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1.  Hippocampal demyelination and memory dysfunction are associated with increased levels of the neuronal microRNA miR-124 and reduced AMPA receptors 
Annals of neurology  2013;73(5):637-645.
Background
Hippocampal demyelination, a common feature of postmortem multiple sclerosis (MS) brains, reduces neuronal gene expression and is a likely contributor to the memory impairment that is found in greater than 40% of individuals with (MS). How demyelination alters neuronal gene expression is unknown.
Methods
To explore if loss of hippocampal myelin alters expression of neuronal microRNAs (miRNA), we compared miRNA profiles from myelinated and demyelinated hippocampi from postmortem MS brains and performed validation studies.
Findings
A network-based interaction analysis depicts a correlation between increased neuronal miRNAs and decreased neuronal genes identified in our previous study. The neuronal miRNA miR-124, was increased in demyelinated MS hippocampi and targets mRNAs encoding 26 neuronal proteins that were decreased in demyelinated hippocampus, including the ionotrophic glutamate receptors, AMPA 2 and AMPA3. Hippocampal demyelination in mice also increased miR-124, reduced expression of AMPA receptors and decreased memory performance in water maze tests. Remyelination of the mouse hippocampus reversed these changes.
Conclusion
We establish here that myelin alters neuronal gene expression and function by modulating the levels of the neuronal miRNA miR-124. Inhibition of miR-124 in hippocampal neurons may provide a therapeutic approach to improve memory performance in MS patients.
doi:10.1002/ana.23860
PMCID: PMC3679350  PMID: 23595422
Multiple sclerosis; myelin; microRNA
2.  CORTICAL REMYELINATION: A NEW TARGET FOR REPAIR THERAPIES IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS 
Annals of neurology  2012;72(6):918-926.
Objective
Generation and differentiation of new oligodendrocytes in demyelinated white matter is the best described repair process in the adult human brain. However, remyelinating capacity falters with age in patients with multiple sclerosis. (MS). Since demyelination of cerebral cortex is extensive in brains from MS patients, we investigated the capacity of cortical lesions to remyelinate and directly compared the extent of remyelination in lesions that involve cerebral cortex and adjacent subcortical white matter.
Methods
Postmortem brain tissue from 22 patients with MS (age 27 to 77 years) and 6 subjects without brain disease were analyzed. Regions of cerebral cortex with reduced myelin were examined for remyelination, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, reactive astrocytes, and molecules that inhibit remyelination.
Results
“New” oligodendrocytes that were actively forming myelin sheaths were identified in 30/42 remyelinated subpial cortical lesions, including lesions from three patients in their 70's. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were not decreased in demyelinated or remyelinated cortices when compared to adjacent normal-appearing cortex or controls. In demyelinated lesions involving cortex and adjacent white matter, the cortex showed greater remyelination, more actively remyelinating oligodendrocytes and fewer reactive astrocytes. Astrocytes in the white-matter, but not in cortical portions of these lesions, significantly up-regulate CD44, hyaluronan, and versican, molecules that form complexes that inhibit oligodendrocyte maturation and remyelination.
Interpretation
Endogenous remyelination of the cerebral cortex occurs in individuals with MS regardless of disease duration or chronological age of the patient. Cortical remyelination should be considered as a primary outcome measure in future clinical trials testing remyelination therapies.
doi:10.1002/ana.23693
PMCID: PMC3535551  PMID: 23076662
multiple sclerosis; remyelination
3.  Clinically feasible MTR is sensitive to cortical demyelination in MS 
Neurology  2013;80(3):246-252.
Objective:
Presently there is no clinically feasible imaging modality that can effectively detect cortical demyelination in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The objective of this study is to determine if clinically feasible magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) imaging is sensitive to cortical demyelination in MS.
Methods:
MRI were acquired in situ on 7 recently deceased patients with MS using clinically feasible sequences at 3 T, including relatively high-resolution T1-weighted and proton density–weighted images with/without a magnetization transfer pulse for calculation of MTR. The brains were rapidly removed and placed in fixative. Multiple cortical regions from each brain were immunostained for myelin proteolipid protein and classified as mostly myelinated (MMctx), mostly demyelinated (MDctx), or intermediately demyelinated (IDctx). MRIs were registered with the cortical sections so that the cortex corresponding to each cortical section could be identified, along with adjacent subcortical white matter (WM). Mean cortical MTR normalized to mean WM MTR was calculated for each cortical region. Linear mixed-effects models were used to test if mean normalized cortical MTR was significantly lower in demyelinated cortex.
Results:
We found that mean normalized cortical MTR was significantly lower in cortical tissue with any demyelination (IDctx or MDctx) compared to MMctx (demyelinated cortex: least-squares mean [LSM] = 0.797, SE = 0.007; MMctx: LSM = 0.837, SE = 0.006; p = 0.01, n = 89).
Conclusions:
This result demonstrates that clinically feasible MTR imaging is sensitive to cortical demyelination and suggests that MTR will be a useful tool to help detect MS cortical lesions in living patients with MS.
doi:10.1212/WNL.0b013e31827deb99
PMCID: PMC3589181  PMID: 23269598
4.  Multiple Sclerosis Normal-Appearing White Matter: Pathology-Imaging Correlations 
Annals of neurology  2011;70(5):764-773.
Objective
To determine the pathologic basis of subtle abnormalities in magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters observed in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) in multiple sclerosis (MS) brains.
Methods
Brain tissues were obtained through a rapid post-mortem protocol that included in situ MRI. Four types of MRI-defined regions of interest (ROIs) were analyzed: (1) Regions that were abnormal on all images (“T2T1MTR lesions”); (2) NAWM regions with slightly-abnormal MTR located close to white matter lesions (“sa-WM Close”); (3) NAWM regions with slightly-abnormal MTR located far from lesions (“sa-WM Far”); and (4) NAWM regions with normal MTR (“NAWM”).
Immunohistochemical analysis for each ROI comprised immunostaining for myelin, axonal markers, activated microglia/macrophages, astrocytes, plasma proteins and blood vessels.
Results
Forty-eight ROIs from four secondary progressive MS brains were analyzed. Sa-WM Close ROIs were associated with significantly more axonal swellings. There were more enlarged MHCII(+) microglia and macrophages detected in sa-WM Far, sa-WM Close, and T2T1MTR lesions than in NAWM. Across all ROIs, MTR and DTI measures were moderately correlated with myelin density, axonal area and axonal counts. Excluding T2T1MTR lesions from analysis revealed that MTR and DTI measures in non-lesional WM were correlated with activated microglia, but not with axonal or myelin integrity.
Interpretation
The pathologic substrates for MRI abnormalities in NAWM vary based on distance from focal WM lesions. Close to WM lesions, axonal pathology and microglial activation may explain subtle MRI changes. Distant from lesions, microglial activation associated with proximity to cortical lesions might underlie MRI abnormalities.
doi:10.1002/ana.22521
PMCID: PMC3241216  PMID: 22162059
5.  Demyelination Causes Synaptic Alterations in Hippocampi from Multiple Sclerosis Patients 
Annals of neurology  2011;69(3):445-454.
Background
Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the human central nervous system. While the clinical impact of gray matter pathology in MS brains is unknown, 30–40% of MS patients demonstrate memory impairment. The molecular basis of this memory dysfunction has not yet been investigated in MS patients.
Method
To investigate possible mechanisms of memory impairment in MS patients, we compared morphological and molecular changes in myelinated and demyelinated hippocampi from postmortem MS brains.
Findings
Demyelinated hippocampi had minimal neuronal loss but significant decreases in synaptic density. Neuronal proteins essential for axonal transport, synaptic plasticity, glutamate neurotransmission, glutamate homeostasis and memory/learning were significantly decreased in demyelinated hippocampi, but not in demyelinated motor cortices from MS brains.
Interpretation
Collectively, these data support hippocampal demyelination as a cause of synaptic alterations in MS patients and establish that the neuronal genes regulated by myelination reflect specific functions of neuronal subpopulations.
doi:10.1002/ana.22337
PMCID: PMC3073544  PMID: 21446020
Multiple Sclerosis; hippocampus; demyelination; memory
6.  Beta-4 tubulin identifies a primitive cell source for oligodendrocytes in the mammalian brain 
We have identified a novel population of cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the mammalian brain that expresses beta-4 tubulin (βT4) and has properties of primitive neuroectodermal cells. βT4 cells are scattered throughout the SVZ of the lateral ventricles in adult human brain, and are significantly increased in the SVZs bordering demyelinated white matter in multiple sclerosis brains. In human fetal brain, βT4 cell densities peak during the latter stages of gliogenesis, which occurs in the SVZ of the lateral ventricles. βT4 cells represent less than 2% of the cells present in neurospheres generated from postnatal rat brain, but >95% of cells in neurospheres treated with the anti-mitotic agent Ara-C. βT4 cells produce oligodendrocytes, neurons, and astrocytes in vitro. We compared the myelinating potential of βT4-positive cells with A2B5-positive oligodendrocyte progenitor cells following transplantation (25,000 cells) into postnatal day 3 (P3) myelin deficient rat brains. At P20, the progeny of βT4 cells myelinated up to 4 mm of the external capsule, which significantly exceeded that of transplanted A2B5-positive progenitor cells. Such extensive and rapid mature CNS cell generation by a relatively small number of transplanted cells provides in vivo support for the therapeutic potential of βT4 cells. We propose that βT4 cells are an endogenous cell source that can be recruited to promote neural repair in the adult telencephalon.
doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1027-09.2009
PMCID: PMC2742370  PMID: 19535576
multiple sclerosis; subventricular zone; neural stem cell; myelin; oligodendrocyte; transplantation
7.  Imaging correlates of leukocyte accumulation and CXCR4/CXCR12 in multiple sclerosis 
Archives of neurology  2009;66(1):44-53.
OBJECTIVE
To compare leukocyte accumulation and expression of the chemokine receptor/ligand pair, CXCR4/CXCL12, in MRI-defined regions of interest (ROIs) from chronic multiple sclerosis (MS) brains. We studied the following ROIs: NAWM (normal appearing white matter); T2-only (regions abnormal only on T2-WI); T2/T1/MTR (regions abnormal on T2-weighted, T1-weighted images (-WI) and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR).
DESIGN
MRI-pathology correlations were performed on five secondary progressive MS (SPMS) cases. Based on imaging characteristics, thirty ROIs were excised. Using immunohistochemistry, we evaluated myelin status, leukocyte accumulation and CXCR4/CXCL12 expression in the MS ROIs and white matter regions from five non-neurological control cases.
RESULTS
Eight of ten T2/T1/MTR regions were chronic-active or chronic-inactive demyelinated lesions, whereas only two of ten T2-only regions were demyelinated and characterized as active or chronic active lesions. Equivalent numbers of CD68+ leukocytes (the predominant cell type) were present in myelinated T2-only regions as compared to NAWM. Parenchymal T-cells were significantly increased in T2/T1/MTR ROIs as compared to T2-only regions and NAWM. Expression of CXCR4 and phospho-CXCR4 was found on reactive microglia and macrophages in T2-only and T2/T1/MTR lesions. CXCL12 immunoreactivity was detected in astrocytes, astrocytic processes and vascular elements in inflamed MS lesions.
CONCLUSIONS
Inflammatory leukocyte accumulation was not increased in myelinated MS ROIs with abnormal T2 signal as compared with NAWM. Robust expression of CXCR4/CXCL12 on inflammatory elements in MS lesions highlights a role of this chemokine/receptor pair in CNS inflammation.
doi:10.1001/archneurol.2008.512
PMCID: PMC2792736  PMID: 19139298
multiple sclerosis; MRI; inflammation; CXCR4; CXCL12; microglia
8.  Neurogenesis in the chronic lesions of multiple sclerosis 
Brain  2008;131(9):2366-2375.
Subcortical white matter in the adult human brain contains a population of interneurons that helps regulate cerebral blood flow. We investigated the fate of these neurons following subcortical white matter demyelination. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine neurons in normal-appearing subcortical white matter and seven acute and 59 chronic demyelinated lesions in brains from nine patients with multiple sclerosis and four controls. Seven acute and 44 of 59 chronic multiple sclerosis lesions had marked neuronal loss. Compared to surrounding normal-appearing white matter, the remaining 15 chronic multiple sclerosis lesions contained a 72% increase in mature interneuron density, increased synaptic densities and cells with phenotypic characteristics of immature neurons. Lesion areas with increased neuron densities contained a morphologically distinct population of activated microglia. Subventricular zones contiguous with demyelinated lesions also contained an increase in cells with phenotypes of neuronal precursors. These results support neurogenesis in a subpopulation of demyelinated subcortical white matter lesions in multiple sclerosis brains.
doi:10.1093/brain/awn157
PMCID: PMC2525445  PMID: 18669500
multiple sclerosis; white matter neurons; neurogenesis

Results 1-8 (8)