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1.  Hawkeye and AMOS: visualizing and assessing the quality of genome assemblies 
Briefings in Bioinformatics  2011;14(2):213-224.
Since its launch in 2004, the open-source AMOS project has released several innovative DNA sequence analysis applications including: Hawkeye, a visual analytics tool for inspecting the structure of genome assemblies; the Assembly Forensics and FRCurve pipelines for systematically evaluating the quality of a genome assembly; and AMOScmp, the first comparative genome assembler. These applications have been used to assemble and analyze dozens of genomes ranging in complexity from simple microbial species through mammalian genomes. Recent efforts have been focused on enhancing support for new data characteristics brought on by second- and now third-generation sequencing. This review describes the major components of AMOS in light of these challenges, with an emphasis on methods for assessing assembly quality and the visual analytics capabilities of Hawkeye. These interactive graphical aspects are essential for navigating and understanding the complexities of a genome assembly, from the overall genome structure down to individual bases. Hawkeye and AMOS are available open source at http://amos.sourceforge.net.
doi:10.1093/bib/bbr074
PMCID: PMC3603210  PMID: 22199379
DNA Sequencing; genome assembly; assembly forensics; visual analytics
3.  The genome of woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) 
Nature Genetics  2010;43(2):109-116.
The woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca (2n = 2x = 14), is a versatile experimental plant system. This diminutive herbaceous perennial has a small genome (240 Mb), is amenable to genetic transformation and shares substantial sequence identity with the cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) and other economically important rosaceous plants. Here we report the draft F. vesca genome, which was sequenced to ×39 coverage using second-generation technology, assembled de novo and then anchored to the genetic linkage map into seven pseudochromosomes. This diploid strawberry sequence lacks the large genome duplications seen in other rosids. Gene prediction modeling identified 34,809 genes, with most being supported by transcriptome mapping. Genes critical to valuable horticultural traits including flavor, nutritional value and flowering time were identified. Macrosyntenic relationships between Fragaria and Prunus predict a hypothetical ancestral Rosaceae genome that had nine chromosomes. New phylogenetic analysis of 154 protein-coding genes suggests that assignment of Populus to Malvidae, rather than Fabidae, is warranted.
doi:10.1038/ng.740
PMCID: PMC3326587  PMID: 21186353
4.  Two New Complete Genome Sequences Offer Insight into Host and Tissue Specificity of Plant Pathogenic Xanthomonas spp.▿† 
Journal of Bacteriology  2011;193(19):5450-5464.
Xanthomonas is a large genus of bacteria that collectively cause disease on more than 300 plant species. The broad host range of the genus contrasts with stringent host and tissue specificity for individual species and pathovars. Whole-genome sequences of Xanthomonas campestris pv. raphani strain 756C and X. oryzae pv. oryzicola strain BLS256, pathogens that infect the mesophyll tissue of the leading models for plant biology, Arabidopsis thaliana and rice, respectively, were determined and provided insight into the genetic determinants of host and tissue specificity. Comparisons were made with genomes of closely related strains that infect the vascular tissue of the same hosts and across a larger collection of complete Xanthomonas genomes. The results suggest a model in which complex sets of adaptations at the level of gene content account for host specificity and subtler adaptations at the level of amino acid or noncoding regulatory nucleotide sequence determine tissue specificity.
doi:10.1128/JB.05262-11
PMCID: PMC3187462  PMID: 21784931
5.  Gene prediction with Glimmer for metagenomic sequences augmented by classification and clustering 
Nucleic Acids Research  2011;40(1):e9.
Environmental shotgun sequencing (or metagenomics) is widely used to survey the communities of microbial organisms that live in many diverse ecosystems, such as the human body. Finding the protein-coding genes within the sequences is an important step for assessing the functional capacity of a metagenome. In this work, we developed a metagenomics gene prediction system Glimmer-MG that achieves significantly greater accuracy than previous systems via novel approaches to a number of important prediction subtasks. First, we introduce the use of phylogenetic classifications of the sequences to model parameterization. We also cluster the sequences, grouping together those that likely originated from the same organism. Analogous to iterative schemes that are useful for whole genomes, we retrain our models within each cluster on the initial gene predictions before making final predictions. Finally, we model both insertion/deletion and substitution sequencing errors using a different approach than previous software, allowing Glimmer-MG to change coding frame or pass through stop codons by predicting an error. In a comparison among multiple gene finding methods, Glimmer-MG makes the most sensitive and precise predictions on simulated and real metagenomes for all read lengths and error rates tested.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkr1067
PMCID: PMC3245904  PMID: 22102569
6.  Genome Sequence of the Dioxin-Mineralizing Bacterium Sphingomonas wittichii RW1 ▿  
Journal of Bacteriology  2010;192(22):6101-6102.
Pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins pose a serious threat to human and environmental health. Natural attenuation of these compounds by microorganisms provides one promising avenue for their removal from contaminated areas. Over the past 2 decades, studies of the bacterium Sphingomonas wittichii RW1 have provided a wealth of knowledge about how bacteria metabolize chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. Here we describe the finished genome sequence of S. wittichii RW1 and major findings from its annotation.
doi:10.1128/JB.01030-10
PMCID: PMC2976435  PMID: 20833805
7.  Core Gene Set As the Basis of Multilocus Sequence Analysis of the Subclass Actinobacteridae 
PLoS ONE  2011;6(3):e14792.
Comparative genomic sequencing is shedding new light on bacterial identification, taxonomy and phylogeny. An in silico assessment of a core gene set necessary for cellular functioning was made to determine a consensus set of genes that would be useful for the identification, taxonomy and phylogeny of the species belonging to the subclass Actinobacteridae which contained two orders Actinomycetales and Bifidobacteriales. The subclass Actinobacteridae comprised about 85% of the actinobacteria families. The following recommended criteria were used to establish a comprehensive gene set; the gene should (i) be long enough to contain phylogenetically useful information, (ii) not be subject to horizontal gene transfer, (iii) be a single copy (iv) have at least two regions sufficiently conserved that allow the design of amplification and sequencing primers and (v) predict whole-genome relationships. We applied these constraints to 50 different Actinobacteridae genomes and made 1,224 pairwise comparisons of the genome conserved regions and gene fragments obtained by using Sequence VARiability Analysis Program (SVARAP), which allow designing the primers. Following a comparative statistical modeling phase, 3 gene fragments were selected, ychF, rpoB, and secY with R2>0.85. Selected sets of broad range primers were tested from the 3 gene fragments and were demonstrated to be useful for amplification and sequencing of 25 species belonging to 9 genera of Actinobacteridae. The intraspecies similarities were 96.3–100% for ychF, 97.8–100% for rpoB and 96.9–100% for secY among 73 strains belonging to 15 species of the subclass Actinobacteridae compare to 99.4–100% for 16S rRNA. The phylogenetic topology obtained from the combined datasets ychF+rpoB+secY was globally similar to that inferred from the 16S rRNA but with higher confidence. It was concluded that multi-locus sequence analysis using core gene set might represent the first consensus and valid approach for investigating the bacterial identification, phylogeny and taxonomy.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0014792
PMCID: PMC3069002  PMID: 21483493
8.  The draft genome of the transgenic tropical fruit tree papaya (Carica papaya Linnaeus) 
Ming, Ray | Hou, Shaobin | Feng, Yun | Yu, Qingyi | Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre | Saw, Jimmy H. | Senin, Pavel | Wang, Wei | Ly, Benjamin V. | Lewis, Kanako L. T. | Salzberg, Steven L. | Feng, Lu | Jones, Meghan R. | Skelton, Rachel L. | Murray, Jan E. | Chen, Cuixia | Qian, Wubin | Shen, Junguo | Du, Peng | Eustice, Moriah | Tong, Eric | Tang, Haibao | Lyons, Eric | Paull, Robert E. | Michael, Todd P. | Wall, Kerr | Rice, Danny W. | Albert, Henrik | Wang, Ming-Li | Zhu, Yun J. | Schatz, Michael | Nagarajan, Niranjan | Acob, Ricelle A. | Guan, Peizhu | Blas, Andrea | Wai, Ching Man | Ackerman, Christine M. | Ren, Yan | Liu, Chao | Wang, Jianmei | Wang, Jianping | Na, Jong-Kuk | Shakirov, Eugene V. | Haas, Brian | Thimmapuram, Jyothi | Nelson, David | Wang, Xiyin | Bowers, John E. | Gschwend, Andrea R. | Delcher, Arthur L. | Singh, Ratnesh | Suzuki, Jon Y. | Tripathi, Savarni | Neupane, Kabi | Wei, Hairong | Irikura, Beth | Paidi, Maya | Jiang, Ning | Zhang, Wenli | Presting, Gernot | Windsor, Aaron | Navajas-Pérez, Rafael | Torres, Manuel J. | Feltus, F. Alex | Porter, Brad | Li, Yingjun | Burroughs, A. Max | Luo, Ming-Cheng | Liu, Lei | Christopher, David A. | Mount, Stephen M. | Moore, Paul H. | Sugimura, Tak | Jiang, Jiming | Schuler, Mary A. | Friedman, Vikki | Mitchell-Olds, Thomas | Shippen, Dorothy E. | dePamphilis, Claude W. | Palmer, Jeffrey D. | Freeling, Michael | Paterson, Andrew H. | Gonsalves, Dennis | Wang, Lei | Alam, Maqsudul
Nature  2008;452(7190):991-996.
Papaya, a fruit crop cultivated in tropical and subtropical regions, is known for its nutritional benefits and medicinal applications. Here we report a 3× draft genome sequence of ‘SunUp’ papaya, the first commercial virus-resistant transgenic fruit tree1 to be sequenced. The papaya genome is three times the size of the Arabidopsis genome, but contains fewer genes, including significantly fewer disease-resistance gene analogues. Comparison of the five sequenced genomes suggests a minimal angiosperm gene set of 13,311. A lack of recent genome duplication, atypical of other angiosperm genomes sequenced so far2–5, may account for the smaller papaya gene number in most functional groups. Nonetheless, striking amplifications in gene number within particular functional groups suggest roles in the evolution of tree-like habit, deposition and remobilization of starch reserves, attraction of seed dispersal agents, and adaptation to tropical daylengths. Transgenesis at three locations is closely associated with chloroplast insertions into the nuclear genome, and with topoisomerase I recognition sites. Papaya offers numerous advantages as a system for fruit-tree functional genomics, and this draft genome sequence provides the foundation for revealing the basis of Carica's distinguishing morpho-physiological, medicinal and nutritional properties.
doi:10.1038/nature06856
PMCID: PMC2836516  PMID: 18432245
9.  Sim4cc: a cross-species spliced alignment program 
Nucleic Acids Research  2009;37(11):e80.
Advances in sequencing technologies have accelerated the sequencing of new genomes, far outpacing the generation of gene and protein resources needed to annotate them. Direct comparison and alignment of existing cDNA sequences from a related species is an effective and readily available means to determine genes in the new genomes. Current spliced alignment programs are inadequate for comparing sequences between different species, owing to their low sensitivity and splice junction accuracy. A new spliced alignment tool, sim4cc, overcomes problems in the earlier tools by incorporating three new features: universal spaced seeds, to increase sensitivity and allow comparisons between species at various evolutionary distances, and powerful splice signal models and evolutionarily-aware alignment techniques, to improve the accuracy of gene models. When tested on vertebrate comparisons at diverse evolutionary distances, sim4cc had significantly higher sensitivity compared to existing alignment programs, more than 10% higher than the closest competitor for some comparisons, while being comparable in speed to its predecessor, sim4. Sim4cc can be used in one-to-one or one-to-many comparisons of genomic and cDNA sequences, and can also be effectively incorporated into a high-throughput annotation engine, as demonstrated by the mapping of 64 000 Fagus grandifolia 454 ESTs and unigenes to the poplar genome.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkp319
PMCID: PMC2699533  PMID: 19429899
10.  A whole-genome assembly of the domestic cow, Bos taurus 
Genome Biology  2009;10(4):R42.
A cow whole-genome assembly of 2.86 billion base pairs that closes gaps and corrects previously-described inversions and deletions as well as describing a portion of the Y chromosome.
Background
The genome of the domestic cow, Bos taurus, was sequenced using a mixture of hierarchical and whole-genome shotgun sequencing methods.
Results
We have assembled the 35 million sequence reads and applied a variety of assembly improvement techniques, creating an assembly of 2.86 billion base pairs that has multiple improvements over previous assemblies: it is more complete, covering more of the genome; thousands of gaps have been closed; many erroneous inversions, deletions, and translocations have been corrected; and thousands of single-nucleotide errors have been corrected. Our evaluation using independent metrics demonstrates that the resulting assembly is substantially more accurate and complete than alternative versions.
Conclusions
By using independent mapping data and conserved synteny between the cow and human genomes, we were able to construct an assembly with excellent large-scale contiguity in which a large majority (approximately 91%) of the genome has been placed onto the 30 B. taurus chromosomes. We constructed a new cow-human synteny map that expands upon previous maps. We also identified for the first time a portion of the B. taurus Y chromosome.
doi:10.1186/gb-2009-10-4-r42
PMCID: PMC2688933  PMID: 19393038
11.  Draft Genome of the Filarial Nematode Parasite Brugia malayi 
Science (New York, N.Y.)  2007;317(5845):1756-1760.
Parasitic nematodes that cause elephantiasis and river blindness threaten hundreds of millions of people in the developing world. We have sequenced the ~90 megabase (Mb) genome of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi and predict ~11,500 protein coding genes in 71 Mb of robustly assembled sequence. Comparative analysis with the free-living, model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans revealed that, despite these genes having maintained little conservation of local synteny during ~350 million years of evolution, they largely remain in linkage on chromosomal units. More than 100 conserved operons were identified. Analysis of the predicted proteome provides evidence for adaptations of B. malayi to niches in its human and vector hosts and insights into the molecular basis of a mutualistic relationship with its Wolbachia endosymbiont. These findings offer a foundation for rational drug design.
doi:10.1126/science.1145406
PMCID: PMC2613796  PMID: 17885136
12.  Aggressive assembly of pyrosequencing reads with mates 
Bioinformatics  2008;24(24):2818-2824.
Motivation: DNA sequence reads from Sanger and pyrosequencing platforms differ in cost, accuracy, typical coverage, average read length and the variety of available paired-end protocols. Both read types can complement one another in a ‘hybrid’ approach to whole-genome shotgun sequencing projects, but assembly software must be modified to accommodate their different characteristics. This is true even of pyrosequencing mated and unmated read combinations. Without special modifications, assemblers tuned for homogeneous sequence data may perform poorly on hybrid data.
Results: Celera Assembler was modified for combinations of ABI 3730 and 454 FLX reads. The revised pipeline called CABOG (Celera Assembler with the Best Overlap Graph) is robust to homopolymer run length uncertainty, high read coverage and heterogeneous read lengths. In tests on four genomes, it generated the longest contigs among all assemblers tested. It exploited the mate constraints provided by paired-end reads from either platform to build larger contigs and scaffolds, which were validated by comparison to a finished reference sequence. A low rate of contig mis-assembly was detected in some CABOG assemblies, but this was reduced in the presence of sufficient mate pair data.
Availability: The software is freely available as open-source from http://wgs-assembler.sf.net under the GNU Public License.
Contact: jmiller@jcvi.org
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btn548
PMCID: PMC2639302  PMID: 18952627
13.  A Unified Model Explaining the Offsets of Overlapping and Near-Overlapping Prokaryotic Genes 
Molecular biology and evolution  2007;24(9):2091-2098.
Overlapping genes are a common phenomenon. Among sequenced prokaryotes, more than 29% of all annotated genes overlap at least 1 of their 2 flanking genes. We present a unified model for the creation and repair of overlaps among adjacent genes where the 3′ ends either overlap or nearly overlap. Our model, derived from a comprehensive analysis of complete prokaryotic genomes in GenBank, explains the nonuniform distribution of the lengths of such overlap regions far more simply than previously proposed models. Specifically, we explain the distribution of overlap lengths based on random extensions of genes to the next occurring downstream stop codon. Our model also provides an explanation for a newly observed (here) pattern in the distribution of the separation distances of closely spaced nonoverlapping genes. We provide evidence that the newly described biased distribution of separation distances is driven by the same phenomenon that creates the uneven distribution of overlap lengths. This suggests a dynamic picture of continual overlap creation and elimination.
doi:10.1093/molbev/msm145
PMCID: PMC2429982  PMID: 17642473
genome analysis; gene finding; overlapping genes; prokaryotes
14.  Identifying bacterial genes and endosymbiont DNA with Glimmer 
Bioinformatics (Oxford, England)  2007;23(6):673-679.
Motivation:
The Glimmer gene-finding software has been successfully used for finding genes in bacteria, archæa and viruses representing hundreds of species. We describe several major changes to the Glimmer system, including improved methods for identifying both coding regions and start codons. We also describe a new module of Glimmer that can distinguish host and endosymbiont DNA. This module was developed in response to the discovery that eukaryotic genome sequencing projects sometimes inadvertently capture the DNA of intracellular bacteria living in the host.
Results:
The new methods dramatically reduce the rate of false-positive predictions, while maintaining Glimmer's 99% sensitivity rate at detecting genes in most species, and they find substantially more correct start sites, as measured by comparisons to known and well-curated genes. We show that our interpolated Markov model (IMM) DNA discriminator correctly separated 99% of the sequences in a recent genome project that produced a mixture of sequences from the bacterium Prochloron didemni and its sea squirt host, Lissoclinum patella.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btm009
PMCID: PMC2387122  PMID: 17237039
15.  Genome sequence and rapid evolution of the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PXO99A 
BMC Genomics  2008;9:204.
Background
Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae causes bacterial blight of rice (Oryza sativa L.), a major disease that constrains production of this staple crop in many parts of the world. We report here on the complete genome sequence of strain PXO99A and its comparison to two previously sequenced strains, KACC10331 and MAFF311018, which are highly similar to one another.
Results
The PXO99A genome is a single circular chromosome of 5,240,075 bp, considerably longer than the genomes of the other strains (4,941,439 bp and 4,940,217 bp, respectively), and it contains 5083 protein-coding genes, including 87 not found in KACC10331 or MAFF311018. PXO99A contains a greater number of virulence-associated transcription activator-like effector genes and has at least ten major chromosomal rearrangements relative to KACC10331 and MAFF311018. PXO99A contains numerous copies of diverse insertion sequence elements, members of which are associated with 7 out of 10 of the major rearrangements. A rapidly-evolving CRISPR (clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats) region contains evidence of dozens of phage infections unique to the PXO99A lineage. PXO99A also contains a unique, near-perfect tandem repeat of 212 kilobases close to the replication terminus.
Conclusion
Our results provide striking evidence of genome plasticity and rapid evolution within Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. The comparisons point to sources of genomic variation and candidates for strain-specific adaptations of this pathogen that help to explain the extraordinary diversity of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae genotypes and races that have been isolated from around the world.
doi:10.1186/1471-2164-9-204
PMCID: PMC2432079  PMID: 18452608
16.  High-throughput sequence alignment using Graphics Processing Units 
BMC Bioinformatics  2007;8:474.
Background
The recent availability of new, less expensive high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies has yielded a dramatic increase in the volume of sequence data that must be analyzed. These data are being generated for several purposes, including genotyping, genome resequencing, metagenomics, and de novo genome assembly projects. Sequence alignment programs such as MUMmer have proven essential for analysis of these data, but researchers will need ever faster, high-throughput alignment tools running on inexpensive hardware to keep up with new sequence technologies.
Results
This paper describes MUMmerGPU, an open-source high-throughput parallel pairwise local sequence alignment program that runs on commodity Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) in common workstations. MUMmerGPU uses the new Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) from nVidia to align multiple query sequences against a single reference sequence stored as a suffix tree. By processing the queries in parallel on the highly parallel graphics card, MUMmerGPU achieves more than a 10-fold speedup over a serial CPU version of the sequence alignment kernel, and outperforms the exact alignment component of MUMmer on a high end CPU by 3.5-fold in total application time when aligning reads from recent sequencing projects using Solexa/Illumina, 454, and Sanger sequencing technologies.
Conclusion
MUMmerGPU is a low cost, ultra-fast sequence alignment program designed to handle the increasing volume of data produced by new, high-throughput sequencing technologies. MUMmerGPU demonstrates that even memory-intensive applications can run significantly faster on the relatively low-cost GPU than on the CPU.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-8-474
PMCID: PMC2222658  PMID: 18070356
17.  Draft Genome Sequence of the Sexually Transmitted Pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis 
Science (New York, N.Y.)  2007;315(5809):207-212.
We describe the genome sequence of the protist Trichomonas vaginalis, a sexually transmitted human pathogen. Repeats and transposable elements comprise about two-thirds of the ~160-megabase genome, reflecting a recent massive expansion of genetic material. This expansion, in conjunction with the shaping of metabolic pathways that likely transpired through lateral gene transfer from bacteria, and amplification of specific gene families implicated in pathogenesis and phagocytosis of host proteins may exemplify adaptations of the parasite during its transition to a urogenital environment. The genome sequence predicts previously unknown functions for the hydrogenosome, which support a common evolutionary origin of this unusual organelle with mitochondria.
doi:10.1126/science.1132894
PMCID: PMC2080659  PMID: 17218520
18.  Minimus: a fast, lightweight genome assembler 
BMC Bioinformatics  2007;8:64.
Background
Genome assemblers have grown very large and complex in response to the need for algorithms to handle the challenges of large whole-genome sequencing projects. Many of the most common uses of assemblers, however, are best served by a simpler type of assembler that requires fewer software components, uses less memory, and is far easier to install and run.
Results
We have developed the Minimus assembler to address these issues, and tested it on a range of assembly problems. We show that Minimus performs well on several small assembly tasks, including the assembly of viral genomes, individual genes, and BAC clones. In addition, we evaluate Minimus' performance in assembling bacterial genomes in order to assess its suitability as a component of a larger assembly pipeline. We show that, unlike other software currently used for these tasks, Minimus produces significantly fewer assembly errors, at the cost of generating a more fragmented assembly.
Conclusion
We find that for small genomes and other small assembly tasks, Minimus is faster and far more flexible than existing tools. Due to its small size and modular design Minimus is perfectly suited to be a component of complex assembly pipelines. Minimus is released as an open-source software project and the code is available as part of the AMOS project at Sourceforge.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-8-64
PMCID: PMC1821043  PMID: 17324286
19.  Macronuclear Genome Sequence of the Ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, a Model Eukaryote 
PLoS Biology  2006;4(9):e286.
The ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila is a model organism for molecular and cellular biology. Like other ciliates, this species has separate germline and soma functions that are embodied by distinct nuclei within a single cell. The germline-like micronucleus (MIC) has its genome held in reserve for sexual reproduction. The soma-like macronucleus (MAC), which possesses a genome processed from that of the MIC, is the center of gene expression and does not directly contribute DNA to sexual progeny. We report here the shotgun sequencing, assembly, and analysis of the MAC genome of T. thermophila, which is approximately 104 Mb in length and composed of approximately 225 chromosomes. Overall, the gene set is robust, with more than 27,000 predicted protein-coding genes, 15,000 of which have strong matches to genes in other organisms. The functional diversity encoded by these genes is substantial and reflects the complexity of processes required for a free-living, predatory, single-celled organism. This is highlighted by the abundance of lineage-specific duplications of genes with predicted roles in sensing and responding to environmental conditions (e.g., kinases), using diverse resources (e.g., proteases and transporters), and generating structural complexity (e.g., kinesins and dyneins). In contrast to the other lineages of alveolates (apicomplexans and dinoflagellates), no compelling evidence could be found for plastid-derived genes in the genome. UGA, the only T. thermophila stop codon, is used in some genes to encode selenocysteine, thus making this organism the first known with the potential to translate all 64 codons in nuclear genes into amino acids. We present genomic evidence supporting the hypothesis that the excision of DNA from the MIC to generate the MAC specifically targets foreign DNA as a form of genome self-defense. The combination of the genome sequence, the functional diversity encoded therein, and the presence of some pathways missing from other model organisms makes T. thermophila an ideal model for functional genomic studies to address biological, biomedical, and biotechnological questions of fundamental importance.
The macronuclear genome ofTetrahymena thermophila is sequenced and analyzed. Conservation in this single-celled ciliate of some features normally observed in only multicellular organisms sheds light on early eukaryotic evolution.
doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0040286
PMCID: PMC1557398  PMID: 16933976
20.  Correction: Serendipitous discovery of Wolbachia genomes in multiple Drosophila species 
Genome Biology  2005;6(7):402.
A correction to Serendipitous discovery of Wolbachia genomes in multiple Drosophila species by SL Salzberg, JC Dunning Hotopp, AL Delcher, M Pop, DR Smith, MB Eisen and WC Nelson. Genome Biology 2005, 6:R23
doi:10.1186/gb-2005-6-7-402
PMCID: PMC1175986  PMID: 15998463
21.  Serendipitous discovery of Wolbachia genomes in multiple Drosophila species 
Genome Biology  2005;6(3):R23.
By searching the publicly available repository of DNA sequencing trace data, we discovered three new species of the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis in three different species of fruit fly: Drosophila ananassae, D. simulans, and D. mojavensis.
Background
The Trace Archive is a repository for the raw, unanalyzed data generated by large-scale genome sequencing projects. The existence of this data offers scientists the possibility of discovering additional genomic sequences beyond those originally sequenced. In particular, if the source DNA for a sequencing project came from a species that was colonized by another organism, then the project may yield substantial amounts of genomic DNA, including near-complete genomes, from the symbiotic or parasitic organism.
Results
By searching the publicly available repository of DNA sequencing trace data, we discovered three new species of the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis in three different species of fruit fly: Drosophila ananassae, D. simulans, and D. mojavensis. We extracted all sequences with partial matches to a previously sequenced Wolbachia strain and assembled those sequences using customized software. For one of the three new species, the data recovered were sufficient to produce an assembly that covers more than 95% of the genome; for a second species the data produce the equivalent of a 'light shotgun' sampling of the genome, covering an estimated 75-80% of the genome; and for the third species the data cover approximately 6-7% of the genome.
Conclusions
The results of this study reveal an unexpected benefit of depositing raw data in a central genome sequence repository: new species can be discovered within this data. The differences between these three new Wolbachia genomes and the previously sequenced strain revealed numerous rearrangements and insertions within each lineage and hundreds of novel genes. The three new genomes, with annotation, have been deposited in GenBank.
doi:10.1186/gb-2005-6-3-r23
PMCID: PMC1088942  PMID: 15774024
22.  Efficient decoding algorithms for generalized hidden Markov model gene finders 
BMC Bioinformatics  2005;6:16.
Background
The Generalized Hidden Markov Model (GHMM) has proven a useful framework for the task of computational gene prediction in eukaryotic genomes, due to its flexibility and probabilistic underpinnings. As the focus of the gene finding community shifts toward the use of homology information to improve prediction accuracy, extensions to the basic GHMM model are being explored as possible ways to integrate this homology information into the prediction process. Particularly prominent among these extensions are those techniques which call for the simultaneous prediction of genes in two or more genomes at once, thereby increasing significantly the computational cost of prediction and highlighting the importance of speed and memory efficiency in the implementation of the underlying GHMM algorithms. Unfortunately, the task of implementing an efficient GHMM-based gene finder is already a nontrivial one, and it can be expected that this task will only grow more onerous as our models increase in complexity.
Results
As a first step toward addressing the implementation challenges of these next-generation systems, we describe in detail two software architectures for GHMM-based gene finders, one comprising the common array-based approach, and the other a highly optimized algorithm which requires significantly less memory while achieving virtually identical speed. We then show how both of these architectures can be accelerated by a factor of two by optimizing their content sensors. We finish with a brief illustration of the impact these optimizations have had on the feasibility of our new homology-based gene finder, TWAIN.
Conclusions
In describing a number of optimizations for GHMM-based gene finders and making available two complete open-source software systems embodying these methods, it is our hope that others will be more enabled to explore promising extensions to the GHMM framework, thereby improving the state-of-the-art in gene prediction techniques.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-6-16
PMCID: PMC552317  PMID: 15667658
23.  Versatile and open software for comparing large genomes 
Genome Biology  2004;5(2):R12.
The newest version of MUMmer easily handles comparisons of large eukaryotic genomes at varying evolutionary distances, as demonstrated by applications to multiple genomes.
The newest version of MUMmer easily handles comparisons of large eukaryotic genomes at varying evolutionary distances, as demonstrated by applications to multiple genomes. Two new graphical viewing tools provide alternative ways to analyze genome alignments. The new system is the first version of MUMmer to be released as open-source software. This allows other developers to contribute to the code base and freely redistribute the code. The MUMmer sources are available at .
doi:10.1186/gb-2004-5-2-r12
PMCID: PMC395750  PMID: 14759262
24.  Improving the Arabidopsis genome annotation using maximal transcript alignment assemblies 
Nucleic Acids Research  2003;31(19):5654-5666.
The spliced alignment of expressed sequence data to genomic sequence has proven a key tool in the comprehensive annotation of genes in eukaryotic genomes. A novel algorithm was developed to assemble clusters of overlapping transcript alignments (ESTs and full-length cDNAs) into maximal alignment assemblies, thereby comprehensively incorporating all available transcript data and capturing subtle splicing variations. Complete and partial gene structures identified by this method were used to improve The Institute for Genomic Research Arabidopsis genome annotation (TIGR release v.4.0). The alignment assemblies permitted the automated modeling of several novel genes and >1000 alternative splicing variations as well as updates (including UTR annotations) to nearly half of the ∼27 000 annotated protein coding genes. The algorithm of the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA) tool is described, as well as the results of automated updates to Arabidopsis gene annotations.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkg770
PMCID: PMC206470  PMID: 14500829
25.  PROBEmer: a web-based software tool for selecting optimal DNA oligos 
Nucleic Acids Research  2003;31(13):3746-3750.
PROBEmer (http://probemer.cs.loyola.edu) is a web-based software tool that enables a researcher to select optimal oligos for PCR applications and multiplex detection platforms including oligonucleotide microarrays and bead-based arrays. Given two groups of nucleic-acid sequences, a target group and a non-target group, the software identifies oligo sequences that occur in members of the target group, but not in the non-target group. To help predict potential cross hybridization, PROBEmer computes all near neighbors in the non-target group and displays their alignments. The software has been used to obtain genus-specific prokaryotic probes based on the 16S rRNA gene, gene-specific probes for expression analyses and PCR primers. In this paper, we describe how to use PROBEmer, the computational methods it employs, and experimental results for oligos identified by this software tool.
PMCID: PMC168975  PMID: 12824409

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