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1.  The Ontogeny of the Endocrine Pancreas in the Fetal/Newborn Baboon 
The Journal of endocrinology  2012;214(3):289-299.
Background
Erratic regulation of glucose metabolism including hyperglycemia is a common condition of premature infants and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality.
Objective
To examine histological and ultra-structural differences in the endocrine pancreas in fetal (throughout gestation) and neonatal baboons.
Methods
Twelve fetal baboons were delivered at 125 days (d) gestational age (GA), 140dGA, or 175dGA. Eight animals were delivered at term (185dGA); half were fed for 5d. Seventy-three non-diabetic adult baboons were used for comparison. Pancreatic tissue was studied utilizing light microscopy, confocal imaging and electron microscopy.
Results
The fetal and neonatal endocrine pancreas islet architecture became more organized as GA advanced. The percent areas of α-β-δ-cell type were similar within each fetal and newborn GA (NS), but were higher than the adults (P<0.05) regardless of GA. The ratio of β-cells within the islet (whole and core) increased with gestation (P<0.01). Neonatal baboons who survived for 5 days (feeding), had a 2.5-fold increase in pancreas weight compared to their counterparts euthanized at birth (P=0.01). Endocrine cells were found amongst exocrine ductal and acinar cells in 125,140 and 175dGA fetuses. Subpopulation of cells that co-expressed trypsin and glucagon/insulin show the presence of cells with mixed endo-exocrine lineage in fetuses.
Conclusions
The fetal endocrine pancreas has no prevalence of a of α-β-δ-cell type with larger endocrine cell percent areas than adults. Cells with mixed endocrine/exocrine phenotype occur during fetal development. Developmental differences may play a role in glucose homeostasis during the neonatal period and may have long term implications.
doi:10.1530/JOE-12-0070
PMCID: PMC3686495  PMID: 22723715
Insulin; glucagon; fetus; islet cells; primates
2.  SEL1L, an UPR Response Protein, a Potential Marker of Colonic Cell Transformation 
Digestive Diseases and Sciences  2012;57(4):905-912.
Background
SEL1L gene product is implicated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation and Unfolded Protein Response pathways. This gene and associated miRNAs have been indicated as predictive and prognostic markers of pancreatic cancer.
Aim
Explore the role of SEL1L in colorectal cancer (CRC) progression.
Methods
SEL1L expression was analysed immunohistochemically in 153 adenomas and 71 CRCs from African American and North Italian patients. The distribution of stained cells was determined by computing median and inter quartile range. The receiver operating characteristics plot was used as discriminate power of SEL1L expression, CRC diagnosis and the effects on patient survival.
Results
SEL1L was low in normal mucosa and confined to few scattered cells at the base crypt of the villi and in the foveolar glandular compartment. The highest levels were in Paneth cells within the lysosomes. The enterocytic progenitor cells and mature enterocytes showed less cytoplasmic staining. In CRCs, SEL1L expression significantly correlated with the progression from adenoma to carcinoma (P = 0.0001) being stronger in well-to-moderately differentiated cancers. No correlation was found with other clinicopathological characteristics or ethnicity.
Conclusions
SEL1L expression is a potential CRC tissue biomarker since its expression is significantly higher in adenoma cells with respect to normal mucosa. The levels of expression decrease sensibly in undifferentiated CRC cancers. Interestingly, Paneth cells contain high levels of SEL1L protein that could indicate pre-neoplastic mucosa undergoing neoplastic transformation. Since SEL1L’s major function lies within ER stress and active ERAD response, it may identify CRCs with differentiated secretory phenotype and acute cellular stress.
doi:10.1007/s10620-011-2026-y
PMCID: PMC3345950  PMID: 22350780
SEL1L expression; Colorectal cancers; Paneth’s cells
3.  Proteomics Reveals Novel Oxidative and Glycolytic Mechanisms in Type 1 Diabetic Patients' Skin Which Are Normalized by Kidney-Pancreas Transplantation 
PLoS ONE  2010;5(3):e9923.
Background
In type 1 diabetes (T1D) vascular complications such as accelerated atherosclerosis and diffused macro-/microangiopathy are linked to chronic hyperglycemia with a mechanism that is not yet well understood. End-stage renal disease (ESRD) worsens most diabetic complications, particularly, the risk of morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease is increased several fold.
Methods and Findings
We evaluated protein regulation and expression in skin biopsies obtained from T1D patients with and without ESRD, to identify pathways of persistent cellular changes linked to diabetic vascular disease. We therefore examined pathways that may be normalized by restoration of normoglycemia with kidney-pancreas (KP) transplantation. Using proteomic and ultrastructural approaches, multiple alterations in the expression of proteins involved in oxidative stress (catalase, superoxide dismutase 1, Hsp27, Hsp60, ATP synthase δ chain, and flavin reductase), aerobic and anaerobic glycolysis (ACBP, pyruvate kinase muscle isozyme, and phosphoglycerate kinase 1), and intracellular signaling (stratifin-14-3-3, S100-calcyclin, cathepsin, and PPI rotamase) as well as endothelial vascular abnormalities were identified in T1D and T1D+ESRD patients. These abnormalities were reversed after KP transplant. Increased plasma levels of malondialdehyde were observed in T1D and T1D+ESRD patients, confirming increased oxidative stress which was normalized after KP transplant.
Conclusions
Our data suggests persistent cellular changes of anti-oxidative machinery and of aerobic/anaerobic glycolysis are present in T1D and T1D+ESRD patients, and these abnormalities may play a key role in the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia-related vascular complications. Restoration of normoglycemia and removal of uremia with KP transplant can correct these abnormalities. Some of these identified pathways may become potential therapeutic targets for a new generation of drugs.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0009923
PMCID: PMC2848014  PMID: 20360867

Results 1-3 (3)