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1.  Recessive mutations in a distal PTF1A enhancer cause isolated pancreatic agenesis 
Nature genetics  2013;46(1):61-64.
The contribution of cis-regulatory mutations to human disease remains poorly understood. Whole genome sequencing can identify all non-coding variants, yet discrimination of causal regulatory mutations represents a formidable challenge. We used epigenomic annotation in hESC-derived embryonic pancreatic progenitor cells to guide the interpretation of whole genome sequences from patients with isolated pancreatic agenesis. This uncovered six different recessive mutations in a previously uncharacterized ~400bp sequence located 25kb downstream of PTF1A (pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a) in ten families with pancreatic agenesis. We show that this region acts as a developmental enhancer of PTF1A and that the mutations abolish enhancer activity. These mutations are the most common cause of isolated pancreatic agenesis. Integrating genome sequencing and epigenomic annotation in a disease-relevant cell type can uncover novel non-coding elements underlying human development and disease.
doi:10.1038/ng.2826
PMCID: PMC4131753  PMID: 24212882
2.  GATA6 haploinsufficiency causes pancreatic agenesis in humans 
Nature genetics  2011;44(1):20-22.
Understanding the regulation of pancreatic development is key for efforts to develop new regenerative therapeutic approaches for diabetes. Rare mutations in PDX1 and PTF1A can cause pancreatic agenesis, however, most instances of this disorder are of unknown origin. We report de novo heterozygous inactivating mutations in GATA6 in 15/27 (56%) individuals with pancreatic agenesis. These findings define the most common cause of human pancreatic agenesis and establish a key role for the transcription factor GATA6 in human pancreatic development.
doi:10.1038/ng.1035
PMCID: PMC4062962  PMID: 22158542
3.  Novel FOXF1 mutations in sporadic and familial cases of Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia with Misaligned Pulmonary Veins imply a role for its DNA binding domain 
Sen, Partha | Yang, Yaping | Navarro, Colby | Silva, Iris | Szafranski, Przemyslaw | Kolodziejska, Katarzyna E. | Dharmadhikari, Avinash V. | Mostafa, Hasnaa | Kozakewich, Harry | Kearney, Debra | Cahill, John B. | Whitt, Merrissa | Bilic, Masha | Margraf, Linda | Charles, Adrian | Goldblatt, Jack | Gibson, Kathleen | Lantz, Patrick | Garvin, Julian | Petty, John | Kiblawi, Zeina | Zuppan, Craig | McConkie-Rosell, Allyn | McDonald, Marie T. | Peterson-Carmichael, Stacey L. | Gaede, Jane T. | Shivanna, Binoy | Schady, Deborah | Friedlich, Philippe S. | Hays, Stephen R. | Palafoll, Irene Valenzuela | Siebers-Renelt, Ulrike | Bohring, Axel | Finn, Laura S. | Siebert, Joseph R. | Galambos, Csaba | Nguyen, Lananh | Riley, Melissa | Chassaing, Nicolas | Vigouroux, Adeline | Rocha, Gustavo | Fernandes, Susana | Brumbaugh, Jane | Roberts, Kari | Ho-ming, Luk | Lo, Ivan | Lam, Stephen | Gerychova, Romana | Jezova, Marta | Valaskova, Iveta | Fellmann, Florence | Afshar, Katayoun | Giannoni, Eric | Muhlethaler, Vincent | Liang, Jinlong | Beckmann, Jacques S. | Lioy, Janet | Deshmukh, Hitesh | Srinivasan, Lakshmi | Swarr, Daniel T. | Sloman, Melissa | Shaw-Smith, Charles | van Loon, Rosa Laura | Hagman, Cecilia | Sznajer, Yves | Barrea, Catherine | Galant, Christine | Detaille, Thierry | Wambach, Jennifer A. | Cole, F. Sessions | Hamvas, Aaron | Prince, Lawrence S. | Diderich, Karin E.M. | Brooks, Alice S. | Verdijk, Rob M. | Ravindranathan, Hari | Sugo, Ella | Mowat, David | Baker, Michael L. | Langston, Claire | Welty, Stephen | Stankiewicz, Pawel
Human mutation  2013;34(6):801-811.
Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV) is a rare and lethal developmental disorder of the lung defined by a constellation of characteristic histopathological features. Non-pulmonary anomalies involving organs of gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and genitourinary systems have been identified in approximately 80% of patients with ACD/MPV. We have collected DNA and pathological samples from more than 90 infants with ACD/MPV and their family members. Since the publication of our initial report of four point mutations and ten deletions, we have identified an additional thirty eight novel nonsynonymous mutations of FOXF1 (nine nonsense, seven frameshift, one inframe deletion, twenty missense, and one no stop). This report represents an up to date list of all known FOXF1 mutations to the best of our knowledge. Majority of the cases are sporadic whereas four familial cases with three showing maternal inheritance, consistent with paternal imprinting of the gene. Twenty five mutations (60%) are located within the putative DNA binding domain, indicating its plausible role in gene regulation. Five mutations map to the second exon. We identified two additional genic and eight genomic deletions upstream to FOXF1. These results corroborate and extend our previous observations and further establish involvement of FOXF1 in ACD/MPV and lung organogenesis.
doi:10.1002/humu.22313
PMCID: PMC3663886  PMID: 23505205
Lung; Development; Angiogenesis; ACD/MPV; FOXF1; Imprinting
4.  GATA6 Mutations Cause a Broad Phenotypic Spectrum of Diabetes From Pancreatic Agenesis to Adult-Onset Diabetes Without Exocrine Insufficiency 
Diabetes  2013;62(3):993-997.
We recently reported de novo GATA6 mutations as the most common cause of pancreatic agenesis, accounting for 15 of 27 (56%) patients with insulin-treated neonatal diabetes and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency requiring enzyme replacement therapy. We investigated the role of GATA6 mutations in 171 subjects with neonatal diabetes of unknown genetic etiology from a cohort of 795 patients with neonatal diabetes. Mutations in known genes had been confirmed in 624 patients (including 15 GATA6 mutations). Sequencing of the remaining 171 patients identified nine new case subjects (24 of 795, 3%). Pancreatic agenesis was present in 21 case subjects (six new); two patients had permanent neonatal diabetes with no enzyme supplementation and one had transient neonatal diabetes. Four parents with heterozygous GATA6 mutations were diagnosed with diabetes outside the neonatal period (12–46 years). Subclinical exocrine insufficiency was demonstrated by low fecal elastase in three of four diabetic patients who did not receive enzyme supplementation. One parent with a mosaic mutation was not diabetic but had a heart malformation. Extrapancreatic features were observed in all 24 probands and three parents, with congenital heart defects most frequent (83%). Heterozygous GATA6 mutations cause a wide spectrum of diabetes manifestations, ranging from pancreatic agenesis to adult-onset diabetes with subclinical or no exocrine insufficiency.
doi:10.2337/db12-0885
PMCID: PMC3581234  PMID: 23223019
5.  Clinical Geneticists’ Views of VACTERL/VATER Association 
VACTERL association (sometimes termed “VATER association” depending on which component features are included) is typically defined by the presence of at least three of the following congenital malformations, which tend to statistically co-occur in affected individuals: Vertebral anomalies, Anal atresia, Cardiac malformations, Tracheo-Esophageal fistula, Renal anomalies, and Limb abnormalities. Although the clinical criteria for VACTERL association may appear to be straightforward, there is wide variability in the way clinical geneticists define the disorder and the genetic testing strategy they use when confronted with an affected patient. In order to describe this variability and determine the most commonly used definitions and testing modalities, we present the results of survey responses by 121 clinical geneticists. We discuss the results of the survey responses, provide a literature review and commentary from a group of physicians who are currently involved in clinical and laboratory-based research on VACTERL association, and offer an algorithm for genetic testing in patients with this association.
doi:10.1002/ajmg.a.35638
PMCID: PMC3507421  PMID: 23165726
VACTERL association; VATER association
6.  16q24.1 microdeletion in a premature newborn: usefulness of array-based comparative genomic hybridation (array CGH) in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn 
Objective
Report of a 16q24.1 deletion in a premature newborn, demonstrating the usefulness of array-CGH in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) and multiple congenital malformations.
Design
Descriptive case report
Setting
Genetic department and neonatal intensive care unit of a tertiary care children’s hospital
Patient
We report the case of a preterm male infant, born at 26 weeks of gestation. A cardiac malformation and bilateral hydronephrosis were diagnosed at 19 weeks of gestation. Karyotype analysis was normal and a 22q11.2 microdeletion was excluded by FISH analysis. A Caesarean section was performed due to fetal distress. The patient developed persistent pulmonary hypertension unresponsive to mechanical ventilation and nitric oxide treatment and expired at 16 hours of life. An autopsy revealed partial atrio-ventricular canal malformation and showed bilateral dilatation of the renal pelvocaliceal system with bilateral ureteral stenosis, and annular pancreas. Array-CGH analysis (Agilent oligoNT 44K) showed an interstitial microdeletion encompassing the FOX gene cluster in 16q24.1. Review of the pulmonary microscopic examination showed the characteristic features of alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV). Some features were less prominent due to the gestational age.
Conclusions
Our review of the literature shows that ACD/MPV is rare, but probably underreported. Prematurity is not a usual presentation and histological features are difficult to interpret. In our case, array-CGH revealed a 16q24.1 deletion leading to the final diagnosis of ACD/MPV. It emphasises the usefulness of array-CGH analysis as a diagnostic tool with implications for both prognosis and management decisions in newborns with refractory PPHN and multiple congenital malformations.
doi:10.1097/PCC.0b013e3182192c96
PMCID: PMC3655521  PMID: 21572369
persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn; alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins; ACD/MPV; 16q24.1; neonate; array-CGH
7.  High incidence of recurrent copy number variants in patients with isolated and syndromic Müllerian aplasia 
Journal of medical genetics  2011;48(3):197-204.
Background
Congenital malformations involving the Müllerian ducts are observed in around 5% of infertile women. Complete aplasia of the uterus, cervix, and upper vagina, also termed Müllerian aplasia or Mayer–Rokitansky–Kuster–Hauser (MRKH) syndrome, occurs with an incidence of around 1 in 4500 female births, and occurs in both isolated and syndromic forms. Previous reports have suggested that a proportion of cases, especially syndromic cases, are caused by variation in copy number at different genomic loci.
Methods
In order to obtain an overview of the contribution of copy number variation to both isolated and syndromic forms of Müllerian aplasia, copy number assays were performed in a series of 63 cases, of which 25 were syndromic and 38 isolated.
Results
A high incidence (9/63, 14%) of recurrent copy number variants in this cohort is reported here. These comprised four cases of microdeletion at 16p11.2, an autism susceptibility locus not previously associated with Müllerian aplasia, four cases of microdeletion at 17q12, and one case of a distal 22q11.2 microdeletion. Microdeletions at 16p11.2 and 17q12 were found in 4/38 (10.5%) cases with isolated Müllerian aplasia, and at 16p11.2, 17q12 and 22q11.2 (distal) in 5/25 cases (20%) with syndromic Müllerian aplasia.
Conclusion
The finding of microdeletion at 16p11.2 in 2/38 (5%) of isolated and 2/25 (8%) of syndromic cases suggests a significant contribution of this copy number variant alone to the pathogenesis of Müllerian aplasia. Overall, the high incidence of recurrent copy number variants in all forms of Müllerian aplasia has implications for the understanding of the aetiopathogenesis of the condition, and for genetic counselling in families affected by it.
doi:10.1136/jmg.2010.082412
PMCID: PMC3322361  PMID: 21278390
8.  Review of genetic factors in intestinal malrotation 
Pediatric Surgery International  2010;26(8):769-781.
Intestinal malrotation is well covered in the surgical literature from the point of view of operative management, but few reviews to date have attempted to provide a comprehensive examination of the topic from the point of view of aetiology, in particular genetic aetiology. Following a brief overview of molecular embryology of midgut rotation, we present in this article instances of and case reports and case series of intestinal malrotation in which a genetic aetiology is likely. Autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked and chromosomal forms of the disorder are represented. Most occur in syndromic form, that is to say, in association with other malformations. In many instances, recognition of a specific syndrome is possible, one of several examples discussed being the recently described association of intestinal malrotation with alveolar capillary dysplasia, due to mutations in the forkhead box transcription factor FOXF1. New advances in sequencing technology mean that the identification of the genes mutated in these disorders is more accessible than ever, and paediatric surgeons are encouraged to refer to their colleagues in clinical genetics where a genetic aetiology seems likely.
doi:10.1007/s00383-010-2622-5
PMCID: PMC2908440  PMID: 20549505
Intestinal malrotation; FOXF1; Genetics; Embryology
9.  Genetic factors in esophageal atresia, tracheo-esophageal fistula and the VACTERL association: Roles for FOXF1 and the 16q24.1 FOX transcription factor gene cluster, and review of the literature 
Esophageal atresia with/without tracheo-esophageal fistula is a relatively common malformation, occurring in around 1 in 3500 births. In around half of cases, additional malformations are present, forming either a syndrome of known genetic aetiology, or a recognised association, of which the VACTERL association (Vertebral anomalies, Anal atresia, Cardiac malformations, Tracheo-Esophageal fistula, Renal and Limb malformations) is the most recognised. Recently, microdeletions of the FOX gene cluster at 16q24.1, comprising four genes, FOXF1, MTHFSD, FOXC2 and FOXL1, were reported to cause a phenotype resembling VACTERL association, with vertebral anomalies, gastro-intestinal atresias (esophageal, duodenal and anal), congenital heart malformations, and urinary tract malformations, as well as a rare lethal developmental anomaly of the lung, alveolar capillary dysplasia. This article reviews these new data alongside other genetic causes of syndromic esophageal atresia, and also highlights information from relevant mouse models, particularly those for genes in the Sonic Hedgehog pathway.
doi:10.1016/j.ejmg.2009.10.001
PMCID: PMC2809919  PMID: 19822228
Esophageal atresia; Tracheo-esophageal fistula; VACTERL association; 16q24.1 microdeletion; FOXF1; Sonic hedgehog
10.  Genomic and Genic Deletions of the FOX Gene Cluster on 16q24.1 and Inactivating Mutations of FOXF1 Cause Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia and Other Malformations 
Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV) is a rare, neonatally lethal developmental disorder of the lung with defining histologic abnormalities typically associated with multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Using array CGH analysis, we have identified six overlapping microdeletions encompassing the FOX transcription factor gene cluster in chromosome 16q24.1q24.2 in patients with ACD/MPV and MCA. Subsequently, we have identified four different heterozygous mutations (frameshift, nonsense, and no-stop) in the candidate FOXF1 gene in unrelated patients with sporadic ACD/MPV and MCA. Custom-designed, high-resolution microarray analysis of additional ACD/MPV samples revealed one microdeletion harboring FOXF1 and two distinct microdeletions upstream of FOXF1, implicating a position effect. DNA sequence analysis revealed that in six of nine deletions, both breakpoints occurred in the portions of Alu elements showing eight to 43 base pairs of perfect microhomology, suggesting replication error Microhomology-Mediated Break-Induced Replication (MMBIR)/Fork Stalling and Template Switching (FoSTeS) as a mechanism of their formation. In contrast to the association of point mutations in FOXF1 with bowel malrotation, microdeletions of FOXF1 were associated with hypoplastic left heart syndrome and gastrointestinal atresias, probably due to haploinsufficiency for the neighboring FOXC2 and FOXL1 genes. These differences reveal the phenotypic consequences of gene alterations in cis.
doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2009.05.005
PMCID: PMC2694971  PMID: 19500772
11.  Great vessel development requires biallelic expression of Chd7 and Tbx1 in pharyngeal ectoderm in mice  
The Journal of Clinical Investigation  2009;119(11):3301-3310.
Aortic arch artery patterning defects account for approximately 20% of congenital cardiovascular malformations and are observed frequently in velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS). In the current study, we screened for chromosome rearrangements in patients suspected of VCFS, but who lacked a 22q11 deletion or TBX1 mutation. One individual displayed hemizygous CHD7, which encodes a chromodomain protein. CHD7 haploinsufficiency is the major cause of coloboma, heart defect, atresia choanae, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, and ear anomalies/deafness (CHARGE) syndrome, but this patient lacked the major diagnostic features of coloboma and choanal atresia. Because a subset of CHARGE cases also display 22q11 deletions, we explored the embryological relationship between CHARGE and VCSF using mouse models. The hallmark of Tbx1 haploinsufficiency is hypo/aplasia of the fourth pharyngeal arch artery (PAA) at E10.5. Identical malformations were observed in Chd7 heterozygotes, with resulting aortic arch interruption at later stages. Other than Tbx1, Chd7 is the only gene reported to affect fourth PAA development by haploinsufficiency. Moreover, Tbx1+/–;Chd7+/– double heterozygotes demonstrated a synergistic interaction during fourth PAA, thymus, and ear morphogenesis. We could not rescue PAA morphogenesis by restoring neural crest Chd7 expression. Rather, biallelic expression of Chd7 and Tbx1 in the pharyngeal ectoderm was required for normal PAA development.
doi:10.1172/JCI37561
PMCID: PMC2769172  PMID: 19855134
12.  Genomic and Genic Deletions of the FOX Gene Cluster on 16q24.1 and Inactivating Mutations of FOXF1 Cause Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia and Other Malformations 
Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV) is a rare, neonatally lethal developmental disorder of the lung with defining histologic abnormalities typically associated with multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Using array CGH analysis, we have identified six overlapping microdeletions encompassing the FOX transcription factor gene cluster in chromosome 16q24.1q24.2 in patients with ACD/MPV and MCA. Subsequently, we have identified four different heterozygous mutations (frameshift, nonsense, and no-stop) in the candidate FOXF1 gene in unrelated patients with sporadic ACD/MPV and MCA. Custom-designed, high-resolution microarray analysis of additional ACD/MPV samples revealed one microdeletion harboring FOXF1 and two distinct microdeletions upstream of FOXF1, implicating a position effect. DNA sequence analysis revealed that in six of nine deletions, both breakpoints occurred in the portions of Alu elements showing eight to 43 base pairs of perfect microhomology, suggesting replication error Microhomology-Mediated Break-Induced Replication (MMBIR)/Fork Stalling and Template Switching (FoSTeS) as a mechanism of their formation. In contrast to the association of point mutations in FOXF1 with bowel malrotation, microdeletions of FOXF1 were associated with hypoplastic left heart syndrome and gastrointestinal atresias, probably due to haploinsufficiency for the neighboring FOXC2 and FOXL1 genes. These differences reveal the phenotypic consequences of gene alterations in cis.
doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2009.05.005
PMCID: PMC2694971  PMID: 19500772
13.  The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome 
Ross, Mark T. | Grafham, Darren V. | Coffey, Alison J. | Scherer, Steven | McLay, Kirsten | Muzny, Donna | Platzer, Matthias | Howell, Gareth R. | Burrows, Christine | Bird, Christine P. | Frankish, Adam | Lovell, Frances L. | Howe, Kevin L. | Ashurst, Jennifer L. | Fulton, Robert S. | Sudbrak, Ralf | Wen, Gaiping | Jones, Matthew C. | Hurles, Matthew E. | Andrews, T. Daniel | Scott, Carol E. | Searle, Stephen | Ramser, Juliane | Whittaker, Adam | Deadman, Rebecca | Carter, Nigel P. | Hunt, Sarah E. | Chen, Rui | Cree, Andrew | Gunaratne, Preethi | Havlak, Paul | Hodgson, Anne | Metzker, Michael L. | Richards, Stephen | Scott, Graham | Steffen, David | Sodergren, Erica | Wheeler, David A. | Worley, Kim C. | Ainscough, Rachael | Ambrose, Kerrie D. | Ansari-Lari, M. Ali | Aradhya, Swaroop | Ashwell, Robert I. S. | Babbage, Anne K. | Bagguley, Claire L. | Ballabio, Andrea | Banerjee, Ruby | Barker, Gary E. | Barlow, Karen F. | Barrett, Ian P. | Bates, Karen N. | Beare, David M. | Beasley, Helen | Beasley, Oliver | Beck, Alfred | Bethel, Graeme | Blechschmidt, Karin | Brady, Nicola | Bray-Allen, Sarah | Bridgeman, Anne M. | Brown, Andrew J. | Brown, Mary J. | Bonnin, David | Bruford, Elspeth A. | Buhay, Christian | Burch, Paula | Burford, Deborah | Burgess, Joanne | Burrill, Wayne | Burton, John | Bye, Jackie M. | Carder, Carol | Carrel, Laura | Chako, Joseph | Chapman, Joanne C. | Chavez, Dean | Chen, Ellson | Chen, Guan | Chen, Yuan | Chen, Zhijian | Chinault, Craig | Ciccodicola, Alfredo | Clark, Sue Y. | Clarke, Graham | Clee, Chris M. | Clegg, Sheila | Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin | Clifford, Karen | Cobley, Vicky | Cole, Charlotte G. | Conquer, Jen S. | Corby, Nicole | Connor, Richard E. | David, Robert | Davies, Joy | Davis, Clay | Davis, John | Delgado, Oliver | DeShazo, Denise | Dhami, Pawandeep | Ding, Yan | Dinh, Huyen | Dodsworth, Steve | Draper, Heather | Dugan-Rocha, Shannon | Dunham, Andrew | Dunn, Matthew | Durbin, K. James | Dutta, Ireena | Eades, Tamsin | Ellwood, Matthew | Emery-Cohen, Alexandra | Errington, Helen | Evans, Kathryn L. | Faulkner, Louisa | Francis, Fiona | Frankland, John | Fraser, Audrey E. | Galgoczy, Petra | Gilbert, James | Gill, Rachel | Glöckner, Gernot | Gregory, Simon G. | Gribble, Susan | Griffiths, Coline | Grocock, Russell | Gu, Yanghong | Gwilliam, Rhian | Hamilton, Cerissa | Hart, Elizabeth A. | Hawes, Alicia | Heath, Paul D. | Heitmann, Katja | Hennig, Steffen | Hernandez, Judith | Hinzmann, Bernd | Ho, Sarah | Hoffs, Michael | Howden, Phillip J. | Huckle, Elizabeth J. | Hume, Jennifer | Hunt, Paul J. | Hunt, Adrienne R. | Isherwood, Judith | Jacob, Leni | Johnson, David | Jones, Sally | de Jong, Pieter J. | Joseph, Shirin S. | Keenan, Stephen | Kelly, Susan | Kershaw, Joanne K. | Khan, Ziad | Kioschis, Petra | Klages, Sven | Knights, Andrew J. | Kosiura, Anna | Kovar-Smith, Christie | Laird, Gavin K. | Langford, Cordelia | Lawlor, Stephanie | Leversha, Margaret | Lewis, Lora | Liu, Wen | Lloyd, Christine | Lloyd, David M. | Loulseged, Hermela | Loveland, Jane E. | Lovell, Jamieson D. | Lozado, Ryan | Lu, Jing | Lyne, Rachael | Ma, Jie | Maheshwari, Manjula | Matthews, Lucy H. | McDowall, Jennifer | McLaren, Stuart | McMurray, Amanda | Meidl, Patrick | Meitinger, Thomas | Milne, Sarah | Miner, George | Mistry, Shailesh L. | Morgan, Margaret | Morris, Sidney | Müller, Ines | Mullikin, James C. | Nguyen, Ngoc | Nordsiek, Gabriele | Nyakatura, Gerald | O’Dell, Christopher N. | Okwuonu, Geoffery | Palmer, Sophie | Pandian, Richard | Parker, David | Parrish, Julia | Pasternak, Shiran | Patel, Dina | Pearce, Alex V. | Pearson, Danita M. | Pelan, Sarah E. | Perez, Lesette | Porter, Keith M. | Ramsey, Yvonne | Reichwald, Kathrin | Rhodes, Susan | Ridler, Kerry A. | Schlessinger, David | Schueler, Mary G. | Sehra, Harminder K. | Shaw-Smith, Charles | Shen, Hua | Sheridan, Elizabeth M. | Shownkeen, Ratna | Skuce, Carl D. | Smith, Michelle L. | Sotheran, Elizabeth C. | Steingruber, Helen E. | Steward, Charles A. | Storey, Roy | Swann, R. Mark | Swarbreck, David | Tabor, Paul E. | Taudien, Stefan | Taylor, Tineace | Teague, Brian | Thomas, Karen | Thorpe, Andrea | Timms, Kirsten | Tracey, Alan | Trevanion, Steve | Tromans, Anthony C. | d’Urso, Michele | Verduzco, Daniel | Villasana, Donna | Waldron, Lenee | Wall, Melanie | Wang, Qiaoyan | Warren, James | Warry, Georgina L. | Wei, Xuehong | West, Anthony | Whitehead, Siobhan L. | Whiteley, Mathew N. | Wilkinson, Jane E. | Willey, David L. | Williams, Gabrielle | Williams, Leanne | Williamson, Angela | Williamson, Helen | Wilming, Laurens | Woodmansey, Rebecca L. | Wray, Paul W. | Yen, Jennifer | Zhang, Jingkun | Zhou, Jianling | Zoghbi, Huda | Zorilla, Sara | Buck, David | Reinhardt, Richard | Poustka, Annemarie | Rosenthal, André | Lehrach, Hans | Meindl, Alfons | Minx, Patrick J. | Hillier, LaDeana W. | Willard, Huntington F. | Wilson, Richard K. | Waterston, Robert H. | Rice, Catherine M. | Vaudin, Mark | Coulson, Alan | Nelson, David L. | Weinstock, George | Sulston, John E. | Durbin, Richard | Hubbard, Tim | Gibbs, Richard A. | Beck, Stephan | Rogers, Jane | Bentley, David R.
Nature  2005;434(7031):325-337.
The human X chromosome has a unique biology that was shaped by its evolution as the sex chromosome shared by males and females. We have determined 99.3% of the euchromatic sequence of the X chromosome. Our analysis illustrates the autosomal origin of the mammalian sex chromosomes, the stepwise process that led to the progressive loss of recombination between X and Y, and the extent of subsequent degradation of the Y chromosome. LINE1 repeat elements cover one-third of the X chromosome, with a distribution that is consistent with their proposed role as way stations in the process of X-chromosome inactivation. We found 1,098 genes in the sequence, of which 99 encode proteins expressed in testis and in various tumour types. A disproportionately high number of mendelian diseases are documented for the X chromosome. Of this number, 168 have been explained by mutations in 113 X-linked genes, which in many cases were characterized with the aid of the DNA sequence.
doi:10.1038/nature03440
PMCID: PMC2665286  PMID: 15772651
14.  DNA sequence of human chromosome 17 and analysis of rearrangement in the human lineage 
Zody, Michael C. | Garber, Manuel | Adams, David J. | Sharpe, Ted | Harrow, Jennifer | Lupski, James R. | Nicholson, Christine | Searle, Steven M. | Wilming, Laurens | Young, Sarah K. | Abouelleil, Amr | Allen, Nicole R. | Bi, Weimin | Bloom, Toby | Borowsky, Mark L. | Bugalter, Boris E. | Butler, Jonathan | Chang, Jean L. | Chen, Chao-Kung | Cook, April | Corum, Benjamin | Cuomo, Christina A. | de Jong, Pieter J. | DeCaprio, David | Dewar, Ken | FitzGerald, Michael | Gilbert, James | Gibson, Richard | Gnerre, Sante | Goldstein, Steven | Grafham, Darren V. | Grocock, Russell | Hafez, Nabil | Hagopian, Daniel S. | Hart, Elizabeth | Norman, Catherine Hosage | Humphray, Sean | Jaffe, David B. | Jones, Matt | Kamal, Michael | Khodiyar, Varsha K. | LaButti, Kurt | Laird, Gavin | Lehoczky, Jessica | Liu, Xiaohong | Lokyitsang, Tashi | Loveland, Jane | Lui, Annie | Macdonald, Pendexter | Major, John E. | Matthews, Lucy | Mauceli, Evan | McCarroll, Steven A. | Mihalev, Atanas H. | Mudge, Jonathan | Nguyen, Cindy | Nicol, Robert | O'Leary, Sinéad B. | Osoegawa, Kazutoyo | Schwartz, David C. | Shaw-Smith, Charles | Stankiewicz, Pawel | Steward, Charles | Swarbreck, David | Venkataraman, Vijay | Whittaker, Charles A. | Yang, Xiaoping | Zimmer, Andrew R. | Bradley, Allan | Hubbard, Tim | Birren, Bruce W. | Rogers, Jane | Lander, Eric S. | Nusbaum, Chad
Nature  2006;440(7087):1045-1049.
Chromosome 17 is unusual among the human chromosomes in many respects. It is the largest human autosome with orthology to only a single mouse chromosome1, mapping entirely to the distal half of mouse chromosome 11. Chromosome 17 is rich in protein-coding genes, having the second highest gene density in the genome2,3. It is also enriched in segmental duplications, ranking third in density among the autosomes4. Here we report a finished sequence for human chromosome 17, as well as a structural comparison with the finished sequence for mouse chromosome 11, the first finished mouse chromosome. Comparison of the orthologous regions reveals striking differences. In contrast to the typical pattern seen in mammalian evolution5,6, the human sequence has undergone extensive intrachromosomal rearrangement, whereas the mouse sequence has been remarkably stable. Moreover, although the human sequence has a high density of segmental duplication, the mouse sequence has a very low density. Notably, these segmental duplications correspond closely to the sites of structural rearrangement, demonstrating a link between duplication and rearrangement. Examination of the main classes of duplicated segments provides insight into the dynamics underlying expansion of chromosome-specific, low-copy repeats in the human genome.
doi:10.1038/nature04689
PMCID: PMC2610434  PMID: 16625196

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