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1.  Comparing schizophrenia symptoms in the Iban of Sarawak with other populations to elucidate clinical heterogeneity 
Introduction
The symptom profile of schizophrenia can vary between ethnic groups. We explored selected symptom variables previously reported to be characteristic of schizophrenia in the Iban of Sarawak in transethnic populations from Australia, India and Sarawak, Malaysia. We tested site differences to confirm previous research, and to explore implications of differences across populations for future investigations.
Methods
We recruited schizophrenia samples in Australia (n=609), India (n=310) and Sarawak (n=205) primarily for the purposes of genetic studies. We analyzed seven identified variables and their relationship to site using logistic regression, including: global delusions, bizarre delusions, thought broadcast/insertion/withdrawal delusions, global hallucinations, auditory hallucinations, disorganized behavior, and prodromal duration.
Results
We identified a distinct symptom profile in our Sarawak sample. Specifically, the Iban exhibit: low frequency of thought broadcast/insertion/withdrawal delusions, high frequency of auditory hallucinations and disorganized behavior, with a comparatively short prodrome when compared with Australian and Indian populations.
Discussion
Understanding between-site variation in symptom profile may complement future transethnic genetic studies, and provide important clues as to the nature of differing schizophrenia expression across ethnically distinct groups. A comprehensive approach to subtyping schizophrenia is warranted, utilizing comprehensively ascertained transethnic samples to inform both schizophrenia genetics and nosology.
doi:10.1111/appy.12093
PMCID: PMC3932150  PMID: 24038814
psychotic disorders; schizophrenia; culture; diagnosis; population characteristics
2.  The three-body problem of therapy with induced pluripotent stem cells 
Genome Medicine  2015;7(1):15.
Regenerative medicine has a three-body problem: alignment of the dynamics of the genome, stem cell and patient. Focusing on the rare inherited fragile skin disorder epidermolysis bullosa, three recent innovative studies have used induced pluripotent stem cells and gene correction, revertant mosaicism or genome editing to advance the prospects of better cell-based therapeutics to restore skin structure and function for epidermolysis bullosa and potentially other inherited diseases.
doi:10.1186/s13073-015-0141-7
PMCID: PMC4335559
3.  Transplanted Bone Marrow–Derived Circulating PDGFRα+ Cells Restore Type VII Collagen in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Mouse Skin Graft 
Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is an intractable genetic blistering skin disease in which the epithelial structure easily separates from the underlying dermis because of genetic loss of functional type VII collagen (Col7) in the cutaneous basement membrane zone. Recent studies have demonstrated that allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) ameliorates the skin blistering phenotype of RDEB patients by restoring Col7. However, the exact therapeutic mechanism of BMT in RDEB remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the roles of transplanted bone marrow–derived circulating mesenchymal cells in RDEB (Col7-null) mice. In wild-type mice with prior GFP-BMT after lethal irradiation, lineage-negative/GFP-positive (Lin−/GFP+) cells, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor α-positive (PDGFRα+) mesenchymal cells, specifically migrated to skin grafts from RDEB mice and expressed Col7. Vascular endothelial cells and follicular keratinocytes in the deep dermis of the skin grafts expressed SDF-1α, and the bone marrow–derived PDGFRα+ cells expressed CXCR4 on their surface. Systemic administration of the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 markedly decreased the migration of bone marrow–derived PDGFRα+ cells into the skin graft, resulting in persistent epidermal detachment with massive necrosis and inflammation in the skin graft of RDEB mice; without AMD3100 administration, Col7 was significantly supplemented to ameliorate the pathogenic blistering phenotype. Collectively, these data suggest that the SDF1α/CXCR4 signaling axis induces transplanted bone marrow–derived circulating PDGFRα+ mesenchymal cells to migrate and supply functional Col7 to regenerate RDEB skin.
doi:10.4049/jimmunol.1400914
PMCID: PMC4319308  PMID: 25601922
4.  A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Recovery in Schizophrenia 
Schizophrenia Bulletin  2012;39(6):1296-1306.
Objective: Our primary aims were (a) to identify the proportion of individuals with schizophrenia and related psychoses who met recovery criteria based on both clinical and social domains and (b) to examine if recovery was associated with factors such as gender, economic index of sites, and selected design features of the study. We also examined if the proportions who met our definition of recovery had changed over time. Method: A comprehensive search strategy was used to identify potential studies, and data were extracted for those that met inclusion criteria. The proportion who met our recovery criteria (improvements in both clinical and social domains and evidence that improvements in at least 1 of these 2 domains had persisted for at least 2 years) was extracted from each study. Meta-regression techniques were used to explore the association between the recovery proportions and the selected variables. Results: We identified 50 studies with data suitable for inclusion. The median proportion (25%–75% quantiles) who met our recovery criteria was 13.5% (8.1%–20.0%). Studies from sites in countries with poorer economic status had higher recovery proportions. However, there were no statistically significant differences when the estimates were stratified according to sex, midpoint of intake period, strictness of the diagnostic criteria, duration of follow-up, or other design features. Conclusions: Based on the best available data, approximately, 1 in 7 individuals with schizophrenia met our criteria for recovery. Despite major changes in treatment options in recent decades, the proportion of recovered cases has not increased.
doi:10.1093/schbul/sbs130
PMCID: PMC3796077  PMID: 23172003
schizophrenia; psychosis; recovery; outcome studies; prognosis; epidemiology
5.  Patient-specific naturally gene-reverted induced pluripotent stem cells in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa 
Spontaneous reversion of disease-causing mutations has been observed in some genetic disorders. In our clinical observations of severe generalized recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB), a currently incurable blistering genodermatosis caused by loss-of-function mutations in COL7A1 that results in a deficit of type VII collagen (C7), we have observed patches of healthy-appearing skin on some individuals. When biopsied, this skin revealed somatic mosaicism resulting from the self-correction of C7 deficiency. We believe this source of cells could represent an opportunity for translational “natural” gene therapy. We show that revertant RDEB keratinocytes expressing functional C7 can be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and that self-corrected RDEB iPSCs can be induced to differentiate into either epidermal or hematopoietic cell populations. Our results give proof in principle that an inexhaustible supply of functional patient-specific revertant cells can be obtained—potentially relevant to local wound therapy and systemic hematopoietic cell transplantation. This technology may also avoid some of the major limitations of other cell therapy strategies, e.g., immune rejection and insertional mutagenesis, which are associated with viral- and nonviral- mediated gene therapy. We believe this approach should be the starting point for autologous cellular therapies using “natural” gene therapy in RDEB and other diseases.
doi:10.1038/jid.2013.523
PMCID: PMC3989384  PMID: 24317394
6.  Targeted prostate cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the initial screening round of the IMPACT study 
Bancroft, Elizabeth K. | Page, Elizabeth C. | Castro, Elena | Lilja, Hans | Vickers, Andrew | Sjoberg, Daniel | Assel, Melissa | Foster, Christopher S. | Mitchell, Gillian | Drew, Kate | Maehle, Lovise | Axcrona, Karol | Evans, D. Gareth | Bulman, Barbara | Eccles, Diana | McBride, Donna | van Asperen, Christi | Vasen, Hans | Kiemeney, Lambertus A. | Ringelberg, Janneke | Cybulski, Cezary | Wokolorczyk, Dominika | Selkirk, Christina | Hulick, Peter J. | Bojesen, Anders | Skytte, Anne-Bine | Lam, Jimmy | Taylor, Louise | Oldenburg, Rogier | Cremers, Ruben | Verhaegh, Gerald | van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A. | Oosterwijk, Jan C. | Blanco, Ignacio | Salinas, Monica | Cook, Jackie | Rosario, Derek J. | Buys, Saundra | Conner, Tom | Ausems, Margreet GEM | Ong, Kai-ren | Hoffman, Jonathan | Domchek, Susan | Powers, Jacquelyn | Teixeira, Manuel R. | Maia, Sofia | Foulkes, William D. | Taherian, Nassim | Ruijs, Marielle | Helderman-van den Enden, Apollonia T. J. M. | Izatt, Louise | Davidson, Rosemarie | Adank, Muriel A. | Walker, Lisa | Schmutzler, Rita | Tucker, Kathy | Kirk, Judy | Hodgson, Shirley | Harris, Marion | Douglas, Fiona | Lindeman, Geoffrey J. | Zgajnar, Janez | Tischkowitz, Marc | Clowes, Virginia E. | Susman, Rachel | Cajal, Teresa Ramon y | Patcher, Nicholas | Gadea, Neus | Spigelman, Allan | van Os, Theo | Liljegren, Annelie | Side, Lucy | Brewer, Carole | Brady, Angela F. | Donaldson, Alan | Stefansdottir, Vigdis | Friedman, Eitan | Chen-Shtoyerman, Rakefet | Amor, David J. | Copakova, Lucia | Barwell, Julian | Giri, Veda N. | Murthy, Vedang | Nicolai, Nicola | Teo, Soo-Hwang | Greenhalgh, Lynn | Strom, Sara | Henderson, Alex | McGrath, John | Gallagher, David | Aaronson, Neil | Ardern-Jones, Audrey | Bangma, Chris | Dearnaley, David | Costello, Philandra | Eyfjord, Jorunn | Rothwell, Jeanette | Falconer, Alison | Gronberg, Henrik | Hamdy, Freddie C. | Johannsson, Oskar | Khoo, Vincent | Kote-Jarai, Zsofia | Lubinski, Jan | Axcrona, Ulrika | Melia, Jane | McKinley, Joanne | Mitra, Anita V. | Moynihan, Clare | Rennert, Gad | Suri, Mohnish | Wilson, Penny | Killick, Emma | Moss, Sue | Eeles, Rosalind A.
European urology  2014;66(3):489-499.
Background
Men with germline BRCA1/2 mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer than non-carriers. IMPACT is an international consortium of 62 centres in 20 countries evaluating the use of targeted PrCa screening in men with BRCA1/2 mutations.
Objective
To report the first year’s screening results for all men at enrolment in the study.
Outcome Measurements and Statistical Analysis
PSA levels, PrCa incidence, and tumour characteristics were evaluated. Fisher’s exact test was used to compare the number of PrCa cases between groups and differences between disease types.
Design, setting and participants
We recruited men aged 40–69 years with germline BRCA1/2 mutations and a control group of men who have tested negative for a pathogenic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation known to be present in their family. All men underwent PSA testing at enrolment and those with a PSA >3ng/ml offered prostate biopsy.
Results and limitations
We recruited 2,481 men (791 BRCA1 carriers, 531 BRCA1 controls; 731 BRCA2 carriers, 428 BRCA2 controls). 199 (8%) presented with a PSA >3ng/ml, 162 biopsies were performed and 59 PrCas diagnosed (18 BRCA1 carriers, 10 BRCA1 controls; 24 BRCA2 carriers, 7 BRCA2 controls); 66% of tumours were classified as intermediate or high-risk disease. The positive-predictive-value for biopsy using a PSA threshold of 3.0ng/ml in BRCA2 mutation carriers was 48%, double that reported in population screening studies. A significant difference in detecting intermediate or high-risk disease was observed in BRCA2 carriers. 95% of men were Caucasian thus the results cannot be generalised to all ethnic groups.
Conclusions
The IMPACT screening network will be useful for targeted PrCa screening studies in men with germline genetic risk variants as they are discovered. These preliminary results support the use of targeted PSA screening based on BRCA genotype and show that this yields a high proportion of aggressive disease.
Patient Summary
In this report we demonstrate that germline genetic markers can be used to identify men at higher risk of PrCa. Targeting screening at these men resulted in the identification of tumours that were more likely to require treatment.
doi:10.1016/j.eururo.2014.01.003
PMCID: PMC4105321  PMID: 24484606
BRCA1; BRCA2; Prostate cancer; Prostate-Specific-Antigen; Targeted screening
7.  Kindlin-1 controls Wnt and TGF-β availability to regulate cutaneous epithelial stem cell proliferation 
Nature medicine  2014;20(4):350-359.
Kindlin-1 is an integrin tail binding protein that controls integrin activation. Mutations in the FERMT-1 gene lead to Kindler Syndrome in man, which is characterized by skin blistering, premature skin ageing and skin cancer of unknown etiology. Here we show that loss of Kindlin-1 in mouse keratinocytes recapitulates Kindler Syndrome, and in addition produces enlarged and hyperactive stem cell compartments, which lead to hyperthickened epidermis, ectopic hair follicle development and increased skin tumor susceptibility. Mechanistically, Kindlin-1 controls keratinocyte adhesion through β1-class integrins and proliferation and differentiation of cutaneous epithelial stem cells by promoting αvβ6 integrin-mediated TGFβ activation and by inhibiting Wnt-β-catenin signaling through an integrin-independent regulation of Wnt ligand expression. Our findings assign Kindlin-1 the novel and essential task to control cutaneous epithelial stem cell homeostasis by balancing TGFβ mediated growth inhibitory and Wnt-β-catenin mediated growth-promoting signals.
doi:10.1038/nm.3490
PMCID: PMC3982140  PMID: 24681597
8.  Global, regional, and national levels of neonatal, infant, and under-5 mortality during 1990–2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 
Wang, Haidong | Liddell, Chelsea A | Coates, Matthew M | Mooney, Meghan D | Levitz, Carly E | Schumacher, Austin E | Apfel, Henry | Iannarone, Marissa | Phillips, Bryan | Lofgren, Katherine T | Sandar, Logan | Dorrington, Rob E | Rakovac, Ivo | Jacobs, Troy A | Liang, Xiaofeng | Zhou, Maigeng | Zhu, Jun | Yang, Gonghuan | Wang, Yanping | Liu, Shiwei | Li, Yichong | Ozgoren, Ayse Abbasoglu | Abera, Semaw Ferede | Abubakar, Ibrahim | Achoki, Tom | Adelekan, Ademola | Ademi, Zanfina | Alemu, Zewdie Aderaw | Allen, Peter J | AlMazroa, Mohammad AbdulAziz | Alvarez, Elena | Amankwaa, Adansi A | Amare, Azmeraw T | Ammar, Walid | Anwari, Palwasha | Cunningham, Solveig Argeseanu | Asad, Majed Masoud | Assadi, Reza | Banerjee, Amitava | Basu, Sanjay | Bedi, Neeraj | Bekele, Tolesa | Bell, Michelle L | Bhutta, Zulfiqar | Blore, Jed | Basara, Berrak Bora | Boufous, Soufiane | Breitborde, Nicholas | Bruce, Nigel G | Bui, Linh Ngoc | Carapetis, Jonathan R | Cárdenas, Rosario | Carpenter, David O | Caso, Valeria | Castro, Ruben Estanislao | Catalá-Lopéz, Ferrán | Cavlin, Alanur | Che, Xuan | Chiang, Peggy Pei-Chia | Chowdhury, Rajiv | Christophi, Costas A | Chuang, Ting-Wu | Cirillo, Massimo | Leite, Iuri da Costa | Courville, Karen J | Dandona, Lalit | Dandona, Rakhi | Davis, Adrian | Dayama, Anand | Deribe, Kebede | Dharmaratne, Samath D | Dherani, Mukesh K | Dilmen, Uğur | Ding, Eric L | Edmond, Karen M | Ermakov, Sergei Petrovich | Farzadfar, Farshad | Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad | Fijabi, Daniel Obadare | Foigt, Nataliya | Forouzanfar, Mohammad H | Garcia, Ana C | Geleijnse, Johanna M | Gessner, Bradford D | Goginashvili, Ketevan | Gona, Philimon | Goto, Atsushi | Gouda, Hebe N | Green, Mark A | Greenwell, Karen Fern | Gugnani, Harish Chander | Gupta, Rahul | Hamadeh, Randah Ribhi | Hammami, Mouhanad | Harb, Hilda L | Hay, Simon | Hedayati, Mohammad T | Hosgood, H Dean | Hoy, Damian G | Idrisov, Bulat T | Islami, Farhad | Ismayilova, Samaya | Jha, Vivekanand | Jiang, Guohong | Jonas, Jost B | Juel, Knud | Kabagambe, Edmond Kato | Kazi, Dhruv S | Kengne, Andre Pascal | Kereselidze, Maia | Khader, Yousef Saleh | Khalifa, Shams Eldin Ali Hassan | Khang, Young-Ho | Kim, Daniel | Kinfu, Yohannes | Kinge, Jonas M | Kokubo, Yoshihiro | Kosen, Soewarta | Defo, Barthelemy Kuate | Kumar, G Anil | Kumar, Kaushalendra | Kumar, Ravi B | Lai, Taavi | Lan, Qing | Larsson, Anders | Lee, Jong-Tae | Leinsalu, Mall | Lim, Stephen S | Lipshultz, Steven E | Logroscino, Giancarlo | Lotufo, Paulo A | Lunevicius, Raimundas | Lyons, Ronan Anthony | Ma, Stefan | Mahdi, Abbas Ali | Marzan, Melvin Barrientos | Mashal, Mohammad Taufiq | Mazorodze, Tasara T | McGrath, John J | Memish, Ziad A | Mendoza, Walter | Mensah, George A | Meretoja, Atte | Miller, Ted R | Mills, Edward J | Mohammad, Karzan Abdulmuhsin | Mokdad, Ali H | Monasta, Lorenzo | Montico, Marcella | Moore, Ami R | Moschandreas, Joanna | Msemburi, William T | Mueller, Ulrich O | Muszynska, Magdalena M | Naghavi, Mohsen | Naidoo, Kovin S | Narayan, KM Venkat | Nejjari, Chakib | Ng, Marie | Ngirabega, Jean de Dieu | Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J | Nyakarahuka, Luke | Ohkubo, Takayoshi | Omer, Saad B | Caicedo, Angel J Paternina | Wyk, Victoria Pillay-van | Pope, Dan | Prabhakaran, Dorairaj | Rahman, Sajjad UR | Rana, Saleem M | Reilly, Robert Quentin | Rojas-Rueda, David | Ronfani, Luca | Rushton, Lesley | Saeedi, Mohammad Yahya | Salomon, Joshua | Sampson, Uchechukwu | Santos, Itamar S | Sawhney, Monika | Schmidt, Jürgen C | Nazarova, Marina Shakh | She, Jun | Sheikhbahaei, Sara | Shibuya, Kenji | Shin, Hwashin Hyun | Shishani, Kawkab | Shiue, Ivy | Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora | Singh, Jasvinder A | Skirbekk, Vegard | Sliwa, Karen | Soshnikov, Sergey S | Sposato, Luciano A | Stathopoulou, Vasiliki Kalliopi | Stroumpoulis, Konstantinos | Tabb, Karen M | Talongwa, Roberto Tchio | Teixeira, Carolina Maria | Terkawi, Abdullah Sulieman | Thomson, Alan J | Lyman, Andrew L Thorne | Toyoshima, Hideaki | Dimbuene, Zacharie Tsala | Uwaliraye, Parfait | Uzun, Selen Begüm | Vasankari, Tommi J | Vasconcelos, Ana Maria Nogales | Vlassov, Vasiliy Victorovich | Vollset, Stein Emil | Vos, Theo | Waller, Stephen | Wan, Xia | Weichenthal, Scott | Weiderpass, Elisabete | Weintraub, Robert G | Westerman, Ronny | Wilkinson, James D | Williams, Hywel C | Yang, Yang C | Yentur, Gokalp Kadri | Yip, Paul | Yonemoto, Naohiro | Younis, Mustafa | Yu, Chuanhua | Jin, Kim Yun | Zaki, Maysaa El Sayed | Zhu, Shankuan | Lopez, Alan D | Murray, Christopher J L
Lancet  2014;384(9947):957-979.
Summary
Background
Remarkable financial and political efforts have been focused on the reduction of child mortality during the past few decades. Timely measurements of levels and trends in under-5 mortality are important to assess progress towards the Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG 4) target of reduction of child mortality by two thirds from 1990 to 2015, and to identify models of success.
Methods
We generated updated estimates of child mortality in early neonatal (age 0–6 days), late neonatal (7–28 days), postneonatal (29–364 days), childhood (1–4 years), and under-5 (0–4 years) age groups for 188 countries from 1970 to 2013, with more than 29 000 survey, census, vital registration, and sample registration datapoints. We used Gaussian process regression with adjustments for bias and non-sampling error to synthesise the data for under-5 mortality for each country, and a separate model to estimate mortality for more detailed age groups. We used explanatory mixed effects regression models to assess the association between under-5 mortality and income per person, maternal education, HIV child death rates, secular shifts, and other factors. To quantify the contribution of these different factors and birth numbers to the change in numbers of deaths in under-5 age groups from 1990 to 2013, we used Shapley decomposition. We used estimated rates of change between 2000 and 2013 to construct under-5 mortality rate scenarios out to 2030.
Findings
We estimated that 6·3 million (95% UI 6·0–6·6) children under-5 died in 2013, a 64% reduction from 17·6 million (17·1–18·1) in 1970. In 2013, child mortality rates ranged from 152·5 per 1000 livebirths (130·6–177·4) in Guinea-Bissau to 2·3 (1·8–2·9) per 1000 in Singapore. The annualised rates of change from 1990 to 2013 ranged from −6·8% to 0·1%. 99 of 188 countries, including 43 of 48 countries in sub-Saharan Africa, had faster decreases in child mortality during 2000–13 than during 1990–2000. In 2013, neonatal deaths accounted for 41·6% of under-5 deaths compared with 37·4% in 1990. Compared with 1990, in 2013, rising numbers of births, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, led to 1·4 million more child deaths, and rising income per person and maternal education led to 0·9 million and 2·2 million fewer deaths, respectively. Changes in secular trends led to 4·2 million fewer deaths. Unexplained factors accounted for only −1% of the change in child deaths. In 30 developing countries, decreases since 2000 have been faster than predicted attributable to income, education, and secular shift alone.
Interpretation
Only 27 developing countries are expected to achieve MDG 4. Decreases since 2000 in under-5 mortality rates are accelerating in many developing countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. The Millennium Declaration and increased development assistance for health might have been a factor in faster decreases in some developing countries. Without further accelerated progress, many countries in west and central Africa will still have high levels of under-5 mortality in 2030.
Funding
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, US Agency for International Development.
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60497-9
PMCID: PMC4165626  PMID: 24797572
9.  A comparative risk assessment of burden of disease and injury attributable to 67 risk factors and risk factor clusters in 21 regions, 1990–2010: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 
Lim, Stephen S | Vos, Theo | Flaxman, Abraham D | Danaei, Goodarz | Shibuya, Kenji | Adair-Rohani, Heather | Amann, Markus | Anderson, H Ross | Andrews, Kathryn G | Aryee, Martin | Atkinson, Charles | Bacchus, Loraine J | Bahalim, Adil N | Balakrishnan, Kalpana | Balmes, John | Barker-Collo, Suzanne | Baxter, Amanda | Bell, Michelle L | Blore, Jed D | Blyth, Fiona | Bonner, Carissa | Borges, Guilherme | Bourne, Rupert | Boussinesq, Michel | Brauer, Michael | Brooks, Peter | Bruce, Nigel G | Brunekreef, Bert | Bryan-Hancock, Claire | Bucello, Chiara | Buchbinder, Rachelle | Bull, Fiona | Burnett, Richard T | Byers, Tim E | Calabria, Bianca | Carapetis, Jonathan | Carnahan, Emily | Chafe, Zoe | Charlson, Fiona | Chen, Honglei | Chen, Jian Shen | Cheng, Andrew Tai-Ann | Child, Jennifer Christine | Cohen, Aaron | Colson, K Ellicott | Cowie, Benjamin C | Darby, Sarah | Darling, Susan | Davis, Adrian | Degenhardt, Louisa | Dentener, Frank | Des Jarlais, Don C | Devries, Karen | Dherani, Mukesh | Ding, Eric L | Dorsey, E Ray | Driscoll, Tim | Edmond, Karen | Ali, Suad Eltahir | Engell, Rebecca E | Erwin, Patricia J | Fahimi, Saman | Falder, Gail | Farzadfar, Farshad | Ferrari, Alize | Finucane, Mariel M | Flaxman, Seth | Fowkes, Francis Gerry R | Freedman, Greg | Freeman, Michael K | Gakidou, Emmanuela | Ghosh, Santu | Giovannucci, Edward | Gmel, Gerhard | Graham, Kathryn | Grainger, Rebecca | Grant, Bridget | Gunnell, David | Gutierrez, Hialy R | Hall, Wayne | Hoek, Hans W | Hogan, Anthony | Hosgood, H Dean | Hoy, Damian | Hu, Howard | Hubbell, Bryan J | Hutchings, Sally J | Ibeanusi, Sydney E | Jacklyn, Gemma L | Jasrasaria, Rashmi | Jonas, Jost B | Kan, Haidong | Kanis, John A | Kassebaum, Nicholas | Kawakami, Norito | Khang, Young-Ho | Khatibzadeh, Shahab | Khoo, Jon-Paul | Kok, Cindy | Laden, Francine | Lalloo, Ratilal | Lan, Qing | Lathlean, Tim | Leasher, Janet L | Leigh, James | Li, Yang | Lin, John Kent | Lipshultz, Steven E | London, Stephanie | Lozano, Rafael | Lu, Yuan | Mak, Joelle | Malekzadeh, Reza | Mallinger, Leslie | Marcenes, Wagner | March, Lyn | Marks, Robin | Martin, Randall | McGale, Paul | McGrath, John | Mehta, Sumi | Mensah, George A | Merriman, Tony R | Micha, Renata | Michaud, Catherine | Mishra, Vinod | Hanafiah, Khayriyyah Mohd | Mokdad, Ali A | Morawska, Lidia | Mozaff arian, Dariush | Murphy, Tasha | Naghavi, Mohsen | Neal, Bruce | Nelson, Paul K | Nolla, Joan Miquel | Norman, Rosana | Olives, Casey | Omer, Saad B | Orchard, Jessica | Osborne, Richard | Ostro, Bart | Page, Andrew | Pandey, Kiran D | Parry, Charles D H | Passmore, Erin | Patra, Jayadeep | Pearce, Neil | Pelizzari, Pamela M | Petzold, Max | Phillips, Michael R | Pope, Dan | Pope III, C Arden | Powles, John | Rao, Mayuree | Razavi, Homie | Rehfuess, Eva A | Rehm, Jürgen T | Ritz, Beate | Rivara, Frederick P | Roberts, Thomas | Robinson, Carolyn | Rodriguez-Portales, Jose A | Romieu, Isabelle | Room, Robin | Rosenfeld, Lisa C | Roy, Ananya | Rushton, Lesley | Salomon, Joshua A | Sampson, Uchechukwu | Sanchez-Riera, Lidia | Sanman, Ella | Sapkota, Amir | Seedat, Soraya | Shi, Peilin | Shield, Kevin | Shivakoti, Rupak | Singh, Gitanjali M | Sleet, David A | Smith, Emma | Smith, Kirk R | Stapelberg, Nicolas J C | Steenland, Kyle | Stöckl, Heidi | Stovner, Lars Jacob | Straif, Kurt | Straney, Lahn | Thurston, George D | Tran, Jimmy H | Van Dingenen, Rita | van Donkelaar, Aaron | Veerman, J Lennert | Vijayakumar, Lakshmi | Weintraub, Robert | Weissman, Myrna M | White, Richard A | Whiteford, Harvey | Wiersma, Steven T | Wilkinson, James D | Williams, Hywel C | Williams, Warwick | Wilson, Nicholas | Woolf, Anthony D | Yip, Paul | Zielinski, Jan M | Lopez, Alan D | Murray, Christopher J L | Ezzati, Majid
Lancet  2012;380(9859):2224-2260.
Summary
Background
Quantification of the disease burden caused by different risks informs prevention by providing an account of health loss different to that provided by a disease-by-disease analysis. No complete revision of global disease burden caused by risk factors has been done since a comparative risk assessment in 2000, and no previous analysis has assessed changes in burden attributable to risk factors over time.
Methods
We estimated deaths and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs; sum of years lived with disability [YLD] and years of life lost [YLL]) attributable to the independent effects of 67 risk factors and clusters of risk factors for 21 regions in 1990 and 2010. We estimated exposure distributions for each year, region, sex, and age group, and relative risks per unit of exposure by systematically reviewing and synthesising published and unpublished data. We used these estimates, together with estimates of cause-specific deaths and DALYs from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010, to calculate the burden attributable to each risk factor exposure compared with the theoretical-minimum-risk exposure. We incorporated uncertainty in disease burden, relative risks, and exposures into our estimates of attributable burden.
Findings
In 2010, the three leading risk factors for global disease burden were high blood pressure (7·0% [95% uncertainty interval 6·2–7·7] of global DALYs), tobacco smoking including second-hand smoke (6·3% [5·5–7·0]), and alcohol use (5·5% [5·0–5·9]). In 1990, the leading risks were childhood underweight (7·9% [6·8–9·4]), household air pollution from solid fuels (HAP; 7·0% [5·6–8·3]), and tobacco smoking including second-hand smoke (6·1% [5·4–6·8]). Dietary risk factors and physical inactivity collectively accounted for 10·0% (95% UI 9·2–10·8) of global DALYs in 2010, with the most prominent dietary risks being diets low in fruits and those high in sodium. Several risks that primarily affect childhood communicable diseases, including unimproved water and sanitation and childhood micronutrient deficiencies, fell in rank between 1990 and 2010, with unimproved water we and sanitation accounting for 0·9% (0·4–1·6) of global DALYs in 2010. However, in most of sub-Saharan Africa childhood underweight, HAP, and non-exclusive and discontinued breastfeeding were the leading risks in 2010, while HAP was the leading risk in south Asia. The leading risk factor in Eastern Europe, most of Latin America, and southern sub-Saharan Africa in 2010 was alcohol use; in most of Asia, North Africa and Middle East, and central Europe it was high blood pressure. Despite declines, tobacco smoking including second-hand smoke remained the leading risk in high-income north America and western Europe. High body-mass index has increased globally and it is the leading risk in Australasia and southern Latin America, and also ranks high in other high-income regions, North Africa and Middle East, and Oceania.
Interpretation
Worldwide, the contribution of different risk factors to disease burden has changed substantially, with a shift away from risks for communicable diseases in children towards those for non-communicable diseases in adults. These changes are related to the ageing population, decreased mortality among children younger than 5 years, changes in cause-of-death composition, and changes in risk factor exposures. New evidence has led to changes in the magnitude of key risks including unimproved water and sanitation, vitamin A and zinc deficiencies, and ambient particulate matter pollution. The extent to which the epidemiological shift has occurred and what the leading risks currently are varies greatly across regions. In much of sub-Saharan Africa, the leading risks are still those associated with poverty and those that affect children.
Funding
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(12)61766-8
PMCID: PMC4156511  PMID: 23245609
10.  Where GWAS and Epidemiology Meet: Opportunities for the Simultaneous Study of Genetic and Environmental Risk Factors in Schizophrenia 
Schizophrenia Bulletin  2013;39(5):955-959.
doi:10.1093/schbul/sbt108
PMCID: PMC3756798  PMID: 23907349
genome-wide association study;  epidemiology; Mendelian randomization; interaction; polygene score
11.  Targeted Prostate Cancer Screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results from the Initial Screening Round of the IMPACT Study 
Bancroft, Elizabeth K. | Page, Elizabeth C. | Castro, Elena | Lilja, Hans | Vickers, Andrew | Sjoberg, Daniel | Assel, Melissa | Foster, Christopher S. | Mitchell, Gillian | Drew, Kate | Mæhle, Lovise | Axcrona, Karol | Evans, D. Gareth | Bulman, Barbara | Eccles, Diana | McBride, Donna | van Asperen, Christi | Vasen, Hans | Kiemeney, Lambertus A. | Ringelberg, Janneke | Cybulski, Cezary | Wokolorczyk, Dominika | Selkirk, Christina | Hulick, Peter J. | Bojesen, Anders | Skytte, Anne-Bine | Lam, Jimmy | Taylor, Louise | Oldenburg, Rogier | Cremers, Ruben | Verhaegh, Gerald | van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A. | Oosterwijk, Jan C. | Blanco, Ignacio | Salinas, Monica | Cook, Jackie | Rosario, Derek J. | Buys, Saundra | Conner, Tom | Ausems, Margreet G. | Ong, Kai-ren | Hoffman, Jonathan | Domchek, Susan | Powers, Jacquelyn | Teixeira, Manuel R. | Maia, Sofia | Foulkes, William D. | Taherian, Nassim | Ruijs, Marielle | den Enden, Apollonia T. Helderman-van | Izatt, Louise | Davidson, Rosemarie | Adank, Muriel A. | Walker, Lisa | Schmutzler, Rita | Tucker, Kathy | Kirk, Judy | Hodgson, Shirley | Harris, Marion | Douglas, Fiona | Lindeman, Geoffrey J. | Zgajnar, Janez | Tischkowitz, Marc | Clowes, Virginia E. | Susman, Rachel | Ramón y Cajal, Teresa | Patcher, Nicholas | Gadea, Neus | Spigelman, Allan | van Os, Theo | Liljegren, Annelie | Side, Lucy | Brewer, Carole | Brady, Angela F. | Donaldson, Alan | Stefansdottir, Vigdis | Friedman, Eitan | Chen-Shtoyerman, Rakefet | Amor, David J. | Copakova, Lucia | Barwell, Julian | Giri, Veda N. | Murthy, Vedang | Nicolai, Nicola | Teo, Soo-Hwang | Greenhalgh, Lynn | Strom, Sara | Henderson, Alex | McGrath, John | Gallagher, David | Aaronson, Neil | Ardern-Jones, Audrey | Bangma, Chris | Dearnaley, David | Costello, Philandra | Eyfjord, Jorunn | Rothwell, Jeanette | Falconer, Alison | Gronberg, Henrik | Hamdy, Freddie C. | Johannsson, Oskar | Khoo, Vincent | Kote-Jarai, Zsofia | Lubinski, Jan | Axcrona, Ulrika | Melia, Jane | McKinley, Joanne | Mitra, Anita V. | Moynihan, Clare | Rennert, Gad | Suri, Mohnish | Wilson, Penny | Killick, Emma | Moss, Sue | Eeles, Rosalind A.
European Urology  2014;66(3):489-499.
Background
Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and controls) is an international consortium of 62 centres in 20 countries evaluating the use of targeted PCa screening in men with BRCA1/2 mutations.
Objective
To report the first year's screening results for all men at enrolment in the study.
Design, setting and participants
We recruited men aged 40–69 yr with germline BRCA1/2 mutations and a control group of men who have tested negative for a pathogenic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation known to be present in their families. All men underwent prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing at enrolment, and those men with PSA >3 ng/ml were offered prostate biopsy.
Outcome measurements and statistical analysis
PSA levels, PCa incidence, and tumour characteristics were evaluated. The Fisher exact test was used to compare the number of PCa cases among groups and the differences among disease types.
Results and limitations
We recruited 2481 men (791 BRCA1 carriers, 531 BRCA1 controls; 731 BRCA2 carriers, 428 BRCA2 controls). A total of 199 men (8%) presented with PSA >3.0 ng/ml, 162 biopsies were performed, and 59 PCas were diagnosed (18 BRCA1 carriers, 10 BRCA1 controls; 24 BRCA2 carriers, 7 BRCA2 controls); 66% of the tumours were classified as intermediate- or high-risk disease. The positive predictive value (PPV) for biopsy using a PSA threshold of 3.0 ng/ml in BRCA2 mutation carriers was 48%—double the PPV reported in population screening studies. A significant difference in detecting intermediate- or high-risk disease was observed in BRCA2 carriers. Ninety-five percent of the men were white, thus the results cannot be generalised to all ethnic groups.
Conclusions
The IMPACT screening network will be useful for targeted PCa screening studies in men with germline genetic risk variants as they are discovered. These preliminary results support the use of targeted PSA screening based on BRCA genotype and show that this screening yields a high proportion of aggressive disease.
Patient summary
In this report, we demonstrate that germline genetic markers can be used to identify men at higher risk of prostate cancer. Targeting screening at these men resulted in the identification of tumours that were more likely to require treatment.
Take Home Message
This report demonstrates that germline genetic markers can be used to identify men at higher risk of prostate cancer. Targeting screening at these higher-risk men resulted in the identification of tumours that were more likely to require treatment.
doi:10.1016/j.eururo.2014.01.003
PMCID: PMC4105321  PMID: 24484606
BRCA1; BRCA2; Prostate cancer; Prostate-specific antigen; Targeted screening
12.  “Selfish spermatogonial selection”: a novel mechanism for the association between advanced paternal age and neurodevelopmental disorders 
The American journal of psychiatry  2013;170(6):599-608.
Objectives
There is robust evidence from epidemiological studies that the offspring of older fathers have an increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. Here we present a novel mechanism that may contribute to this association.
Methods
Narrative review.
Results
Because the male germ cell undergoes many more cell divisions across the reproductive age range, copy-errors taking place in the paternal germline are associated with de novo mutations in the offspring of older men. Recently it has been recognized that somatic mutations in male germ cells that modify proliferation via dysregulation of the RAS pathway can lead to within-testis expansion of mutant clonal lines. First identified in association with rare paternal age-effect disorders (e.g. Apert syndrome, achondroplasia), this process is known as ‘selfish spermatogonial selection’. This mechanism will (a) favor propagation of germ cells carrying pathogenic mutations, (b) increasingly skew the mutational profile of sperm as men age, and (c) result in an enrichment of de novo mutations in the offspring of older fathers that preferentially impact on specific cellular signaling pathways. This mechanism offers a parsimonious explanation not only for the association between advanced paternal age and various neurodevelopmental disorders, but also provides insights into the genetic architecture (role of de novo mutations), neurobiological correlates (altered cell cycle) and some epidemiological features of these disorders. We outline hypotheses to test this model.
Conclusions
In light of our current understanding of the genetic networks involved in neurocognitive disorders and the principles of selfish spermatogonial selection, we speculate that some pathogenic mutations associated with these disorders are the consequence of a selfish mechanism originating in the aging testis. Given the secular changes for delayed parenthood in most societies, this hypothesis has important public health implications.
doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.2013.12101352
PMCID: PMC4001324  PMID: 23639989
paternal age; selfish mutations; schizophrenia; autism; de novo mutation; spermatogonia; neurodevelopment
13.  3D In Vitro Model of a Functional Epidermal Permeability Barrier from Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells 
Stem Cell Reports  2014;2(5):675-689.
Summary
Cornification and epidermal barrier defects are associated with a number of clinically diverse skin disorders. However, a suitable in vitro model for studying normal barrier function and barrier defects is still lacking. Here, we demonstrate the generation of human epidermal equivalents (HEEs) from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). HEEs are structurally similar to native epidermis, with a functional permeability barrier. We exposed a pure population of hESC/iPSC-derived keratinocytes, whose transcriptome corresponds to the gene signature of normal primary human keratinocytes (NHKs), to a sequential high-to-low humidity environment in an air/liquid interface culture. The resulting HEEs had all of the cellular strata of the human epidermis, with skin barrier properties similar to those of normal skin. Such HEEs generated from disease-specific iPSCs will be an invaluable tool not only for dissecting molecular mechanisms that lead to epidermal barrier defects but also for drug development and screening.
Highlights
•Manufacture of HEEs with a functional epidermal barrier in vitro from hESCs/iPSCs•Unique model for skin diseases with defective epidermal permeability barriers•Easily adaptable model for use in regenerative and aesthetic medicine•Cost-effective model for testing new drugs and cosmetics
Ilic, Mauro, and colleagues describe the manufacture of in vitro human epidermal equivalents (HEEs) from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The HEEs have cellular strata and apparently normal barrier properties as seen in the intact human epidermis. Thus, they represent a unique in vitro system for investigating diseases caused by defective epidermal permeability barriers, and provide a model for testing new drugs and cosmetics.
doi:10.1016/j.stemcr.2014.03.009
PMCID: PMC4050479  PMID: 24936454
14.  Desmoglein 1 deficiency results in severe dermatitis, multiple allergies and metabolic wasting 
Nature genetics  2013;45(10):1244-1248.
The relative contribution of immunological dysregulation and impaired epithelial barrier function to allergic diseases is still a matter of debate. Here we describe a new syndrome featuring severe dermatitis, multiple allergies and metabolic wasting (SAM syndrome) caused by homozygous mutations in DSG1. DSG1 encodes desmoglein 1, a major constituent of desmosomes, which connect the cell surface to the keratin cytoskeleton and play a crucial role in maintaining epidermal integrity and barrier function. SAM syndrome-causing mutations resulted in lack of membrane expression of DSG1, leading to loss of cell-cell adhesion. In addition, DSG1 deficiency was associated with increased expression of a number of genes encoding allergy-related cytokines. The deciphering of the pathogenesis of SAM syndrome substantiates the notion that allergy may result from a primary structural epidermal defect.
doi:10.1038/ng.2739
PMCID: PMC3791825  PMID: 23974871
15.  Cardiometabolic Risk Indicators That Distinguish Adults with Psychosis from the General Population, by Age and Gender 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(12):e82606.
Individuals with psychosis are more likely than the general community to develop obesity and to die prematurely from heart disease. Interventions to improve cardiovascular outcomes are best targeted at the earliest indicators of risk, at the age they first emerge. We investigated which cardiometabolic risk indicators distinguished those with psychosis from the general population, by age by gender, and whether obesity explained the pattern of observed differences. Data was analyzed from an epidemiologically representative sample of 1,642 Australians with psychosis aged 18–64 years and a national comparator sample of 8,866 controls aged 25–64 years from the general population. Cubic b-splines were used to compare cross sectional age trends by gender for mean waist circumference, body mass index [BMI], blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, LDL, HDL, and total cholesterol in our psychosis and control samples. At age 25 individuals with psychosis had a significantly higher mean BMI, waist circumference, triglycerides, glucose [women only], and diastolic blood pressure and significantly lower HDL-cholesterol than controls. With the exception of triglycerides at age 60+ in men, and glucose in women at various ages, these differences were present at every age. Differences in BMI and waist circumference between samples, although dramatic, could not explain all differences in diastolic blood pressure, HDL-cholesterol or triglycerides but did explain differences in glucose. Psychosis has the hallmarks of insulin resistance by at least age 25. The entire syndrome, not just weight, should be a focus of intervention to reduce mortality from cardiovascular disease.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0082606
PMCID: PMC3867369  PMID: 24367528
16.  Haploinsufficiency for AAGAB causes clinically heterogeneous forms of punctate palmoplantar keratoderma 
Nature genetics  2012;44(11):10.1038/ng.2444.
Palmoplantar keratodermas (PPKs) are a group of disorders that are diagnostically and therapeutically problematic in dermatogenetics1-3. Punctate PPKs are characterized by circumscribed hyperkeratotic lesions on palms and soles with considerable heterogeneity. In 18 families with autosomal dominant punctate PPK (OMIM #148600), we report heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in AAGAB, encoding alpha- and gamma-adaptin binding protein p34, at a previously linked locus on 15q22. p34, a cytosolic protein with a Rab-like GTPase domain, was shown to bind both clathrin adaptor protein complexes, indicative of a role in membrane traffic. Ultrastucturally, lesional epidermis showed abnormalities in intracellular vesicle biology. Immunohistochemistry showed hyperproliferation within the punctate lesions. Knockdown of p34 in keratinocytes led to increased cell division, which was linked to greatly increased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein expression and tyrosine phosphorylation. We hypothesize that p34 deficiency may impair endocytic recycling of growth factor receptors such as EGFR, leading to increased signaling and proliferation.
doi:10.1038/ng.2444
PMCID: PMC3836166  PMID: 23064416
17.  The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY: an expert-driven knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands 
Nucleic Acids Research  2013;42(Database issue):D1098-D1106.
The International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology/British Pharmacological Society (IUPHAR/BPS) Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (http://www.guidetopharmacology.org) is a new open access resource providing pharmacological, chemical, genetic, functional and pathophysiological data on the targets of approved and experimental drugs. Created under the auspices of the IUPHAR and the BPS, the portal provides concise, peer-reviewed overviews of the key properties of a wide range of established and potential drug targets, with in-depth information for a subset of important targets. The resource is the result of curation and integration of data from the IUPHAR Database (IUPHAR-DB) and the published BPS ‘Guide to Receptors and Channels’ (GRAC) compendium. The data are derived from a global network of expert contributors, and the information is extensively linked to relevant databases, including ChEMBL, DrugBank, Ensembl, PubChem, UniProt and PubMed. Each of the ∼6000 small molecule and peptide ligands is annotated with manually curated 2D chemical structures or amino acid sequences, nomenclature and database links. Future expansion of the resource will complete the coverage of all the targets of currently approved drugs and future candidate targets, alongside educational resources to guide scientists and students in pharmacological principles and techniques.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkt1143
PMCID: PMC3965070  PMID: 24234439
18.  Impairment in Functional Capacity as an Endophenotype Candidate in Severe Mental Illness 
Schizophrenia Bulletin  2011;38(6):1318-1326.
Impairment in everyday functioning (also referred to as “disability”) is a central feature of schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder, as well as other neuropsychiatric conditions. There is a genetic contribution to both SZ and bipolar illness (BPI), and the primary putative determinant of impairments in everyday functioning across these 2 conditions, cognitive impairments, also show substantial heritability and in fact have been proposed to be endophenotypes for these disorders. In this article, we review data and make our case that impairments in functional capacity, the functional abilities that result in functional disability, may also be a heritable trait that is common across neuropsychiatric illnesses such BPI and SZ. While there has been little previous research on the heritability of these abilities, it is an area receiving substantial research attention. We consider advances in the measurement of cognitive functioning in SZ that may facilitate the discovery of genetic influences on functional capacity. Functional capacity measures are proximal to real-world impairments, measured with suitable psychometric precision to be used in heritability analyses, and appear to be minimally influenced by environmental factors that may cause disability such as environmental factors, symptoms, and disability compensation. Our conclusion is that these functional capacity measures have potential to be the target of genetic analyses and that these measures should be considered across neuropsychiatric conditions where impairments in everyday functioning are present.
doi:10.1093/schbul/sbr046
PMCID: PMC3494058  PMID: 21562142
schizophrenia; disability; endophenotypes
19.  Sporadic Kindler Syndrome with a novel mutation*  
Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia  2013;88(6 Suppl 1):212-215.
We report the case of a 28-year-old woman with Kindler syndrome, a rare form of epidermolysis bullosa. Clinically, since childhood, she had widespread pigmentary changes in her skin as well as photosensitivity and fragility of the skin and mucous membranes. The mucosal involvement led to an erosive stomatitis as well as esophageal, anal and vaginal stenoses, requiring surgical intervention. The diagnosis of Kindler syndrome was confirmed by DNA sequencing with compound heterozygosity for a nonsense/frameshift combination of mutations (p.Arg110X; p.Ala289GlyfsX7) in the FERMT1 gene.
doi:10.1590/abd1806-4841.20132173
PMCID: PMC3875998  PMID: 24346923
DNA mutational analysis; Epidermolysis bullosa; Photosensitivity disorders
20.  The Global Epidemiology and Contribution of Cannabis Use and Dependence to the Global Burden of Disease: Results from the GBD 2010 Study 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(10):e76635.
Aims
Estimate the prevalence of cannabis dependence and its contribution to the global burden of disease.
Methods
Systematic reviews of epidemiological data on cannabis dependence (1990-2008) were conducted in line with PRISMA and meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) guidelines. Culling and data extraction followed protocols, with cross-checking and consistency checks. DisMod-MR, the latest version of generic disease modelling system, redesigned as a Bayesian meta-regression tool, imputed prevalence by age, year and sex for 187 countries and 21 regions. The disability weight associated with cannabis dependence was estimated through population surveys and multiplied by prevalence data to calculate the years of life lived with disability (YLDs) and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). YLDs and DALYs attributed to regular cannabis use as a risk factor for schizophrenia were also estimated.
Results
There were an estimated 13.1 million cannabis dependent people globally in 2010 (point prevalence0.19% (95% uncertainty: 0.17-0.21%)). Prevalence peaked between 20-24 yrs, was higher in males (0.23% (0.2-0.27%)) than females (0.14% (0.12-0.16%)) and in high income regions. Cannabis dependence accounted for 2 million DALYs globally (0.08%; 0.05-0.12%) in 2010; a 22% increase in crude DALYs since 1990 largely due to population growth. Countries with statistically higher age-standardised DALY rates included the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Western European countries such as the United Kingdom; those with lower DALY rates were from Sub-Saharan Africa-West and Latin America. Regular cannabis use as a risk factor for schizophrenia accounted for an estimated 7,000 DALYs globally.
Conclusion
Cannabis dependence is a disorder primarily experienced by young adults, especially in higher income countries. It has not been shown to increase mortality as opioid and other forms of illicit drug dependence do. Our estimates suggest that cannabis use as a risk factor for schizophrenia is not a major contributor to population-level disease burden.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0076635
PMCID: PMC3811989  PMID: 24204649
21.  Paternal Age and General Cognitive Ability—A Cross Sectional Study of Danish Male Conscripts 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(10):e77444.
Objectives
Offspring of older men have impaired cognitive ability as children, but it is unclear if this impairment persists into adulthood. The main objective of this study was to explore the association between paternal age at offspring birth and general cognitive ability as young adults.
Design
Population-based cross-sectional study with prospectively collected data on obstetric factors and parental education.
Setting
Nationwide Danish sample.
Participants
Male conscripts (n = 169,009).
Primary and secondary outcome measures
General cognitive ability as assessed by the Børge Priens test score, an intelligence test with components related to logical, verbal, numerical and spatial reasoning.
Results
We observed an inverse U-shaped association between paternal age and general cognitive ability (slightly lower test scores in the offspring of fathers aged less than 25 years and older than 40 years, compared with fathers aged 25 to 29 years). However, after adjustment for maternal age, parental education and birth order the shape of the association changed. Offspring of fathers younger than 20 still showed slightly lower cognitive ability (-1.11 (95% CI -1.68 to -0.54)), but no significant impairments were identified in the men whose fathers were older than 29 years at the time of their birth (e.g. the mean difference in test score in the offspring of fathers aged 40 to 44 years were -0.03 [95% CI (-0.27 to 0.20)] compared with fathers aged 25 to 29 years).
Conclusions
We did not find that the offspring of older fathers had impaired cognitive ability as young adults. Whereas, we found a tendency that the offspring of teen fathers have lower cognitive ability. Thus, our results suggest that any potentially deleterious effects of older fathers on general cognitive ability as young adults may be counter-balanced by other potentially beneficial factors.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0077444
PMCID: PMC3792927  PMID: 24116230
22.  α1D-Adrenoceptors are responsible for the high sensitivity and the slow time-course of noradrenaline-mediated contraction in conductance arteries 
The objective of this study was to determine whether the different time-course characteristics of α1-adrenoceptor-mediated contraction in arteries can be related to the subtypes involved. Contractile responses to noradrenaline (NA) were compared with inositol phosphate accumulation and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation after α1-agonist stimuli in the same vessels in the presence or absence of α1-antagonists in rat or in α1-subtype knockout (KO) mice. Aorta, where α1D-AR is the main functional subtype, had higher sensitivity to NA (in respect of inositol phosphate [IP], pERK1/2, and contractile response) than tail artery, where the α1A-adrenoceptor subtype is predominant. Furthermore, the contraction in aorta exhibited a slower decay after agonist removal and this was consistent in all strains harboring α1D-adrenoceptors (from rat, α1B-KO, and wild-type [WT] mice) but was not observed in the absence of the α1D-adrenoceptor signal (α1D-adrenoceptor blocked rat aorta or aorta from α1D-KO). IP formation paralleled α1-adrenoceptor-mediated contraction (agonist present or postagonist) in aorta and tail artery. High sensitivity to agonist and persistence of response after agonist removal is a property of α1D-adrenoceptors. Therefore, the preponderance of this subtype in noninnervated conductance arteries such as aorta allows responsiveness to circulating catecholamines and prevents abrupt changes in vessel caliber when the stimulus fluctuates. Conversely, in innervated distributing arteries, high local concentrations of NA are required to activate α1A-adrenoceptors for a response that is rapid but short lived allowing fine adjustment of the contractile tone by perivascular sympathetic nerves.
doi:10.1002/prp2.1
PMCID: PMC4184566  PMID: 25505555
α1A-adrenoceptors; conductance and resistance vessels; contraction time-course
23.  Service Use for Mental Health Problems in People with Delusional-Like Experiences: A Nationwide Population Based Survey 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(8):e71951.
Objective
Previous population-based studies have found that delusional-like experiences (DLEs) are prevalent in the community, and are associated with a wide range of mental health disorders. The aim of the study was to investigate mental health service use by people with DLEs.
Methods
Subjects were drawn from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing 2007 of 8 841community residents aged between 16 and 85 years. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) was used to identify DLEs. Service utilization was assessed using a module that elicited information about hospital admissions, consultations with various health professionals, and prescription medication use. This study focussed on service use for mental health problems. We used logistic regression to examine the association, adjusting for potential confounding factors.
Results
Of 8 773 included participants, 8.4% (n = 776) positively endorsed one or more DLEs. With respect to consultations for mental health needs, individuals who endorsed DLEs were more likely to consult health professionals compared with those who did not endorse DLEs. Individuals with DLEs were also more likely to use prescription medicine. When we repeated the main analysis in a subgroup excluding any CIDI diagnosis of mental health disorders the results remained largely unchanged.
Conclusions
DLEs are common in the general population, and individuals with DLEs have an increased rate of accessing services for their mental health needs. Individuals endorsing both DLEs and increased help-seeking may identify a group of vulnerable people who have increased risk of developing psychotic illnesses later in life. This needs closer scrutiny in longitudinal prospective studies.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0071951
PMCID: PMC3749219  PMID: 23991012
24.  The Impact of Adult Vitamin D Deficiency on Behaviour and Brain Function in Male Sprague-Dawley Rats 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(8):e71593.
Background
Vitamin D deficiency is common in the adult population, and this has been linked to depression and cognitive outcomes in clinical populations. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of adult vitamin D (AVD) deficiency on behavioural tasks of relevance to neuropsychiatric disorders in male Sprague-Dawley rats.
Methods
Ten-week old male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a control or vitamin D deficient diet for 6 weeks prior to, and during behavioural testing. We first examined a range of behavioural domains including locomotion, exploration, anxiety, social behaviour, learned helplessness, sensorimotor gating, and nociception. We then assessed locomotor response to the psychomimetic drugs, amphetamine and MK-801. Attention and vigilance were assessed using the 5 choice serial reaction time task (5C-SRT) and the 5 choice continuous performance task (5C-CPT) and, in a separate cohort, working memory was assessed using the delay match to sample (DMTS) task. We also examined excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in prefrontal cortex and striatum.
Results
AVD-deficient rats were deficient in vitamin D3 (<10 nM) and had normal calcium and phosphate levels after 8–10 weeks on the diet. Overall, AVD deficiency was not associated with an altered phenotype across the range of behavioural domains tested. On the 5C-SRT AVD-deficient rats made more premature responses and more head entries during longer inter-trial intervals (ITI) than control rats. On the 5C-CPT AVD-deficient rats took longer to make false alarm (FA) responses than control rats. AVD-deficient rats had increases in baseline GABA levels and the ratio of DOPAC/HVA within the striatum.
Conclusions
AVD-deficient rats exhibited no major impairments in any of the behavioural domains tested. Impairments in premature responses in AVD-deficient rats may indicate that these animals have specific alterations in striatal systems governing compulsive or reward-seeking behaviour.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0071593
PMCID: PMC3739737  PMID: 23951200
25.  Autism Risk Across Generations: A Population Based Study of Advancing Grandpaternal and Paternal Age 
JAMA psychiatry (Chicago, Ill.)  2013;70(5):516-521.
Context
Advancing paternal age has been linked to autism.
Objective
To further expand knowledge about the relation between paternal age and autism by studying the effect of grandfathers’ age on childhood autism.
Design
Population-based multigenerational case-control study.
Setting
Nationwide Multi-Generation and Patient registers in Sweden.
Participants
We conducted a study of individuals born in Sweden since 1932. Parental age at birth was obtained for over 90% of the cohort. Grandparental age at the time of birth of the parent was obtained for a smaller subset (5,936 cases and 30,923 controls).
Main Outcome Measures
International Classification of Diseases (ICD) diagnosis of childhood autism in the Patient Registry.
Results
There was a statistically significant monotonic association between advancing grandpaternal age at the time of birth of the parent and risk of autism in grandchildren. Men who had a daughter when they were 50 or older were 1.79 times (95% confidence interval: 1.35-2.37, p<0.001) more likely to have a grandchild with autism, and men who had a son when they were 50 or older were 1.67 times (95% confidence interval: 1.35-2.37, p<0.001) more likely to have a grandchild with autism, compared to men who had children when they were 20-24, after controlling for birth year, sex, age of the spouse, family history of psychiatric disorders, highest family education and residential county. There was also a statistically significant monotonic association between advancing paternal age and risk of autism in the offspring. Sensitivity analyses indicated that these findings were not the result of bias due to missing data on grandparental age.
Conclusion
Advanced grandparental age was associated with increased risk of autism, suggesting that risk for autism could develop over generations. The results are consistent with mutations and/or epigenetic alterations associated with advancing paternal age.
doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.1180
PMCID: PMC3701020  PMID: 23553111

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