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1.  From Days to Hours: Reporting Clinically Actionable Variants from Whole Genome Sequencing 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(2):e86803.
As the cost of whole genome sequencing (WGS) decreases, clinical laboratories will be looking at broadly adopting this technology to screen for variants of clinical significance. To fully leverage this technology in a clinical setting, results need to be reported quickly, as the turnaround rate could potentially impact patient care. The latest sequencers can sequence a whole human genome in about 24 hours. However, depending on the computing infrastructure available, the processing of data can take several days, with the majority of computing time devoted to aligning reads to genomics regions that are to date not clinically interpretable. In an attempt to accelerate the reporting of clinically actionable variants, we have investigated the utility of a multi-step alignment algorithm focused on aligning reads and calling variants in genomic regions of clinical relevance prior to processing the remaining reads on the whole genome. This iterative workflow significantly accelerates the reporting of clinically actionable variants with no loss of accuracy when compared to genotypes obtained with the OMNI SNP platform or to variants detected with a standard workflow that combines Novoalign and GATK.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0086803
PMCID: PMC3914798  PMID: 24505267
2.  SoftSearch: Integration of Multiple Sequence Features to Identify Breakpoints of Structural Variations 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(12):e83356.
Background
Structural variation (SV) represents a significant, yet poorly understood contribution to an individual’s genetic makeup. Advanced next-generation sequencing technologies are widely used to discover such variations, but there is no single detection tool that is considered a community standard. In an attempt to fulfil this need, we developed an algorithm, SoftSearch, for discovering structural variant breakpoints in Illumina paired-end next-generation sequencing data. SoftSearch combines multiple strategies for detecting SV including split-read, discordant read-pair, and unmated pairs. Co-localized split-reads and discordant read pairs are used to refine the breakpoints.
Results
We developed and validated SoftSearch using real and synthetic datasets. SoftSearch’s key features are 1) not requiring secondary (or exhaustive primary) alignment, 2) portability into established sequencing workflows, and 3) is applicable to any DNA-sequencing experiment (e.g. whole genome, exome, custom capture, etc.). SoftSearch identifies breakpoints from a small number of soft-clipped bases from split reads and a few discordant read-pairs which on their own would not be sufficient to make an SV call.
Conclusions
We show that SoftSearch can identify more true SVs by combining multiple sequence features. SoftSearch was able to call clinically relevant SVs in the BRCA2 gene not reported by other tools while offering significantly improved overall performance.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0083356
PMCID: PMC3865185  PMID: 24358278
3.  An Integrated Model of the Transcriptome of HER2-Positive Breast Cancer 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(11):e79298.
Our goal in these analyses was to use genomic features from a test set of primary breast tumors to build an integrated transcriptome landscape model that makes relevant hypothetical predictions about the biological and/or clinical behavior of HER2-positive breast cancer. We interrogated RNA-Seq data from benign breast lesions, ER+, triple negative, and HER2-positive tumors to identify 685 differentially expressed genes, 102 alternatively spliced genes, and 303 genes that expressed single nucleotide sequence variants (eSNVs) that were associated with the HER2-positive tumors in our survey panel. These features were integrated into a transcriptome landscape model that identified 12 highly interconnected genomic modules, each of which represents a cellular processes pathway that appears to define the genomic architecture of the HER2-positive tumors in our test set. The generality of the model was confirmed by the observation that several key pathways were enriched in HER2-positive TCGA breast tumors. The ability of this model to make relevant predictions about the biology of breast cancer cells was established by the observation that integrin signaling was linked to lapatinib sensitivity in vitro and strongly associated with risk of relapse in the NCCTG N9831 adjuvant trastuzumab clinical trial dataset. Additional modules from the HER2 transcriptome model, including ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, TGF-beta signaling, RHO-family GTPase signaling, and M-phase progression, were linked to response to lapatinib and paclitaxel in vitro and/or risk of relapse in the N9831 dataset. These data indicate that an integrated transcriptome landscape model derived from a test set of HER2-positive breast tumors has potential for predicting outcome and for identifying novel potential therapeutic strategies for this breast cancer subtype.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0079298
PMCID: PMC3815156  PMID: 24223926
4.  SAAP-RRBS: streamlined analysis and annotation pipeline for reduced representation bisulfite sequencing 
Bioinformatics  2012;28(16):2180-2181.
Summary: Reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) is a cost-effective approach for genome-wide methylation pattern profiling. Analyzing RRBS sequencing data is challenging and specialized alignment/mapping programs are needed. Although such programs have been developed, a comprehensive solution that provides researchers with good quality and analyzable data is still lacking. To address this need, we have developed a Streamlined Analysis and Annotation Pipeline for RRBS data (SAAP-RRBS) that integrates read quality assessment/clean-up, alignment, methylation data extraction, annotation, reporting and visualization. This package facilitates a rapid transition from sequencing reads to a fully annotated CpG methylation report to biological interpretation.
Availability and implementation: SAAP-RRBS is freely available to non-commercial users at the web site http://ndc.mayo.edu/mayo/research/biostat/stand-alone-packages.cfm.
Contact: baheti.saurabh@mayo.edu or sun.zhifu@mayo.edu
Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/bts337
PMCID: PMC3413387  PMID: 22689387
5.  Deep Sequence Analysis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Integrated Analysis of Gene Expression, Alternative Splicing, and Single Nucleotide Variations in Lung Adenocarcinomas with and without Oncogenic KRAS Mutations 
KRAS mutations are highly prevalent in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and tumors harboring these mutations tend to be aggressive and resistant to chemotherapy. We used next-generation sequencing technology to identify pathways that are specifically altered in lung tumors harboring a KRAS mutation. Paired-end RNA-sequencing of 15 primary lung adenocarcinoma tumors (8 harboring mutant KRAS and 7 with wild-type KRAS) were performed. Sequences were mapped to the human genome, and genomic features, including differentially expressed genes, alternate splicing isoforms and single nucleotide variants, were determined for tumors with and without KRAS mutation using a variety of computational methods. Network analysis was carried out on genes showing differential expression (374 genes), alternate splicing (259 genes), and SNV-related changes (65 genes) in NSCLC tumors harboring a KRAS mutation. Genes exhibiting two or more connections from the lung adenocarcinoma network were used to carry out integrated pathway analysis. The most significant signaling pathways identified through this analysis were the NFκB, ERK1/2, and AKT pathways. A 27 gene mutant KRAS-specific sub network was extracted based on gene–gene connections from the integrated network, and interrogated for druggable targets. Our results confirm previous evidence that mutant KRAS tumors exhibit activated NFκB, ERK1/2, and AKT pathways and may be preferentially sensitive to target therapeutics toward these pathways. In addition, our analysis indicates novel, previously unappreciated links between mutant KRAS and the TNFR and PPARγ signaling pathways, suggesting that targeted PPARγ antagonists and TNFR inhibitors may be useful therapeutic strategies for treatment of mutant KRAS lung tumors. Our study is the first to integrate genomic features from RNA-Seq data from NSCLC and to define a first draft genomic landscape model that is unique to tumors with oncogenic KRAS mutations.
doi:10.3389/fonc.2012.00012
PMCID: PMC3356053  PMID: 22655260
transcriptome sequencing; RNA-Seq; KRAS mutation; NSCLC; bioinformatics; network analysis; data integration and computational methods
6.  TREAT: a bioinformatics tool for variant annotations and visualizations in targeted and exome sequencing data 
Bioinformatics  2011;28(2):277-278.
Summary: TREAT (Targeted RE-sequencing Annotation Tool) is a tool for facile navigation and mining of the variants from both targeted resequencing and whole exome sequencing. It provides a rich integration of publicly available as well as in-house developed annotations and visualizations for variants, variant-hosting genes and host-gene pathways.
Availability and implementation: TREAT is freely available to non-commercial users as either a stand-alone annotation and visualization tool, or as a comprehensive workflow integrating sequencing alignment and variant calling. The executables, instructions and the Amazon Cloud Images of TREAT can be downloaded at the website: http://ndc.mayo.edu/mayo/research/biostat/stand-alone-packages.cfm
Contact: Hossain.Asif@mayo.edu; Kocher.JeanPierre@mayo.edu
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are provided at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btr612
PMCID: PMC3259432  PMID: 22088845

Results 1-6 (6)