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1.  Urine haptoglobin levels predict early renal functional decline in patients with type 2 diabetes 
Kidney international  2013;83(6):1136-1143.
Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end stage renal disease. The urinary albumin to creatinine ratio is used as a predictor for the development of nephropathy but it is neither sensitive nor specific. Here we used liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry on urine of eight normoalbuminuric patients with type 2 diabetes from the VA Diabetes Trial to identify candidate markers for loss of renal function. Initial verification of 7 markers (agrin, haptoglobin, mannan-binding lectin serine protease 2, LAMP-2, angiotensinogen, NGAL and uromodulin) in the urine of an additional 30 patients showed that haptoglobin was the best predictor of early renal functional decline. We then measured this in the urine of 204 patients with type 2 diabetes who did not yet have significant kidney disease (eGFR stage 2 or better and an albumin to creatinine ratio less than 300 mg/g). In comparing the highest to lowest tertile, the odds ratio for having early renal function decline was 2.70 (CI 1.15, 6.32) using the haptoglobin to creatinine ratio compared to 2.50 (CI 1.14, 5.48) using the albumin to creatinine ratio after adjusting for treatment group and use of ACE inhibitors. Addition of the haptoglobin to creatinine ratio to a model using the albumin to creatinine ratio to predict early renal function decline resulted in improved predictive performance. Thus, the haptoglobin to creatinine ratio may be useful to predict patients with type 2 diabetes at risk of nephropathy prior to the development of macroalbuminuria or reduced GFR.
doi:10.1038/ki.2013.57
PMCID: PMC3672380  PMID: 23536133
Diabetes; diabetic nephropathy; type 2 diabetes; urine; biological markers; chronic kidney disease
2.  Urinary angiotensinogen predicts adverse outcomes among acute kidney injury patients in the intensive care unit 
Critical Care  2013;17(2):R69.
Introduction
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is commonly observed in the intensive care unit (ICU), where it can be caused by a variety of factors. The objective of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of urinary angiotensinogen, a candidate prognostic AKI biomarker identified in post-cardiac surgery patients, in this heterogeneous population.
Methods
Urinary angiotensinogen was measured by ELISA and corrected for urine creatinine in 45 patients who developed AKI in the ICU. Patients were grouped by AKI etiology, and the angiotensinogen-to-creatinine ratio (uAnCR) was compared among the groups using the Kruskal-Wallis test. The ability of uAnCR to predict the following endpoints was tested using the area under the ROC curve (AUC): the need for renal replacement therapy (RRT) or death, increased length of stay (defined as hospital discharge > 7 days or death ≤ 7 days from sample collection), and worsening AKI (defined as an increase in serum creatinine > 0.3 mg/dL after sample collection or RRT).
Results
uAnCR was significantly elevated in patients who met the composite outcome RRT or death (89.4 vs 25.4 ng/mg; P = 0.01), and it was a strong predictor of this outcome (AUC = 0.73). Patients with uAnCR values above the median for the cohort (55.21 ng/mg) had increased length of stay compared to patients with uAnCR ≤ 55.21 ng/mg (22 days vs 7 days after sample collection; P = 0.01). uAnCR was predictive of the outcome increased length of stay (AUC = 0.77). uAnCR was also a strong predictor of worsening of AKI (AUC = 0.77). The uAnCR of patients with pre-renal AKI was lower compared to patients with AKI of other causes (median uAnCR 11.3 vs 80.2 ng/mg; P = 0.02).
Conclusions
Elevated urinary angiotensinogen is associated with adverse events in AKI patients in the ICU. It could be used to identify high risk patients who would benefit from timely intervention that could improve their outcomes.
doi:10.1186/cc12612
PMCID: PMC3672721  PMID: 23587112
3.  Ratiometric Measurements of Adiponectin by Mass Spectrometry in Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) with Iron Overload Reveal an Association with Insulin Resistance and Glucagon 
High molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin levels are reduced in humans with type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Similar to humans with insulin resistance, managed bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) diagnosed with hemochromatosis (iron overload) have higher levels of 2 h post-prandial plasma insulin than healthy controls. A parallel reaction monitoring assay for dolphin serum adiponectin was developed based on tryptic peptides identified by mass spectrometry. Using identified post-translational modifications, a differential measurement was constructed. Total and unmodified adiponectin levels were measured in sera from dolphins with (n = 4) and without (n = 5) iron overload. This measurement yielded total adiponectin levels as well as site specific percent unmodified adiponectin that may inversely correlate with HMW adiponectin. Differences in insulin levels between iron overload cases and controls were observed 2 h post-prandial, but not during the fasting state. Thus, post-prandial as well as fasting serum adiponectin levels were measured to determine whether adiponectin and insulin would follow similar patterns. There was no difference in total adiponectin or percent unmodified adiponectin from case or control fasting animals. There was no difference in post-prandial total adiponectin levels between case and control dolphins (mean ± SD) at 763 ± 298 and 727 ± 291 pmol/ml, respectively (p = 0.91); however, percent unmodified adiponectin was significantly higher in post-prandial cases compared to controls (30.0 ± 6.3 versus 17.0 ± 6.6%, respectively; p = 0.016). Interestingly, both total and percent unmodified adiponectin were correlated with glucagon levels in controls (r = 0.999, p  < 0.001), but not in cases, which is possibly a reflection of insulin resistance. Although total adiponectin levels were not significantly different, the elevated percent unmodified adiponectin follows a trend similar to HMW adiponectin reported for humans with metabolic disorders.
doi:10.3389/fendo.2013.00132
PMCID: PMC3778387  PMID: 24065958
parallel reaction monitoring; marine mammal; assay; hemochromatosis; liver; diabetes
4.  Sources of Variability among Replicate Samples Separated by Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis 
Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) offers high-resolution separation for intact proteins. However, variability in the appearance of spots can limit the ability to identify true differences between conditions. Variability can occur at a number of levels. Individual samples can differ because of biological variability. Technical variability can occur during protein extraction, processing, or storage. Another potential source of variability occurs during analysis of the gels and is not a result of any of the causes of variability named above. We performed a study designed to focus only on the variability caused by analysis. We separated three aliquots of rat left ventricle and analyzed differences in protein abundance on the replicate 2D gels. As the samples loaded on each gel were identical, differences in protein abundance are caused by variability in separation or interpretation of the gels. Protein spots were compared across gels by quantile values to determine differences. Fourteen percent of spots had a maximum difference in intensity of 0.4 quantile values or more between replicates. We then looked individually at the spots to determine the cause of differences between the measured intensities. Reasons for differences were: failure to identify a spot (59%), differences in spot boundaries (13%), difference in the peak height (6%), and a combination of these factors (21). This study demonstrates that spot identification and characterization make major contributions to variability seen with 2DE. Methods to highlight why measured protein spot abundance is different could reduce these errors.
PMCID: PMC2841997  PMID: 20357976
heart; proteomics; reproducibility; protein
5.  Urine Biomarkers Predict the Cause of Glomerular Disease 
Diagnosis of the type of glomerular disease that causes the nephrotic syndrome is necessary for appropriate treatment and typically requires a renal biopsy. The goal of this study was to identify candidate protein biomarkers to diagnose glomerular diseases. Proteomic methods and informatic analysis were used to identify patterns of urine proteins that are characteristic of the diseases. Urine proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis in 32 patients with FSGS, lupus nephritis, membranous nephropathy, or diabetic nephropathy. Protein abundances from 16 patients were used to train an artificial neural network to create a prediction algorithm. The remaining 16 patients were used as an external validation set to test the accuracy of the prediction algorithm. In the validation set, the model predicted the presence of the diseases with sensitivities between 75 and 86% and specificities from 92 to 67%. The probability of obtaining these results in the novel set by chance is 5 × 10−8. Twenty-one gel spots were most important for the differentiation of the diseases. The spots were cut from the gel, and 20 were identified by mass spectrometry as charge forms of 11 plasma proteins: Orosomucoid, transferrin, α-1 microglobulin, zinc α-2 glycoprotein, α-1 antitrypsin, complement factor B, haptoglobin, transthyretin, plasma retinol binding protein, albumin, and hemopexin. These data show that diseases that cause nephrotic syndrome change glomerular protein permeability in characteristic patterns. The fingerprint of urine protein charge forms identifies the glomerular disease. The identified proteins are candidate biomarkers that can be tested in assays that are more amenable to clinical testing.
doi:10.1681/ASN.2006070767
PMCID: PMC2733832  PMID: 17301191
6.  Overcoming the Effects of Matrix Interference in the Measurement of Urine Protein Analytes 
Biomarker Insights  2012;7:1-8.
Using multiplex bead assays to measure urine proteins has a great potential for biomarker discovery, but substances in urine (the matrix) can interfere with assay measurements. By comparing the recovery of urine spiked with known quantities of several common analytes, this study demonstrated that the urine matrix variably interfered with the accurate measurement of low abundance proteins. Dilution of the urine permitted a more accurate measure of these proteins, equivalent to the standard dilution technique when the diluted analytes were above the limits of detection of the assay. Therefore, dilution can be used as an effective technique for over-coming urine matrix effects in urine immunoassays. These results may be applicable to other biological fluids in which matrix components interfere with assay performance.
doi:10.4137/BMI.S8703
PMCID: PMC3290108  PMID: 22403482
biomarkers; body fluids urine; analysis/urine; standard addition; assay validation
7.  Identification of Diagnostic Urinary Biomarkers for Acute Kidney Injury 
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important cause of death among hospitalized patients. The two most common causes of AKI are acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and prerenal azotemia (PRA). Appropriate diagnosis of the disease is important but often difficult. We analyzed urine proteins by 2-DE from 38 patients with AKI. Patients were randomly assigned to a training set, an internal test set or an external validation set. Spot abundances were analyzed by artificial neural networks (ANN) to identify biomarkers which differentiate between ATN and PRA. When the trained neural network algorithm was tested against the training data it identified the diagnosis for 16/18 patients in the training set and all 10 patients in the internal test set. The accuracy was validated in the novel external set of patients where 9/10 subjects were correctly diagnosed including 5/5 with ATN and 4/5 with PRA. Plasma retinol binding protein (PRBP) was identified in one spot and a fragment of albumin and PRBP in the other. These proteins are candidate markers for diagnostic assays of AKI.
doi:10.231/JIM.0b013e3181d473e7
PMCID: PMC2864920  PMID: 20224435
Acute kidney injury; Biomarkers; Diagnosis; Kidney; Urine
8.  Prediction of urinary protein markers in lupus nephritis 
Kidney international  2005;68(6):2588-2592.
Background
Lupus nephritis is divided into six classes and scored according to activity and chronicity indices based on histologic findings. Treatment differs based on the pathologic findings. Renal biopsy is currently the only way to accurately predict class and activity and chronicity indices. We propose to use patterns of abundance of urine proteins to identify class and disease indices.
Methods
Urine was collected from 20 consecutive patients immediately prior to biopsy for evaluation of lupus nephritis. The International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society (ISN/RPS) class of lupus nephritis, activity, and chronicity indices were determined by a renal pathologist. Proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Artificial neural networks were trained on normalized spot abundance values.
Results
Biopsy specimens were classified in the database according to ISN/RPS class, activity, and chronicity. Nine samples had characteristics of more than one class present. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of the trained networks demonstrated areas under the curve ranging from 0.85 to 0.95. The sensitivity and specificity for the ISN/RPS classes were class II 100%, 100%; III 86%, 100%; IV 100%, 92%; and V 92%, 50%. Activity and chronicity indices had r values of 0.77 and 0.87, respectively. A list of spots was obtained that provided diagnostic sensitivity to the analysis.
Conclusion
We have identified a list of protein spots that can be used to develop a clinical assay to predict ISN/RPS class and chronicity for patients with lupus nephritis. An assay based on antibodies against these spots could eliminate the need for renal biopsy, allow frequent evaluation of disease status, and begin specific therapy for patients with lupus nephritis.
doi:10.1111/j.1523-1755.2005.00730.x
PMCID: PMC2667626  PMID: 16316334
lupus nephritis; biomarkers; urine; electrophoresis; two-dimensional gel
9.  An open-source representation for 2-DE-centric proteomics and support infrastructure for data storage and analysis 
BMC Bioinformatics  2008;9:4.
Background
In spite of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) being an effective and widely used method to screen the proteome, its data standardization has still not matured to the level of microarray genomics data or mass spectrometry approaches. The trend toward identifying encompassing data standards has been expanding from genomics to transcriptomics, and more recently to proteomics. The relative success of genomic and transcriptomic data standardization has enabled the development of central repositories such as GenBank and Gene Expression Omnibus. An equivalent 2-DE-centric data structure would similarly have to include a balance among raw data, basic feature detection results, sufficiency in the description of the experimental context and methods, and an overall structure that facilitates a diversity of usages, from central reposition to local data representation in LIMs systems.
Results & Conclusion
Achieving such a balance can only be accomplished through several iterations involving bioinformaticians, bench molecular biologists, and the manufacturers of the equipment and commercial software from which the data is primarily generated. Such an encompassing data structure is described here, developed as the mature successor to the well established and broadly used earlier version. A public repository, AGML Central, is configured with a suite of tools for the conversion from a variety of popular formats, web-based visualization, and interoperation with other tools and repositories, and is particularly mass-spectrometry oriented with I/O for annotation and data analysis.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-9-4
PMCID: PMC2231339  PMID: 18179696
10.  Comparison of Variability Associated with Sample Preparation in Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis of Cardiac Tissue 
Variability is a major complicating factor in analysis by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Improvements in methodologies have focused on improving individual gel quality rather than reproducibility. We homogenized rat cardiac tissue and rehydrated using a matrix of buffers to determine the optimal sample conditions. Six buffers were used to solubilize the proteins. Solubilized proteins were separated by isoelectric focusing using four buffers. Gels were run in triplicate to assess the method of preparation yielding the least variability. Number of spots and variability were different between conditions. Proteins solubilized in a buffer containing 5 M urea, 2M thiourea, 2% CHAPS, 2% SB 3–10, ampholytes, DTT, and protease inhibitors and focused in a buffer containing 9 M urea and 4% NP40 had the lowest coefficient of variation. Variability was compared across isoelectric point ranges and was different. Minimizing technical variability in two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is critical to identify differences between conditions. Sample preparation should be optimized to minimize variability as well as to maximize the number of spots seen.
PMCID: PMC2291783  PMID: 16870710
Reproducibility; variability: two-dimensional gel electrophoresis; heart

Results 1-10 (10)