PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-5 (5)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Metastatic Hepatocellular Carcinoma in a Patient with Crohn's Disease Treated with Azathioprine and Infliximab: A Case Report and Literature Review 
Hepatocellular carcinoma most commonly occurs in patients with underlying liver disease or cirrhosis. We describe a case of hepatocellular carcinoma in a 34-year-old man with Crohn's disease treated with azathioprine and infliximab. The patient had no history of liver disease and a complete autoimmune and viral workup was unremarkable. Unfortunately, the patient developed widespread metastatic disease and passed away 5 months after his initial diagnosis. The mechanism of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients' with Crohn's disease is poorly understood and may include both autoimmunity and treatment-related complications. Previous case reports suggest the possibility of a concerning association between azathioprine therapy and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with Crohn's disease. Clinicians may consider early imaging in patients with Crohn's disease presenting with concerning symptomatology or abnormal liver enzymes, especially in those being treated with azathioprine alone or in combination with infliximab. Future research may help to uncover additional risk factors for this exceedingly rare diagnosis in this patient population.
doi:10.1155/2014/340836
PMCID: PMC4283353  PMID: 25587469
2.  Identification of Driver Genes in Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Exome Sequencing 
Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.)  2013;58(5):1693-1702.
Genetic alterations in specific driver genes lead to disruption of cellular pathways and are critical events in the instigation and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma. As a prerequisite for individualized cancer treatment, we sought to characterize the landscape of recurrent somatic mutations in hepatocellular carcinoma. We performed whole exome sequencing on 87 hepatocellular carcinomas and matched normal adjacent tissues to anaverage coverage of 59x. The overall mutation rate was roughly 2 mutations per Mb, with a median of 45 non-synonymous mutations that altered the amino acid sequence (range 2 to 381). We found recurrent mutations in several genes with high transcript levels: TP53 (18%), CTNNB1 (10%), KEAP1 (8%), C16orf62 (8%), MLL4(7%) and RAC2 (5%). Significantly affected gene families include the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine rich repeat containing family, calcium channel subunits, and histone methyltransferases. In particular, the MLL family of methyltransferases for histone H3 lysine 4 were mutated in 20% of tumors.
Conclusion
The NFE2L2-KEAP1 and MLL pathways are recurrently mutated in multiple cohorts of hepatocellular carcinoma.
doi:10.1002/hep.26540
PMCID: PMC3830584  PMID: 23728943
HCC; mutations; histone methyltransferases
3.  Handheld Computing in Medicine 
Handheld computers have become a valuable and popular tool in various fields of medicine. A systematic review of articles was undertaken to summarize the current literature regarding the use of handheld devices in medicine. A variety of articles were identified, and relevant information for various medical fields was summarized. The literature search covered general information about handheld devices, the use of these devices to access medical literature, electronic pharmacopoeias, patient tracking, medical education, research, business management, e-prescribing, patient confidentiality, and costs as well as specialty-specific uses for personal digital assistants (PDAs).
The authors concluded that only a small number of articles provide evidence-based information about the use of PDAs in medicine. The majority of articles provide descriptive information, which is nevertheless of value. This article aims to increase the awareness among physicians about the potential roles for handheld computers in medicine and to encourage the further evaluation of their use.
doi:10.1197/jamia.M1180
PMCID: PMC150367  PMID: 12595403
4.  Surgical procedure logging with use of a hand-held computer 
Canadian Journal of Surgery  2002;45(5):345-350.
Objective
To evaluate the feasibility of incorporating hand-held computing technology in a surgical residency program, by means of hand-held devices for surgical procedure logging linked through the Internet to a central database.
Setting
Division of General Surgery, University of Toronto.
Design
A survey of general surgery residents.
Methods
The 69 residents in the general surgery training program received hand-held computers with preinstalled medical programs and a program designed for surgical procedure logging. Procedural data were uploaded via the Internet to a central database. Survey data were collected regarding previous computer use as well as previous procedure logging methods.
Main outcome measure
Utilization of the procedure logging system.
Results
After a 5-month pilot period, 38% of surgical residents were using the procedure-logging program successfully and on a regular basis. Program use was higher among more junior trainees. Analysis of the database provided valuable information on individual trainees, hospital programs and supervising surgeons, data that would assist in program development.
Conclusions
Hand-held devices can be implemented in a large division of general surgery to provide a reference database and a procedure-logging platform. However, user acceptance is not uniform and continued training and support are necessary to increase acceptance. The procedure database provides important information for optimizing trainees’ educational experience.
PMCID: PMC3684636  PMID: 12387537
5.  Practising evidence-based medicine: the design and implementation of a multidisciplinary team-driven extubation protocol 
Critical Care  2001;5(6):349-354.
Background
Evidence from recent literature shows that protocol-directed extubation is a useful approach to liberate patients from mechanical ventilation (MV). However, research evidence does not necessarily provide guidance on how to implement changes in individual intensive care units (ICUs). We conducted the present study to determine whether such an evidence-based strategy can be implemented safely and effectively using a multidisciplinary team (MDT) approach.
Method
We designed a MDT-driven extubation protocol. Multiple meetings were held to encourage constructive criticism of the design by attending physicians, nurses and respiratory care practitioners (RCPs), in order to define a protocol that was evidence based and acceptable to all clinical staff involved in the process of extubation. It was subsequently implemented and evaluated in our medical/ surgical ICU. Outcomes included response of the MDT to the initiative, duration of MV and stay in the ICU, as well as reintubation rate.
Results
The MDT responded favourably to the design and implementation of this MDT-driven extubation protocol, because it provided greater autonomy to the staff. Outcomes reported in the literature and in the historical control group were compared with those in the protocol group, and indicated similar durations of MV and ICU stay, as well as reintubation rates. No adverse events were documented.
Conclusion
An MDT approach to protocol-directed extubation can be implemented safely and effectively in a multidisciplinary ICU. Such an effort is viewed favourably by the entire team and is useful in enhancing team building.
PMCID: PMC83857  PMID: 11737924
extubation protocol; mechanical ventilation; multidisciplinary team; spontaneous breathing trial; weaning

Results 1-5 (5)