PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-7 (7)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  The zebrafish reference genome sequence and its relationship to the human genome 
Howe, Kerstin | Clark, Matthew D. | Torroja, Carlos F. | Torrance, James | Berthelot, Camille | Muffato, Matthieu | Collins, John E. | Humphray, Sean | McLaren, Karen | Matthews, Lucy | McLaren, Stuart | Sealy, Ian | Caccamo, Mario | Churcher, Carol | Scott, Carol | Barrett, Jeffrey C. | Koch, Romke | Rauch, Gerd-Jörg | White, Simon | Chow, William | Kilian, Britt | Quintais, Leonor T. | Guerra-Assunção, José A. | Zhou, Yi | Gu, Yong | Yen, Jennifer | Vogel, Jan-Hinnerk | Eyre, Tina | Redmond, Seth | Banerjee, Ruby | Chi, Jianxiang | Fu, Beiyuan | Langley, Elizabeth | Maguire, Sean F. | Laird, Gavin K. | Lloyd, David | Kenyon, Emma | Donaldson, Sarah | Sehra, Harminder | Almeida-King, Jeff | Loveland, Jane | Trevanion, Stephen | Jones, Matt | Quail, Mike | Willey, Dave | Hunt, Adrienne | Burton, John | Sims, Sarah | McLay, Kirsten | Plumb, Bob | Davis, Joy | Clee, Chris | Oliver, Karen | Clark, Richard | Riddle, Clare | Eliott, David | Threadgold, Glen | Harden, Glenn | Ware, Darren | Mortimer, Beverly | Kerry, Giselle | Heath, Paul | Phillimore, Benjamin | Tracey, Alan | Corby, Nicole | Dunn, Matthew | Johnson, Christopher | Wood, Jonathan | Clark, Susan | Pelan, Sarah | Griffiths, Guy | Smith, Michelle | Glithero, Rebecca | Howden, Philip | Barker, Nicholas | Stevens, Christopher | Harley, Joanna | Holt, Karen | Panagiotidis, Georgios | Lovell, Jamieson | Beasley, Helen | Henderson, Carl | Gordon, Daria | Auger, Katherine | Wright, Deborah | Collins, Joanna | Raisen, Claire | Dyer, Lauren | Leung, Kenric | Robertson, Lauren | Ambridge, Kirsty | Leongamornlert, Daniel | McGuire, Sarah | Gilderthorp, Ruth | Griffiths, Coline | Manthravadi, Deepa | Nichol, Sarah | Barker, Gary | Whitehead, Siobhan | Kay, Michael | Brown, Jacqueline | Murnane, Clare | Gray, Emma | Humphries, Matthew | Sycamore, Neil | Barker, Darren | Saunders, David | Wallis, Justene | Babbage, Anne | Hammond, Sian | Mashreghi-Mohammadi, Maryam | Barr, Lucy | Martin, Sancha | Wray, Paul | Ellington, Andrew | Matthews, Nicholas | Ellwood, Matthew | Woodmansey, Rebecca | Clark, Graham | Cooper, James | Tromans, Anthony | Grafham, Darren | Skuce, Carl | Pandian, Richard | Andrews, Robert | Harrison, Elliot | Kimberley, Andrew | Garnett, Jane | Fosker, Nigel | Hall, Rebekah | Garner, Patrick | Kelly, Daniel | Bird, Christine | Palmer, Sophie | Gehring, Ines | Berger, Andrea | Dooley, Christopher M. | Ersan-Ürün, Zübeyde | Eser, Cigdem | Geiger, Horst | Geisler, Maria | Karotki, Lena | Kirn, Anette | Konantz, Judith | Konantz, Martina | Oberländer, Martina | Rudolph-Geiger, Silke | Teucke, Mathias | Osoegawa, Kazutoyo | Zhu, Baoli | Rapp, Amanda | Widaa, Sara | Langford, Cordelia | Yang, Fengtang | Carter, Nigel P. | Harrow, Jennifer | Ning, Zemin | Herrero, Javier | Searle, Steve M. J. | Enright, Anton | Geisler, Robert | Plasterk, Ronald H. A. | Lee, Charles | Westerfield, Monte | de Jong, Pieter J. | Zon, Leonard I. | Postlethwait, John H. | Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane | Hubbard, Tim J. P. | Crollius, Hugues Roest | Rogers, Jane | Stemple, Derek L.
Nature  2013;496(7446):498-503.
Zebrafish have become a popular organism for the study of vertebrate gene function1,2. The virtually transparent embryos of this species, and the ability to accelerate genetic studies by gene knockdown or overexpression, have led to the widespread use of zebrafish in the detailed investigation of vertebrate gene function and increasingly, the study of human genetic disease3–5. However, for effective modelling of human genetic disease it is important to understand the extent to which zebrafish genes and gene structures are related to orthologous human genes. To examine this, we generated a high-quality sequence assembly of the zebrafish genome, made up of an overlapping set of completely sequenced large-insert clones that were ordered and oriented using a high-resolution high-density meiotic map. Detailed automatic and manual annotation provides evidence of more than 26,000 protein-coding genes6, the largest gene set of any vertebrate so far sequenced. Comparison to the human reference genome shows that approximately 70% of human genes have at least one obvious zebrafish orthologue. In addition, the high quality of this genome assembly provides a clearer understanding of key genomic features such as a unique repeat content, a scarcity of pseudogenes, an enrichment of zebrafish-specific genes on chromosome 4 and chromosomal regions that influence sex determination.
doi:10.1038/nature12111
PMCID: PMC3703927  PMID: 23594743
2.  Zebrafish models of cancer: progress and future challenges☆ 
The need for scalable strategies to probe the biological consequences of candidate cancer genes has never been more pressing. The zebrafish, with its capacity for high-throughput transgenesis, in vivo imaging and chemical/genetic screening, has ideal features for undertaking this task. Unique biological insights from zebrafish have already led to the identification of novel oncogenic drivers and small molecules being used to treat the human cancer. This review summarizes the recent main findings and describes pertinent areas where the zebrafish can greatly contribute to our understanding of cancer biology and treatment.
doi:10.1016/j.gde.2013.11.003
PMCID: PMC4003353  PMID: 24657535
3.  A systematic genome-wide analysis of zebrafish protein-coding gene function 
Nature  2013;496(7446):494-497.
Since the publication of the human reference genome, the identities of specific genes associated with human diseases are being discovered at an enormous rate. A central problem is that the biological activity of these genes is often unclear. Detailed investigations in vertebrate model organisms, typically mice, have been essential for understanding the activities of many orthologues of these disease-associated genes. Although gene-targeting approaches1-3 and phenotype analysis have led to a detailed understanding of nearly 6,000 protein-coding genes3,4, this number falls significantly short of all >22,000 mouse protein-coding genes5. Similarly, in zebrafish genetics, one-by-one gene studies using positional cloning6, insertional mutagenesis7-9, antisense morpholino oligonucleotides10, targeted re-sequencing11-13 and zinc finger and TAL endonucleases14-17 have made significant contributions to our understanding of the biological activity of vertebrate genes, but the number of genes studied again falls well short of the >26,000 zebrafish protein-coding genes18. Importantly, for both mice and zebrafish, none of these strategies is particularly suited to the rapid generation of knockouts in thousands of genes and the assessment of their biological activity. Enabled by a well-annotated zebrafish reference genome sequence18,19, high-throughput sequencing and efficient chemical mutagenesis, we describe an active project that aims to identify and phenotype disruptive mutations in every zebrafish protein-coding gene. Thus far we have identified potentially disruptive mutations in more than 38% of all known protein coding genes. We have developed a multi-allelic phenotyping scheme to efficiently assess the effects of each allele during embryogenesis and have analysed the phenotypic consequences of over 1000 alleles. All mutant alleles and data are available to the community and our phenotyping scheme is adaptable to phenotypic analysis beyond embryogenesis.
doi:10.1038/nature11992
PMCID: PMC3743023  PMID: 23594742
4.  The genetic heterogeneity and mutational burden of engineered melanomas in zebrafish models 
Genome Biology  2013;14(10):R113.
Background
Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer. Expression of oncogenic BRAF or NRAS, which are frequently mutated in human melanomas, promote the formation of nevi but are not sufficient for tumorigenesis. Even with germline mutated p53, these engineered melanomas present with variable onset and pathology, implicating additional somatic mutations in a multi-hit tumorigenic process.
Results
To decipher the genetics of these melanomas, we sequence the protein coding exons of 53 primary melanomas generated from several BRAFV600E or NRASQ61K driven transgenic zebrafish lines. We find that engineered zebrafish melanomas show an overall low mutation burden, which has a strong, inverse association with the number of initiating germline drivers. Although tumors reveal distinct mutation spectrums, they show mostly C > T transitions without UV light exposure, and enrichment of mutations in melanogenesis, p53 and MAPK signaling. Importantly, a recurrent amplification occurring with pre-configured drivers BRAFV600E and p53-/- suggests a novel path of BRAF cooperativity through the protein kinase A pathway.
Conclusion
This is the first analysis of a melanoma mutational landscape in the absence of UV light, where tumors manifest with remarkably low mutation burden and high heterogeneity. Genotype specific amplification of protein kinase A in cooperation with BRAF and p53 mutation suggests the involvement of melanogenesis in these tumors. This work is important for defining the spectrum of events in BRAF or NRAS driven melanoma in the absence of UV light, and for informed exploitation of models such as transgenic zebrafish to better understand mechanisms leading to human melanoma formation.
doi:10.1186/gb-2013-14-10-r113
PMCID: PMC3983654  PMID: 24148783
5.  Use of Purified Clostridium difficile Spores To Facilitate Evaluation of Health Care Disinfection Regimens▿ †  
Applied and Environmental Microbiology  2010;76(20):6895-6900.
Clostridium difficile is a major cause of antibiotic-associated diarrheal disease in many parts of the world. In recent years, distinct genetic variants of C. difficile that cause severe disease and persist within health care settings have emerged. Highly resistant and infectious C. difficile spores are proposed to be the main vectors of environmental persistence and host transmission, so methods to accurately monitor spores and their inactivation are urgently needed. Here we describe simple quantitative methods, based on purified C. difficile spores and a murine transmission model, for evaluating health care disinfection regimens. We demonstrate that disinfectants that contain strong oxidizing active ingredients, such as hydrogen peroxide, are very effective in inactivating pure spores and blocking spore-mediated transmission. Complete inactivation of 106 pure C. difficile spores on indicator strips, a six-log reduction, and a standard measure of stringent disinfection regimens require at least 5 min of exposure to hydrogen peroxide vapor (HPV; 400 ppm). In contrast, a 1-min treatment with HPV was required to disinfect an environment that was heavily contaminated with C. difficile spores (17 to 29 spores/cm2) and block host transmission. Thus, pure C. difficile spores facilitate practical methods for evaluating the efficacy of C. difficile spore disinfection regimens and bringing scientific acumen to C. difficile infection control.
doi:10.1128/AEM.00718-10
PMCID: PMC2953018  PMID: 20802075
6.  α-Galactosidase A-Tat Fusion Enhances Storage Reduction in Hearts and Kidneys of Fabry Mice 
Molecular Medicine  2010;16(5-6):216-221.
The protein transduction domain from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Tat allows proteins to penetrate the cell membrane. Enhanced cellular uptake of therapeutic proteins could benefit a number of disorders. This is especially true for lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) where enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and gene therapy have been developed. We developed a novel recombinant lentiviral vector (LV) that engineers expression of α-galactosidase A (α-gal A)-Tat fusion protein for correction of Fabry disease, the second-most prevalent LSD with manifestations in the brain, kidney and heart. In vitro experiments confirmed mannose-6-phosphate independent uptake of the fusion factor. Next, concentrated therapeutic LV was injected into neonatal Fabry mice. Analysis of tissues at 26 wks demonstrated similar α-gal A enzyme activities but enhanced globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) reduction in hearts and kidneys compared with the α-gal A LV control. This strategy might advance not only gene therapy for Fabry disease and other LSDs, but also ERT, especially for cardiac Fabry disease.
doi:10.2119/molmed.2009.00163
PMCID: PMC2864812  PMID: 20454522
7.  The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome 
Ross, Mark T. | Grafham, Darren V. | Coffey, Alison J. | Scherer, Steven | McLay, Kirsten | Muzny, Donna | Platzer, Matthias | Howell, Gareth R. | Burrows, Christine | Bird, Christine P. | Frankish, Adam | Lovell, Frances L. | Howe, Kevin L. | Ashurst, Jennifer L. | Fulton, Robert S. | Sudbrak, Ralf | Wen, Gaiping | Jones, Matthew C. | Hurles, Matthew E. | Andrews, T. Daniel | Scott, Carol E. | Searle, Stephen | Ramser, Juliane | Whittaker, Adam | Deadman, Rebecca | Carter, Nigel P. | Hunt, Sarah E. | Chen, Rui | Cree, Andrew | Gunaratne, Preethi | Havlak, Paul | Hodgson, Anne | Metzker, Michael L. | Richards, Stephen | Scott, Graham | Steffen, David | Sodergren, Erica | Wheeler, David A. | Worley, Kim C. | Ainscough, Rachael | Ambrose, Kerrie D. | Ansari-Lari, M. Ali | Aradhya, Swaroop | Ashwell, Robert I. S. | Babbage, Anne K. | Bagguley, Claire L. | Ballabio, Andrea | Banerjee, Ruby | Barker, Gary E. | Barlow, Karen F. | Barrett, Ian P. | Bates, Karen N. | Beare, David M. | Beasley, Helen | Beasley, Oliver | Beck, Alfred | Bethel, Graeme | Blechschmidt, Karin | Brady, Nicola | Bray-Allen, Sarah | Bridgeman, Anne M. | Brown, Andrew J. | Brown, Mary J. | Bonnin, David | Bruford, Elspeth A. | Buhay, Christian | Burch, Paula | Burford, Deborah | Burgess, Joanne | Burrill, Wayne | Burton, John | Bye, Jackie M. | Carder, Carol | Carrel, Laura | Chako, Joseph | Chapman, Joanne C. | Chavez, Dean | Chen, Ellson | Chen, Guan | Chen, Yuan | Chen, Zhijian | Chinault, Craig | Ciccodicola, Alfredo | Clark, Sue Y. | Clarke, Graham | Clee, Chris M. | Clegg, Sheila | Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin | Clifford, Karen | Cobley, Vicky | Cole, Charlotte G. | Conquer, Jen S. | Corby, Nicole | Connor, Richard E. | David, Robert | Davies, Joy | Davis, Clay | Davis, John | Delgado, Oliver | DeShazo, Denise | Dhami, Pawandeep | Ding, Yan | Dinh, Huyen | Dodsworth, Steve | Draper, Heather | Dugan-Rocha, Shannon | Dunham, Andrew | Dunn, Matthew | Durbin, K. James | Dutta, Ireena | Eades, Tamsin | Ellwood, Matthew | Emery-Cohen, Alexandra | Errington, Helen | Evans, Kathryn L. | Faulkner, Louisa | Francis, Fiona | Frankland, John | Fraser, Audrey E. | Galgoczy, Petra | Gilbert, James | Gill, Rachel | Glöckner, Gernot | Gregory, Simon G. | Gribble, Susan | Griffiths, Coline | Grocock, Russell | Gu, Yanghong | Gwilliam, Rhian | Hamilton, Cerissa | Hart, Elizabeth A. | Hawes, Alicia | Heath, Paul D. | Heitmann, Katja | Hennig, Steffen | Hernandez, Judith | Hinzmann, Bernd | Ho, Sarah | Hoffs, Michael | Howden, Phillip J. | Huckle, Elizabeth J. | Hume, Jennifer | Hunt, Paul J. | Hunt, Adrienne R. | Isherwood, Judith | Jacob, Leni | Johnson, David | Jones, Sally | de Jong, Pieter J. | Joseph, Shirin S. | Keenan, Stephen | Kelly, Susan | Kershaw, Joanne K. | Khan, Ziad | Kioschis, Petra | Klages, Sven | Knights, Andrew J. | Kosiura, Anna | Kovar-Smith, Christie | Laird, Gavin K. | Langford, Cordelia | Lawlor, Stephanie | Leversha, Margaret | Lewis, Lora | Liu, Wen | Lloyd, Christine | Lloyd, David M. | Loulseged, Hermela | Loveland, Jane E. | Lovell, Jamieson D. | Lozado, Ryan | Lu, Jing | Lyne, Rachael | Ma, Jie | Maheshwari, Manjula | Matthews, Lucy H. | McDowall, Jennifer | McLaren, Stuart | McMurray, Amanda | Meidl, Patrick | Meitinger, Thomas | Milne, Sarah | Miner, George | Mistry, Shailesh L. | Morgan, Margaret | Morris, Sidney | Müller, Ines | Mullikin, James C. | Nguyen, Ngoc | Nordsiek, Gabriele | Nyakatura, Gerald | O’Dell, Christopher N. | Okwuonu, Geoffery | Palmer, Sophie | Pandian, Richard | Parker, David | Parrish, Julia | Pasternak, Shiran | Patel, Dina | Pearce, Alex V. | Pearson, Danita M. | Pelan, Sarah E. | Perez, Lesette | Porter, Keith M. | Ramsey, Yvonne | Reichwald, Kathrin | Rhodes, Susan | Ridler, Kerry A. | Schlessinger, David | Schueler, Mary G. | Sehra, Harminder K. | Shaw-Smith, Charles | Shen, Hua | Sheridan, Elizabeth M. | Shownkeen, Ratna | Skuce, Carl D. | Smith, Michelle L. | Sotheran, Elizabeth C. | Steingruber, Helen E. | Steward, Charles A. | Storey, Roy | Swann, R. Mark | Swarbreck, David | Tabor, Paul E. | Taudien, Stefan | Taylor, Tineace | Teague, Brian | Thomas, Karen | Thorpe, Andrea | Timms, Kirsten | Tracey, Alan | Trevanion, Steve | Tromans, Anthony C. | d’Urso, Michele | Verduzco, Daniel | Villasana, Donna | Waldron, Lenee | Wall, Melanie | Wang, Qiaoyan | Warren, James | Warry, Georgina L. | Wei, Xuehong | West, Anthony | Whitehead, Siobhan L. | Whiteley, Mathew N. | Wilkinson, Jane E. | Willey, David L. | Williams, Gabrielle | Williams, Leanne | Williamson, Angela | Williamson, Helen | Wilming, Laurens | Woodmansey, Rebecca L. | Wray, Paul W. | Yen, Jennifer | Zhang, Jingkun | Zhou, Jianling | Zoghbi, Huda | Zorilla, Sara | Buck, David | Reinhardt, Richard | Poustka, Annemarie | Rosenthal, André | Lehrach, Hans | Meindl, Alfons | Minx, Patrick J. | Hillier, LaDeana W. | Willard, Huntington F. | Wilson, Richard K. | Waterston, Robert H. | Rice, Catherine M. | Vaudin, Mark | Coulson, Alan | Nelson, David L. | Weinstock, George | Sulston, John E. | Durbin, Richard | Hubbard, Tim | Gibbs, Richard A. | Beck, Stephan | Rogers, Jane | Bentley, David R.
Nature  2005;434(7031):325-337.
The human X chromosome has a unique biology that was shaped by its evolution as the sex chromosome shared by males and females. We have determined 99.3% of the euchromatic sequence of the X chromosome. Our analysis illustrates the autosomal origin of the mammalian sex chromosomes, the stepwise process that led to the progressive loss of recombination between X and Y, and the extent of subsequent degradation of the Y chromosome. LINE1 repeat elements cover one-third of the X chromosome, with a distribution that is consistent with their proposed role as way stations in the process of X-chromosome inactivation. We found 1,098 genes in the sequence, of which 99 encode proteins expressed in testis and in various tumour types. A disproportionately high number of mendelian diseases are documented for the X chromosome. Of this number, 168 have been explained by mutations in 113 X-linked genes, which in many cases were characterized with the aid of the DNA sequence.
doi:10.1038/nature03440
PMCID: PMC2665286  PMID: 15772651

Results 1-7 (7)