PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-3 (3)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Regional differences in practice patterns and associated outcomes for upper tract urothelial carcinoma in Canada 
Introduction:
We delineated Canadian regional differences in practice patterns in the management of upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) after nephroureterectomy and relate these to patient outcomes.
Methods:
A database was created with 1029 patients undergoing radical nephroureterectomy for UTUC between 1994 and 2009 at 10 Canadian centres. Demographic, clinical and pathological variables were collected from chart review. Practice pattern variables were defined as: open versus laparoscopic nephroureterectomy, management strategy for the distal ureter, performance of lymphadenectomy and administration of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. The outcome measures were overall (OS), disease-specific (DSS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). The centres were divided into three regions (West, Central, East). Cox proportional multivariable linear regression analysis was used to determine the association between regional differences in practice patterns and clinical outcomes.
Results:
There was a significant difference in practice patterns between regions within Canada for: time from diagnosis to surgery (p = 0.001), type of surgery (open vs. laparoscopic, p < 0.01) and method of management of the distal ureter (p = 0.001). As well, there were significant differences in survival between regions across Canada: 5-year OS (West 70%, Central 81% and East 62%, p < 0.0001) and DSS (West=79%, Central=85%, East=75%, p = 0.007) were significantly different, but there was no difference in RFS (West 47%, Central 48%, East 46%, p = 0.88). Multivariable linear regression analysis demonstrated that the differences in survival were independent of region OS (p = 0.78), DSS (p = 0.30) or RFS (p = 0.43).
Conclusion:
There is significant disparity in practice patterns between regions within Canada, but these do not appear to have an effect on survival. We believe that the variability in practice is a reflection of the lack of standardized treatments for UTUC and underlines the need for multi-institutional studies in this disease.
doi:10.5489/cuaj.12146
PMCID: PMC3526631  PMID: 23282664
2.  Risk factors and outcomes for the development of malignancy in lung and heart-lung transplant recipients 
BACKGROUND:
Many factors may limit survival from lung and heart-lung transplantation, including malignancy.
OBJECTIVE:
To investigate factors associated with the development of malignancy following transplantation and its effect on survival by retrospectively reviewing a population of lung transplant recipients.
METHODS:
Data from 342 consecutive lung transplant patients were collected. Results were analyzed by fitting variables into a multivariate logistic regression model predicting the development of post-transplant malignancies. Covariates were selected based on crude associations that reached a level of significance at P≤0.10. Length of survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method.
RESULTS:
Fifty-eight subjects developed post-transplant malignancies, which were the cause of death of 14 patients. Twenty-one patients had a pretransplant malignancy, of whom six developed a malignancy post-transplant – of these, two were fatal recurrences. No risk factors were significantly associated with all forms of post-transplant malignancy. When adjusted for age at transplantation and donor smoking history, Epstein-Barr virus seropositivity at the time of transplant was significantly associated with a reduced risk of a post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (OR 0.17; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.59). The median survival time in individuals without a post-transplant malignancy was significantly shorter than in those with a post-transplant malignancy (P=0.018 Wilcoxon [Breslow]). This may be secondary to the length of time required to develop malignancy and the fact that not all malignancies that developed were fatal. The median time to develop malignancy was greater than two years. In addition, the 14 patients who died as a result of their malignancy had a significantly shorter survival time than the 44 who died because of nonmalignant causes (P<0.001).
CONCLUSIONS:
Malignancy was not associated with an overall decrease in survival time when compared with those who did not develop a malignancy. Risk factors specific for the development of malignancies remain difficult to specify.
PMCID: PMC2866202  PMID: 20186364
Heart and lung transplantation; Lung transplantation; Malignancy; Outcome; Risk factor; Thoracic transplantation
3.  Stopping smokeless tobacco with varenicline: randomised double blind placebo controlled trial  
Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of varenicline (a licensed cigarette smoking cessation aid) in helping users of smokeless tobacco to quit.
Design Double blind, placebo controlled, parallel group, multicentre, randomised controlled trial.
Setting Medical clinics (mostly primary care) in Norway and Sweden.
Participants Men and women aged ≥18 who used smokeless tobacco at least eight times a day, with no abstinence period over three months within one year before screening, who wanted to quit all tobacco use. Participants were excluded if they used any other form of tobacco (except smokeless tobacco) or medication to stop smoking within three months of screening or had any pre-existing medical or psychiatric condition.
Interventions Varenicline 1 mg twice daily (titrated during the first week) or placebo for 12 weeks, with 14 weeks’ follow-up after treatment.
Main outcome measures The primary end point was the four week continuous abstinence rate at the end of treatment (weeks 9-12) confirmed with cotinine concentration. A secondary end point was continuous abstinence rate for weeks 9-26. Safety and tolerability were also evaluated.
Results 431 participants (213 varenicline; 218 placebo) were randomised and received at least one dose of study drug. Participants’ demographics and baseline use of smokeless tobacco were similar (89% (189) and 90% (196), respectively, were men; mean age in both groups was 43.9; participants used smokeless tobacco products about 15 times a day, and about 80% first used smokeless tobacco within 30 minutes after awakening). Continuous abstinence rate at week 9-12 was higher in the varenicline group than the placebo group (59% (125) v 39% (85); relative risk 1.60, 95% confidence interval 1.32 to 1.87, P<0.001; risk difference 20%; number needed to treat 5). The advantage of varenicline over placebo persisted through 14 weeks of follow-up (continuous abstinence rate at week 9-26 was 45% (95) v 34% (73); relative risk 1.42, 1.08 to 1.79, P=0.012; risk difference 11%; number needed to treat 9). The most common adverse events in the varenicline group compared with the placebo group were nausea (35% (74) v 6% (14)), fatigue (10% (22) v 7% (15)), headache (10% (22) v 9% (20)), and sleep disorder (10% (22) v 7% (15)). Few adverse events led to discontinuation of treatment (9% (19) and 4% (9), respectively), and serious adverse events occurred in two (1%) and three (1%) participants, respectively.
Conclusion Varenicline can help people to give up smokeless tobacco and has an acceptable safety profile. The response rate in the placebo group in this study was high, suggesting a population less resistant to treatment than smokers.
Trial Registration NCT00717093.
doi:10.1136/bmj.c6549
PMCID: PMC2997603  PMID: 21134997

Results 1-3 (3)