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1.  Functional repeats (TGYCC)n in the p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3) promoter and susceptibility to squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck 
Carcinogenesis  2012;34(4):812-817.
A polymorphic pentanucleotide microsatellite sequence (TGYCC)n within the p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3) promoter is correlated with the extent of transcriptional activation by p53 and thought to modulate susceptibility to cancer. Using a PCR–silver staining-based single-strand conformation assay, we visualized variant genotypes of the PIG3 promoter (TGYCC)n motif in a subset of 100 subjects for each of four ethnic groups: non-Hispanic whites, African Americans, Hispanic Americans and Native Chinese. We found that PIG3 (TGYCC)15 was the most common allele but less frequent in non-Hispanic whites (0.660) than in Chinese (0.785) (P = 0.016). In an additional study of 616 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and 623 cancer-free controls in a non-Hispanic white population, we found that compared with those who were PIG3 (TGYCC)15 homozygotes, subjects without the PIG3 (TGYCC)15 allele had a significantly increased SCCHN risk [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.34; 95% CI = 1.04–1.73 for heterozygotes and OR = 1.69; 95% CI = 1.18–2.44 for variant homozygotes] in an allele-dose response manner (P = 0.002). Consistently, subsequent luciferase reporter assay revealed that the wild-type (TGYCC)15 allele had the highest p53-mediated transcriptional activity, compared with the other (TGYCC)n motifs. Our data suggest that the PIG3 variant polymorphic repeats alleles other than (TGYCC)15 may affect p53 binding and thus may be a marker for susceptibility to SCCHN, but our findings need to be validated in larger studies.
doi:10.1093/carcin/bgs388
PMCID: PMC3616663  PMID: 23241165
2.  Association between functional polymorphisms in genes involved in the MAPK signaling pathways and cutaneous melanoma risk 
Carcinogenesis  2013;34(4):885-892.
Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have mainly focused on top significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), most of which did not have clear biological functions but were just surrogates for unknown causal variants. Studying SNPs with modest association and putative functions in biologically plausible pathways has become one complementary approach to GWASs. To unravel the key roles of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in cutaneous melanoma (CM) risk, we re-evaluated the associations between 47 818 SNPs in 280 MAPK genes and CM risk using our published GWAS dataset with 1804 CM cases and 1026 controls. We initially found 105 SNPs with P ≤ 0.001, more than expected by chance, 26 of which were predicted to be putatively functional SNPs. The risk associations with 16 SNPs around DUSP14 (rs1051849) and a previous reported melanoma locus MAFF/PLA2G6 (proxy SNP rs4608623) were replicated in the GenoMEL dataset (P < 0.01) but failed in the Australian dataset. Meta-analysis showed that rs1051849 in the 3ʹ untranslated regions of DUSP14 was associated with a reduced risk of melanoma (odds ratio = 0.89, 95% confidence interval: 0.82–0.96, P = 0.003, false discovery rate = 0.056). Further genotype–phenotype correlation analysis using the 90 HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines from Caucasians showed significant correlations between two SNPs (rs1051849 and rs4608623) and messenger RNA expression levels of DUSP14 and MAFF (P = 0.025 and P = 0.010, respectively). Gene-based tests also revealed significant SNPs were over-represented in MAFF, PLA2G6, DUSP14 and other 16 genes. Our results suggest that functional SNPs in MAPK pathways may contribute to CM risk. Further studies are warranted to validate our findings.
doi:10.1093/carcin/bgs407
PMCID: PMC3616673  PMID: 23291271
3.  ATM POLYMORPHISMS PREDICT SEVERE RADIATION PNEUMONITIS IN PATIENTS WITH NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER TREATED WITH DEFINITIVE RADIATION THERAPY 
Purpose
The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene mediates detection and repair of DNA damage. We investigated associations between ATM polymorphisms and severe radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP).
Methods and Materials
We genotyped three potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ATM (rs1801516 [D1853N/5557G>A], rs189037 [−111G>A] and rs228590) in 362 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who received definitive radio(chemo)therapy. The cumulative severe RP probabilities by genotypes were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier analysis. The associations between severe RP risk and genotypes were assessed by both logistic regression analysis and Cox proportional hazard model with time to event considered.
Results
Of 362 patients with 82% of non-Hispanic whites, 56 (15.5%) experienced grade ≥ 3 RP. Patients carrying ATM rs189037 AG/GG or rs228590 TT/CT genotypes, or rs189037G/rs228590T/rs1801516G (G-T-G) haplotype had a lower risk of severe RP (rs189037: GG/AG vs. AA, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29–0.83, P = 0.009; rs228590: TT/CT vs. CC, HR=0.57, 95% CI, 0.33–0.97, P =0.036; haplotype: G-T-G vs. A-C-G, HR=0.52, 95% CI, 0.35–0.79, P =0.002). Such positive findings remained in non-Hispanic whites.
CONCLUSIONS
ATM polymorphisms may serve as biomarkers for susceptibility to severe RP in non-Hispanic whites. Large prospective studies are required to confirm our findings.
doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2012.09.024
PMCID: PMC3594431  PMID: 23154078
Non–small cell lung cancer; radiation pneumonitis; single-nucleotide polymorphisms; ataxia telangiectasia mutated gene
4.  PGC-1 Coactivators Regulate MITF and the Tanning Response 
Molecular cell  2012;49(1):145-157.
SUMMARY
The production of pigment by melanocytes tans the skin and protects against skin cancers. UV-exposed keratinocytes secrete α-MSH, which then activates melanin formation in melanocytes by inducing the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF). We show that PPAR-γ coactivator (PGC)-1α and PGC-1β are critical components of this melanogenic system in melanocytes. α-MSH signaling strongly induces PGC-1α expression and stabilizes both PGC-1α and PGC-1β proteins. The PGC-1s in turn activate the MITF promoter, and their expression correlates strongly with that of MITF in human melanoma cell lines and biopsy specimens. Inhibition of PGC-1α and PGC-1β blocks the α-MSH-mediated induction of MITF and melanogenic genes. Conversely, overexpression of PGC-1α induces pigment formation in cell culture and transgenic animals. Finally, polymorphism studies reveal expression quantitative trait loci in the PGC-1β gene that correlate with tanning ability and protection from melanoma in humans. These data identify PGC-1 coactivators as regulators of human tanning.
doi:10.1016/j.molcel.2012.10.027
PMCID: PMC3753666  PMID: 23201126
5.  Correction: Polymorphisms in the mTOR Gene and Risk of Sporadic Prostate Cancer in an Eastern Chinese Population 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(1):10.1371/annotation/bc36c048-60e4-48a2-908d-6253e93df062.
doi:10.1371/annotation/bc36c048-60e4-48a2-908d-6253e93df062
PMCID: PMC3882253
6.  INCORPORATING SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS INTO THE LYMAN MODEL TO IMPROVE PREDICTION OF RADIATION PNEUMONITIS 
Purpose
To determine whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes associated with DNA repair, cell cycle, transforming growth factor beta, tumor necrosis factor and receptor, folic acid metabolism, and angiogenesis can significantly improve the fit of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) model of radiation pneumonitis (RP) risk among patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
Methods and Materials
Sixteen SNPs from 10 different genes (XRCC1, XRCC3, APEX1, MDM2, TGFβ, TNFα, TNFR, MTHFR, MTRR, and VEGF) were genotyped in 141 NSCLC patients treated with definitive radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy. The LKB model was used to estimate the risk of severe (Grade ≥3) RP as a function of mean lung dose (MLD), with SNPs and patient smoking status incorporated into the model as dose-modifying factors. Multivariate (MV) analyses were performed by adding significant factors to the MLD model in a forward stepwise procedure, with significance assessed using the likelihood-ratio test. Bootstrap analyses were used to assess the reproducibility of results under variations in the data.
Results
Five SNPs were selected for inclusion in the multivariate NTCP model based on MLD alone. SNPs associated with an increased risk of severe RP were in genes for TGFβ, VEGF, TNFα, XRCC1 and APEX1. With smoking status included in the MV model, the SNPs significantly associated with increased risk of RP were in genes for TGFβ, VEGF, and XRCC3. Bootstrap analyses selected a median of 4 SNPs per model fit, with the 6 genes listed above selected most often.
Conclusions
This study provides evidence that SNPs can significantly improve the predictive ability of the Lyman MLD model. With a small number of SNPs, it was possible to distinguish cohorts with >50% risk versus <10% risk of RP when exposed to high MLDs.
doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2012.02.021
PMCID: PMC3521878  PMID: 22541966
SNP; NTCP; biomarker; non-small cell lung cancer
7.  Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Novel Genetic Determinants of DNA Repair Capacity in Lung Cancer 
Cancer research  2012;73(1):256-264.
Suboptimal cellular DNA repair capacity (DRC) has been shown to be associated with enhanced cancer risk, but genetic variants affecting the DRC phenotype have not been comprehensively investigated. In this study, with the available DRC phenotype data, we analyzed correlations between the DRC phenotype and genotypes detected by the Illumina 317K platform in 1,774 individuals of European ancestry from a Texas lung cancer genome-wide association study. The discovery phase was followed by a replication in an independent set of 1,374 cases and controls of European ancestry. We applied a generalized linear model with SNPs as predictors and DRC (a continuous variable) as the outcome. Covariates of age, sex, pack-years of smoking, DRC assay-related variables and case-control status of the study participants were adjusted in the model. We validated that reduced DRC was associated with an increased risk of lung cancer in both independent datasets. Several suggestive loci that contributed to the DRC phenotype were defined in ERCC2/XPD, PHACTR2 and DUSP1. In summary, we determined that DRC is an independent risk factor for lung cancer and we defined several genetic loci contributing to DRC phenotype.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-12-1915
PMCID: PMC3537906  PMID: 23108145
DNA repair capacity; genetic susceptibility; genome-wide association; molecular epidemiology
8.  Polymorphisms of Nucleotide Excision Repair Genes Predict Melanoma Survival 
Melanoma is the most highly malignant skin cancer, and nucleotide excision repair (NER) is involved in melanoma susceptibility. In this analysis of 1042 melanoma patients, we evaluated whether genetic variants of NER genes may predict survival outcome of melanoma patients. We used genotyping data of 74 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tagSNPs) in eight core NER genes from our genome-wide association study (including 2 in XPA, 14 in XPC, 3 in XPE, 4 in ERCC1, 10 in ERCC2, 8 in ERCC3, 14 in ERCC4, and 19 in ERCC5) and evaluated their associations with prognosis of melanoma patients. Using the Cox proportional hazards model and Kaplan-Meier analysis, we found a predictive role of XPE rs28720291, ERCC5 rs4150314, XPC rs2470458 and ERCC2 rs50871 SNPs in prognosis of melanoma patients (rs28720291: AG vs. GG, adjusted hazard ratio [adjHR] = 11.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.04–40.9, P = 0.0003; rs4150314: AG vs. GG, adjHR = 4.76, 95% CI 1.09–20.8, P = 0.038; rs2470458: AA vs. AG/GG, adjHR = 2.11, 95% CI 1.03–4.33, P = 0.040; and rs50871: AA vs. AC/CC adjHR =2.27, 95% CI 1.18–4.35, P = 0.015). Patients with an increasing number of unfavorable genotypes had dramatically increased death risk. Genetic variants of NER genes, particularly XPE rs28720291, ERCC5 rs4150314, XPC rs2470458 and ERCC2 rs50871, may independently or jointly modulate survival outcome of melanoma patients. Because our results were based on a median follow-up of 3 years without multiple test corrections, additional large prospective studies are needed to confirm our findings.
doi:10.1038/jid.2012.498
PMCID: PMC3660504  PMID: 23407396
melanoma; nucleotide excision repair; survival; association
9.  Joint Effect of Multiple Common SNPs Predicts Melanoma Susceptibility  
PLoS ONE  2013;8(12):e85642.
Single genetic variants discovered so far have been only weakly associated with melanoma. This study aims to use multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) jointly to obtain a larger genetic effect and to improve the predictive value of a conventional phenotypic model. We analyzed 11 SNPs that were associated with melanoma risk in previous studies and were genotyped in MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) and Harvard Medical School investigations. Participants with ≥15 risk alleles were 5-fold more likely to have melanoma compared to those carrying ≤6. Compared to a model using the most significant single variant rs12913832, the increase in predictive value for the model using a polygenic risk score (PRS) comprised of 11 SNPs was 0.07(95% CI, 0.05-0.07). The overall predictive value of the PRS together with conventional phenotypic factors in the MDACC population was 0.69 (95% CI, 0.64-0.69). PRS significantly improved the risk prediction and reclassification in melanoma as compared with the conventional model. Our study suggests that a polygenic profile can improve the predictive value of an individual gene polymorphism and may be able to significantly improve the predictive value beyond conventional phenotypic melanoma risk factors.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0085642
PMCID: PMC3877376  PMID: 24392023
10.  Association Between CASP8 and CASP10 Polymorphisms and Toxicity Outcomes With Platinum-Based Chemotherapy in Chinese Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer 
The Oncologist  2012;17(12):1551-1561.
Thirteen tag SNPs at the CASP8 and CASP10 loci in patients with advanced NSCLC were genotyped in a two-stage analysis consisting of a discovery set and an independent validation set. These SNPs were evaluated for their association with toxicity outcomes with platinum-based chemotherapy.
Caspase-8 and caspase-10 play crucial roles in both cancer development and chemotherapy efficacy. In this study, we aimed to comprehensively assess single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the caspase-8 (CASP8) and caspase-10 (CASP10) genes in relation to toxicity outcomes with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We genotyped 13 tag SNPs of CASP8 and CASP10 in 663 patients with advanced NSCLC treated with platinum-based chemotherapy regimens. Associations between SNPs and chemotherapy toxicity outcomes were identified in a discovery set of 279 patients and then validated in an independent set of 384 patients. In both the discovery and validation sets, variant homozygotes of CASP8 rs12990906 and heterozygotes of CASP8 rs3769827 and CASP10 rs11674246 and rs3731714 had a significantly lower risk for severe toxicity overall. However, only the association with the rs12990906 variant was replicated in the validation set for hematological toxicity risk. In a stratified analysis, we found that some other SNPs, including rs3769821, rs3769825, rs7608692, and rs12613347, were significantly associated with severe toxicity risk in some subgroups, such as in nonsmoking patients, patients with adenocarcinoma, and patients treated with cisplatin combinations. Consistent results were also found in haplotype analyses. Our results provide novel evidence that polymorphisms in CASP8 and CASP10 may modulate toxicity outcomes in patients with advanced NSCLC treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. If validated, the findings will facilitate the genotype-based selection of platinum-based chemotherapy regimens.
doi:10.1634/theoncologist.2011-0419
PMCID: PMC3528388  PMID: 22843554
CASP8; CASP10; Polymorphisms; Platinum-based chemotherapy; Toxicity; Non-small cell lung cancer; Association
11.  Genetic variants of a BH3-only pro-apoptotic gene, PUMA, and risk of HPV16-associated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck 
Molecular carcinogenesis  2011;51(Suppl 1):E54-E64.
P53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) is a critical factor in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Through PUMA-dependent mechanisms, human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) oncoprotein may affect apoptosis by E6-mediated p53 degradation. To examine whether the PUMA variants modify the association between HPV16 serology and risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN), we genotyped two polymorphisms in the PUMA promoter (rs3810294 and rs2032809) in 380 cases and 335 cancer-free controls of non-Hispanic whites, who were frequency-matched by age (± 5 years), sex, smoking and drinking status. We found that each individual polymorphism had only a modest impact on risk of SCCHN, particularly in oropharyngeal cancer for rs3810294 and non-oropharyngeal cancer for rs2032809. After we stratified the individuals by HPV16 serology, and used those with the corresponding common homozygous genotype and HPV16 seronegativity as the reference group, for each polymorphism we found that the risk of SCCHN associated with HPV16 seropositivity was higher among those with variant genotypes than those with the corresponding common homozygous genotype. Notably, this effect modification was particularly pronounced in several subgroups including never smokers, never drinkers, younger patients, and patients with oropharyngeal cancer. Furthermore, we also characterized the functional relevance of the two polymorphisms to explore the genotype-phenotype correlation. Our results suggested that the PUMA promoter polymorphisms may be a biomarker for risk of HPV16-associated SCCHN, particularly in never smokers, never drinkers, younger patients, and patients with oropharyngeal cancer. Larger studies are needed to validate our findings.
doi:10.1002/mc.21838
PMCID: PMC3326219  PMID: 22086558
PUMA polymorphisms; HPV16; genetic susceptibility; molecular epidemiology; squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck
12.  Combined effects of E2F1 and E2F2 polymorphisms on risk and early onset of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck 
Molecular carcinogenesis  2012;51(Suppl 1):E132-E141.
Deregulated expression of most members of the E2F family has been detected in many human cancers. We examined the association of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of E2F1 and E2F2 with risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) in 1,096 SCCHN patients and 1,090 cancer-free controls. We genotyped ten selected SNPs in E2F1 and E2F2, including those at the near 5′ UTR, miRNA binding sites at the near 3′ UTR and tagSNPs according to bioinfotmatics analysis. Although none of the selected SNPs alone was significantly associated with risk of SCCHN, there was a statistically significantly increased risk of SCCHN associated with the combined risk genotypes (i.e. rs3213182 AA, rs3213183 GG, rs3213180 GG, rs321318121 GG, rs2742976 GT+TT, rs6667575 GA+AA, rs3218203 CC, rs3218148 AA, rs3218211 CC, rs3218123 GT+TT). Compared with those with 0–4 risk genotypes, an increased risk was observed for those who carried 5–8 risk genotypes (adjusted OR = 1.04; 95% CI = 0.86–1.26) and 9–10 risk genotypes (adjusted OR = 1.62; 95% CI = 1.14–2.30) in a dose-response manner (P = 0.045). Furthermore, the joint effect was more pronounced among patients with oropharyngeal cancer, younger adults (≤57 years old), men, non-smokers, non-drinkers, and individuals with family history of cancer first-degree relatives. Additionally, we also observed that those with 5–10 risk genotypes had an earlier SCCHN onset than those with 0–4 risk genotypes, particularly for non-smokers and/or non-drinkers. We concluded that E2F1 and E2F2 genetic variants may jointly play important roles in head and neck carcinogenesis.
doi:10.1002/mc.21882
PMCID: PMC3370129  PMID: 22344756
E2F1; E2F2; head and neck cancer; polymorphisms; age at onset
13.  HSPB1 Gene Polymorphisms Predict Risk of Mortality for U.S. Patients after Radio(chemo)therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer 
Purpose
We investigated potential associations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the heat shock protein beta-1 (HSPB1) gene and overall survival in U.S. patients with non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
Materials and Methods
Using available genomic DNA samples from 224 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive radio(chemo)therapy, we genotyped two SNPs of HSPB1 (rs2868370 and rs2868371). We used both Kaplan-Meier cumulative probability and Cox proportional hazards analyses to evaluate the effect of HSPB1 genotypes on survival.
Results
Our cohort comprised 117 men and 107 women, mostly white (79.5%), with a median age of 70 years. The median radiation dose was 66 Gy (range 63–87.5 Gy), and 183 patients (82%) received concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. The most common genotype of the rs2868371 SNP was CC (61%). Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that this genotype was associated with poorer survival than carriers of CG/GG genotypes (univariate hazard ratio [HR]=1.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02–1.90, P = 0.037; multivariate HR=1.39; 95% CI 1.01–1.92; P = 0.045).
Conclusion
Our results show that the CC genotype of HSPB1 rs2868371 was associated with poorer overall survival in patients with NSCLC after radio(chemo)therapy, findings that contradict those of a previous study of Chinese patients. Validation of our findings with larger numbers of similar patients is needed, as are mechanical and clinical studies to determine the mechanism underlying these associations.
doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2012.03.032
PMCID: PMC3426644  PMID: 22608953
Non–small cell lung cancer; radiation therapy; overall survival; single-nucleotide polymorphisms; heat shock protein beta-1
14.  Functional polymorphisms in the insulin-like binding protein-3 gene may modulate susceptibility to differentiated thyroid carcinoma in Caucasian Americans 
Molecular carcinogenesis  2012;51(Suppl 1):E158-E167.
Purpose
The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) pathway is believed to play a pivotal role in thyroid carcinogenesis. Polymorphisms of IGF-1 and IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) have been associated with modulation of risk for the emergence of assorted common malignancies, but studies of the influence of such polymorphisms on risk of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) are lacking.
Methods
In a case-control study of 173 DTC patients, 101 patients with benign thyroid disease, and 401 controls, an unconditional logistical regression model adjusted for age and sex was applied to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations between polymorphisms of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 and DTC risk.
Results
IGFBP-3 rs2132572 GA/AA genotypes were associated with a decreased risk of DTC (adjusted OR=0.6, 95% CI: 0.4–0.9), particularly multifocal DTC (adjusted OR=0.3, 95% CI: 0.1–0.7). The association with DTC was more evident in subjects with a first-degree family history of cancer (adjusted OR=0.4, 95% CI: 0.2–0.7, Pinteraction=0.013) and nondrinkers (adjusted OR=0.4, 95% CI: 0.2–0.7, Pinteraction=0.028). A 4 SNP haplotype of IGFBP-3 was associated with a decreased risk of DTC (adjusted OR=0.7, 95% CI: 0.5–1.0, P=0.030).
Conclusions
Our study suggests that polymorphic IGFBP-3 may be involved in susceptibility to DTC.
doi:10.1002/mc.21900
PMCID: PMC3473095  PMID: 22415807
IGF-1; multifocal; genetic susceptibility; papillary thyroid carcinoma; case-control study
15.  Functional Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the BRCA1 Gene and Risk of Salivary Gland Carcinoma 
Oral oncology  2012;48(9):842-847.
Objectives
Polymorphic BRCA1 is a vital tumor suppressor gene within the DNA double-strand break repair pathways, but its association with salivary gland carcinoma (SGC) has yet to be investigated.
Materials and Methods
In a case-control study of 156 SGC patients and 511 controls, we used unconditional logistical regression analyses to investigate the association between SGC risk and seven common functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (A1988G, A31875G, C33420T, A33921G, A34356G, T43893C and A55298G) in BRCA1.
Results
T43893C TC/CC genotype was associated with a reduction of SGC risk (adjusted odds ratio =0.55, 95% CI: 0.38–0.80, Bonferroni-adjusted p=0.011), which was more pronounced in women, non-Hispanic whites, and individuals with a family history of cancer in first-degree relatives. The interaction between T43893C and family history of cancer was significant (p=0.009). The GATGGCG and AACAACA haplotypes, both of which carry the T43893C minor allele, were also associated with reduced SGC risk.
Conclusion
Our results suggest that polymorphic BRCA1, particularly T43893C polymorphism, may protect against SGC.
doi:10.1016/j.oraloncology.2012.03.012
PMCID: PMC3408797  PMID: 22503699
BRCA1 polymorphism; salivary gland carcinoma; genetic susceptibility; DNA repair; case-control study
16.  Polymorphisms in the mTOR Gene and Risk of Sporadic Prostate Cancer in an Eastern Chinese Population 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(8):e71968.
Background
The mTOR gene regulates cell growth by controlling mRNA translation, ribosome biogenesis, autophagy, and metabolism. Abnormally increased expression of mTOR was associated with carcinogenesis, and its functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may regulate the expression of mTOR and thus contribute to cancer risk.
Methodology/Principal Findings
In a hospital-based case-control study of 1004 prostate cancer (PCa) cases and 1051 cancer-free controls, we genotyped six potentially functional SNPs of mTOR (rs2536 T>C, rs1883965 G>A, rs1034528 G>C, rs17036508 T>C, rs3806317 A>G, and rs2295080 T>G) and assessed their associations with risk of PCa by using logistic regression analysis.
Conclusions/Significances
In the single-locus analysis, we found a significantly increased risk of PCa associated with mTOR rs2536 CT/CC and rs1034528 CG/CC genotypes [adjusted OR = 1.42 (1.13–1.78), P = 0.003 and 1.29 (1.07–1.55), P = 0.007), respectively], compared with their common homozygous genotypes, whereas mTOR rs2295080 GT/GG genotypes were associated with a decreased risk of PCa [adjusted OR = 0.76 (0.64–0.92), P = 0.003], compared with wild-type TT genotypes. In the combined analysis of the six SNPs, we found that individuals carrying two or more adverse genotypes had an increased risk of PCa [adjusted OR = 1.24 (1.04–1.47), P = 0.016], compared with individuals carrying less than two adverse genotypes. In the multiple dimension reduction analysis, body mass index (BMI) was the best one-factor model with the highest CVC (100%) and the lowest prediction error (42.7%) among all seven factors. The model including an interaction among BMI, rs17036508, and rs2536 was the best three-factor model with the highest CVC (100%) and the lowest prediction error of 41.9%. These findings suggested that mTOR SNPs may contribute to the risk of PCa in Eastern Chinese men, but the effect was weak and needs further validation by larger population-based studies.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0071968
PMCID: PMC3734314  PMID: 23940798
17.  Combined p53-related genetic variants together with HPV infection increase oral cancer risk 
To explore the role of polymorphisms of p53-related genes in etiology of oral cancer, we investigated joint effects of seven putatively functional polymorphisms of p53 (codon 72 Arg/Pro), p73 (4/14 GC/AT), MDM2 (A2164G and T2580G), and MDM4 (rs11801299 G>A, rs10900598 G>T, and rs1380576 C>G) on risk of HPV16-associated oral cancer in a case-control study with 325 cases and 335 cancer-free controls. We found that HPV16 seropositivity alone was associated with an increased risk of oral cancer [adjusted odds ratio (OR), 3.1; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.1–4.6]. After combining genotypes of seven polymorphisms and using the low-risk group (0–3 combined risk genotypes) and HPV16 seronegativity as the reference group, the medium-risk (4 combined risk genotypes) and high-risk groups (5–7 combined risk genotypes) and HPV16 seronegativity were associated with only an OR of 1.6 (95% CI, 1.1–2.5) and 1.2 (95% CI, 0.7–1.9) for oral cancer risk, respectively, while the low-risk, medium-risk, and high-risk groups and HPV16 seropositivity were significantly associated with a higher OR of 2.1 (95% CI, 1.2–3.6), 4.0 (95% CI, 1.8–9.1), and 19.1 (95% CI, 5.7–64.2), respectively. Notably, such effect modification by these combined risk genotypes was particularly pronounced in young subjects (aged < 50 years), never smokers, and patients with oropharyngeal cancer. Taken together, these findings suggest that the combined risk genotypes of p53-related genes may modify risk of HPV16-associated oral cancer, especially in young patients, never-smokers, and patients with oropharyngeal cancer. Larger studies are needed to validate our findings.
doi:10.1002/ijc.27335
PMCID: PMC3289741  PMID: 22052649
p53; p73; MDM2; MDM4; HPV infection; oral cancer
18.  Genome-wide gene–environment interaction analysis for asbestos exposure in lung cancer susceptibility 
Carcinogenesis  2012;33(8):1531-1537.
Asbestos exposure is a known risk factor for lung cancer. Although recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified some novel loci for lung cancer risk, few addressed genome-wide gene–environment interactions. To determine gene–asbestos interactions in lung cancer risk, we conducted genome-wide gene–environment interaction analyses at levels of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), genes and pathways, using our published Texas lung cancer GWAS dataset. This dataset included 317 498 SNPs from 1154 lung cancer cases and 1137 cancer-free controls. The initial SNP-level P-values for interactions between genetic variants and self-reported asbestos exposure were estimated by unconditional logistic regression models with adjustment for age, sex, smoking status and pack-years. The P-value for the most significant SNP rs13383928 was 2.17×10–6, which did not reach the genome-wide statistical significance. Using a versatile gene-based test approach, we found that the top significant gene was C7orf54, located on 7q32.1 (P = 8.90×10–5). Interestingly, most of the other significant genes were located on 11q13. When we used an improved gene-set-enrichment analysis approach, we found that the Fas signaling pathway and the antigen processing and presentation pathway were most significant (nominal P < 0.001; false discovery rate < 0.05) among 250 pathways containing 17 572 genes. We believe that our analysis is a pilot study that first describes the gene–asbestos interaction in lung cancer risk at levels of SNPs, genes and pathways. Our findings suggest that immune function regulation-related pathways may be mechanistically involved in asbestos-associated lung cancer risk.
Abbreviations:CIconfidence intervalEenvironmentFDRfalse discovery rateGgeneGSEAgene-set-enrichment analysisGWASgenome-wide association studiesi-GSEAimproved gene-set-enrichment analysis approachORodds ratioSNPsingle nucleotide polymorphism
doi:10.1093/carcin/bgs188
PMCID: PMC3499061  PMID: 22637743
19.  Variants in melanocortin 1 receptor gene contribute to risk of melanoma – a direct sequencing analysis in a Texas population 
Pigment cell & melanoma research  2013;26(3):422-425.
Summary
In this study, we directly sequenced the Melanocortin 1 Receptor (MC1R) gene in 2,212 individuals to detect all variants and assessed their associations with cutaneous melanoma (CM) risk in a hospital-based study of 1,106 CM patients and 1,106 control subjects. Of 61 MC1R variants identified, 16 rare variants have not been previously reported by others; three MC1R variants were associated with a significant CM risk [c.451C>T (OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.44–2.20), c.478C>T (OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.05–1.63), and c.880G>C (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.15–2.48)]; and two with borderline CM risk [c.942A>G (OR =1.23, 95% CI =1.00–1.51, and c.274G>A (OR = 1.23,95% CI = 0.99–1.53)] under a dominant model. When combined these five MC1R variants for cumulative effect analysis, we found that subjects with an increased number of variant genotypes from any of these five variants had significantly increased risk of CM with ORs of 1.68 (95% CI = 1.39–2.04), 1.61 (95% CI = 1.27–2.04), and 2.64 (95% CI = 1.72–4.05) for one, two, and three or more variant genotypes, respectively (trend test: P <0.001). Further haplotype and diplotype analyses based on the above-mentioned five SNPs suggested that the c.451T allele contributed to the high risk of CM and that the five variants may have joint effects on the risk of CM. Additional analysis suggests that the three most significant SNPs may be the molecular mechanisms underlying the known risk factors of the colors of the eyes, skin and hair in this study population. In conclusion, our study provided confirmatory evidence that both common and rare variants in the MC1R coding region may be biomarkers for susceptibility to CM in US populations.
doi:10.1111/pcmr.12070
PMCID: PMC3721512  PMID: 23360207
melanocortin 1 receptor gene; direct sequencing; interaction; melanoma; case-control
20.  Association between putative functional variants in the PSMB9 gene and risk of melanoma - re-analysis of published melanoma genome-wide association studies 
Pigment cell & melanoma research  2013;26(3):392-401.
Summary
To mine possibly hidden causal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the etiology of melanoma, we investigated the association of SNPs in 76 M/G1 transition genes with melanoma risk using our published genome-wide association study (GWAS) dataset with 1804 melanoma cases and 1,026 cancer-free controls. We found multiple SNPs with P < 0.01 and performed validation studies for 18 putative functional SNPs in PSMB9 in other two GWAS datasets. Two SNPs (rs1351383 and rs2127675) were associated with melanoma risk in the GenoMEL dataset (P = 0.013 and 0.004, respectively), but failed validation in the Australia dataset. Genotype-phenotype analysis revealed these two SNPs were significantly correlated with mRNA expression levels of PSMB9. Further experiments revealed that the promoter SNP rs2071480, which is in high LD with rs1351383 and rs2127675, involved in influencing transcription factor binding and gene expression. Taken together, our data suggested that functional variants in PSMB9 may contribute to melanoma susceptibility.
doi:10.1111/pcmr.12069
PMCID: PMC3721546  PMID: 23360169
GWAS; Cell cycle; PSMB9; Polymorphism; melanoma
21.  Association of tumor necrosis factor-alpha promoter variants with risk of HPV-associated oral squamous cell carcinoma 
Molecular Cancer  2013;12:80.
Background
Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) plays an important role in inflammation, immunity, and defense against infection and clearance of human papillomavirus (HPV). Thus, genetic variants may modulate individual susceptibility to HPV-associated oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC).
Methods
In this study we genotyped four common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the TNF-α promoter [ −308G > A(rs1800629), -857C > T (rs1799724), -863C > A (rs1800630), and -1031T > C (rs1799964)] and determined HPV16 serology in 325 OSCC cases and 335 matched controls and tumor HPV status in 176 squamous cell carcinomas of the oropharynx (SCCOP) patients. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
Results
We found that HPV16 seropositivity alone was associated with an increased risk of OSCC (OR, 3.1; 95% CI, 2.1–4.6), and such risk of HPV16-associated OSCC was modified by each SNP. Patients with both HPV16 seropositivity and variant genotypes for each SNP had the highest risk when using patients with HPV16 seronegativity and a wild-type genotype as a comparison group. Moreover, similar results were observed for the combined risk genotypes of four variants and all such significant associations were more pronounced in several subgroups, particularly in SCCOP patients and never smokers. Notably, the combined risk genotypes of four variants were also significantly associated with tumor HPV-positive SCCOP.
Conclusion
Taken together, these results suggest that TNF-α SNPs may individually or, more likely, jointly affect individual susceptibility to HPV16-associated OSCC, particularly SCCOP and never smokers. Validation of our findings is warranted.
doi:10.1186/1476-4598-12-80
PMCID: PMC3725173  PMID: 23870134
TNF-α; Polymorphism; HPV infection; Oropharyngeal cancer; Case–control study
22.  FAMILY HISTORY OF CANCER: POOLED ANALYSIS IN THE INTERNATIONAL HEAD AND NECK CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY (INHANCE) CONSORTIUM 
Alcohol and tobacco consumption are well recognized risk factors for head and neck cancer (HNC). Evidence suggests that genetic predisposition may also play a role. Only a few epidemiologic studies, however, have considered the relation between HNC risk and family history of HNC and other cancers. We pooled individual- level data across 12 case-control studies including 8,967 HNC cases and 13,627 controls. We obtained pooled odds ratios (OR) using fixed and random effect models, and adjusting for potential confounding factors. All statistical tests were two-sided. A family history of HNC in first-degree relatives increased the risk of HNC (OR=1.7, 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.2-2.3). The risk was higher when the affected relative was a sibling (OR=2.2, 95% CI 1.6-3.1) rather than a parent (OR=1.5, 95% CI 1.1-1.8), and for more distal HNC anatomic sites (hypopharynx and larynx). The risk was also higher, or limited to, subjects exposed to tobacco. The OR rose to 7.2 (95% CI 5.5-9.5) among subjects with family history, who were alcohol and tobacco users. A weak but significant association (OR=1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.2) emerged for family history of other tobacco-related neoplasms, particularly with laryngeal cancer (OR=1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.5). No association was observed for family history of non-tobacco related neoplasms and the risk of HNC (OR=1.0, 95% CI 0.9-1.1). Familial factors play a role in the etiology of HNC. In both subjects with and without family history of HNC, avoidance of tobacco and alcohol exposure may be the best way to avoid HNC.
doi:10.1002/ijc.23848
PMCID: PMC3711193  PMID: 18814262
Head and neck cancer; family history; pooled analysis; tobacco; alcohol
23.  Neighborhood Deprivation and Clinical Outcomes among Head and Neck Cancer Patients 
Health & place  2012;18(4):861-868.
The unique effects of neighborhood-level economic deprivation on survival, recurrence, and second primary malignancy development were examined using adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models among 1151 incident squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) patients. Cancer site was examined as a potential moderator. Main analyses yielded null results; however, interaction analyses indicated poorer overall survival [HR=1.59 (1.00-2.53)] and greater second primary malignancy development [HR=2.99 (1.46-6.11)] among oropharyngeal cancer patients from highly deprived neighborhoods relative to less deprived neighborhoods. Results suggest a dual focus on individual and neighborhood risk factors could help improve clinical outcomes among oropharyngeal cancer patients.
doi:10.1016/j.healthplace.2012.03.005
PMCID: PMC3372668  PMID: 22445028
neighborhood deprivation; head and neck cancer; survival; second primary malignancy; oropharyngeal cancer
24.  TGFβ1 Polymorphisms Predict Distant Metastasis–Free Survival in Patients with Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer after Definitive Radiotherapy 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(6):e65659.
Purpose
Transforming growth factor (TGF) -β1 signaling is involved in cancer-cell metastasis. We investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at TGFβ1 were associated with overall survival (OS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy.
Methods
We genotyped TGFβ1 SNPs at rs1800469 (C–509T), rs1800471 (G915C), and rs1982073 (T+29C) by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism in blood samples from 205 NSCLC patients who had had definitive radiotherapy at one institution in November 1998–January 2005. We also tested whether the TGF-β1 rs1982073 (T+29C) SNP affected the migration and invasion of A549 and PC9 lung cancer cells.
Results
Median follow-up time for all patients was 17 months (range, 1–97 months; 39 months for patients alive at the time of analysis). Multivariate analysis showed that the TGFβ1 rs1800469 CT/CC genotype was associated with poor OS (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.463 [95% confidence interval {CI} = 1.012–2.114], P = 0.043) and shorter DMFS (HR = 1.601 [95% CI = 1.042–2.459], P = 0.032) and that the TGFβ1 rs1982073 CT/CC genotype predicted poor DMFS (HR = 1.589 [95% CI = 1.009–2.502], P = 0.046) and poor brain MFS (HR = 2.567 [95% CI = 1.155–5.702], P = 0.021) after adjustment for age, sex, race, performance status, smoking status, tumor histology and volume, stage, receipt of concurrent radiochemotherapy, number of chemotherapy cycles, and radiation dose. Transfection with TGFβ1+29C (vs. +29T) stimulated the migration and invasion of A549 and PC9 cells, suggesting that TGFβ1+29C may be linked with increased metastatic potential.
Conclusions
TGFβ1 genotypes at rs1800469 and rs1982073 could be useful for predicting DMFS among patients with NSCLC treated with definitive radiation therapy. These findings require validation in larger prospective trials and thorough mechanistic studies.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0065659
PMCID: PMC3686751  PMID: 23840350
25.  The miR-184 Binding-Site rs8126 T>C Polymorphism in TNFAIP2 Is Associated with Risk of Gastric Cancer 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(5):e64973.
Background
TNFAIP2 is a crucial gene involved in apoptosis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in its miRNA binding sites could modulate functions of the miRNA-target genes and thus risk of cancers. In this study, we investigated associations between potentially functional SNPs in the miRNA binding sites of the 3′UTR of TNFAIP2 and gastric cancer risk in a US population.
Methods
We conducted a case-control study of 301 gastric cancer patients and 313 cancer-free controls frequency-matched by age, sex and ethnicity. We genotyped four selected TNFAIP2 SNPs (rs8126 T>C, rs710100 G>A, rs1052912 G>A and rs1052823 G>T) and used the logistic regression analysis to assess associations of these SNPs with cancer risk.
Results
The rs8126 CC genotype was associated with a significantly elevated risk of gastric cancer (adjusted OR = 2.00, 95% CI = 1.09–3.64 and P = 0.024), compared with the combined rs8126 TT+TC genotypes, particularly in current drinkers. However, none of other TNFAIP2 SNPs was associated with risk of gastric cancer.
Conclusions
Our data suggested that the TNFAIP2 miRNA binding site rs8126 T>C SNP may be a marker for susceptibility to gastric cancer, and this finding requires further validation by larger studies.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0064973
PMCID: PMC3665554  PMID: 23724109

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