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1.  Long-Term Survival of Hydrated Resting Eggs from Brachionus plicatilis 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(1):e29365.
Background
Several organisms display dormancy and developmental arrest at embryonic stages. Long-term survival in the dormant form is usually associated with desiccation, orthodox plant seeds and Artemia cysts being well documented examples. Several aquatic invertebrates display dormancy during embryonic development and survive for tens or even hundreds of years in a hydrated form, raising the question of whether survival in the non-desiccated form of embryonic development depends on pathways similar to those occurring in desiccation tolerant forms.
Methodology/Principal Findings
To address this question, Illumina short read sequencing was used to generate transcription profiles from the resting and amictic eggs of an aquatic invertebrate, the rotifer, Brachionus plicatilis. These two types of egg have very different life histories, with the dormant or diapausing resting eggs, the result of the sexual cycle and amictic eggs, the non-dormant products of the asexual cycle. Significant transcriptional differences were found between the two types of egg, with amictic eggs rich in genes involved in the morphological development into a juvenile rotifer. In contrast, representatives of classical “stress” proteins: a small heat shock protein, ferritin and Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins were identified in resting eggs. More importantly however, was the identification of transcripts for messenger ribonucleoprotein particles which stabilise RNA. These inhibit translation and provide a valuable source of useful RNAs which can be rapidly activated on the exit from dormancy. Apoptotic genes were also present. Although apoptosis is inconsistent with maintenance of prolonged dormancy, an altered apoptotic pathway has been proposed for Artemia, and this may be the case with the rotifer.
Conclusions
These data represent the first transcriptional profiling of molecular processes associated with dormancy in a non-desiccated form and indicate important similarities in the molecular pathways activated in resting eggs compared with desiccated dormant forms, specifically plant seeds and Artemia.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0029365
PMCID: PMC3253786  PMID: 22253713
2.  The European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax genome puzzle: comparative BAC-mapping and low coverage shotgun sequencing 
BMC Genomics  2010;11:68.
Background
Food supply from the ocean is constrained by the shortage of domesticated and selected fish. Development of genomic models of economically important fishes should assist with the removal of this bottleneck. European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax L. (Moronidae, Perciformes, Teleostei) is one of the most important fishes in European marine aquaculture; growing genomic resources put it on its way to serve as an economic model.
Results
End sequencing of a sea bass genomic BAC-library enabled the comparative mapping of the sea bass genome using the three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus genome as a reference. BAC-end sequences (102,690) were aligned to the stickleback genome. The number of mappable BACs was improved using a two-fold coverage WGS dataset of sea bass resulting in a comparative BAC-map covering 87% of stickleback chromosomes with 588 BAC-contigs. The minimum size of 83 contigs covering 50% of the reference was 1.2 Mbp; the largest BAC-contig comprised 8.86 Mbp. More than 22,000 BAC-clones aligned with both ends to the reference genome. Intra-chromosomal rearrangements between sea bass and stickleback were identified. Size distributions of mapped BACs were used to calculate that the genome of sea bass may be only 1.3 fold larger than the 460 Mbp stickleback genome.
Conclusions
The BAC map is used for sequencing single BACs or BAC-pools covering defined genomic entities by second generation sequencing technologies. Together with the WGS dataset it initiates a sea bass genome sequencing project. This will allow the quantification of polymorphisms through resequencing, which is important for selecting highly performing domesticated fish.
doi:10.1186/1471-2164-11-68
PMCID: PMC2837037  PMID: 20105308
3.  Comparative Analysis of Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) Libraries in the Seagrass Zostera marina Subjected to Temperature Stress 
Global warming is associated with increasing stress and mortality on temperate seagrass beds, in particular during periods of high sea surface temperatures during summer months, adding to existing anthropogenic impacts, such as eutrophication and habitat destruction. We compare several expressed sequence tag (EST) in the ecologically important seagrass Zostera marina (eelgrass) to elucidate the molecular genetic basis of adaptation to environmental extremes. We compared the tentative unigene (TUG) frequencies of libraries derived from leaf and meristematic tissue from a control situation with two experimentally imposed temperature stress conditions and found that TUG composition is markedly different among these conditions (all P < 0.0001). Under heat stress, we find that 63 TUGs are differentially expressed (d.e.) at 25°C compared with lower, no-stress condition temperatures (4°C and 17°C). Approximately one-third of d.e. eelgrass genes were characteristic for the stress response of the terrestrial plant model Arabidopsis thaliana. The changes in gene expression suggest complex photosynthetic adjustments among light-harvesting complexes, reaction center subunits of photosystem I and II, and components of the dark reaction. Heat shock encoding proteins and reactive oxygen scavengers also were identified, but their overall frequency was too low to perform statistical tests. In all conditions, the most abundant transcript (3–15%) was a putative metallothionein gene with unknown function. We also find evidence that heat stress may translate to enhanced infection by protists. A total of 210 TUGs contain one or more microsatellites as potential candidates for gene-linked genetic markers. Data are publicly available in a user-friendly database at http://www.uni-muenster.de/Evolution/ebb/Services/zostera.
Eletronic Supplementary Material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10126-007-9065-6) contains supplementary material which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1007/s10126-007-9065-6
PMCID: PMC2757623  PMID: 18239962
Gene expression profiling; EST library; Ecological genomics; Temperature stress; Seagrass; Zostera marina
4.  The Genome of the Kinetoplastid Parasite, Leishmania major 
Ivens, Alasdair C. | Peacock, Christopher S. | Worthey, Elizabeth A. | Murphy, Lee | Aggarwal, Gautam | Berriman, Matthew | Sisk, Ellen | Rajandream, Marie-Adele | Adlem, Ellen | Aert, Rita | Anupama, Atashi | Apostolou, Zina | Attipoe, Philip | Bason, Nathalie | Bauser, Christopher | Beck, Alfred | Beverley, Stephen M. | Bianchettin, Gabriella | Borzym, Katja | Bothe, Gordana | Bruschi, Carlo V. | Collins, Matt | Cadag, Eithon | Ciarloni, Laura | Clayton, Christine | Coulson, Richard M. R. | Cronin, Ann | Cruz, Angela K. | Davies, Robert M. | Gaudenzi, Javier De | Dobson, Deborah E. | Duesterhoeft, Andreas | Fazelina, Gholam | Fosker, Nigel | Frasch, Alberto Carlos | Fraser, Audrey | Fuchs, Monika | Gabel, Claudia | Goble, Arlette | Goffeau, André | Harris, David | Hertz-Fowler, Christiane | Hilbert, Helmut | Horn, David | Huang, Yiting | Klages, Sven | Knights, Andrew | Kube, Michael | Larke, Natasha | Litvin, Lyudmila | Lord, Angela | Louie, Tin | Marra, Marco | Masuy, David | Matthews, Keith | Michaeli, Shulamit | Mottram, Jeremy C. | Müller-Auer, Silke | Munden, Heather | Nelson, Siri | Norbertczak, Halina | Oliver, Karen | O'Neil, Susan | Pentony, Martin | Pohl, Thomas M. | Price, Claire | Purnelle, Bénédicte | Quail, Michael A. | Rabbinowitsch, Ester | Reinhardt, Richard | Rieger, Michael | Rinta, Joel | Robben, Johan | Robertson, Laura | Ruiz, Jeronimo C. | Rutter, Simon | Saunders, David | Schäfer, Melanie | Schein, Jacquie | Schwartz, David C. | Seeger, Kathy | Seyler, Amber | Sharp, Sarah | Shin, Heesun | Sivam, Dhileep | Squares, Rob | Squares, Steve | Tosato, Valentina | Vogt, Christy | Volckaert, Guido | Wambutt, Rolf | Warren, Tim | Wedler, Holger | Woodward, John | Zhou, Shiguo | Zimmermann, Wolfgang | Smith, Deborah F. | Blackwell, Jenefer M. | Stuart, Kenneth D. | Barrell, Bart | Myler, Peter J.
Science (New York, N.Y.)  2005;309(5733):436-442.
doi:10.1126/science.1112680
PMCID: PMC1470643  PMID: 16020728
5.  Obstetrician's Stress Fracture 
British Medical Journal  1964;2(5423):1502.3-1509.
Images
PMCID: PMC1817171  PMID: 14214192
6.  Are Accidents Inevitable? 
British Medical Journal  1954;2(4890):757.
Images
PMCID: PMC2079044

Results 1-7 (7)