, Dirkje S | Pouta, Anneli | Pylkäs, Katri | Radice, Paolo | Ring, Susan | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Robino, Antonietta | Rose, Lynda M | Rudolph, Anja | Salomaa, Veikko | Sanna, Serena | Schlessinger, David | Schmidt, Marjanka K | Southey, Mellissa C | Sovio, Ulla | Stampfer, Meir J | Stöckl, Doris | Storniolo, Anna M | Timpson, Nicholas J | Tyrer, Jonathan | Visser, Jenny A | Vollenweider, Peter | Völzke, Henry | Waeber, Gerard | Waldenberger, Melanie | Wallaschofski, Henri | Wang, Qin | Willemsen, Gonneke | Winqvist, Robert | Wolffenbuttel, Bruce HR | Wright, Margaret J | Boomsma, Dorret I | Econs, Michael J | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Loos, Ruth JF | McCarthy, Mark I | Montgomery, Grant W | Rice, John P | Streeten, Elizabeth A | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | van Duijn, Cornelia M | Alizadeh, Behrooz Z | Bergmann, Sven | Boerwinkle, Eric | Boyd, Heather A | Crisponi, Laura | Gasparini, Paolo | Gieger, Christian | Harris, Tamara B | Ingelsson, Erik | Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Kraft, Peter | Lawlor, Debbie | Metspalu, Andres | Pennell, Craig E | Ridker, Paul M | Snieder, Harold | Sørensen, Thorkild IA | Spector, Tim D | Strachan, David P | Uitterlinden, André G | Wareham, Nicholas J | Widen, Elisabeth | Zygmunt, Marek | Murray, Anna | Easton, Douglas F | Stefansson, Kari | Murabito, Joanne M | Ong, Ken K
Nature  2014;514(7520):92-97.
Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality1. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation2,3, but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P<5×10−8) for 123 signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty. Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1/WDR25, MKRN3/MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signaling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition.
doi:10.1038/nature13545
PMCID: PMC4185210  PMID: 25231870
5.  A large-scale assessment of two-way SNP interactions in breast cancer susceptibility using 46 450 cases and 42 461 controls from the breast cancer association consortium 
Milne, Roger L. | Herranz, Jesús | Michailidou, Kyriaki | Dennis, Joe | Tyrer, Jonathan P. | Zamora, M. Pilar | Arias-Perez, José Ignacio | González-Neira, Anna | Pita, Guillermo | Alonso, M. Rosario | Wang, Qin | Bolla, Manjeet K. | Czene, Kamila | Eriksson, Mikael | Humphreys, Keith | Darabi, Hatef | Li, Jingmei | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Neuhausen, Susan L. | Ziogas, Argyrios | Clarke, Christina A. | Hopper, John L. | Dite, Gillian S. | Apicella, Carmel | Southey, Melissa C. | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Swerdlow, Anthony | Ashworth, Alan | Orr, Nicholas | Schoemaker, Minouk | Jakubowska, Anna | Lubinski, Jan | Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna | Durda, Katarzyna | Andrulis, Irene L. | Knight, Julia A. | Glendon, Gord | Mulligan, Anna Marie | Bojesen, Stig E. | Nordestgaard, Børge G. | Flyger, Henrik | Nevanlinna, Heli | Muranen, Taru A. | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Blomqvist, Carl | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Rudolph, Anja | Seibold, Petra | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Wang, Xianshu | Olson, Janet E. | Vachon, Celine | Purrington, Kristen | Winqvist, Robert | Pylkäs, Katri | Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja | Grip, Mervi | Dunning, Alison M. | Shah, Mitul | Guénel, Pascal | Truong, Thérèse | Sanchez, Marie | Mulot, Claire | Brenner, Hermann | Dieffenbach, Aida Karina | Arndt, Volker | Stegmaier, Christa | Lindblom, Annika | Margolin, Sara | Hooning, Maartje J. | Hollestelle, Antoinette | Collée, J. Margriet | Jager, Agnes | Cox, Angela | Brock, Ian W. | Reed, Malcolm W.R. | Devilee, Peter | Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M. | Seynaeve, Caroline | Haiman, Christopher A. | Henderson, Brian E. | Schumacher, Fredrick | Le Marchand, Loic | Simard, Jacques | Dumont, Martine | Soucy, Penny | Dörk, Thilo | Bogdanova, Natalia V. | Hamann, Ute | Försti, Asta | Rüdiger, Thomas | Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich | Fasching, Peter A. | Häberle, Lothar | Ekici, Arif B. | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Fletcher, Olivia | Johnson, Nichola | dos Santos Silva, Isabel | Peto, Julian | Radice, Paolo | Peterlongo, Paolo | Peissel, Bernard | Mariani, Paolo | Giles, Graham G. | Severi, Gianluca | Baglietto, Laura | Sawyer, Elinor | Tomlinson, Ian | Kerin, Michael | Miller, Nicola | Marme, Federik | Burwinkel, Barbara | Mannermaa, Arto | Kataja, Vesa | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Hartikainen, Jaana M. | Lambrechts, Diether | Yesilyurt, Betul T. | Floris, Giuseppe | Leunen, Karin | Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker | Kristensen, Vessela | Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise | García-Closas, Montserrat | Chanock, Stephen J. | Lissowska, Jolanta | Figueroa, Jonine D. | Schmidt, Marjanka K. | Broeks, Annegien | Verhoef, Senno | Rutgers, Emiel J. | Brauch, Hiltrud | Brüning, Thomas | Ko, Yon-Dschun | Couch, Fergus J. | Toland, Amanda E. | Yannoukakos, Drakoulis | Pharoah, Paul D.P. | Hall, Per | Benítez, Javier | Malats, Núria | Easton, Douglas F.
Human Molecular Genetics  2013;23(7):1934-1946.
Part of the substantial unexplained familial aggregation of breast cancer may be due to interactions between common variants, but few studies have had adequate statistical power to detect interactions of realistic magnitude. We aimed to assess all two-way interactions in breast cancer susceptibility between 70 917 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected primarily based on prior evidence of a marginal effect. Thirty-eight international studies contributed data for 46 450 breast cancer cases and 42 461 controls of European origin as part of a multi-consortium project (COGS). First, SNPs were preselected based on evidence (P < 0.01) of a per-allele main effect, and all two-way combinations of those were evaluated by a per-allele (1 d.f.) test for interaction using logistic regression. Second, all 2.5 billion possible two-SNP combinations were evaluated using Boolean operation-based screening and testing, and SNP pairs with the strongest evidence of interaction (P < 10−4) were selected for more careful assessment by logistic regression. Under the first approach, 3277 SNPs were preselected, but an evaluation of all possible two-SNP combinations (1 d.f.) identified no interactions at P < 10−8. Results from the second analytic approach were consistent with those from the first (P > 10−10). In summary, we observed little evidence of two-way SNP interactions in breast cancer susceptibility, despite the large number of SNPs with potential marginal effects considered and the very large sample size. This finding may have important implications for risk prediction, simplifying the modelling required. Further comprehensive, large-scale genome-wide interaction studies may identify novel interacting loci if the inherent logistic and computational challenges can be overcome.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddt581
PMCID: PMC3943524  PMID: 24242184
6.  A Genome-wide Association Study of Early-onset Breast Cancer Identifies PFKM as a Novel Breast Cancer Gene and Supports a Common Genetic Spectrum for Breast Cancer at Any Age 
Ahsan, Habibul | Halpern, Jerry | Kibriya, Muhammad G | Pierce, Brandon L | Tong, Lin | Gamazon, Eric | McGuire, Valerie | Felberg, Anna | Shi, Jianxin | Jasmine, Farzana | Roy, Shantanu | Brutus, Rachelle | Argos, Maria | Melkonian, Stephanie | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Andrulis, Irene | Hopper, John L | John, Esther M. | Malone, Kathi | Ursin, Giske | Gammon, Marilie D | Thomas, Duncan C | Seminara, Daniela | Casey, Graham | Knight, Julia A | Southey, Melissa C | Giles, Graham G | Santella, Regina M | Lee, Eunjung | Conti, David | Duggan, David | Gallinger, Steve | Haile, Robert | Jenkins, Mark | Lindor, Noralane M | Newcomb, Polly | Michailidou, Kyriaki | Apicella, Carmel | Park, Daniel J | Peto, Julian | Fletcher, Olivia | Silva, Isabel dos Santos | Lathrop, Mark | Hunter, David J | Chanock, Stephen J | Meindl, Alfons | Schmutzler, Rita K | Müller-Myhsok, Bertram | Lochmann, Magdalena | Beckmann, Lars | Hein, Rebecca | Makalic, Enes | Schmidt, Daniel F | Bui, Quang Minh | Stone, Jennifer | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Dahmen, Norbert | Nevanlinna, Heli | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Blomqvist, Carl | Hall, Per | Czene, Kamila | Irwanto, Astrid | Liu, Jianjun | Rahman, Nazneen | Turnbull, Clare | Dunning, Alison M. | Pharoah, Paul | Waisfisz, Quinten | Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne | Uitterlinden, Andre G. | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Nicolae, Dan | Easton, Douglas F | Cox, Nancy J | Whittemore, Alice S
Early-onset breast cancer (EOBC) causes substantial loss of life and productivity, creating a major burden among women worldwide. We analyzed 1,265,548 Hapmap3 SNPs among a discovery set of 3,523 EOBC incident case and 2,702 population control women aged <=51 years. The SNPs with smallest P-values were examined in a replication set of 3,470 EOBC case and 5,475 control women. We also tested EOBC association with 19,684 genes by annotating each gene with putative functional SNPs, and then combining their P-values to obtain a gene-based P-value. We examined the gene with smallest P-value for replication in 1,145 breast cancer case and 1,142 control women. The combined discovery and replication sets identified 72 new SNPs associated with EOBC (P<4×10−8) located in six genomic regions previously reported to contain SNPs associated largely with later-onset breast cancer (LOBC). SNP rs2229882 and 10 other SNPs on chromosome 5q11.2 remained associated (P<6×10−4) after adjustment for the strongest published SNPs in the region. Thirty-two of the 82 currently known LOBC SNPs were associated with EOBC (P<0.05). Low power is likely responsible for the remaining 50 unassociated known LOBC SNPs. The gene-based analysis identified an association between breast cancer and the phosphofructokinase-muscle (PFKM) gene on chromosome 12q13.11 that met the genomewide gene-based threshold of 2.5×10−6. In conclusion, EOBC and LOBC appear to have similar genetic etiologies; the 5q11.2 region may contain multiple distinct breast cancer loci; and the PFKM gene region is worthy of further investigation. These findings should enhance our understanding of the etiology of breast cancer.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0340
PMCID: PMC3990360  PMID: 24493630
7.  Assessing Associations between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 Functional Module and Breast Cancer Risk in BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers 
Blanco, Ignacio | Kuchenbaecker, Karoline | Cuadras, Daniel | Wang, Xianshu | Barrowdale, Daniel | de Garibay, Gorka Ruiz | Librado, Pablo | Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro | Rozas, Julio | Bonifaci, Núria | McGuffog, Lesley | Pankratz, Vernon S. | Islam, Abul | Mateo, Francesca | Berenguer, Antoni | Petit, Anna | Català, Isabel | Brunet, Joan | Feliubadaló, Lidia | Tornero, Eva | Benítez, Javier | Osorio, Ana | Cajal, Teresa Ramón y | Nevanlinna, Heli | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Arun, Banu K. | Toland, Amanda E. | Karlan, Beth Y. | Walsh, Christine | Lester, Jenny | Greene, Mark H. | Mai, Phuong L. | Nussbaum, Robert L. | Andrulis, Irene L. | Domchek, Susan M. | Nathanson, Katherine L. | Rebbeck, Timothy R. | Barkardottir, Rosa B. | Jakubowska, Anna | Lubinski, Jan | Durda, Katarzyna | Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna | Claes, Kathleen | Van Maerken, Tom | Díez, Orland | Hansen, Thomas V. | Jønson, Lars | Gerdes, Anne-Marie | Ejlertsen, Bent | de la Hoya, Miguel | Caldés, Trinidad | Dunning, Alison M. | Oliver, Clare | Fineberg, Elena | Cook, Margaret | Peock, Susan | McCann, Emma | Murray, Alex | Jacobs, Chris | Pichert, Gabriella | Lalloo, Fiona | Chu, Carol | Dorkins, Huw | Paterson, Joan | Ong, Kai-Ren | Teixeira, Manuel R. | Hogervorst, Frans B. L. | van der Hout, Annemarie H. | Seynaeve, Caroline | van der Luijt, Rob B. | Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L. | Devilee, Peter | Wijnen, Juul T. | Rookus, Matti A. | Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J. | Blok, Marinus J. | van den Ouweland, Ans M. W. | Aalfs, Cora M. | Rodriguez, Gustavo C. | Phillips, Kelly-Anne A. | Piedmonte, Marion | Nerenstone, Stacy R. | Bae-Jump, Victoria L. | O'Malley, David M. | Ratner, Elena S. | Schmutzler, Rita K. | Wappenschmidt, Barbara | Rhiem, Kerstin | Engel, Christoph | Meindl, Alfons | Ditsch, Nina | Arnold, Norbert | Plendl, Hansjoerg J. | Niederacher, Dieter | Sutter, Christian | Wang-Gohrke, Shan | Steinemann, Doris | Preisler-Adams, Sabine | Kast, Karin | Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda | Gehrig, Andrea | Bojesen, Anders | Pedersen, Inge Sokilde | Sunde, Lone | Jensen, Uffe Birk | Thomassen, Mads | Kruse, Torben A. | Foretova, Lenka | Peterlongo, Paolo | Bernard, Loris | Peissel, Bernard | Scuvera, Giulietta | Manoukian, Siranoush | Radice, Paolo | Ottini, Laura | Montagna, Marco | Agata, Simona | Maugard, Christine | Simard, Jacques | Soucy, Penny | Berger, Andreas | Fink-Retter, Anneliese | Singer, Christian F. | Rappaport, Christine | Geschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne | Tea, Muy-Kheng | Pfeiler, Georg | John, Esther M. | Miron, Alex | Neuhausen, Susan L. | Terry, Mary Beth | Chung, Wendy K. | Daly, Mary B. | Goldgar, David E. | Janavicius, Ramunas | Dorfling, Cecilia M. | van Rensburg, Elisabeth J. | Fostira, Florentia | Konstantopoulou, Irene | Garber, Judy | Godwin, Andrew K. | Olah, Edith | Narod, Steven A. | Rennert, Gad | Paluch, Shani Shimon | Laitman, Yael | Friedman, Eitan | Liljegren, Annelie | Rantala, Johanna | Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie | Loman, Niklas | Imyanitov, Evgeny N. | Hamann, Ute | Spurdle, Amanda B. | Healey, Sue | Weitzel, Jeffrey N. | Herzog, Josef | Margileth, David | Gorrini, Chiara | Esteller, Manel | Gómez, Antonio | Sayols, Sergi | Vidal, Enrique | Heyn, Holger | Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique | Léoné, Melanie | Barjhoux, Laure | Fassy-Colcombet, Marion | de Pauw, Antoine | Lasset, Christine | Ferrer, Sandra Fert | Castera, Laurent | Berthet, Pascaline | Cornelis, François | Bignon, Yves-Jean | Damiola, Francesca | Mazoyer, Sylvie | Sinilnikova, Olga M. | Maxwell, Christopher A. | Vijai, Joseph | Robson, Mark | Kauff, Noah | Corines, Marina J. | Villano, Danylko | Cunningham, Julie | Lee, Adam | Lindor, Noralane | Lázaro, Conxi | Easton, Douglas F. | Offit, Kenneth | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Couch, Fergus J. | Antoniou, Antonis C. | Pujana, Miguel Angel
PLoS ONE  2015;10(4):e0120020.
While interplay between BRCA1 and AURKA-RHAMM-TPX2-TUBG1 regulates mammary epithelial polarization, common genetic variation in HMMR (gene product RHAMM) may be associated with risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers. Following on these observations, we further assessed the link between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 functional module and risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Forty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers and subsequently analyzed using a retrospective likelihood approach. The association of HMMR rs299290 with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers was confirmed: per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04 – 1.15, p = 1.9 x 10−4 (false discovery rate (FDR)-adjusted p = 0.043). Variation in CSTF1, located next to AURKA, was also found to be associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers: rs2426618 per-allele HR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.03 – 1.16, p = 0.005 (FDR-adjusted p = 0.045). Assessment of pairwise interactions provided suggestions (FDR-adjusted pinteraction values > 0.05) for deviations from the multiplicative model for rs299290 and CSTF1 rs6064391, and rs299290 and TUBG1 rs11649877 in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following these suggestions, the expression of HMMR and AURKA or TUBG1 in sporadic breast tumors was found to potentially interact, influencing patients’ survival. Together, the results of this study support the hypothesis of a causative link between altered function of AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 and breast carcinogenesis in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0120020
PMCID: PMC4382299  PMID: 25830658
8.  Fine mapping of genetic susceptibility loci for melanoma reveals a mixture of single variant and multiple variant regions 
At least 17 genomic regions are established as harboring melanoma susceptibility variants, in most instances with genome-wide levels of significance and replication in independent samples. Based on genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data augmented by imputation to the 1,000 Genomes reference panel, we have fine mapped these regions in over 5,000 individuals with melanoma (mainly from the GenoMEL consortium) and over 7,000 ethnically matched controls. A penalized regression approach was used to discover those SNP markers that most parsimoniously explain the observed association in each genomic region. For the majority of the regions, the signal is best explained by a single SNP, which sometimes, as in the tyrosinase region, is a known functional variant. However in five regions the explanation is more complex. At the CDKN2A locus, for example, there is strong evidence that not only multiple SNPs but also multiple genes are involved. Our results illustrate the variability in the biology underlying genome-wide susceptibility loci and make steps toward accounting for some of the “missing heritability.”
doi:10.1002/ijc.29099
PMCID: PMC4328144  PMID: 25077817
melanoma; fine mapping; penalized regression; heritability; genome-wide signal
9.  Assessment of variation in immunosuppressive pathway genes reveals TGFBR2 to be associated with prognosis of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer after chemotherapy 
Lei, Jieping | Rudolph, Anja | Moysich, Kirsten B | Rafiq, Sajjad | Behrens, Sabine | Goode, Ellen L | Pharoah, Paul PD | Seibold, Petra | Fasching, Peter A | Andrulis, Irene L | Kristensen, Vessela N | Couch, Fergus J | Hamann, Ute | Hooning, Maartje J | Nevanlinna, Heli | Eilber, Ursula | Bolla, Manjeet K | Dennis, Joe | Wang, Qin | Lindblom, Annika | Mannermaa, Arto | Lambrechts, Diether | García-Closas, Montserrat | Hall, Per | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Shah, Mitul | Luben, Robert | Haeberle, Lothar | Ekici, Arif B | Beckmann, Matthias W | Knight, Julia A | Glendon, Gord | Tchatchou, Sandrine | Alnæs, Grethe I Grenaker | Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise | Nord, Silje | Olson, Janet E | Hallberg, Emily | Vachon, Celine | Torres, Diana | Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich | Rüdiger, Thomas | Jager, Agnes | van Deurzen, Carolien HM | Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine MA | Muranen, Taru A | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Blomqvist, Carl | Margolin, Sara | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Hartikainen, Jaana M | Kataja, Vesa | Hatse, Sigrid | Wildiers, Hans | Smeets, Ann | Figueroa, Jonine | Chanock, Stephen J | Lissowska, Jolanta | Li, Jingmei | Humphreys, Keith | Phillips, Kelly-Anne | Linn, Sabine | Cornelissen, Sten | van den Broek, Sandra Alexandra J | Kang, Daehee | Choi, Ji-Yeob | Park, Sue K | Yoo, Keun-Young | Hsiung, Chia-Ni | Wu, Pei-Ei | Hou, Ming-Feng | Shen, Chen-Yang | Teo, Soo Hwang | Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd | Yip, Cheng Har | Ho, Gwo Fuang | Matsuo, Keitaro | Ito, Hidemi | Iwata, Hiroji | Tajima, Kazuo | Dunning, Alison M | Benitez, Javier | Czene, Kamila | Sucheston, Lara E | Maishman, Tom | Tapper, William J | Eccles, Diana | Easton, Douglas F | Schmidt, Marjanka K | Chang-Claude, Jenny
Introduction
Tumor lymphocyte infiltration is associated with clinical response to chemotherapy in estrogen receptor (ER) negative breast cancer. To identify variants in immunosuppressive pathway genes associated with prognosis after adjuvant chemotherapy for ER-negative patients, we studied stage I-III invasive breast cancer patients of European ancestry, including 9,334 ER-positive (3,151 treated with chemotherapy) and 2,334 ER-negative patients (1,499 treated with chemotherapy).
Methods
We pooled data from sixteen studies from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC), and employed two independent studies for replications. Overall 3,610 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 133 genes were genotyped as part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study, in which phenotype and clinical data were collected and harmonized. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression was used to assess genetic associations with overall survival (OS) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS). Heterogeneity according to chemotherapy or ER status was evaluated with the log-likelihood ratio test.
Results
Three independent SNPs in TGFBR2 and IL12B were associated with OS (P <10−3) solely in ER-negative patients after chemotherapy (267 events). Poorer OS associated with TGFBR2 rs1367610 (G > C) (per allele hazard ratio (HR) 1.54 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22 to 1.95), P = 3.08 × 10−4) was not found in ER-negative patients without chemotherapy or ER-positive patients with chemotherapy (P for interaction <10−3). Two SNPs in IL12B (r2 = 0.20) showed different associations with ER-negative disease after chemotherapy: rs2546892 (G > A) with poorer OS (HR 1.50 (95% CI 1.21 to 1.86), P = 1.81 × 10−4), and rs2853694 (A > C) with improved OS (HR 0.73 (95% CI 0.61 to 0.87), P = 3.67 × 10−4). Similar associations were observed with BCSS. Association with TGFBR2 rs1367610 but not IL12B variants replicated using BCAC Asian samples and the independent Prospective Study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary Breast Cancer Study and yielded a combined HR of 1.57 ((95% CI 1.28 to 1.94), P = 2.05 × 10−5) without study heterogeneity.
Conclusions
TGFBR2 variants may have prognostic and predictive value in ER-negative breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Our findings provide further insights into the development of immunotherapeutic targets for ER-negative breast cancer.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13058-015-0522-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s13058-015-0522-2
PMCID: PMC4374346  PMID: 25849327
10.  Fine-mapping identifies two additional breast cancer susceptibility loci at 9q31.2 
Orr, Nick | Dudbridge, Frank | Dryden, Nicola | Maguire, Sarah | Novo, Daniela | Perrakis, Eleni | Johnson, Nichola | Ghoussaini, Maya | Hopper, John L. | Southey, Melissa C. | Apicella, Carmel | Stone, Jennifer | Schmidt, Marjanka K. | Broeks, Annegien | Van't Veer, Laura J. | Hogervorst, Frans B. | Fasching, Peter A. | Haeberle, Lothar | Ekici, Arif B. | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Gibson, Lorna | Aitken, Zoe | Warren, Helen | Sawyer, Elinor | Tomlinson, Ian | Kerin, Michael J. | Miller, Nicola | Burwinkel, Barbara | Marme, Frederik | Schneeweiss, Andreas | Sohn, Chistof | Guénel, Pascal | Truong, Thérèse | Cordina-Duverger, Emilie | Sanchez, Marie | Bojesen, Stig E. | Nordestgaard, Børge G. | Nielsen, Sune F. | Flyger, Henrik | Benitez, Javier | Zamora, Maria Pilar | Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio | Menéndez, Primitiva | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Neuhausen, Susan L. | Brenner, Hermann | Dieffenbach, Aida Karina | Arndt, Volker | Stegmaier, Christa | Hamann, Ute | Brauch, Hiltrud | Justenhoven, Christina | Brüning, Thomas | Ko, Yon-Dschun | Nevanlinna, Heli | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Blomqvist, Carl | Khan, Sofia | Bogdanova, Natalia | Dörk, Thilo | Lindblom, Annika | Margolin, Sara | Mannermaa, Arto | Kataja, Vesa | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Hartikainen, Jaana M. | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Beesley, Jonathan | Lambrechts, Diether | Moisse, Matthieu | Floris, Guiseppe | Beuselinck, Benoit | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Rudolph, Anja | Seibold, Petra | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Radice, Paolo | Peterlongo, Paolo | Peissel, Bernard | Pensotti, Valeria | Couch, Fergus J. | Olson, Janet E. | Slettedahl, Seth | Vachon, Celine | Giles, Graham G. | Milne, Roger L. | McLean, Catriona | Haiman, Christopher A. | Henderson, Brian E. | Schumacher, Fredrick | Le Marchand, Loic | Simard, Jacques | Goldberg, Mark S. | Labrèche, France | Dumont, Martine | Kristensen, Vessela | Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker | Nord, Silje | Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise | Zheng, Wei | Deming-Halverson, Sandra | Shrubsole, Martha | Long, Jirong | Winqvist, Robert | Pylkäs, Katri | Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja | Grip, Mervi | Andrulis, Irene L. | Knight, Julia A. | Glendon, Gord | Tchatchou, Sandrine | Devilee, Peter | Tollenaar, Robertus A. E. M. | Seynaeve, Caroline M. | Van Asperen, Christi J. | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Figueroa, Jonine | Chanock, Stephen J. | Lissowska, Jolanta | Czene, Kamila | Darabi, Hatef | Eriksson, Mikael | Klevebring, Daniel | Hooning, Maartje J. | Hollestelle, Antoinette | van Deurzen, Carolien H. M. | Kriege, Mieke | Hall, Per | Li, Jingmei | Liu, Jianjun | Humphreys, Keith | Cox, Angela | Cross, Simon S. | Reed, Malcolm W. R. | Pharoah, Paul D. P. | Dunning, Alison M. | Shah, Mitul | Perkins, Barbara J. | Jakubowska, Anna | Lubinski, Jan | Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna | Durda, Katarzyna | Ashworth, Alan | Swerdlow, Anthony | Jones, Michael | Schoemaker, Minouk J. | Meindl, Alfons | Schmutzler, Rita K. | Olswold, Curtis | Slager, Susan | Toland, Amanda E. | Yannoukakos, Drakoulis | Muir, Kenneth | Lophatananon, Artitaya | Stewart-Brown, Sarah | Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep | Matsuo, Keitaro | Ito, Hidema | Iwata, Hiroji | Ishiguro, Junko | Wu, Anna H. | Tseng, Chiu-chen | Van Den Berg, David | Stram, Daniel O. | Teo, Soo Hwang | Yip, Cheng Har | Kang, Peter | Ikram, Mohammad Kamran | Shu, Xiao-Ou | Lu, Wei | Gao, Yu-Tang | Cai, Hui | Kang, Daehee | Choi, Ji-Yeob | Park, Sue K. | Noh, Dong-Young | Hartman, Mikael | Miao, Hui | Lim, Wei Yen | Lee, Soo Chin | Sangrajrang, Suleeporn | Gaborieau, Valerie | Brennan, Paul | Mckay, James | Wu, Pei-Ei | Hou, Ming-Feng | Yu, Jyh-Cherng | Shen, Chen-Yang | Blot, William | Cai, Qiuyin | Signorello, Lisa B. | Luccarini, Craig | Bayes, Caroline | Ahmed, Shahana | Maranian, Mel | Healey, Catherine S. | González-Neira, Anna | Pita, Guillermo | Alonso, M. Rosario | Álvarez, Nuria | Herrero, Daniel | Tessier, Daniel C. | Vincent, Daniel | Bacot, Francois | Hunter, David J. | Lindstrom, Sara | Dennis, Joe | Michailidou, Kyriaki | Bolla, Manjeet K. | Easton, Douglas F. | dos Santos Silva, Isabel | Fletcher, Olivia | Peto, Julian
Human Molecular Genetics  2015;24(10):2966-2984.
We recently identified a novel susceptibility variant, rs865686, for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer at 9q31.2. Here, we report a fine-mapping analysis of the 9q31.2 susceptibility locus using 43 160 cases and 42 600 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 52 studies and a further 5795 cases and 6624 controls of Asian ancestry from nine studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs676256 was most strongly associated with risk in Europeans (odds ratios [OR] = 0.90 [0.88–0.92]; P-value = 1.58 × 10−25). This SNP is one of a cluster of highly correlated variants, including rs865686, that spans ∼14.5 kb. We identified two additional independent association signals demarcated by SNPs rs10816625 (OR = 1.12 [1.08–1.17]; P-value = 7.89 × 10−09) and rs13294895 (OR = 1.09 [1.06–1.12]; P-value = 2.97 × 10−11). SNP rs10816625, but not rs13294895, was also associated with risk of breast cancer in Asian individuals (OR = 1.12 [1.06–1.18]; P-value = 2.77 × 10−05). Functional genomic annotation using data derived from breast cancer cell-line models indicates that these SNPs localise to putative enhancer elements that bind known drivers of hormone-dependent breast cancer, including ER-α, FOXA1 and GATA-3. In vitro analyses indicate that rs10816625 and rs13294895 have allele-specific effects on enhancer activity and suggest chromatin interactions with the KLF4 gene locus. These results demonstrate the power of dense genotyping in large studies to identify independent susceptibility variants. Analysis of associations using subjects with different ancestry, combined with bioinformatic and genomic characterisation, can provide strong evidence for the likely causative alleles and their functional basis.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddv035
PMCID: PMC4406292  PMID: 25652398
11.  Refined histopathological predictors of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status: a large-scale analysis of breast cancer characteristics from the BCAC, CIMBA, and ENIGMA consortia 
Spurdle, Amanda B | Couch, Fergus J | Parsons, Michael T | McGuffog, Lesley | Barrowdale, Daniel | Bolla, Manjeet K | Wang, Qin | Healey, Sue | Schmutzler, Rita Katharina | Wappenschmidt, Barbara | Rhiem, Kerstin | Hahnen, Eric | Engel, Christoph | Meindl, Alfons | Ditsch, Nina | Arnold, Norbert | Plendl, Hansjoerg | Niederacher, Dieter | Sutter, Christian | Wang-Gohrke, Shan | Steinemann, Doris | Preisler-Adams, Sabine | Kast, Karin | Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda | Ellis, Steve | Frost, Debra | Platte, Radka | Perkins, Jo | Evans, D Gareth | Izatt, Louise | Eeles, Ros | Adlard, Julian | Davidson, Rosemarie | Cole, Trevor | Scuvera, Giulietta | Manoukian, Siranoush | Bonanni, Bernardo | Mariette, Frederique | Fortuzzi, Stefano | Viel, Alessandra | Pasini, Barbara | Papi, Laura | Varesco, Liliana | Balleine, Rosemary | Nathanson, Katherine L | Domchek, Susan M | Offitt, Kenneth | Jakubowska, Anna | Lindor, Noralane | Thomassen, Mads | Jensen, Uffe Birk | Rantala, Johanna | Borg, Åke | Andrulis, Irene L | Miron, Alexander | Hansen, Thomas VO | Caldes, Trinidad | Neuhausen, Susan L | Toland, Amanda E | Nevanlinna, Heli | Montagna, Marco | Garber, Judy | Godwin, Andrew K | Osorio, Ana | Factor, Rachel E | Terry, Mary B | Rebbeck, Timothy R | Karlan, Beth Y | Southey, Melissa | Rashid, Muhammad Usman | Tung, Nadine | Pharoah, Paul DP | Blows, Fiona M | Dunning, Alison M | Provenzano, Elena | Hall, Per | Czene, Kamila | Schmidt, Marjanka K | Broeks, Annegien | Cornelissen, Sten | Verhoef, Senno | Fasching, Peter A | Beckmann, Matthias W | Ekici, Arif B | Slamon, Dennis J | Bojesen, Stig E | Nordestgaard, Børge G | Nielsen, Sune F | Flyger, Henrik | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Rudolph, Anja | Seibold, Petra | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Muranen, Taru A | Heikkilä, Päivi | Blomqvist, Carl | Figueroa, Jonine | Chanock, Stephen J | Brinton, Louise | Lissowska, Jolanta | Olson, Janet E | Pankratz, Vernon S | John, Esther M | Whittemore, Alice S | West, Dee W | Hamann, Ute | Torres, Diana | Ulmer, Hans Ulrich | Rüdiger, Thomas | Devilee, Peter | Tollenaar, Robert AEM | Seynaeve, Caroline | Van Asperen, Christi J | Eccles, Diana M | Tapper, William J | Durcan, Lorraine | Jones, Louise | Peto, Julian | dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel | Fletcher, Olivia | Johnson, Nichola | Dwek, Miriam | Swann, Ruth | Bane, Anita L | Glendon, Gord | Mulligan, Anna M | Giles, Graham G | Milne, Roger L | Baglietto, Laura | McLean, Catriona | Carpenter, Jane | Clarke, Christine | Scott, Rodney | Brauch, Hiltrud | Brüning, Thomas | Ko, Yon-Dschun | Cox, Angela | Cross, Simon S | Reed, Malcolm WR | Lubinski, Jan | Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna | Durda, Katarzyna | Gronwald, Jacek | Dörk, Thilo | Bogdanova, Natalia | Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won | Hillemanns, Peter | Haiman, Christopher A | Henderson, Brian E | Schumacher, Fredrick | Le Marchand, Loic | Burwinkel, Barbara | Marme, Frederik | Surovy, Harald | Yang, Rongxi | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Ziogas, Argyrios | Hooning, Maartje J | Collée, J Margriet | Martens, John WM | Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine MA | Brenner, Hermann | Dieffenbach, Aida Karina | Arndt, Volke | Stegmaier, Christa | Winqvist, Robert | Pylkäs, Katri | Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja | Grip, Mervi | Lindblom, Annika | Margolin, Sara | Joseph, Vijai | Robson, Mark | Rau-Murthy, Rohini | González-Neira, Anna | Arias, José Ignacio | Zamora, Pilar | Benítez, Javier | Mannermaa, Arto | Kataja, Vesa | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Hartikainen, Jaana M | Peterlongo, Paolo | Zaffaroni, Daniela | Barile, Monica | Capra, Fabio | Radice, Paolo | Teo, Soo H | Easton, Douglas F | Antoniou, Antonis C | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Goldgar, David E
Breast Cancer Research : BCR  2014;16(6):3419.
Introduction
The distribution of histopathological features of invasive breast tumors in BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation carriers differs from that of individuals with no known mutation. Histopathological features thus have utility for mutation prediction, including statistical modeling to assess pathogenicity of BRCA1 or BRCA2 variants of uncertain clinical significance. We analyzed large pathology datasets accrued by the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) to reassess histopathological predictors of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status, and provide robust likelihood ratio (LR) estimates for statistical modeling.
Methods
Selection criteria for study/center inclusion were estrogen receptor (ER) status or grade data available for invasive breast cancer diagnosed younger than 70 years. The dataset included 4,477 BRCA1 mutation carriers, 2,565 BRCA2 mutation carriers, and 47,565 BCAC breast cancer cases. Country-stratified estimates of the likelihood of mutation status by histopathological markers were derived using a Mantel-Haenszel approach.
Results
ER-positive phenotype negatively predicted BRCA1 mutation status, irrespective of grade (LRs from 0.08 to 0.90). ER-negative grade 3 histopathology was more predictive of positive BRCA1 mutation status in women 50 years or older (LR = 4.13 (3.70 to 4.62)) versus younger than 50 years (LR = 3.16 (2.96 to 3.37)). For BRCA2, ER-positive grade 3 phenotype modestly predicted positive mutation status irrespective of age (LR = 1.7-fold), whereas ER-negative grade 3 features modestly predicted positive mutation status at 50 years or older (LR = 1.54 (1.27 to 1.88)). Triple-negative tumor status was highly predictive of BRCA1 mutation status for women younger than 50 years (LR = 3.73 (3.43 to 4.05)) and 50 years or older (LR = 4.41 (3.86 to 5.04)), and modestly predictive of positive BRCA2 mutation status in women 50 years or older (LR = 1.79 (1.42 to 2.24)).
Conclusions
These results refine likelihood-ratio estimates for predicting BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status by using commonly measured histopathological features. Age at diagnosis is an important variable for most analyses, and grade is more informative than ER status for BRCA2 mutation carrier prediction. The estimates will improve BRCA1 and BRCA2 variant classification and inform patient mutation testing and clinical management.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13058-014-0474-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s13058-014-0474-y
PMCID: PMC4352262  PMID: 25857409
12.  Lymphocyte telomere length is long in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers regardless of cancer-affected status 
Background
Telomere length has been linked to risk of common diseases, including cancer, and has previously been proposed as a biomarker for cancer risk. Germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations predispose to breast, ovarian and other cancer types.
Methods
We investigated telomere length in BRCA mutation carriers and their non-carrier relatives and further examined whether telomere length is a modifier of cancer risk in mutation carriers. We measured mean telomere length in DNA extracted from whole blood using high-throughput Q-PCR. Participants were from the EMBRACE study in the UK and Eire (n=4,822) and comprised BRCA1 (n=1,628) and BRCA2 (n=1,506) mutation carriers and their non-carrier relatives (n=1,688).
Results
We find no significant evidence that mean telomere length is associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA mutation carriers. However, we find mutation carriers to have longer mean telomere length than their non-carrier relatives (all carriers vs. non-carriers, P-trend=0.0018), particularly in families with BRCA2 mutations (BRCA2 mutation carriers vs. all non-carriers, P-trend=0.0016). Our findings lend little support to the hypothesis that short mean telomere length predisposes to cancer. Conversely, our main and unexpected finding is that BRCA mutation carriers (regardless of cancer status) have longer telomeres than their non-mutation carrier, non-cancer-affected relatives. The longer telomere length in BRCA2 mutation carriers is consistent with its role in DNA damage response.
Conclusions
Overall, it appears that increased telomere length may be a consequence of these mutations, but is not itself directly related to the increased cancer risk in carriers.
Impact
The finding that mutation carriers to have longer mean telomere lengths than their non-carrier relatives is unexpected but biologically plausible and could open up new lines of research into the functions of the BRCA proteins. To our knowledge, this is the largest study of telomere length in BRCA mutation carriers and their relatives. The null cancer-risk association supports recent large prospective studies of breast and ovarian cancer and indicates that mean telomere length would not be a useful biomarker in these cancers.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0635-T
PMCID: PMC4266102  PMID: 24642354
13.  POT1 loss-of-function variants predispose to familial melanoma 
Nature genetics  2014;46(5):478-481.
Deleterious germline variants in CDKN2A account for around 40% of familial melanoma cases1, while rare variants in CDK4, BRCA2, BAP1, and the promoter of TERT, have also been linked to the disease2-5. Here we set out to identify novel high-penetrance susceptibility genes in unexplained cases by sequencing 184 melanoma patients from 105 pedigrees recruited in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and Australia that were negative for variants in known predisposition genes. We identify families where melanoma co-segregates with loss-of-function variants in the protection of telomeres 1 (POT1) gene, a proportion of members presenting with an early age of onset and multiple primaries. We show that these variants either affect POT1 mRNA splicing or alter key residues in the highly conserved oligonucleotide-/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) domains of POT1, disrupting protein-telomere binding, leading to increased telomere length. Thus, POT1 variants predispose to melanoma formation via a direct effect on telomeres.
doi:10.1038/ng.2947
PMCID: PMC4266105  PMID: 24686849
14.  MicroRNA Related Polymorphisms and Breast Cancer Risk 
Khan, Sofia | Greco, Dario | Michailidou, Kyriaki | Milne, Roger L. | Muranen, Taru A. | Heikkinen, Tuomas | Aaltonen, Kirsimari | Dennis, Joe | Bolla, Manjeet K. | Liu, Jianjun | Hall, Per | Irwanto, Astrid | Humphreys, Keith | Li, Jingmei | Czene, Kamila | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Hein, Rebecca | Rudolph, Anja | Seibold, Petra | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Fletcher, Olivia | Peto, Julian | dos Santos Silva, Isabel | Johnson, Nichola | Gibson, Lorna | Aitken, Zoe | Hopper, John L. | Tsimiklis, Helen | Bui, Minh | Makalic, Enes | Schmidt, Daniel F. | Southey, Melissa C. | Apicella, Carmel | Stone, Jennifer | Waisfisz, Quinten | Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne | Adank, Muriel A. | van der Luijt, Rob B. | Meindl, Alfons | Schmutzler, Rita K. | Müller-Myhsok, Bertram | Lichtner, Peter | Turnbull, Clare | Rahman, Nazneen | Chanock, Stephen J. | Hunter, David J. | Cox, Angela | Cross, Simon S. | Reed, Malcolm W. R. | Schmidt, Marjanka K. | Broeks, Annegien | Veer, Laura J. V. a. n't. | Hogervorst, Frans B. | Fasching, Peter A. | Schrauder, Michael G. | Ekici, Arif B. | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Bojesen, Stig E. | Nordestgaard, Børge G. | Nielsen, Sune F. | Flyger, Henrik | Benitez, Javier | Zamora, Pilar M. | Perez, Jose I. A. | Haiman, Christopher A. | Henderson, Brian E. | Schumacher, Fredrick | Le Marchand, Loic | Pharoah, Paul D. P. | Dunning, Alison M. | Shah, Mitul | Luben, Robert | Brown, Judith | Couch, Fergus J. | Wang, Xianshu | Vachon, Celine | Olson, Janet E. | Lambrechts, Diether | Moisse, Matthieu | Paridaens, Robert | Christiaens, Marie-Rose | Guénel, Pascal | Truong, Thérèse | Laurent-Puig, Pierre | Mulot, Claire | Marme, Frederick | Burwinkel, Barbara | Schneeweiss, Andreas | Sohn, Christof | Sawyer, Elinor J. | Tomlinson, Ian | Kerin, Michael J. | Miller, Nicola | Andrulis, Irene L. | Knight, Julia A. | Tchatchou, Sandrine | Mulligan, Anna Marie | Dörk, Thilo | Bogdanova, Natalia V. | Antonenkova, Natalia N. | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Darabi, Hatef | Eriksson, Mikael | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Figueroa, Jonine | Lissowska, Jolanta | Brinton, Louise | Devilee, Peter | Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M. | Seynaeve, Caroline | van Asperen, Christi J. | Kristensen, Vessela N. | Slager, Susan | Toland, Amanda E. | Ambrosone, Christine B. | Yannoukakos, Drakoulis | Lindblom, Annika | Margolin, Sara | Radice, Paolo | Peterlongo, Paolo | Barile, Monica | Mariani, Paolo | Hooning, Maartje J. | Martens, John W. M. | Collée, J. Margriet | Jager, Agnes | Jakubowska, Anna | Lubinski, Jan | Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna | Durda, Katarzyna | Giles, Graham G. | McLean, Catriona | Brauch, Hiltrud | Brüning, Thomas | Ko, Yon-Dschun | Brenner, Hermann | Dieffenbach, Aida Karina | Arndt, Volker | Stegmaier, Christa | Swerdlow, Anthony | Ashworth, Alan | Orr, Nick | Jones, Michael | Simard, Jacques | Goldberg, Mark S. | Labrèche, France | Dumont, Martine | Winqvist, Robert | Pylkäs, Katri | Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja | Grip, Mervi | Kataja, Vesa | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Hartikainen, Jaana M. | Mannermaa, Arto | Hamann, Ute | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Blomqvist, Carl | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Easton, Douglas F. | Nevanlinna, Heli
PLoS ONE  2014;9(11):e109973.
Genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in microRNAs (miRNA) or in the miRNA binding sites may affect the miRNA dependent gene expression regulation, which has been implicated in various cancers, including breast cancer, and may alter individual susceptibility to cancer. We investigated associations between miRNA related SNPs and breast cancer risk. First we evaluated 2,196 SNPs in a case-control study combining nine genome wide association studies (GWAS). Second, we further investigated 42 SNPs with suggestive evidence for association using 41,785 cases and 41,880 controls from 41 studies included in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Combining the GWAS and BCAC data within a meta-analysis, we estimated main effects on breast cancer risk as well as risks for estrogen receptor (ER) and age defined subgroups. Five miRNA binding site SNPs associated significantly with breast cancer risk: rs1045494 (odds ratio (OR) 0.92; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88–0.96), rs1052532 (OR 0.97; 95% CI: 0.95–0.99), rs10719 (OR 0.97; 95% CI: 0.94–0.99), rs4687554 (OR 0.97; 95% CI: 0.95–0.99, and rs3134615 (OR 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01–1.05) located in the 3′ UTR of CASP8, HDDC3, DROSHA, MUSTN1, and MYCL1, respectively. DROSHA belongs to miRNA machinery genes and has a central role in initial miRNA processing. The remaining genes are involved in different molecular functions, including apoptosis and gene expression regulation. Further studies are warranted to elucidate whether the miRNA binding site SNPs are the causative variants for the observed risk effects.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0109973
PMCID: PMC4229095  PMID: 25390939
15.  Fine-mapping of the HNF1B multicancer locus identifies candidate variants that mediate endometrial cancer risk 
Painter, Jodie N. | O'Mara, Tracy A. | Batra, Jyotsna | Cheng, Timothy | Lose, Felicity A. | Dennis, Joe | Michailidou, Kyriaki | Tyrer, Jonathan P. | Ahmed, Shahana | Ferguson, Kaltin | Healey, Catherine S. | Kaufmann, Susanne | Hillman, Kristine M. | Walpole, Carina | Moya, Leire | Pollock, Pamela | Jones, Angela | Howarth, Kimberley | Martin, Lynn | Gorman, Maggie | Hodgson, Shirley | De Polanco, Ma. Magdalena Echeverry | Sans, Monica | Carracedo, Angel | Castellvi-Bel, Sergi | Rojas-Martinez, Augusto | Santos, Erika | Teixeira, Manuel R. | Carvajal-Carmona, Luis | Shu, Xiao-Ou | Long, Jirong | Zheng, Wei | Xiang, Yong-Bing | Montgomery, Grant W. | Webb, Penelope M. | Scott, Rodney J. | McEvoy, Mark | Attia, John | Holliday, Elizabeth | Martin, Nicholas G. | Nyholt, Dale R. | Henders, Anjali K. | Fasching, Peter A. | Hein, Alexander | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Renner, Stefan P. | Dörk, Thilo | Hillemanns, Peter | Dürst, Matthias | Runnebaum, Ingo | Lambrechts, Diether | Coenegrachts, Lieve | Schrauwen, Stefanie | Amant, Frederic | Winterhoff, Boris | Dowdy, Sean C. | Goode, Ellen L. | Teoman, Attila | Salvesen, Helga B. | Trovik, Jone | Njolstad, Tormund S. | Werner, Henrica M.J. | Ashton, Katie | Proietto, Tony | Otton, Geoffrey | Tzortzatos, Gerasimos | Mints, Miriam | Tham, Emma | Hall, Per | Czene, Kamila | Liu, Jianjun | Li, Jingmei | Hopper, John L. | Southey, Melissa C. | Ekici, Arif B. | Ruebner, Matthias | Johnson, Nicola | Peto, Julian | Burwinkel, Barbara | Marme, Frederik | Brenner, Hermann | Dieffenbach, Aida K. | Meindl, Alfons | Brauch, Hiltrud | Lindblom, Annika | Depreeuw, Jeroen | Moisse, Matthieu | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Rudolph, Anja | Couch, Fergus J. | Olson, Janet E. | Giles, Graham G. | Bruinsma, Fiona | Cunningham, Julie M. | Fridley, Brooke L. | Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise | Kristensen, Vessela N. | Cox, Angela | Swerdlow, Anthony J. | Orr, Nicholas | Bolla, Manjeet K. | Wang, Qin | Weber, Rachel Palmieri | Chen, Zhihua | Shah, Mitul | French, Juliet D. | Pharoah, Paul D.P. | Dunning, Alison M. | Tomlinson, Ian | Easton, Douglas F. | Edwards, Stacey L. | Thompson, Deborah J. | Spurdle, Amanda B.
Human Molecular Genetics  2014;24(5):1478-1492.
Common variants in the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox B (HNF1B) gene are associated with the risk of Type II diabetes and multiple cancers. Evidence to date indicates that cancer risk may be mediated via genetic or epigenetic effects on HNF1B gene expression. We previously found single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the HNF1B locus to be associated with endometrial cancer, and now report extensive fine-mapping and in silico and laboratory analyses of this locus. Analysis of 1184 genotyped and imputed SNPs in 6608 Caucasian cases and 37 925 controls, and 895 Asian cases and 1968 controls, revealed the best signal of association for SNP rs11263763 (P = 8.4 × 10−14, odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval = 0.82–0.89), located within HNF1B intron 1. Haplotype analysis and conditional analyses provide no evidence of further independent endometrial cancer risk variants at this locus. SNP rs11263763 genotype was associated with HNF1B mRNA expression but not with HNF1B methylation in endometrial tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Genetic analyses prioritized rs11263763 and four other SNPs in high-to-moderate linkage disequilibrium as the most likely causal SNPs. Three of these SNPs map to the extended HNF1B promoter based on chromatin marks extending from the minimal promoter region. Reporter assays demonstrated that this extended region reduces activity in combination with the minimal HNF1B promoter, and that the minor alleles of rs11263763 or rs8064454 are associated with decreased HNF1B promoter activity. Our findings provide evidence for a single signal associated with endometrial cancer risk at the HNF1B locus, and that risk is likely mediated via altered HNF1B gene expression.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddu552
PMCID: PMC4321445  PMID: 25378557
16.  Fine-mapping identifies multiple prostate cancer risk loci at 5p15, one of which associates with TERT expression 
Kote-Jarai, Zsofia | Saunders, Edward J. | Leongamornlert, Daniel A. | Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata | Dadaev, Tokhir | Jugurnauth-Little, Sarah | Ross-Adams, Helen | Al Olama, Ali Amin | Benlloch, Sara | Halim, Silvia | Russell, Roslin | Dunning, Alison M. | Luccarini, Craig | Dennis, Joe | Neal, David E. | Hamdy, Freddie C. | Donovan, Jenny L. | Muir, Ken | Giles, Graham G. | Severi, Gianluca | Wiklund, Fredrik | Gronberg, Henrik | Haiman, Christopher A. | Schumacher, Fredrick | Henderson, Brian E. | Le Marchand, Loic | Lindstrom, Sara | Kraft, Peter | Hunter, David J. | Gapstur, Susan | Chanock, Stephen | Berndt, Sonja I. | Albanes, Demetrius | Andriole, Gerald | Schleutker, Johanna | Weischer, Maren | Canzian, Federico | Riboli, Elio | Key, Tim J. | Travis, Ruth C. | Campa, Daniele | Ingles, Sue A. | John, Esther M. | Hayes, Richard B. | Pharoah, Paul | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Stanford, Janet L. | Ostrander, Elaine A. | Signorello, Lisa B. | Thibodeau, Stephen N. | Schaid, Dan | Maier, Christiane | Vogel, Walther | Kibel, Adam S. | Cybulski, Cezary | Lubinski, Jan | Cannon-Albright, Lisa | Brenner, Hermann | Park, Jong Y. | Kaneva, Radka | Batra, Jyotsna | Spurdle, Amanda | Clements, Judith A. | Teixeira, Manuel R. | Govindasami, Koveela | Guy, Michelle | Wilkinson, Rosemary A. | Sawyer, Emma J. | Morgan, Angela | Dicks, Ed | Baynes, Caroline | Conroy, Don | Bojensen, Stig E. | Kaaks, Rudolf | Vincent, Daniel | Bacot, François | Tessier, Daniel C. | Easton, Douglas F. | Eeles, Rosalind A.
Human Molecular Genetics  2013;22(20):4239.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddt334
PMCID: PMC3871151
17.  The Effect on Melanoma Risk of Genes Previously Associated With Telomere Length 
Telomere length has been associated with risk of many cancers, but results are inconsistent. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously associated with mean leukocyte telomere length were either genotyped or well-imputed in 11108 case patients and 13933 control patients from Europe, Israel, the United States and Australia, four of the seven SNPs reached a P value under .05 (two-sided). A genetic score that predicts telomere length, derived from these seven SNPs, is strongly associated (P = 8.92x10-9, two-sided) with melanoma risk. This demonstrates that the previously observed association between longer telomere length and increased melanoma risk is not attributable to confounding via shared environmental effects (such as ultraviolet exposure) or reverse causality. We provide the first proof that multiple germline genetic determinants of telomere length influence cancer risk.
doi:10.1093/jnci/dju267
PMCID: PMC4196080  PMID: 25231748
18.  Confirmation of 5p12 as a susceptibility locus for progesterone-receptor-positive, lower grade breast cancer 
Milne, Roger L. | Goode, Ellen L. | García-Closas, Montserrat | Couch, Fergus J. | Severi, Gianluca | Hein, Rebecca | Fredericksen, Zachary | Malats, Núria | Zamora, M. Pilar | Pérez, Jose Ignacio Arias | Benítez, Javier | Dörk, Thilo | Schürmann, Peter | Karstens, Johann H. | Hillemanns, Peter | Cox, Angela | Brock, Ian W. | Elliot, Graeme | Cross, Simon S. | Seal, Sheila | Turnbull, Clare | Renwick, Anthony | Rahman, Nazneen | Shen, Chen-Yang | Yu, Jyh-Cherng | Huang, Chiun-Sheng | Hou, Ming-Feng | Nordestgaard, Børge G. | Bojesen, Stig E. | Lanng, Charlotte | Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker | Kristensen, Vessela | Børrensen-Dale, Anne-Lise | Hopper, John L. | Dite, Gillian S. | Apicella, Carmel | Southey, Melissa C. | Lambrechts, Diether | Yesilyurt, Betül T. | Floris, Giuseppe | Leunen, Karin | Sangrajrang, Suleeporn | Gaborieau, Valerie | Brennan, Paul | McKay, James | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Wang-Gohrke, Shan | Radice, Paolo | Peterlongo, Paolo | Manoukian, Siranoush | Barile, Monica | Giles, Graham G. | Baglietto, Laura | John, Esther M. | Miron, Alexander | Chanock, Stephen J. | Lissowska, Jolanta | Sherman, Mark E. | Figueroa, Jonine D. | Bogdanova, Natalia V. | Antonenkova, Natalia N. | Zalutsky, Iosif V. | Rogov, Yuri I. | Fasching, Peter A. | Bayer, Christian M. | Ekici, Arif B. | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Brenner, Hermann | Müller, Heiko | Arndt, Volker | Stegmaier, Christa | Andrulis, Irene L. | Knight, Julia A. | Glendon, Gord | Mulligan, Anna Marie | Mannermaa, Arto | Kataja, Vesa | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Hartikainen, Jaana M. | Meindl, Alfons | Heil, Joerg | Bartram, Claus R. | Schmutzler, Rita K. | Thomas, Gilles D. | Hoover, Robert N. | Fletcher, Olivia | Gibson, Lorna J. | Silva, Isabel dos Santos | Peto, Julian | Nickels, Stefan | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Ziogas, Argyrios | Sawyer, Elinor | Tomlinson, Ian | Kerin, Michael | Miller, Nicola | Schmidt, Marjanka K. | Broeks, Annegien | Van ‘t Veer, Laura J. | Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M. | Pharoah, Paul D.P. | Dunning, Alison M. | Pooley, Karen A. | Marme, Frederik | Schneeweiss, Andreas | Sohn, Christof | Burwinkel, Barbara | Jakubowska, Anna | Lubinski, Jan | Jaworska, Katarzyna | Durda, Katarzyna | Kang, Daehee | Yoo, Keun-Young | Noh, Dong-Young | Ahn, Sei-Hyun | Hunter, David J. | Hankinson, Susan E. | Kraft, Peter | Lindstrom, Sara | Chen, Xiaoqing | Beesley, Jonathan | Hamann, Ute | Harth, Volker | Justenhoven, Christina | Winqvist, Robert | Pylkäs, Katri | Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja | Grip, Mervi | Hooning, Maartje | Hollestelle, Antoinette | Oldenburg, Rogier A. | Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine | Khusnutdinova, Elza | Bermisheva, Marina | Prokofieva, Darya | Farahtdinova, Albina | Olson, Janet E. | Wang, Xianshu | Humphreys, Manjeet K. | Wang, Qin | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Easton, Douglas F.
Background
The single nucleotide polymorphism 5p12-rs10941679has been found to be associated with risk of breast cancer, particularly estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease. We aimed to further explore this association overall, and by tumor histopathology, in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.
Methods
Data were combined from 37 studies, including 40,972 invasive cases, 1,398 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and 46,334 controls, all of white European ancestry, as well as 3,007 invasive cases and 2,337 controls of Asian ancestry. Associations overall and by tumor invasiveness and histopathology were assessed using logistic regression.
Results
For white Europeans, the per-allele odds ratio (OR) associated with 5p12-rs10941679 was 1.11 (95% confidence interval [CI] =1.08–1.14, P=7×10−18) for invasive breast cancer and 1.10 (95%CI=1.01–1.21, P=0.03) for DCIS. For Asian women, the estimated OR for invasive disease was similar (OR=1.07, 95%CI=0.99–1.15, P=0.09). Further analyses suggested that the association in white Europeans was largely limited to progesterone receptor (PR)-positive disease (per-allele OR=1.16, 95%CI=1.12–1.20, P=1×10−18 versus OR=1.03, 95%CI=0.99–1.07, P=0.2 for PR-negative disease; P-heterogeneity=2×10−7); heterogeneity by estrogen receptor status was not observed (P=0.2) once PR status was accounted for. The association was also stronger for lower-grade tumors (per-allele OR [95%CI]=1.20 [1.14–1.25], 1.13 [1.09–1.16] and 1.04 [0.99–1.08] for grade 1, 2 and 3/4, respectively; P–trend=5×10−7).
Conclusion
5p12 is a breast cancer susceptibility locus for PR-positive, lower gradebreast cancer.
Impact
Multi-centre fine-mapping studies of this region are needed as a first step to identifying the causal variant or variants.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-11-0569
PMCID: PMC4164116  PMID: 21795498
Breast cancer; SNP; susceptibility; disease subtypes
19.  Common non-synonymous SNPs associated with breast cancer susceptibility: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium 
Milne, Roger L. | Burwinkel, Barbara | Michailidou, Kyriaki | Arias-Perez, Jose-Ignacio | Zamora, M. Pilar | Menéndez-Rodríguez, Primitiva | Hardisson, David | Mendiola, Marta | González-Neira, Anna | Pita, Guillermo | Alonso, M. Rosario | Dennis, Joe | Wang, Qin | Bolla, Manjeet K. | Swerdlow, Anthony | Ashworth, Alan | Orr, Nick | Schoemaker, Minouk | Ko, Yon-Dschun | Brauch, Hiltrud | Hamann, Ute | Andrulis, Irene L. | Knight, Julia A. | Glendon, Gord | Tchatchou, Sandrine | Matsuo, Keitaro | Ito, Hidemi | Iwata, Hiroji | Tajima, Kazuo | Li, Jingmei | Brand, Judith S. | Brenner, Hermann | Dieffenbach, Aida Karina | Arndt, Volker | Stegmaier, Christa | Lambrechts, Diether | Peuteman, Gilian | Christiaens, Marie-Rose | Smeets, Ann | Jakubowska, Anna | Lubinski, Jan | Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna | Durda, Katazyna | Hartman, Mikael | Hui, Miao | Yen Lim, Wei | Wan Chan, Ching | Marme, Federick | Yang, Rongxi | Bugert, Peter | Lindblom, Annika | Margolin, Sara | García-Closas, Montserrat | Chanock, Stephen J. | Lissowska, Jolanta | Figueroa, Jonine D. | Bojesen, Stig E. | Nordestgaard, Børge G. | Flyger, Henrik | Hooning, Maartje J. | Kriege, Mieke | van den Ouweland, Ans M.W. | Koppert, Linetta B. | Fletcher, Olivia | Johnson, Nichola | dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel | Peto, Julian | Zheng, Wei | Deming-Halverson, Sandra | Shrubsole, Martha J. | Long, Jirong | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Rudolph, Anja | Seibold, Petra | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Winqvist, Robert | Pylkäs, Katri | Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja | Grip, Mervi | Cox, Angela | Cross, Simon S. | Reed, Malcolm W.R. | Schmidt, Marjanka K. | Broeks, Annegien | Cornelissen, Sten | Braaf, Linde | Kang, Daehee | Choi, Ji-Yeob | Park, Sue K. | Noh, Dong-Young | Simard, Jacques | Dumont, Martine | Goldberg, Mark S. | Labrèche, France | Fasching, Peter A. | Hein, Alexander | Ekici, Arif B. | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Radice, Paolo | Peterlongo, Paolo | Azzollini, Jacopo | Barile, Monica | Sawyer, Elinor | Tomlinson, Ian | Kerin, Michael | Miller, Nicola | Hopper, John L. | Schmidt, Daniel F. | Makalic, Enes | Southey, Melissa C. | Hwang Teo, Soo | Har Yip, Cheng | Sivanandan, Kavitta | Tay, Wan-Ting | Shen, Chen-Yang | Hsiung, Chia-Ni | Yu, Jyh-Cherng | Hou, Ming-Feng | Guénel, Pascal | Truong, Therese | Sanchez, Marie | Mulot, Claire | Blot, William | Cai, Qiuyin | Nevanlinna, Heli | Muranen, Taru A. | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Blomqvist, Carl | Wu, Anna H. | Tseng, Chiu-Chen | Van Den Berg, David | Stram, Daniel O. | Bogdanova, Natalia | Dörk, Thilo | Muir, Kenneth | Lophatananon, Artitaya | Stewart-Brown, Sarah | Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep | Mannermaa, Arto | Kataja, Vesa | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Hartikainen, Jaana M. | Shu, Xiao-Ou | Lu, Wei | Gao, Yu-Tang | Zhang, Ben | Couch, Fergus J. | Toland, Amanda E. | Yannoukakos, Drakoulis | Sangrajrang, Suleeporn | McKay, James | Wang, Xianshu | Olson, Janet E. | Vachon, Celine | Purrington, Kristen | Severi, Gianluca | Baglietto, Laura | Haiman, Christopher A. | Henderson, Brian E. | Schumacher, Fredrick | Le Marchand, Loic | Devilee, Peter | Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M. | Seynaeve, Caroline | Czene, Kamila | Eriksson, Mikael | Humphreys, Keith | Darabi, Hatef | Ahmed, Shahana | Shah, Mitul | Pharoah, Paul D.P. | Hall, Per | Giles, Graham G. | Benítez, Javier | Dunning, Alison M. | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Easton, Douglas F. | Berchuck, Andrew | Eeles, Rosalind A. | Olama, Ali Amin Al | Kote-Jarai, Zsofia | Benlloch, Sara | Antoniou, Antonis | McGuffog, Lesley | Offit, Ken | Lee, Andrew | Dicks, Ed | Luccarini, Craig | Tessier, Daniel C. | Bacot, Francois | Vincent, Daniel | LaBoissière, Sylvie | Robidoux, Frederic | Nielsen, Sune F. | Cunningham, Julie M. | Windebank, Sharon A. | Hilker, Christopher A. | Meyer, Jeffrey | Angelakos, Maggie | Maskiell, Judi | van der Schoot, Ellen | Rutgers, Emiel | Verhoef, Senno | Hogervorst, Frans | Boonyawongviroj, Prat | Siriwanarungsan, Pornthep | Schrauder, Michael | Rübner, Matthias | Oeser, Sonja | Landrith, Silke | Williams, Eileen | Ryder-Mills, Elaine | Sargus, Kara | McInerney, Niall | Colleran, Gabrielle | Rowan, Andrew | Jones, Angela | Sohn, Christof | Schneeweiß, Andeas | Bugert, Peter | Álvarez, Núria | Lacey, James | Wang, Sophia | Ma, Huiyan | Lu, Yani | Deapen, Dennis | Pinder, Rich | Lee, Eunjung | Schumacher, Fred | Horn-Ross, Pam | Reynolds, Peggy | Nelson, David | Ziegler, Hartwig | Wolf, Sonja | Hermann, Volker | Lo, Wing-Yee | Justenhoven, Christina | Baisch, Christian | Fischer, Hans-Peter | Brüning, Thomas | Pesch, Beate | Rabstein, Sylvia | Lotz, Anne | Harth, Volker | Heikkinen, Tuomas | Erkkilä, Irja | Aaltonen, Kirsimari | von Smitten, Karl | Antonenkova, Natalia | Hillemanns, Peter | Christiansen, Hans | Myöhänen, Eija | Kemiläinen, Helena | Thorne, Heather | Niedermayr, Eveline | Bowtell, D | Chenevix-Trench, G | deFazio, A | Gertig, D | Green, A | Webb, P | Green, A. | Parsons, P. | Hayward, N. | Webb, P. | Whiteman, D. | Fung, Annie | Yashiki, June | Peuteman, Gilian | Smeets, Dominiek | Brussel, Thomas Van | Corthouts, Kathleen | Obi, Nadia | Heinz, Judith | Behrens, Sabine | Eilber, Ursula | Celik, Muhabbet | Olchers, Til | Manoukian, Siranoush | Peissel, Bernard | Scuvera, Giulietta | Zaffaroni, Daniela | Bonanni, Bernardo | Feroce, Irene | Maniscalco, Angela | Rossi, Alessandra | Bernard, Loris | Tranchant, Martine | Valois, Marie-France | Turgeon, Annie | Heguy, Lea | Sze Yee, Phuah | Kang, Peter | Nee, Kang In | Mariapun, Shivaani | Sook-Yee, Yoon | Lee, Daphne | Ching, Teh Yew | Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd | Otsukka, Meeri | Mononen, Kari | Selander, Teresa | Weerasooriya, Nayana | staff, OFBCR | Krol-Warmerdam, E. | Molenaar, J. | Blom, J. | Brinton, Louise | Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila | Peplonska, Beata | Zatonski, Witold | Chao, Pei | Stagner, Michael | Bos, Petra | Blom, Jannet | Crepin, Ellen | Nieuwlaat, Anja | Heemskerk, Annette | Higham, Sue | Cross, Simon | Cramp, Helen | Connley, Dan | Balasubramanian, Sabapathy | Brock, Ian | Luccarini, Craig | Conroy, Don | Baynes, Caroline | Chua, Kimberley
Human Molecular Genetics  2014;23(22):6096-6111.
Candidate variant association studies have been largely unsuccessful in identifying common breast cancer susceptibility variants, although most studies have been underpowered to detect associations of a realistic magnitude. We assessed 41 common non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) for which evidence of association with breast cancer risk had been previously reported. Case-control data were combined from 38 studies of white European women (46 450 cases and 42 600 controls) and analyzed using unconditional logistic regression. Strong evidence of association was observed for three nsSNPs: ATXN7-K264R at 3p21 [rs1053338, per allele OR = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04–1.10, P = 2.9 × 10−6], AKAP9-M463I at 7q21 (rs6964587, OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.03–1.07, P = 1.7 × 10−6) and NEK10-L513S at 3p24 (rs10510592, OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.07–1.12, P = 5.1 × 10−17). The first two associations reached genome-wide statistical significance in a combined analysis of available data, including independent data from nine genome-wide association studies (GWASs): for ATXN7-K264R, OR = 1.07 (95% CI = 1.05–1.10, P = 1.0 × 10−8); for AKAP9-M463I, OR = 1.05 (95% CI = 1.04–1.07, P = 2.0 × 10−10). Further analysis of other common variants in these two regions suggested that intronic SNPs nearby are more strongly associated with disease risk. We have thus identified a novel susceptibility locus at 3p21, and confirmed previous suggestive evidence that rs6964587 at 7q21 is associated with risk. The third locus, rs10510592, is located in an established breast cancer susceptibility region; the association was substantially attenuated after adjustment for the known GWAS hit. Thus, each of the associated nsSNPs is likely to be a marker for another, non-coding, variant causally related to breast cancer risk. Further fine-mapping and functional studies are required to identify the underlying risk-modifying variants and the genes through which they act.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddu311
PMCID: PMC4204770  PMID: 24943594
20.  Common genetic determinants of breast-cancer risk in East Asian women: a collaborative study of 23 637 breast cancer cases and 25 579 controls 
Human Molecular Genetics  2013;22(12):2539-2550.
In a consortium including 23 637 breast cancer patients and 25 579 controls of East Asian ancestry, we investigated 70 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 67 independent breast cancer susceptibility loci recently identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs) conducted primarily in European-ancestry populations. SNPs in 31 loci showed an association with breast cancer risk at P < 0.05 in a direction consistent with that reported previously. Twenty-one of them remained statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons with the Bonferroni-corrected significance level of <0.0015. Eight of the 70 SNPs showed a significantly different association with breast cancer risk by estrogen receptor (ER) status at P < 0.05. With the exception of rs2046210 at 6q25.1, the seven other SNPs showed a stronger association with ER-positive than ER-negative cancer. This study replicated all five genetic risk variants initially identified in Asians and provided evidence for associations of breast cancer risk in the East Asian population with nearly half of the genetic risk variants initially reported in GWASs conducted in European descendants. Taken together, these common genetic risk variants explain ∼10% of excess familial risk of breast cancer in Asian populations.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddt089
PMCID: PMC3658167  PMID: 23535825
21.  Identification of New Genetic Susceptibility Loci for Breast Cancer Through Consideration of Gene-Environment Interactions 
Schoeps, Anja | Rudolph, Anja | Seibold, Petra | Dunning, Alison M. | Milne, Roger L. | Bojesen, Stig E. | Swerdlow, Anthony | Andrulis, Irene | Brenner, Hermann | Behrens, Sabine | Orr, Nicholas | Jones, Michael | Ashworth, Alan | Li, Jingmei | Cramp, Helen | Connley, Dan | Czene, Kamila | Darabi, Hatef | Chanock, Stephen J. | Lissowska, Jolanta | Figueroa, Jonine D. | Knight, Julia | Glendon, Gord | Mulligan, Anna M. | Dumont, Martine | Severi, Gianluca | Baglietto, Laura | Olson, Janet | Vachon, Celine | Purrington, Kristen | Moisse, Matthieu | Neven, Patrick | Wildiers, Hans | Spurdle, Amanda | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Kataja, Vesa | Hartikainen, Jaana M. | Hamann, Ute | Ko, Yon-Dschun | Dieffenbach, Aida K. | Arndt, Volker | Stegmaier, Christa | Malats, Núria | Arias Perez, JoséI. | Benítez, Javier | Flyger, Henrik | Nordestgaard, Børge G. | Truong, Théresè | Cordina-Duverger, Emilie | Menegaux, Florence | Silva, Isabel dos Santos | Fletcher, Olivia | Johnson, Nichola | Häberle, Lothar | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Ekici, Arif B. | Braaf, Linde | Atsma, Femke | van den Broek, Alexandra J. | Makalic, Enes | Schmidt, Daniel F. | Southey, Melissa C. | Cox, Angela | Simard, Jacques | Giles, Graham G. | Lambrechts, Diether | Mannermaa, Arto | Brauch, Hiltrud | Guénel, Pascal | Peto, Julian | Fasching, Peter A. | Hopper, John | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Couch, Fergus | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Pharoah, Paul D. P. | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Schmidt, Marjanka K. | Hall, Per | Easton, Douglas F. | Chang-Claude, Jenny
Genetic epidemiology  2013;38(1):84-93.
Genes that alter disease risk only in combination with certain environmental exposures may not be detected in genetic association analysis. By using methods accounting for gene-environment (G × E) interaction, we aimed to identify novel genetic loci associated with breast cancer risk. Up to 34,475 cases and 34,786 controls of European ancestry from up to 23 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were included. Overall, 71,527 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), enriched for association with breast cancer, were tested for interaction with 10 environmental risk factors using three recently proposed hybrid methods and a joint test of association and interaction. Analyses were adjusted for age, study, population stratification, and confounding factors as applicable. Three SNPs in two independent loci showed statistically significant association: SNPs rs10483028 and rs2242714 in perfect linkage disequilibrium on chromosome 21 and rs12197388 in ARID1B on chromosome 6. While rs12197388 was identified using the joint test with parity and with age at menarche (P-values = 3 × 10−07), the variants on chromosome 21 q22.12, which showed interaction with adult body mass index (BMI) in 8,891 postmenopausal women, were identified by all methods applied. SNP rs10483028 was associated with breast cancer in women with a BMI below 25 kg/m2 (OR = 1.26, 95% CI 1.15–1.38) but not in women with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or higher (OR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.72–1.11, P for interaction = 3.2 × 10−05). Our findings confirm comparable power of the recent methods for detecting G × E interaction and the utility of using G × E interaction analyses to identify new susceptibility loci.
doi:10.1002/gepi.21771
PMCID: PMC3995140  PMID: 24248812
breast cancer risk; gene-environment interaction; polymorphisms; body mass index; case-control study
22.  Genetic Predisposition to In Situ and Invasive Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast 
Sawyer, Elinor | Roylance, Rebecca | Petridis, Christos | Brook, Mark N. | Nowinski, Salpie | Papouli, Efterpi | Fletcher, Olivia | Pinder, Sarah | Hanby, Andrew | Kohut, Kelly | Gorman, Patricia | Caneppele, Michele | Peto, Julian | dos Santos Silva, Isabel | Johnson, Nichola | Swann, Ruth | Dwek, Miriam | Perkins, Katherine-Anne | Gillett, Cheryl | Houlston, Richard | Ross, Gillian | De Ieso, Paolo | Southey, Melissa C. | Hopper, John L. | Provenzano, Elena | Apicella, Carmel | Wesseling, Jelle | Cornelissen, Sten | Keeman, Renske | Fasching, Peter A. | Jud, Sebastian M. | Ekici, Arif B. | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Kerin, Michael J. | Marme, Federick | Schneeweiss, Andreas | Sohn, Christof | Burwinkel, Barbara | Guénel, Pascal | Truong, Therese | Laurent-Puig, Pierre | Kerbrat, Pierre | Bojesen, Stig E. | Nordestgaard, Børge G. | Nielsen, Sune F. | Flyger, Henrik | Milne, Roger L. | Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias | Menéndez, Primitiva | Benitez, Javier | Brenner, Hermann | Dieffenbach, Aida Karina | Arndt, Volker | Stegmaier, Christa | Meindl, Alfons | Lichtner, Peter | Schmutzler, Rita K. | Lochmann, Magdalena | Brauch, Hiltrud | Fischer, Hans-Peter | Ko, Yon-Dschun | Nevanlinna, Heli | Muranen, Taru A. | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Blomqvist, Carl | Bogdanova, Natalia V. | Dörk, Thilo | Lindblom, Annika | Margolin, Sara | Mannermaa, Arto | Kataja, Vesa | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Hartikainen, Jaana M. | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Investigators, kConFab | Lambrechts, Diether | Weltens, Caroline | Van Limbergen, Erik | Hatse, Sigrid | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Rudolph, Anja | Seibold, Petra | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Radice, Paolo | Peterlongo, Paolo | Bonanni, Bernardo | Volorio, Sara | Giles, Graham G. | Severi, Gianluca | Baglietto, Laura | Mclean, Catriona A. | Haiman, Christopher A. | Henderson, Brian E. | Schumacher, Fredrick | Le Marchand, Loic | Simard, Jacques | Goldberg, Mark S. | Labrèche, France | Dumont, Martine | Kristensen, Vessela | Winqvist, Robert | Pylkäs, Katri | Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja | Kauppila, Saila | Andrulis, Irene L. | Knight, Julia A. | Glendon, Gord | Mulligan, Anna Marie | Devillee, Peter | Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M. | Seynaeve, Caroline M. | Kriege, Mieke | Figueroa, Jonine | Chanock, Stephen J. | Sherman, Mark E. | Hooning, Maartje J. | Hollestelle, Antoinette | van den Ouweland, Ans M. W. | van Deurzen, Carolien H. M. | Li, Jingmei | Czene, Kamila | Humphreys, Keith | Cox, Angela | Cross, Simon S. | Reed, Malcolm W. R. | Shah, Mitul | Jakubowska, Anna | Lubinski, Jan | Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna | Durda, Katarzyna | Swerdlow, Anthony | Ashworth, Alan | Orr, Nicholas | Schoemaker, Minouk | Couch, Fergus J. | Hallberg, Emily | González-Neira, Anna | Pita, Guillermo | Alonso, M. Rosario | Tessier, Daniel C. | Vincent, Daniel | Bacot, Francois | Bolla, Manjeet K. | Wang, Qin | Dennis, Joe | Michailidou, Kyriaki | Dunning, Alison M. | Hall, Per | Easton, Doug | Pharoah, Paul | Schmidt, Marjanka K. | Tomlinson, Ian | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat
PLoS Genetics  2014;10(4):e1004285.
Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) accounts for 10–15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+) and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to breast cancer, but these studies included predominantly ductal (IDC) carcinomas. To identify novel common polymorphisms that predispose to ILC and LCIS, we pooled data from 6,023 cases (5,622 ILC, 401 pure LCIS) and 34,271 controls from 36 studies genotyped using the iCOGS chip. Six novel SNPs most strongly associated with ILC/LCIS in the pooled analysis were genotyped in a further 516 lobular cases (482 ILC, 36 LCIS) and 1,467 controls. These analyses identified a lobular-specific SNP at 7q34 (rs11977670, OR (95%CI) for ILC = 1.13 (1.09–1.18), P = 6.0×10−10; P-het for ILC vs IDC ER+ tumors = 1.8×10−4). Of the 75 known breast cancer polymorphisms that were genotyped, 56 were associated with ILC and 15 with LCIS at P<0.05. Two SNPs showed significantly stronger associations for ILC than LCIS (rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2, P-het = 0.04 and rs889312/5q11/MAP3K1, P-het = 0.03); and two showed stronger associations for LCIS than ILC (rs6678914/1q32/LGR6, P-het = 0.001 and rs1752911/6q14, P-het = 0.04). In addition, seven of the 75 known loci showed significant differences between ER+ tumors with IDC and ILC histology, three of these showing stronger associations for ILC (rs11249433/1p11, rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2 and rs10995190/10q21/ZNF365) and four associated only with IDC (5p12/rs10941679; rs2588809/14q24/RAD51L1, rs6472903/8q21 and rs1550623/2q31/CDCA7). In conclusion, we have identified one novel lobular breast cancer specific predisposition polymorphism at 7q34, and shown for the first time that common breast cancer polymorphisms predispose to LCIS. We have shown that many of the ER+ breast cancer predisposition loci also predispose to ILC, although there is some heterogeneity between ER+ lobular and ER+ IDC tumors. These data provide evidence for overlapping, but distinct etiological pathways within ER+ breast cancer between morphological subtypes.
Author Summary
Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) accounts for 10–15% of invasive breast cancer and is generally ER positive (ER+). To date, none of the genome-wide association studies that have identified loci that predispose to breast cancer in general or to ER+ or ER-negative breast cancer have focused on lobular breast cancer. In this lobular breast cancer study we identified a new variant that appears to be specific to this morphological subtype. We also ascertained which of the known variants predisposes specifically to lobular breast cancer and show for the first time that some of these loci are also associated with lobular carcinoma in situ, a non-obligate precursor of breast cancer and also a risk factor for contralateral breast cancer. Our study shows that the genetic pathways of invasive lobular cancer and ER+ ductal carcinoma mostly overlap, but there are important differences that are likely to provide insights into the biology of lobular breast tumors.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1004285
PMCID: PMC3990493  PMID: 24743323
23.  Large-scale genotyping identifies 41 new loci associated with breast cancer risk 
Michailidou, Kyriaki | Hall, Per | Gonzalez-Neira, Anna | Ghoussaini, Maya | Dennis, Joe | Milne, Roger L | Schmidt, Marjanka K | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Bojesen, Stig E | Bolla, Manjeet K | Wang, Qin | Dicks, Ed | Lee, Andrew | Turnbull, Clare | Rahman, Nazneen | Fletcher, Olivia | Peto, Julian | Gibson, Lorna | Silva, Isabel dos Santos | Nevanlinna, Heli | Muranen, Taru A | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Blomqvist, Carl | Czene, Kamila | Irwanto, Astrid | Liu, Jianjun | Waisfisz, Quinten | Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne | Adank, Muriel | van der Luijt, Rob B | Hein, Rebecca | Dahmen, Norbert | Beckman, Lars | Meindl, Alfons | Schmutzler, Rita K | Müller-Myhsok, Bertram | Lichtner, Peter | Hopper, John L | Southey, Melissa C | Makalic, Enes | Schmidt, Daniel F | Uitterlinden, Andre G | Hofman, Albert | Hunter, David J | Chanock, Stephen J | Vincent, Daniel | Bacot, François | Tessier, Daniel C | Canisius, Sander | Wessels, Lodewyk F A | Haiman, Christopher A | Shah, Mitul | Luben, Robert | Brown, Judith | Luccarini, Craig | Schoof, Nils | Humphreys, Keith | Li, Jingmei | Nordestgaard, Børge G | Nielsen, Sune F | Flyger, Henrik | Couch, Fergus J | Wang, Xianshu | Vachon, Celine | Stevens, Kristen N | Lambrechts, Diether | Moisse, Matthieu | Paridaens, Robert | Christiaens, Marie-Rose | Rudolph, Anja | Nickels, Stefan | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Johnson, Nichola | Aitken, Zoe | Aaltonen, Kirsimari | Heikkinen, Tuomas | Broeks, Annegien | Van’t Veer, Laura J | van der Schoot, C Ellen | Guénel, Pascal | Truong, Thérèse | Laurent-Puig, Pierre | Menegaux, Florence | Marme, Frederik | Schneeweiss, Andreas | Sohn, Christof | Burwinkel, Barbara | Zamora, M Pilar | Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias | Pita, Guillermo | Alonso, M Rosario | Cox, Angela | Brock, Ian W | Cross, Simon S | Reed, Malcolm W R | Sawyer, Elinor J | Tomlinson, Ian | Kerin, Michael J | Miller, Nicola | Henderson, Brian E | Schumacher, Fredrick | Le Marchand, Loic | Andrulis, Irene L | Knight, Julia A | Glendon, Gord | Mulligan, Anna Marie | Lindblom, Annika | Margolin, Sara | Hooning, Maartje J | Hollestelle, Antoinette | van den Ouweland, Ans M W | Jager, Agnes | Bui, Quang M | Stone, Jennifer | Dite, Gillian S | Apicella, Carmel | Tsimiklis, Helen | Giles, Graham G | Severi, Gianluca | Baglietto, Laura | Fasching, Peter A | Haeberle, Lothar | Ekici, Arif B | Beckmann, Matthias W | Brenner, Hermann | Müller, Heiko | Arndt, Volker | Stegmaier, Christa | Swerdlow, Anthony | Ashworth, Alan | Orr, Nick | Jones, Michael | Figueroa, Jonine | Lissowska, Jolanta | Brinton, Louise | Goldberg, Mark S | Labrèche, France | Dumont, Martine | Winqvist, Robert | Pylkäs, Katri | Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja | Grip, Mervi | Brauch, Hiltrud | Hamann, Ute | Brüning, Thomas | Radice, Paolo | Peterlongo, Paolo | Manoukian, Siranoush | Bonanni, Bernardo | Devilee, Peter | Tollenaar, Rob A E M | Seynaeve, Caroline | van Asperen, Christi J | Jakubowska, Anna | Lubinski, Jan | Jaworska, Katarzyna | Durda, Katarzyna | Mannermaa, Arto | Kataja, Vesa | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Hartikainen, Jaana M | Bogdanova, Natalia V | Antonenkova, Natalia N | Dörk, Thilo | Kristensen, Vessela N | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Slager, Susan | Toland, Amanda E | Edge, Stephen | Fostira, Florentia | Kang, Daehee | Yoo, Keun-Young | Noh, Dong-Young | Matsuo, Keitaro | Ito, Hidemi | Iwata, Hiroji | Sueta, Aiko | Wu, Anna H | Tseng, Chiu-Chen | Van Den Berg, David | Stram, Daniel O | Shu, Xiao-Ou | Lu, Wei | Gao, Yu-Tang | Cai, Hui | Teo, Soo Hwang | Yip, Cheng Har | Phuah, Sze Yee | Cornes, Belinda K | Hartman, Mikael | Miao, Hui | Lim, Wei Yen | Sng, Jen-Hwei | Muir, Kenneth | Lophatananon, Artitaya | Stewart-Brown, Sarah | Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep | Shen, Chen-Yang | Hsiung, Chia-Ni | Wu, Pei-Ei | Ding, Shian-Ling | Sangrajrang, Suleeporn | Gaborieau, Valerie | Brennan, Paul | McKay, James | Blot, William J | Signorello, Lisa B | Cai, Qiuyin | Zheng, Wei | Deming-Halverson, Sandra | Shrubsole, Martha | Long, Jirong | Simard, Jacques | Garcia-Closas, Montse | Pharoah, Paul D P | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Dunning, Alison M | Benitez, Javier | Easton, Douglas F
Nature genetics  2013;45(4):353-361e2.
Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Common variants at 27 loci have been identified as associated with susceptibility to breast cancer, and these account for ~9% of the familial risk of the disease. We report here a meta-analysis of 9 genome-wide association studies, including 10,052 breast cancer cases and 12,575 controls of European ancestry, from which we selected 29,807 SNPs for further genotyping. These SNPs were genotyped in 45,290 cases and 41,880 controls of European ancestry from 41 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). The SNPs were genotyped as part of a collaborative genotyping experiment involving four consortia (Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study, COGS) and used a custom Illumina iSelect genotyping array, iCOGS, comprising more than 200,000 SNPs. We identified SNPs at 41 new breast cancer susceptibility loci at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8). Further analyses suggest that more than 1,000 additional loci are involved in breast cancer susceptibility.
doi:10.1038/ng.2563
PMCID: PMC3771688  PMID: 23535729
24.  A role for XRCC2 gene polymorphisms in breast cancer risk and survival 
Journal of medical genetics  2011;48(7):477-484.
Background
The XRCC2 gene is a key mediator in the homologous recombination repair of DNA double strand breaks. We hypothesised that inherited variants in the XRCC2 gene might also affect susceptibility to, and survival from, breast cancer.
Methods
We genotyped 12 XRCC2 tagging SNPs in 1,131 breast cancer cases and 1,148 controls from the Sheffield Breast Cancer Study (SBCS), and examined their associations with breast cancer risk and survival by estimating odds ratios (ORs) and hazard ratios (HRs), and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Positive findings were further investigated in 860 cases and 869 controls from the Utah Breast Cancer Study (UBCS) and jointly analysed together with available published data for breast cancer risk. The survival findings were further confirmed in studies (8,074 cases) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC).
Results
The most significant association with breast cancer risk in the SBCS dataset was the XRCC2 rs3218408 SNP (recessive model p=2.3×10−4, MAF=0.23). This SNP yielded an ORrec (95% CI) of 1.64 (1.25–2.16) in a two-site analysis of SBCS and UBCS, and a meta-ORrec (95% CI) of 1.33 (1.12–1.57) when all published data were included. This SNP may mark a rare risk haplotype carried by 2 in 1000 of the control population. Furthermore, the XRCC2 coding R188H SNP (rs3218536, MAF=0.08) was significantly associated with poor survival, with an increased per-allele HR (95% CI) of 1.58 (1.01–2.49) in a multivariate analysis. This effect was still evident in a pooled meta-analysis of 8,781 breast cancer patients from the BCAC [HR (95% CI) of 1.19 (1.05–1.36), p=0.01].
Conclusions
Our findings suggest that XRCC2 SNPs may influence breast cancer risk and survival.
doi:10.1136/jmedgenet-2011-100018
PMCID: PMC3932658  PMID: 21632523
Single nucleotide polymorphism; XRCC2; breast cancer risk; breast cancer survival
25.  A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of breast cancer identifies two novel susceptibility loci at 6q14 and 20q11 
Siddiq, Afshan | Couch, Fergus J. | Chen, Gary K. | Lindström, Sara | Eccles, Diana | Millikan, Robert C. | Michailidou, Kyriaki | Stram, Daniel O. | Beckmann, Lars | Rhie, Suhn Kyong | Ambrosone, Christine B. | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Amiano, Pilar | Apicella, Carmel | Baglietto, Laura | Bandera, Elisa V. | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Berg, Christine D. | Bernstein, Leslie | Blomqvist, Carl | Brauch, Hiltrud | Brinton, Louise | Bui, Quang M. | Buring, Julie E. | Buys, Saundra S. | Campa, Daniele | Carpenter, Jane E. | Chasman, Daniel I. | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Chen, Constance | Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise | Cox, Angela | Cross, Simon S. | Czene, Kamila | Deming, Sandra L. | Diasio, Robert B. | Diver, W. Ryan | Dunning, Alison M. | Durcan, Lorraine | Ekici, Arif B. | Fasching, Peter A. | Feigelson, Heather Spencer | Fejerman, Laura | Figueroa, Jonine D. | Fletcher, Olivia | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Gaudet, Mia M. | Gerty, Susan M. | Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L. | Giles, Graham G. | van Gils, Carla H. | Godwin, Andrew K. | Graham, Nikki | Greco, Dario | Hall, Per | Hankinson, Susan E. | Hartmann, Arndt | Hein, Rebecca | Heinz, Judith | Hoover, Robert N. | Hopper, John L. | Hu, Jennifer J. | Huntsman, Scott | Ingles, Sue A. | Irwanto, Astrid | Isaacs, Claudine | Jacobs, Kevin B. | John, Esther M. | Justenhoven, Christina | Kaaks, Rudolf | Kolonel, Laurence N. | Coetzee, Gerhard A. | Lathrop, Mark | Le Marchand, Loic | Lee, Adam M. | Lee, I-Min | Lesnick, Timothy | Lichtner, Peter | Liu, Jianjun | Lund, Eiliv | Makalic, Enes | Martin, Nicholas G. | McLean, Catriona A. | Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne | Meindl, Alfons | Miron, Penelope | Monroe, Kristine R. | Montgomery, Grant W. | Müller-Myhsok, Bertram | Nickels, Stefan | Nyante, Sarah J. | Olswold, Curtis | Overvad, Kim | Palli, Domenico | Park, Daniel J. | Palmer, Julie R. | Pathak, Harsh | Peto, Julian | Pharoah, Paul | Rahman, Nazneen | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Schmidt, Daniel F. | Schmutzler, Rita K. | Slager, Susan | Southey, Melissa C. | Stevens, Kristen N. | Sinn, Hans-Peter | Press, Michael F. | Ross, Eric | Riboli, Elio | Ridker, Paul M. | Schumacher, Fredrick R. | Severi, Gianluca | dos Santos Silva, Isabel | Stone, Jennifer | Sund, Malin | Tapper, William J. | Thun, Michael J. | Travis, Ruth C. | Turnbull, Clare | Uitterlinden, Andre G. | Waisfisz, Quinten | Wang, Xianshu | Wang, Zhaoming | Weaver, JoEllen | Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger | Wilkens, Lynne R. | Van Den Berg, David | Zheng, Wei | Ziegler, Regina G. | Ziv, Elad | Nevanlinna, Heli | Easton, Douglas F. | Hunter, David J. | Henderson, Brian E. | Chanock, Stephen J. | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Kraft, Peter | Haiman, Christopher A. | Vachon, Celine M.
Human Molecular Genetics  2012;21(24):5373-5384.
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of breast cancer defined by hormone receptor status have revealed loci contributing to susceptibility of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative subtypes. To identify additional genetic variants for ER-negative breast cancer, we conducted the largest meta-analysis of ER-negative disease to date, comprising 4754 ER-negative cases and 31 663 controls from three GWAS: NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) (2188 ER-negative cases; 25 519 controls of European ancestry), Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC) (1562 triple negative cases; 3399 controls of European ancestry) and African American Breast Cancer Consortium (AABC) (1004 ER-negative cases; 2745 controls). We performed in silico replication of 86 SNPs at P ≤ 1 × 10-5 in an additional 11 209 breast cancer cases (946 with ER-negative disease) and 16 057 controls of Japanese, Latino and European ancestry. We identified two novel loci for breast cancer at 20q11 and 6q14. SNP rs2284378 at 20q11 was associated with ER-negative breast cancer (combined two-stage OR = 1.16; P = 1.1 × 10−8) but showed a weaker association with overall breast cancer (OR = 1.08, P = 1.3 × 10–6) based on 17 869 cases and 43 745 controls and no association with ER-positive disease (OR = 1.01, P = 0.67) based on 9965 cases and 22 902 controls. Similarly, rs17530068 at 6q14 was associated with breast cancer (OR = 1.12; P = 1.1 × 10−9), and with both ER-positive (OR = 1.09; P = 1.5 × 10−5) and ER-negative (OR = 1.16, P = 2.5 × 10−7) disease. We also confirmed three known loci associated with ER-negative (19p13) and both ER-negative and ER-positive breast cancer (6q25 and 12p11). Our results highlight the value of large-scale collaborative studies to identify novel breast cancer risk loci.
doi:10.1093/hmg/dds381
PMCID: PMC3510753  PMID: 22976474

Results 1-25 (96)