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1.  Comparative analysis of metazoan chromatin organization 
Ho, Joshua W. K. | Jung, Youngsook L. | Liu, Tao | Alver, Burak H. | Lee, Soohyun | Ikegami, Kohta | Sohn, Kyung-Ah | Minoda, Aki | Tolstorukov, Michael Y. | Appert, Alex | Parker, Stephen C. J. | Gu, Tingting | Kundaje, Anshul | Riddle, Nicole C. | Bishop, Eric | Egelhofer, Thea A. | Hu, Sheng’en Shawn | Alekseyenko, Artyom A. | Rechtsteiner, Andreas | Asker, Dalal | Belsky, Jason A. | Bowman, Sarah K. | Chen, Q. Brent | Chen, Ron A-J | Day, Daniel S. | Dong, Yan | Dose, Andrea C. | Duan, Xikun | Epstein, Charles B. | Ercan, Sevinc | Feingold, Elise A. | Ferrari, Francesco | Garrigues, Jacob M. | Gehlenborg, Nils | Good, Peter J. | Haseley, Psalm | He, Daniel | Herrmann, Moritz | Hoffman, Michael M. | Jeffers, Tess E. | Kharchenko, Peter V. | Kolasinska-Zwierz, Paulina | Kotwaliwale, Chitra V. | Kumar, Nischay | Langley, Sasha A. | Larschan, Erica N. | Latorre, Isabel | Libbrecht, Maxwell W. | Lin, Xueqiu | Park, Richard | Pazin, Michael J. | Pham, Hoang N. | Plachetka, Annette | Qin, Bo | Schwartz, Yuri B. | Shoresh, Noam | Stempor, Przemyslaw | Vielle, Anne | Wang, Chengyang | Whittle, Christina M. | Xue, Huiling | Kingston, Robert E. | Kim, Ju Han | Bernstein, Bradley E. | Dernburg, Abby F. | Pirrotta, Vincenzo | Kuroda, Mitzi I. | Noble, William S. | Tullius, Thomas D. | Kellis, Manolis | MacAlpine, David M. | Strome, Susan | Elgin, Sarah C. R. | Liu, Xiaole Shirley | Lieb, Jason D. | Ahringer, Julie | Karpen, Gary H. | Park, Peter J.
Nature  2014;512(7515):449-452.
doi:10.1038/nature13415
PMCID: PMC4227084  PMID: 25164756
2.  Selective PDZ protein-dependent stimulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase by the adenovirus E4-ORF1 oncoprotein 
Oncogene  2003;22(5):710-721.
While PDZ domain-containing proteins represent cellular targets for several different viral oncoproteins, including human papillomavirus E6, human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax, and human adenovirus E4-ORF1, the functional consequences for such interactions have not been elucidated. Here we report that, at the plasma membrane of cells, the adenovirus E4-ORF1 oncoprotein selectively and potently stimulates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), triggering a downstream cascade of events that includes activation of both protein kinase B and p70S6-kinase. This activity of E4-ORF1 could be abrogated by overexpression of its PDZ-protein targets or by disruption of its PDZ domain-binding motif, which was shown to mediate complex formation between E4-ORF1 and PDZ proteins at the plasma membrane of cells. Furthermore, E4-ORF1 mutants unable to activate the PI3K pathway failed to transform cells in culture or to promote tumors in animals, and drugs that block either PI3K or p70S6-kinase inhibited E4-ORF1-induced transformation of cells. From these results, we propose that the transforming and tumorigenic potentials of the adenovirus E4-ORF1 oncoprotein depend on its capacity to activate PI3K through a novel PDZ protein-dependent mechanism of action.
doi:10.1038/sj.onc.1206151
PMCID: PMC3501958  PMID: 12569363
adenovirus; E4-ORF1; PDZ; PI3K; oncoprotein
3.  Viral oncoprotein-induced mislocalization of select PDZ proteins disrupts tight junctions and causes polarity defects in epithelial cells 
Journal of cell science  2005;118(Pt 18):4283-4293.
Summary
The development of human cancers is frequently associated with a failure of epithelial cells to form tight junctions and to establish proper apicobasal polarity. Interestingly, the oncogenic potential of the adenovirus E4-ORF1 protein correlates with its binding to the cellular PDZ proteins MUPP1, MAGI-1, ZO-2 and SAP97, the first three of which assemble protein complexes at tight junctions. Given that E4-ORF1 sequesters these three PDZ proteins in the cytoplasm of fibroblasts, we postulated that E4-ORF1 would inhibit tight junction formation in epithelial cells. Providing further support for this idea, we identified MUPP1-related PATJ, a key component of the tight junction-associated CRB3-PALS1-PATJ polarity complex, as a new PDZ-protein target for both the E4-ORF1 and high-risk human papillomavirus type 18 E6 oncoproteins. Moreover, in epithelial cells, E4-ORF1 blocked the tight junction localization of PATJ and ZO-2, as well as their interacting partners, and disrupted both the tight junction barrier and apicobasal polarity. These significant findings expose a direct link between the tumorigenic potential of E4-ORF1 and inactivation of cellular PDZ proteins involved in tight junction assembly and polarity establishment.
doi:10.1242/jcs.02560
PMCID: PMC3471650  PMID: 16141229
Tight junction; Polarity; PATJ; ZO-2; E4-ORF1; E6
4.  Integrative Analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans Genome by the modENCODE Project 
Gerstein, Mark B. | Lu, Zhi John | Van Nostrand, Eric L. | Cheng, Chao | Arshinoff, Bradley I. | Liu, Tao | Yip, Kevin Y. | Robilotto, Rebecca | Rechtsteiner, Andreas | Ikegami, Kohta | Alves, Pedro | Chateigner, Aurelien | Perry, Marc | Morris, Mitzi | Auerbach, Raymond K. | Feng, Xin | Leng, Jing | Vielle, Anne | Niu, Wei | Rhrissorrakrai, Kahn | Agarwal, Ashish | Alexander, Roger P. | Barber, Galt | Brdlik, Cathleen M. | Brennan, Jennifer | Brouillet, Jeremy Jean | Carr, Adrian | Cheung, Ming-Sin | Clawson, Hiram | Contrino, Sergio | Dannenberg, Luke O. | Dernburg, Abby F. | Desai, Arshad | Dick, Lindsay | Dosé, Andréa C. | Du, Jiang | Egelhofer, Thea | Ercan, Sevinc | Euskirchen, Ghia | Ewing, Brent | Feingold, Elise A. | Gassmann, Reto | Good, Peter J. | Green, Phil | Gullier, Francois | Gutwein, Michelle | Guyer, Mark S. | Habegger, Lukas | Han, Ting | Henikoff, Jorja G. | Henz, Stefan R. | Hinrichs, Angie | Holster, Heather | Hyman, Tony | Iniguez, A. Leo | Janette, Judith | Jensen, Morten | Kato, Masaomi | Kent, W. James | Kephart, Ellen | Khivansara, Vishal | Khurana, Ekta | Kim, John K. | Kolasinska-Zwierz, Paulina | Lai, Eric C. | Latorre, Isabel | Leahey, Amber | Lewis, Suzanna | Lloyd, Paul | Lochovsky, Lucas | Lowdon, Rebecca F. | Lubling, Yaniv | Lyne, Rachel | MacCoss, Michael | Mackowiak, Sebastian D. | Mangone, Marco | McKay, Sheldon | Mecenas, Desirea | Merrihew, Gennifer | Miller, David M. | Muroyama, Andrew | Murray, John I. | Ooi, Siew-Loon | Pham, Hoang | Phippen, Taryn | Preston, Elicia A. | Rajewsky, Nikolaus | Rätsch, Gunnar | Rosenbaum, Heidi | Rozowsky, Joel | Rutherford, Kim | Ruzanov, Peter | Sarov, Mihail | Sasidharan, Rajkumar | Sboner, Andrea | Scheid, Paul | Segal, Eran | Shin, Hyunjin | Shou, Chong | Slack, Frank J. | Slightam, Cindie | Smith, Richard | Spencer, William C. | Stinson, E. O. | Taing, Scott | Takasaki, Teruaki | Vafeados, Dionne | Voronina, Ksenia | Wang, Guilin | Washington, Nicole L. | Whittle, Christina M. | Wu, Beijing | Yan, Koon-Kiu | Zeller, Georg | Zha, Zheng | Zhong, Mei | Zhou, Xingliang | Ahringer, Julie | Strome, Susan | Gunsalus, Kristin C. | Micklem, Gos | Liu, X. Shirley | Reinke, Valerie | Kim, Stuart K. | Hillier, LaDeana W. | Henikoff, Steven | Piano, Fabio | Snyder, Michael | Stein, Lincoln | Lieb, Jason D. | Waterston, Robert H.
Science (New York, N.Y.)  2010;330(6012):1775-1787.
We systematically generated large-scale data sets to improve genome annotation for the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a key model organism. These data sets include transcriptome profiling across a developmental time course, genome-wide identification of transcription factor–binding sites, and maps of chromatin organization. From this, we created more complete and accurate gene models, including alternative splice forms and candidate noncoding RNAs. We constructed hierarchical networks of transcription factor–binding and microRNA interactions and discovered chromosomal locations bound by an unusually large number of transcription factors. Different patterns of chromatin composition and histone modification were revealed between chromosome arms and centers, with similarly prominent differences between autosomes and the X chromosome. Integrating data types, we built statistical models relating chromatin, transcription factor binding, and gene expression. Overall, our analyses ascribed putative functions to most of the conserved genome.
doi:10.1126/science.1196914
PMCID: PMC3142569  PMID: 21177976
5.  An assessment of histone-modification antibody quality 
We report testing of the specificity and utility of over 200 antibodies raised against 57 different histone modifications, in Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans and human cells. While most antibodies performed well, over 25% failed specificity tests by dot blot or western blot. Among specific antibodies, over 20% failed in chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments. We advise rigorous testing of histone-modification antibodies before use and provide a website for posting new test results.
doi:10.1038/nsmb.1972
PMCID: PMC3017233  PMID: 21131980
6.  Systematic bias in high-throughput sequencing data and its correction by BEADS 
Nucleic Acids Research  2011;39(15):e103.
Genomic sequences obtained through high-throughput sequencing are not uniformly distributed across the genome. For example, sequencing data of total genomic DNA show significant, yet unexpected enrichments on promoters and exons. This systematic bias is a particular problem for techniques such as chromatin immunoprecipitation, where the signal for a target factor is plotted across genomic features. We have focused on data obtained from Illumina’s Genome Analyser platform, where at least three factors contribute to sequence bias: GC content, mappability of sequencing reads, and regional biases that might be generated by local structure. We show that relying on input control as a normalizer is not generally appropriate due to sample to sample variation in bias. To correct sequence bias, we present BEADS (bias elimination algorithm for deep sequencing), a simple three-step normalization scheme that successfully unmasks real binding patterns in ChIP-seq data. We suggest that this procedure be done routinely prior to data interpretation and downstream analyses.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkr425
PMCID: PMC3159482  PMID: 21646344
7.  Differential chromatin marking of introns and expressed exons by H3K36me3 
Nature genetics  2009;41(3):376-381.
Variation in patterns of methylations of histone tails reflects and modulates chromatin structure and function1-3. To provide a framework for the analysis of chromatin function in C. elegans, we generated a genome-wide map of histone H3 tail methylations. We find that C. elegans genes show similarities in distributions of histone modifications to those of other organisms, with H3K4me3 near transcription start sites, H3K36me3 in the body of genes, and H3K9me3 enriched on silent genes. Unexpectedly, we also observe a striking novel pattern: exons are preferentially marked with H3K36me3 relative to introns. H3K36me3 exon marking is dependent on transcription and its level is lower in alternatively spliced exons, supporting a splicing related marking mechanism. We further show that the difference in H3K36me3 marking between exons and introns is evolutionarily conserved in human and mouse. We propose that H3K36me3 exon marking in chromatin provides a dynamic link between transcription and splicing.
doi:10.1038/ng.322
PMCID: PMC2648722  PMID: 19182803

Results 1-7 (7)