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1.  Cytokine Responses to Novel Antigens in a Peri-Urban Population in Brazil Exposed to Leishmania infantum chagasi 
Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is fatal if untreated, and there are no vaccines for this disease. High levels of CD4-derived interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in the presence of low levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10) predicts vaccine success. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is also important in this process. We characterized human immune responses in three groups exposed to Leishmania infantum chagasi in Brazil: 1) drug-cured VL patients (recovered VL); 2) asymptomatic persons with positive Leishmania-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reactions (DTH+); and 3) DTH-negative household contacts. Magnitude of DTH correlated with crude Leishmania antigen–driven IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-5, but not IL-10. DTH+ persons showed equivalent levels of IFN-γ, but higher levels of IL-10, to tryparedoxin peroxidase and Leishmania homolog of receptor for activated C kinase compared with recovered VL patients. The IFN-γ:IL-10 and TNF-α:IL-10 ratios were higher in recovered VL patients than in DTH+ persons. Seven of 11 novel candidates (R71, L37, N52, L302.06, M18, J41, and M22) elicited cytokine responses (36–71% of responders) in recovered VL patients and DTH+ persons. This result confirmed their putative status as cross-species vaccine/immunotherapeutic candidates.
doi:10.4269/ajtmh.2012.12-0180
PMCID: PMC3516316  PMID: 22826477
2.  Genetic and Functional Evidence Implicating DLL1 as the Gene That Influences Susceptibility to Visceral Leishmaniasis at Chromosome 6q27 
The Journal of Infectious Diseases  2011;204(3):467-477.
Background. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is caused by Leishmania donovani and Leishmania infantum chagasi. Genome-wide linkage studies from Sudan and Brazil identified a putative susceptibility locus on chromosome 6q27.
Methods. Twenty-two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at genes PHF10, C6orf70, DLL1, FAM120B, PSMB1, and TBP were genotyped in 193 VL cases from 85 Sudanese families, and 8 SNPs at genes PHF10, C6orf70, DLL1, PSMB1, and TBP were genotyped in 194 VL cases from 80 Brazilian families. Family-based association, haplotype, and linkage disequilibrium analyses were performed. Multispecies comparative sequence analysis was used to identify conserved noncoding sequences carrying putative regulatory elements. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction measured expression of candidate genes in splenic aspirates from Indian patients with VL compared with that in the control spleen sample.
Results. Positive associations were observed at PHF10, C6orf70, DLL1, PSMB1, and TBP in Sudan, but only at DLL1 in Brazil (combined P = 3 × 10−4 at DLL1 across Sudan and Brazil). No functional coding region variants were observed in resequencing of 22 Sudanese VL cases. DLL1 expression was significantly (P = 2 × 10−7) reduced (mean fold change, 3.5 [SEM, 0.7]) in splenic aspirates from patients with VL, whereas other 6q27 genes showed higher levels (1.27 × 10−6 < P < .01) than did the control spleen sample. A cluster of conserved noncoding sequences with putative regulatory variants was identified in the distal promoter of DLL1.
Conclusions. DLL1, which encodes Delta-like 1, the ligand for Notch3, is strongly implicated as the chromosome 6q27 VL susceptibility gene.
doi:10.1093/infdis/jir284
PMCID: PMC3132144  PMID: 21742847
3.  Evidence for associations between the purinergic receptor P2X7 (P2RX7) and toxoplasmosis 
Genes and immunity  2010;11(5):374-383.
Congenital Toxoplasma gondii infection can result in intracranial calcification, hydrocephalus, and retinochoroiditis. Acquired infection is commonly associated with ocular disease. Pathology is characterized by strong pro-inflammatory responses. Ligation of ATP by purinergic receptor P2X7, encoded by P2RX7, stimulates pro-inflammatory cytokines and can lead directly to killing of intracellular pathogens. To determine whether P2X7 plays a role in susceptibility to congenital toxoplasmosis, we examined polymorphisms at P2RX7 in 149 child/parent trios from North America. We found association (FBAT Z scores ±2.429; P= 0.015) between the derived C(+)G(−) allele (f= 0.68; OR= 2.06; 95% CI: 1.14–3.75) at SNP rs1718119 (1068T>C; Thr-348-Ala), and a second synonymous variant rs1621388 in linkage disequilibrium with it, and clinical signs of disease per se. Analysis of clinical sub-groups showed no association with hydrocephalus, with effect sizes for associations with retinal disease and brain calcifications enhanced (OR=3.0 to 4.25; 0.004
doi:10.1038/gene.2010.31
PMCID: PMC2908187  PMID: 20535134
Toxoplasmosis; genetic polymorphisms; purinergic receptor P2X7; North America; Brazil
BMC Infectious Diseases  2014;14(1):662.
Background
Little is known about the parasite/host factors that lead to Post Kala-azar Dermal Leishmaniasis (PKDL) in some visceral leishmaniasis (VL) patients after drug-cure. Studies in Sudan provide evidence for association between polymorphisms in the gene (IFNGR1) encoding the alpha chain of interferon-γ receptor type I and risk of PKDL. This study aimed to identify putative functional polymorphisms in the IFNGR1 gene, and to determine whether differences in expression of interferon-γ (IFNG) and IFNGR1 at the RNA level are associated with pathogenesis of VL and/or PKDL in Sudan.
Methods
Sanger sequencing was used to re-sequence 841 bp of upstream, exon1 and intron1 of the IFNGR1 gene in DNA from 30 PKDL patients. LAGAN and SYNPLOT bioinformatics tools were used to compare human, chimpanzee and dog sequences to identify conserved noncoding sequences carrying putative regulatory elements. The relative expression of IFNG and IFNGR1 in paired pre- and post-treatment RNA samples from the lymph nodes of 24 VL patients, and in RNA samples from skin biopsies of 19 PKDL patients, was measured using real time PCR. Pre- versus post-treatment expression was evaluated statistically using the nonparametric Wilcoxon matched pairs signed-rank test.
Results
Ten variants were identified in the 841 bp of sequence, four of which are novel polymorphisms at -77A/G, +10 C/T, +18C/T and +91G/T relative to the IFNGR1 initiation site. A cluster of conserved non-coding sequences with putative regulatory variants was identified in the distal promoter of IFNGR1. Variable expression of IFNG was detected in lymph node aspirates of VL patients before treatment, with a marked reduction (P = 0.006) in expression following treatment. IFNGR1 expression was also variable in lymph node aspirates from VL patients, with no significant reduction in expression with treatment. IFNG expression was undetectable in the skin biopsies of PKDL cases, while IFNGR1 expression was also uniformly low.
Conclusions
Uniformly low expression of IFN and IFNGR1 in PKDL skin biopsies could explain parasite persistence and is consistent with prior demonstration of genetic association with IFNGR1 polymorphisms. Identification of novel potentially functional rare variants at IFNGR1 makes an important general contribution to knowledge of rare variants of potential relevance in this Sudanese population.
doi:10.1186/s12879-014-0662-5
PMCID: PMC4265480  PMID: 25466928
PKDL; Visceral leishmaniasis; Polymorphisms; RNA expression; IFNG; IFNGR1; Rare variants; Sudan
PLoS Genetics  2014;10(7):e1004445.
Approaches based on linear mixed models (LMMs) have recently gained popularity for modelling population substructure and relatedness in genome-wide association studies. In the last few years, a bewildering variety of different LMM methods/software packages have been developed, but it is not always clear how (or indeed whether) any newly-proposed method differs from previously-proposed implementations. Here we compare the performance of several LMM approaches (and software implementations, including EMMAX, GenABEL, FaST-LMM, Mendel, GEMMA and MMM) via their application to a genome-wide association study of visceral leishmaniasis in 348 Brazilian families comprising 3626 individuals (1972 genotyped). The implementations differ in precise details of methodology implemented and through various user-chosen options such as the method and number of SNPs used to estimate the kinship (relatedness) matrix. We investigate sensitivity to these choices and the success (or otherwise) of the approaches in controlling the overall genome-wide error-rate for both real and simulated phenotypes. We compare the LMM results to those obtained using traditional family-based association tests (based on transmission of alleles within pedigrees) and to alternative approaches implemented in the software packages MQLS, ROADTRIPS and MASTOR. We find strong concordance between the results from different LMM approaches, and all are successful in controlling the genome-wide error rate (except for some approaches when applied naively to longitudinal data with many repeated measures). We also find high correlation between LMMs and alternative approaches (apart from transmission-based approaches when applied to SNPs with small or non-existent effects). We conclude that LMM approaches perform well in comparison to competing approaches. Given their strong concordance, in most applications, the choice of precise LMM implementation cannot be based on power/type I error considerations but must instead be based on considerations such as speed and ease-of-use.
Author Summary
Recently, statistical approaches known as linear mixed models (LMMs) have become popular for analysing data from genome-wide association studies. In the last few years, a bewildering variety of different LMM methods/software packages have been developed, but it has not always been clear how (or indeed whether) any newly-proposed method differs from previously-proposed implementations. Here we compare the performance of several different LMM approaches (and software implementations) via their application to a genome-wide association study of visceral leishmaniasis in 348 Brazilian families comprising 3626 individuals. We also compare the LMM results to those obtained using alternative analysis methods. Overall, we find strong concordance between the results from the different LMM approaches and high correlation between the results from LMMs and most alternative approaches. We conclude that LMM approaches perform well in comparison to competing approaches and, in most applications, the precise LMM implementation will not be too important, and can be chosen on the basis of speed or convenience.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1004445
PMCID: PMC4102448  PMID: 25033443
BMC Medical Genetics  2014;15:18.
Background
Otitis media (OM) is a common childhood disease characterised by middle ear effusion and inflammation. Susceptibility to recurrent acute OM and chronic OM with effusion is 40-70% heritable. Linkage studies provide evidence for multiple putative OM susceptibility loci. This study attempts to replicate these linkages in a Western Australian (WA) population, and to identify the etiological gene(s) in a replicated region.
Methods
Microsatellites were genotyped in 468 individuals from 101 multicase families (208 OM cases) from the WA Family Study of OM (WAFSOM) and non-parametric linkage analysis carried out in ALLEGRO. Association mapping utilized dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data extracted from Illumina 660 W-Quad analysis of 256 OM cases and 575 controls from the WA Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken in ProbABEL. RT-PCR was used to compare gene expression in paired adenoid and tonsil samples, and in epithelial and macrophage cell lines. Comparative genomics methods were used to identify putative regulatory elements and transcription factor binding sites potentially affected by associated SNPs.
Results
Evidence for linkage was observed at 10q26.3 (Zlr = 2.69; P = 0.0036; D10S1770) with borderline evidence for linkage at 10q22.3 (Zlr = 1.64; P = 0.05; D10S206). No evidence for linkage was seen at 3p25.3, 17q12, or 19q13.43. Peak association at 10q26.3 was in the intergenic region between TCERG1L and PPP2R2D (rs7922424; P = 9.47 × 10-6), immediately under the peak of linkage. Independent associations were observed at DOCK1 (rs9418832; P = 7.48 × 10-5) and ADAM12 (rs7902734; P = 8.04 × 10-4). RT-PCR analysis confirmed expression of all 4 genes in adenoid samples. ADAM12, DOCK1 and PPP2R2D, but not TCERG1L, were expressed in respiratory epithelial and macrophage cell lines. A significantly associated polymorphism (rs7087384) in strong LD with the top SNP (rs7922424; r2 = 0.97) alters a transcription factor binding site (CREB/CREBP) in the intergenic region between TCERG1L and PPP2R2D.
Conclusions
OM linkage was replicated at 10q26.3. Whilst multiple genes could contribute to this linkage, the weight of evidence supports PPP2R2D, a TGF-β/Activin/Nodal pathway modulator, as the more likely functional candidate lying immediately under the linkage peak for OM susceptibility at chromosome 10q26.3.
doi:10.1186/1471-2350-15-18
PMCID: PMC3926687  PMID: 24499112
Acute otitis media; Otitis media with effusion; Genetic polymorphisms; Linkage; Association; Raine study; WAFSOM; Australia
The Journal of Infectious Diseases  2012;207(1):152-163.
Retinochoroiditis manifests in patients infected with Toxoplasma gondii. Here, we assessed 30 sibships and 89 parent/case trios of presumed ocular toxoplasmosis (POT) to evaluate associations with polymorphisms in the NOD2 gene. Three haplotype-tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (tag-SNPs) within the NOD2 gene were genotyped. The family-based association test showed that the tag-SNP rs3135499 is associated with retinochoroiditis (P = .039). We then characterized the cellular immune response of 59 cases of POT and 4 cases of active ocular toxoplasmosis (AOT). We found no differences in levels of interferon γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin 2 produced by T-helper 1 cells when comparing patients with AOT or POT to asymptomatic individuals. Unexpectedly, we found an increased interleukin 17A (IL-17A) production in patients with POT or OAT. In patients with POT or AOT, the main cellular source of IL-17A was CD4+CD45RO+T-bet−IFN-γ− T-helper 17 cells. Altogether, our results suggest that NOD2 influences the production of IL-17A by CD4+ T lymphocytes and might contribute to the development of ocular toxoplasmosis.
doi:10.1093/infdis/jis640
PMCID: PMC3523795  PMID: 23100559
NOD2; IL-17; Th17; T lymphocytes; ocular toxoplasmosis; Toxoplasma gondii
Strange, Amy | Capon, Francesca | Spencer, Chris CA | Knight, Jo | Weale, Michael E | Allen, Michael H | Barton, Anne | Band, Gavin | Bellenguez, Céline | Bergboer, Judith GM | Blackwell, Jenefer M | Bramon, Elvira | Bumpstead, Suzannah J | Casas, Juan P | Cork, Michael J | Corvin, Aiden | Deloukas, Panos | Dilthey, Alexander | Duncanson, Audrey | Edkins, Sarah | Estivill, Xavier | Fitzgerald, Oliver | Freeman, Colin | Giardina, Emiliano | Gray, Emma | Hofer, Angelika | Hüffmeier, Ulrike | Hunt, Sarah E | Irvine, Alan D | Jankowski, Janusz | Kirby, Brian | Langford, Cordelia | Lascorz, Jesús | Leman, Joyce | Leslie, Stephen | Mallbris, Lotus | Markus, Hugh S | Mathew, Christopher G | McLean, WH Irwin | McManus, Ross | Mössner, Rotraut | Moutsianas, Loukas | Naluai, Åsa T | Nestle, Frank O | Novelli, Giuseppe | Onoufriadis, Alexandros | Palmer, Colin NA | Perricone, Carlo | Pirinen, Matti | Plomin, Robert | Potter, Simon C | Pujol, Ramon M | Rautanen, Anna | Riveira-Munoz, Eva | Ryan, Anthony W | Salmhofer, Wolfgang | Samuelsson, Lena | Sawcer, Stephen J | Schalkwijk, Joost | Smith, Catherine H | Ståhle, Mona | Su, Zhan | Tazi-Ahnini, Rachid | Traupe, Heiko | Viswanathan, Ananth C | Warren, Richard B | Weger, Wolfgang | Wolk, Katarina | Wood, Nicholas | Worthington, Jane | Young, Helen S | Zeeuwen, Patrick LJM | Hayday, Adrian | Burden, A David | Griffiths, Christopher EM | Kere, Juha | Reis, André | McVean, Gilean | Evans, David M | Brown, Matthew A | Barker, Jonathan N | Peltonen, Leena | Donnelly, Peter | Trembath, Richard C
Nature genetics  2010;42(11):985-990.
doi:10.1038/ng.694
PMCID: PMC3749730  PMID: 20953190
Chromosome 6q26–27 is linked to susceptibility to visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Brazil and Sudan. DLL1 encoding the Delta-like 1 ligand for Notch 3 was implicated as the etiological gene. DLL1 belongs to the family of Notch ligands known to selectively drive antigen-specific CD4 T helper 1 cell responses, which are important in protective immune response in leishmaniasis. Here we provide further genetic and functional evidence that supports a role for DLL1 in a well-powered population-based study centred in the largest global focus of VL in India. Twenty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at PHF10/C6orf70/DLL1/FAM120B/PSMB1/TBP were genotyped in 941 cases and 992 controls. Logistic regression analysis under an additive model showed association between VL and variants at DLL1 and FAM120B, with top associations (rs9460106, OR=1.17, 95%CI 1.01–1.35, P=0.033; rs2103816, OR=1.16, 95%CI 1.01–1.34, P=0.039) robust to analysis using caste as a covariate to take account of population substructure. Haplotype analysis taking population substructure into account identified a common 2-SNP risk haplotype (frequency 0.43; P=0.028) at FAM120B, while the most significant protective haplotype (frequency 0.18; P=0.007) was a 5-SNP haplotype across the interval 5’ of both DLL1 (negative strand) and FAM120B (positive strand) and extending to intron 4 of DLL1. Quantitative RT/PCR was used to compare expression of 6q27 genes in paired pre- and post-treatment splenic aspirates from VL patients (N=19). DLL1 was the only gene to show differential expression that was higher (P<0.0001) in pre- compared to post-treatment samples, suggesting that regulation of gene expression was important in disease pathogenesis. This well-powered genetic and functional study in an Indian population provides evidence supporting DLL1 as the etiological gene contributing to susceptibility to VL at Chromosome 6q27, confirming the potential for polymorphism at DLL1 to act as a genetic risk factor across the epidemiological divides of geography and parasite species.
doi:10.1016/j.meegid.2012.04.017
PMCID: PMC3651914  PMID: 22561395
visceral leishmaniasis; DLL1; genetic association; Notch signalling
Nature genetics  2013;45(2):208-213.
To identify susceptibility loci for visceral leishmaniasis we undertook genome-wide association studies in two populations; 989 cases and 1089 controls from India, and 357 cases in 308 Brazilian families (1970 individuals). The HLA-DRB1-HLA-DQA1 locus was the only region to show strong evidence of association in both populations. Replication at this region was undertaken in a second Indian population comprising 941 cases and 990 controls, resulting in Pcombined=2.76×10−17 and OR(95%CI)=1.41(1.30-1.52) across the three cohorts at rs9271858. A conditional analysis provided evidence for multiple associations within the HLA-DRB1-HLA-DQA1 region, and a model in which risk differed between three groups of haplotypes better explained the signal and was significant in the Indian discovery and replication cohorts. In conclusion the HLA-DRB1-HLA-DQA1 HLA class II region contributes to visceral leishmaniasis susceptibility in India and Brazil, suggesting shared genetic risk factors for visceral leishmaniasis that cross the epidemiological divides of geography and parasite species.
doi:10.1038/ng.2518
PMCID: PMC3664012  PMID: 23291585
Human Molecular Genetics  2013;22(22):4653-4660.
To discover quantitative trait loci for intraocular pressure, a major risk factor for glaucoma and the only modifiable one, we performed a genome-wide association study on a discovery cohort of 2175 individuals from Sydney, Australia. We found a novel association between intraocular pressure and a common variant at 7p21 near to GLCCI1 and ICA1. The findings in this region were confirmed through two UK replication cohorts totalling 4866 individuals (rs59072263, Pcombined = 1.10 × 10−8). A copy of the G allele at this SNP is associated with an increase in mean IOP of 0.45 mmHg (95%CI = 0.30–0.61 mmHg). These results lend support to the implication of vesicle trafficking and glucocorticoid inducibility pathways in the determination of intraocular pressure and in the pathogenesis of primary open-angle glaucoma.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddt293
PMCID: PMC3904806  PMID: 23836780
Infection, Genetics and Evolution  2012;12(5):1102-1110.
Leishmania braziliensis causes cutaneous (CL) and mucosal (ML) leishmaniasis. In the mouse, Fli1 was identified as a gene influencing enhanced wound healing and resistance to CL caused by L. major. Polymorphism at FLI1 is associated with CL caused by L. braziliensis in humans, with an inverse association observed for ML disease. Here we extend the analysis to look at other wound healing genes, including CTGF, TGFB1, TGFBR1/2, SMADS 2/3/4/7 and FLII, all functionally linked along with FLI1 in the TGF beta pathway. Haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tag-SNPs) were genotyped using Taqman technology in 325 nuclear families (652 CL cases; 126 ML cases) from Brazil. Robust case-pseudocontrol (CPC) conditional logistic regression analysis showed associations between CL and SNPs at CTGF (SNP rs6918698; CC genotype; OR 1.67; 95%CI 1.10–2.54; P=0.016), TGFBR2 (rs1962859; OR 1.50; 95%CI 1.12–1.99; P=0.005), SMAD2 (rs1792658; OR 1.57; 95%CI 1.04–2.38; P=0.03), SMAD7 (rs4464148; AA genotype; OR 2.80; 95%CI 1.00–7.87; P=0.05) and FLII (rs2071242; OR 1.60; 95%CI 1.14–2.24; P=0.005), and between ML and SNPs at SMAD3 (rs1465841; OR 2.15; 95%CI 1.13–4.07; P=0.018) and SMAD7 (rs2337107; TT genotype; OR 3.70; 95%CI 1.27–10.7; P=0.016). Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that all SNPs associated with CL at FLI1, CTGF, TGFBR2, and FLII showed independent effects from each other, but SNPs at SMAD2 and SMAD7 did not add independent effects to SNPs from other genes. These results suggest that TGFβ signalling via SMAD2 is important in directing events that contribute to CL, whereas signalling via SMAD3 is important in ML. Both are modulated by the inhibitory SMAD7 that acts upstream of SMAD2 and SMAD3 in this signalling pathway. Along with the published FLI1 association, these data further contribute to the hypothesis that wound healing processes are important determinants of pathology associated with cutaneous forms of leishmaniasis.
doi:10.1016/j.meegid.2012.03.017
PMCID: PMC3372530  PMID: 22554650
leishmaniasis; wound healing; TGFB pathway; CTGF; SMADs; FLII; FLI1
PLoS ONE  2012;7(10):e48215.
Background
Otitis media (OM) is a common childhood disease characterised by middle ear inflammation and effusion. Susceptibility to recurrent acute OM (rAOM; ≥3 episodes of AOM in 6 months) and chronic OM with effusion (COME; MEE ≥3 months) is 40–70% heritable. Few underlying genes have been identified to date, and no genome-wide association study (GWAS) of OM has been reported.
Methods and Findings
Data for 2,524,817 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; 535,544 quality-controlled SNPs genotyped by Illumina 660W-Quad; 1,989,273 by imputation) were analysed for association with OM in 416 cases and 1,075 controls from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Logistic regression analyses under an additive model undertaken in GenABEL/ProbABEL adjusting for population substructure using principal components identified SNPs at CAPN14 (rs6755194: OR = 1.90; 95%CI 1.47–2.45; Padj-PCA = 8.3×10−7) on chromosome 2p23.1 as the top hit, with independent effects (rs1862981: OR = 1.60; 95%CI 1.29–1.99; Padj-PCA = 2.2×10−5) observed at the adjacent GALNT14 gene. In a gene-based analysis in VEGAS, BPIFA3 (PGene = 2×10−5) and BPIFA1 (PGene = 1.07×10−4) in the BPIFA gene cluster on chromosome 20q11.21 were the top hits. In all, 32 genomic regions show evidence of association (Padj-PCA<10−5) in this GWAS, with pathway analysis showing a connection between top candidates and the TGFβ pathway. However, top and tag-SNP analysis for seven selected candidate genes in this pathway did not replicate in 645 families (793 affected individuals) from the Western Australian Family Study of Otitis Media (WAFSOM). Lack of replication may be explained by sample size, difference in OM disease severity between primary and replication cohorts or due to type I error in the primary GWAS.
Conclusions
This first discovery GWAS for an OM phenotype has identified CAPN14 and GALNT14 on chromosome 2p23.1 and the BPIFA gene cluster on chromosome 20q11.21 as novel candidate genes which warrant further analysis in cohorts matched more precisely for clinical phenotypes.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0048215
PMCID: PMC3485007  PMID: 23133572
Background
There are no effective vaccines for visceral leishmaniasis (VL), a neglected parasitic disease second only to malaria in global mortality. We previously identified 14 protective candidates in a screen of 100 Leishmania antigens as DNA vaccines in mice. Here we employ whole blood assays to evaluate human cytokine responses to 11 of these antigens, in comparison to known defined and crude antigen preparations.
Methods
Whole blood assays were employed to measure IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-10 responses to peptide pools of the novel antigens R71, Q51, L37, N52, L302.06, J89, M18, J41, M22, M63, M57, as well as to recombinant proteins of tryparedoxin peroxidase (TRYP), Leishmania homolog of the receptor for activated C kinase (LACK) and to crude soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA), in Indian patients with active (n = 8) or cured (n = 16) VL, and in modified Quantiferon positive (EHC+ve, n = 20) or modified Quantiferon negative (EHC−ve, n = 9) endemic healthy controls (EHC).
Results
Active VL, cured VL and EHC+ve groups showed elevated SLA-specific IFN-γ, but only active VL patients produced IL-10 and EHC+ve did not make TNF-α. IFN-γ to IL-10 and TNF-α to IL-10 ratios in response to TRYP and LACK antigens were higher in cured VL and EHC+ve exposed individuals compared to active VL. Five of the eleven novel candidates (R71, L37, N52, J41, and M22) elicited IFN-γ and TNF-α, but not IL-10, responses in cured VL (55–87.5% responders) and EHC+ve (40–65% responders) subjects.
Conclusions
Our results are consistent with an important balance between pro-inflammatory IFNγ and TNFγ cytokine responses and anti-inflammatory IL-10 in determining outcome of VL in India, as highlighted by response to both crude and defined protein antigens. Importantly, cured VL patients and endemic Quantiferon positive individuals recognise 5 novel vaccine candidate antigens, confirming our recent data for L. chagasi in Brazil, and their potential as cross-species vaccine candidates.
Author Summary
Visceral leishmaniasis is a parasitic infection that results in death in susceptible people unless they are treated. Current drugs are expensive and toxic, and there are no vaccines in use in humans. We know that it is possible to become immune to infection with this parasite because people who have been cured using drug treatment are resistant to further infection. In addition, a large percentage of people infected with the parasite remain asymptomatic and develop a specific immune response that can be measured using crude leishmanial antigens. We hypothesized that these resistant people might hold the key to understanding the kind of immune response required for protection. In this paper we compared the immune response to a series of novel vaccine candidates in people with active disease, in those drug-cured from the disease, and in the naturally resistant individuals. We show that immune individuals make strong cytokine responses to five of eleven novel vaccine candidates that were tested, making them ideal candidates to take forward in the development of a defined vaccine against leishmaniasis.
doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0001874
PMCID: PMC3493615  PMID: 23150744
Sawcer, Stephen | Hellenthal, Garrett | Pirinen, Matti | Spencer, Chris C.A. | Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A. | Moutsianas, Loukas | Dilthey, Alexander | Su, Zhan | Freeman, Colin | Hunt, Sarah E. | Edkins, Sarah | Gray, Emma | Booth, David R. | Potter, Simon C. | Goris, An | Band, Gavin | Oturai, Annette Bang | Strange, Amy | Saarela, Janna | Bellenguez, Céline | Fontaine, Bertrand | Gillman, Matthew | Hemmer, Bernhard | Gwilliam, Rhian | Zipp, Frauke | Jayakumar, Alagurevathi | Martin, Roland | Leslie, Stephen | Hawkins, Stanley | Giannoulatou, Eleni | D’alfonso, Sandra | Blackburn, Hannah | Boneschi, Filippo Martinelli | Liddle, Jennifer | Harbo, Hanne F. | Perez, Marc L. | Spurkland, Anne | Waller, Matthew J | Mycko, Marcin P. | Ricketts, Michelle | Comabella, Manuel | Hammond, Naomi | Kockum, Ingrid | McCann, Owen T. | Ban, Maria | Whittaker, Pamela | Kemppinen, Anu | Weston, Paul | Hawkins, Clive | Widaa, Sara | Zajicek, John | Dronov, Serge | Robertson, Neil | Bumpstead, Suzannah J. | Barcellos, Lisa F. | Ravindrarajah, Rathi | Abraham, Roby | Alfredsson, Lars | Ardlie, Kristin | Aubin, Cristin | Baker, Amie | Baker, Katharine | Baranzini, Sergio E. | Bergamaschi, Laura | Bergamaschi, Roberto | Bernstein, Allan | Berthele, Achim | Boggild, Mike | Bradfield, Jonathan P. | Brassat, David | Broadley, Simon A. | Buck, Dorothea | Butzkueven, Helmut | Capra, Ruggero | Carroll, William M. | Cavalla, Paola | Celius, Elisabeth G. | Cepok, Sabine | Chiavacci, Rosetta | Clerget-Darpoux, Françoise | Clysters, Katleen | Comi, Giancarlo | Cossburn, Mark | Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle | Cox, Mathew B. | Cozen, Wendy | Cree, Bruce A.C. | Cross, Anne H. | Cusi, Daniele | Daly, Mark J. | Davis, Emma | de Bakker, Paul I.W. | Debouverie, Marc | D’hooghe, Marie Beatrice | Dixon, Katherine | Dobosi, Rita | Dubois, Bénédicte | Ellinghaus, David | Elovaara, Irina | Esposito, Federica | Fontenille, Claire | Foote, Simon | Franke, Andre | Galimberti, Daniela | Ghezzi, Angelo | Glessner, Joseph | Gomez, Refujia | Gout, Olivier | Graham, Colin | Grant, Struan F.A. | Guerini, Franca Rosa | Hakonarson, Hakon | Hall, Per | Hamsten, Anders | Hartung, Hans-Peter | Heard, Rob N. | Heath, Simon | Hobart, Jeremy | Hoshi, Muna | Infante-Duarte, Carmen | Ingram, Gillian | Ingram, Wendy | Islam, Talat | Jagodic, Maja | Kabesch, Michael | Kermode, Allan G. | Kilpatrick, Trevor J. | Kim, Cecilia | Klopp, Norman | Koivisto, Keijo | Larsson, Malin | Lathrop, Mark | Lechner-Scott, Jeannette S. | Leone, Maurizio A. | Leppä, Virpi | Liljedahl, Ulrika | Bomfim, Izaura Lima | Lincoln, Robin R. | Link, Jenny | Liu, Jianjun | Lorentzen, Åslaug R. | Lupoli, Sara | Macciardi, Fabio | Mack, Thomas | Marriott, Mark | Martinelli, Vittorio | Mason, Deborah | McCauley, Jacob L. | Mentch, Frank | Mero, Inger-Lise | Mihalova, Tania | Montalban, Xavier | Mottershead, John | Myhr, Kjell-Morten | Naldi, Paola | Ollier, William | Page, Alison | Palotie, Aarno | Pelletier, Jean | Piccio, Laura | Pickersgill, Trevor | Piehl, Fredrik | Pobywajlo, Susan | Quach, Hong L. | Ramsay, Patricia P. | Reunanen, Mauri | Reynolds, Richard | Rioux, John D. | Rodegher, Mariaemma | Roesner, Sabine | Rubio, Justin P. | Rückert, Ina-Maria | Salvetti, Marco | Salvi, Erika | Santaniello, Adam | Schaefer, Catherine A. | Schreiber, Stefan | Schulze, Christian | Scott, Rodney J. | Sellebjerg, Finn | Selmaj, Krzysztof W. | Sexton, David | Shen, Ling | Simms-Acuna, Brigid | Skidmore, Sheila | Sleiman, Patrick M.A. | Smestad, Cathrine | Sørensen, Per Soelberg | Søndergaard, Helle Bach | Stankovich, Jim | Strange, Richard C. | Sulonen, Anna-Maija | Sundqvist, Emilie | Syvänen, Ann-Christine | Taddeo, Francesca | Taylor, Bruce | Blackwell, Jenefer M. | Tienari, Pentti | Bramon, Elvira | Tourbah, Ayman | Brown, Matthew A. | Tronczynska, Ewa | Casas, Juan P. | Tubridy, Niall | Corvin, Aiden | Vickery, Jane | Jankowski, Janusz | Villoslada, Pablo | Markus, Hugh S. | Wang, Kai | Mathew, Christopher G. | Wason, James | Palmer, Colin N.A. | Wichmann, H-Erich | Plomin, Robert | Willoughby, Ernest | Rautanen, Anna | Winkelmann, Juliane | Wittig, Michael | Trembath, Richard C. | Yaouanq, Jacqueline | Viswanathan, Ananth C. | Zhang, Haitao | Wood, Nicholas W. | Zuvich, Rebecca | Deloukas, Panos | Langford, Cordelia | Duncanson, Audrey | Oksenberg, Jorge R. | Pericak-Vance, Margaret A. | Haines, Jonathan L. | Olsson, Tomas | Hillert, Jan | Ivinson, Adrian J. | De Jager, Philip L. | Peltonen, Leena | Stewart, Graeme J. | Hafler, David A. | Hauser, Stephen L. | McVean, Gil | Donnelly, Peter | Compston, Alastair
Nature  2011;476(7359):214-219.
Multiple sclerosis (OMIM 126200) is a common disease of the central nervous system in which the interplay between inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes typically results in intermittent neurological disturbance followed by progressive accumulation of disability.1 Epidemiological studies have shown that genetic factors are primarily responsible for the substantially increased frequency of the disease seen in the relatives of affected individuals;2,3 and systematic attempts to identify linkage in multiplex families have confirmed that variation within the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) exerts the greatest individual effect on risk.4 Modestly powered Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS)5-10 have enabled more than 20 additional risk loci to be identified and have shown that multiple variants exerting modest individual effects play a key role in disease susceptibility.11 Most of the genetic architecture underlying susceptibility to the disease remains to be defined and is anticipated to require the analysis of sample sizes that are beyond the numbers currently available to individual research groups. In a collaborative GWAS involving 9772 cases of European descent collected by 23 research groups working in 15 different countries, we have replicated almost all of the previously suggested associations and identified at least a further 29 novel susceptibility loci. Within the MHC we have refined the identity of the DRB1 risk alleles and confirmed that variation in the HLA-A gene underlies the independent protective effect attributable to the Class I region. Immunologically relevant genes are significantly over-represented amongst those mapping close to the identified loci and particularly implicate T helper cell differentiation in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis.
doi:10.1038/nature10251
PMCID: PMC3182531  PMID: 21833088
multiple sclerosis; GWAS; genetics
BMC Medical Genetics  2011;12:162.
Background
IL8RA and IL8RB, encoded by CXCR1 and CXCR2, are receptors for interleukin (IL)-8 and other CXC chemokines involved in chemotaxis and activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). Variants at CXCR1 and CXCR2 have been associated with susceptibility to cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis in Brazil. Here we investigate the role of CXCR1/CXCR2 in visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in India.
Methods
Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs4674259, rs2234671, rs3138060) that tag linkage disequilibrium blocks across CXCR1/CXCR2 were genotyped in primary family-based (313 cases; 176 nuclear families; 836 individuals) and replication (941 cases; 992 controls) samples. Family- and population-based analyses were performed to look for association between CXCR1/CXCR2 variants and VL. Quantitative RT/PCR was used to compare CXCR1/CXCR2 expression in mRNA from paired splenic aspirates taken before and after treatment from 19 VL patients.
Results
Family-based analysis using FBAT showed association between VL and SNPs CXCR1_rs2234671 (Z-score = 2.935, P = 0.003) and CXCR1_rs3138060 (Z-score = 2.22, P = 0.026), but not with CXCR2_rs4674259. Logistic regression analysis of the case-control data under an additive model of inheritance showed association between VL and SNPs CXCR2_rs4674259 (OR = 1.15, 95%CI = 1.01-1.31, P = 0.027) and CXCR1_rs3138060 (OR = 1.25, 95%CI = 1.02-1.53, P = 0.028), but not with CXCR1_rs2234671. The 3-locus haplotype T_G_C across these SNPs was shown to be the risk haplotype in both family- (TRANSMIT; P = 0.014) and population- (OR = 1.16, P = 0.028) samples (combined P = 0.002). CXCR2, but not CXCR1, expression was down regulated in pre-treatment compared to post-treatment splenic aspirates (P = 0.021).
Conclusions
This well-powered primary and replication genetic study, together with functional analysis of gene expression, implicate CXCR2 in determining outcome of VL in India.
doi:10.1186/1471-2350-12-162
PMCID: PMC3260103  PMID: 22171941
Nature genetics  2010;43(2):117-120.
Metformin is the most commonly used pharmacological therapy for type 2 diabetes. We carried out a GWA study on glycaemic response to metformin in 1024 Scottish patients with type 2 diabetes. Replication was in two cohorts consisting of 1783 Scottish patients and 1113 patients from the UK Prospective Diabetes Study. In a meta-analysis (n=3920) we observed an association (P=2.9 *10−9) for a SNP rs11212617 at a locus containing the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene with an odds ratio of 1.35 (95% CI 1.22 to 1.49) for treatment success. In a rat hepatoma cell line, inhibition of ATM with KU-55933 attenuated the phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in response to metformin. We conclude that ATM, a gene known to be involved in DNA repair and cell cycle control, plays a role in the effect of metformin upstream of AMPK, and variation in this gene alters glycaemic response to metformin.
doi:10.1038/ng.735
PMCID: PMC3030919  PMID: 21186350
Mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) follows localized cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) caused by Leishmania braziliensis. Proinflammatory responses mediate CL self-healing but are exaggerated in ML. Proinflammatory monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1; encoded by CCL2) is associated with CL. We explore its role in CL/ML through analysis of the regulatory CCL2 -2518bp promoter polymorphism in CL/ML population samples and families from Brazil. Genotype frequencies were compared among ML/CL cases and control groups using logistic regression and the family-based association test (FBAT). MCP-1 was measured in plasma and macrophages. The GG recessive genotype at CCL2 -2518bp was more common in patients with ML (N=67) than in neighborhood control (NC; N=60) subjects (OR 1.78; 95% CI 1.01–3.14; P=0.045), than in NC combined with leishmanin skin-test positive (N=60) controls (OR 4.40; 95% CI 1.42–13.65; P=0.010), and than in controls combined with CL (N=60) patients (OR 2.78; 95% CI 1.13–6.85; P=0.045). No associations were observed for CL compared to any groups. FBAT (91 ML and 223 CL cases in families) confirmed recessive association of ML with allele G (Z=2.679; P=0.007). Higher levels of MCP-1 occurred in plasma (P=0.03) and macrophages (P<0.0001) from GG compared to AA individuals. These results suggest that high MCP-1 increases risk of ML.
doi:10.1016/j.meegid.2010.04.006
PMCID: PMC2878927  PMID: 20430117
Mucosal leishmaniasis; genetic association; MCP-1; CCL2
The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R)4 is highly expressed on the macrophage cell surface and activation of infected cells by extracellular ATP has been shown to kill intracellular bacteria and parasites. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that decrease receptor function reduce the ability of human macrophages to kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis and are associated with extrapulmonary tuberculosis. In this paper we show that macrophages from people with the 1513C (rs3751143) loss-of-function P2X7R SNP are less effective in killing intracellular Toxoplasma gondii after exposure to ATP compared with macrophages from people with the 1513A wild-type allele. Supporting a P2X7R-specific effect on T. gondii, macrophages from P2X7R knock-out mice (P2X7R−/−) are unable to kill T. gondii as effectively as macrophages from wild-type mice. We show that P2X7R-mediated T. gondii killing occurs in parallel with host cell apoptosis and is independent of NO production.
doi:10.4049/jimmunol.1000012
PMCID: PMC2931343  PMID: 20488797
Background
Leishmania (Viannia) parasites present particular challenges, as human and murine immune responses to infection are distinct from other Leishmania species, indicating a unique interaction with the host. Further, vaccination studies utilizing small animal models indicate that modalities and antigens that prevent infection by other Leishmania species are generally not protective.
Methodology
Using a newly developed mouse model of chronic L. (Viannia) panamensis infection and the heterologous DNA prime – modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) boost vaccination modality, we examined whether the conserved vaccine candidate antigen tryparedoxin peroxidase (TRYP) could provide protection against infection/disease.
Results
Heterologous prime – boost (DNA/MVA) vaccination utilizing TRYP antigen can provide protection against disease caused by L. (V.) panamensis. However, protection is dependent on modulating the innate immune response using the TLR1/2 agonist Pam3CSK4 during DNA priming. Prime-boost vaccination using DNA alone fails to protect. Prior to infection protectively vaccinated mice exhibit augmented CD4 and CD8 IFNγ and memory responses as well as decreased IL-10 and IL-13 responses. IL-13 and IL-10 have been shown to be independently critical for disease in this model. CD8 T cells have an essential role in mediating host defense, as CD8 depletion reversed protection in the vaccinated mice; vaccinated mice depleted of CD4 T cells remained protected. Hence, vaccine-induced protection is dependent upon TLR1/2 activation instructing the generation of antigen specific CD8 cells and restricting IL-13 and IL-10 responses.
Conclusions
Given the general effectiveness of prime-boost vaccination, the recalcitrance of Leishmania (Viannia) to vaccine approaches effective against other species of Leishmania is again evident. However, prime-boost vaccination modality can with modulation induce protective responses, indicating that the delivery system is critical. Moreover, these results suggest that CD8 T cells should be targeted for the development of a vaccine against infection caused by Leishmania (Viannia) parasites. Further, TLR1/2 modulation may be useful in vaccines where CD8 T cell responses are critical.
Author Summary
Leishmania (Viannia) are the predominant agents of leishmaniasis in Latin America. Given the fact that leishmaniasis is a zoonosis, eradication is unlikely; a vaccine could provide effective prevention of disease. However, these parasites present a challenge and we do not fully understand what elements of the host immune defense prevent disease. We examined the ability of vaccination to protect against L. (Viannia) infection using the highly immunogenic heterologous prime-boost (DNA-modified vaccinia virus) modality and a single Leishmania antigen (TRYP). Although this mode of vaccination can induce protection against other leishmaniases (cutaneous, visceral), no protection was observed against L. (V.) panamensis. However, we found that if the vaccination was modified and the innate immune response was activated through Toll-like receptor1/2(TLR1/2) during the DNA priming, vaccinated mice were protected. Protection was dependent on CD8 T cells. Vaccinated mice had higher CD8 T cell responses and decreased levels of cytokines known to promote infection. Given the long-term persistence of CD8 T cell memory, these findings are encouraging for vaccine development. Further, these results suggest that modulation of TLR1/2 signaling could improve the efficacy of DNA-based vaccines, especially where CD8 T cell activation is critical, thereby contributing to effective and affordable anti parasitic vaccines.
doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0001204
PMCID: PMC3114751  PMID: 21695103
BMC Medical Genetics  2011;12:71.
Background
SLC11A1 has pleiotropic effects on macrophage function and remains a strong candidate for infectious disease susceptibility. 5' and/or 3' polymorphisms have been associated with tuberculosis, leprosy, and visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Most studies undertaken to date were under-powered, and none has been replicated within a population. Association with tuberculosis has replicated variably across populations. Here we investigate SLC11A1 and VL in India.
Methods
Nine polymorphisms (rs34448891, rs7573065, rs2276631, rs3731865, rs17221959, rs2279015, rs17235409, rs17235416, rs17229009) that tag linkage disequilibrium blocks across SLC11A1 were genotyped in primary family-based (313 cases; 176 families) and replication (941 cases; 992 controls) samples. Family- and population-based analyses were performed to look for association between SLC11A1 variants and VL. Quantitative RT/PCR was used to compare SLC11A1 expression in mRNA from paired splenic aspirates taken before and after treatment from 24 VL patients carrying different genotypes at the functional promoter GTn polymorphism (rs34448891).
Results
No associations were observed between VL and polymorphisms at SLC11A1 that were either robust to correction for multiple testing or replicated across primary and replication samples. No differences in expression of SLC11A1 were observed when comparing pre- and post-treatment samples, or between individuals carrying different genotypes at the GTn repeat.
Conclusions
This is the first well-powered study of SLC11A1 as a candidate for VL, which we conclude does not have a major role in regulating VL susceptibility in India.
doi:10.1186/1471-2350-12-71
PMCID: PMC3128845  PMID: 21599885
SLC11A1; visceral leishmaniasis; genetic susceptibility
Applied Spatial Statistics used in conjunction with geographic information systems (GIS) provide an efficient tool for the surveillance of diseases. Here, using these tools we analyzed the spatial distribution of Hansen's disease in an endemic area in Brazil. A sample of 808 selected from a universe of 1,293 cases was geocoded in Mossoró, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. Hansen's disease cases were not distributed randomly within the neighborhoods, with higher detection rates found in more populated districts. Cluster analysis identified two areas of high risk, one with a relative risk of 5.9 (P = 0.001) and the other 6.5 (P = 0.001). A significant relationship between the geographic distribution of disease and the social economic variables indicative of poverty was observed. Our study shows that the combination of GIS and spatial analysis can identify clustering of transmissible disease, such as Hansen's disease, pointing to areas where intervention efforts can be targeted to control disease.
doi:10.4269/ajtmh.2010.08-0675
PMCID: PMC2813173  PMID: 20134009
PLoS ONE  2010;5(12):e15807.
Background
Genome wide linkage studies (GWLS) have provided evidence for loci controlling visceral leishmaniasis on Chromosomes 1p22, 6q27, 22q12 in Sudan and 6q27, 9p21, 17q11-q21 in Brazil. Genome wide studies from the major focus of disease in India have not previously been reported.
Methods and Findings
We undertook a GWLS in India in which a primary ∼10 cM (515 microsatellites) scan was carried out in 58 multicase pedigrees (74 nuclear families; 176 affected, 353 total individuals) and replication sought in 79 pedigrees (102 nuclear families; 218 affected, 473 total individuals). The primary scan provided evidence (≥2 adjacent markers allele-sharing LOD≥0.59; nominal P≤0.05) for linkage on Chromosomes 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 20 and X, with peaks at 6p25.3-p24.3 and 8p23.1-p21.3 contributed to largely by 31 Hindu families and at Xq21.1-q26.1 by 27 Muslim families. Refined mapping confirmed linkage across all primary scan families at 2q12.2-q14.1 and 11q13.2-q23.3, but only 11q13.2-q23.3 replicated (combined LOD = 1.59; P = 0.0034). Linkage at 6p25.3-p24.3 and 8p23.1-p21.3, and at Xq21.1-q26.1, was confirmed by refined mapping for primary Hindu and Muslim families, respectively, but only Xq21.1-q26.1 replicated across all Muslim families (combined LOD 1.49; P = 0.0045). STRUCTURE and SMARTPCA did not identify population genetic substructure related to religious group. Classification and regression tree, and spatial interpolation, analyses confirm geographical heterogeneity for linkages at 6p25.3-p24.3, 8p23.1-p21.3 and Xq21.1-q26.1, with specific clusters of families contributing LOD scores of 2.13 (P = 0.0009), 1.75 (P = 0.002) and 1.84 (P = 0.001), respectively.
Conclusions
GWLS has identified novel loci that show geographical heterogeneity in their influence on susceptibility to VL in India.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0015807
PMCID: PMC3013125  PMID: 21209823
Clinical Microbiology Reviews  2009;22(2):370-385.
Summary: Following their discovery in the early 1970s, classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci have been the prototypical candidates for genetic susceptibility to infectious disease. Indeed, the original hypothesis for the extreme variability observed at HLA loci (H-2 in mice) was the major selective pressure from infectious diseases. Now that both the human genome and the molecular basis of innate and acquired immunity are understood in greater detail, do the classical HLA loci still stand out as major genes that determine susceptibility to infectious disease? This review looks afresh at the evidence supporting a role for classical HLA loci in susceptibility to infectious disease, examines the limitations of data reported to date, and discusses current advances in methodology and technology that will potentially lead to greater understanding of their role in infectious diseases in the future.
doi:10.1128/CMR.00048-08
PMCID: PMC2668228  PMID: 19366919

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