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author:("fukui, tomoto")
1.  Pathologic and Gene Expression Features of Metastatic Melanomas to the Brain (MBM) 
Cancer  2013;119(15):2737-2746.
Background
The prognosis of MBM is variable with prolonged survival in a subset. It is unclear whether MBMs differ from extracranial metastases (EcM) and primary melanomas (PrM).
Methods
To study the biology of MBM we performed histopathologic analysis of tumor blocks from patients' craniotomy samples and whole genome expression profiling (WGEP) with confirmatory immunohistochemistry (IHC).
Results
Mononuclear infiltrate and low intratumoral hemorrhage were associated with prolonged overall survival (OS). Pathway analysis of WGEP data from 29 such craniotomy tumor blocks demonstrated that several immune-related BioCarta gene sets were associated with prolonged OS. WGEP analysis of MBM in comparison with same-patient EcM and PrM showed that MBM and EcM were similar—but both differ significantly from PrM. IHC analysis revealed that peritumoral CD3+ and CD8+ cells were associated with prolonged OS.
Conclusions
MBMs are more similar to EcM compared to PrM. Immune infiltrate is a favorable prognostic factor for MBM.
doi:10.1002/cncr.28029
PMCID: PMC3901051  PMID: 23695963
Melanoma; Brain Metastases; Craniotomy Immune Infiltrate; Gene Expression Profiling
2.  Genetic variation in ESR2 and estrogen receptor-beta expression in lung tumors 
Cancer epidemiology  2013;37(4):518-522.
Objective
To investigate the association between inherited variation in the estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) gene (ESR2) and ERβ lung tumor expression, a phenotype that possibly affects survival differently in men and women.
Methods
We genotyped 135 lung cancer patients for 22 ESR2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and measured nuclear and cytoplasmic ERβ expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in their primary lung tumor. Distributing Allred ERβ IHC scores according to ESR2 genotype classified under a dominant genetic model, we used rank sum tests to identify ESR2 SNPs significantly associated (p<0.05) with ERβ expression.
Results
35%, 35%, and 29% of lung tumors showed no/low (Allred <6), intermediate (Allred 6 to 7), and maximal (Allred 8) cytoplasmic ERβ expression, whereas 13%, 27%, and 60% showed no/low, intermediate, and maximal nuclear ERβ expression. For SNPs rs8021944, rs1256061 and rs10146204, ERβ expression was higher according to the rank sum test in lung tumors from patients with at least one minor allele. For each of these three SNPs, the odds of maximal (Allred 8) relative to no/low (Allred <6) ERβ expression was 3-fold higher in tumors from patients with at least one minor allele than in tumors from patients homozygous for the common allele.
Conclusion
Inherited variability in ESR2 may determine ERβ lung tumor expression.
doi:10.1016/j.canep.2013.03.020
PMCID: PMC3684046  PMID: 23619141
lung cancer; genetic polymorphism; estrogen receptor
3.  Frequent mutation of the PI3K pathway in head and neck cancer defines predictive biomarkers 
Cancer discovery  2013;3(7):761-769.
Genomic findings underscore the heterogeneity of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC)(1, 2). Identification of mutations that predict therapeutic response would be a major advance. We determined the mutationally altered, targetable mitogenic pathways in a large HNSCC cohort. Analysis of whole-exome sequencing data from 151 tumors revealed the PI3K pathway to be the most frequently mutated oncogenic pathway (30.5%). PI3K pathway-mutated HNSCC tumors harbored a significantly higher rate of mutations in known cancer genes. In a subset of HPV-positive tumors, PIK3CA or PIK3R1 was the only mutated cancer gene. Strikingly, all tumors with concurrent mutation of multiple PI3K pathway genes were advanced (stage IV), implicating concerted PI3K pathway aberrations in HNSCC progression. Patient-derived tumorgrafts with canonical and non-canonical PIK3CA mutations were sensitive to an m-TOR/PI3K inhibitor (BEZ-235) in contrast to PIK3CA wildtype tumorgrafts. These results suggest that PI3K pathway mutations may serve as predictive biomarkers for treatment selection.
doi:10.1158/2159-8290.CD-13-0103
PMCID: PMC3710532  PMID: 23619167
PI3K; mutation; BEZ-235; head and neck cancer
4.  CYP2A6 Genotype and Smoking Behavior in Current Smokers Screened for Lung Cancer 
Substance use & misuse  2013;48(7):490-494.
Functional CYP2A6 genetic variation partially determines nicotine metabolism. In 2005, we examined functional CYP2A6 variants associated with reduced metabolism (CYP2A6*2, CYP2A6*9, CYP2A6*4), smoking history, and change in smoking in 878 adult smokers undergoing lung cancer screening in an urban setting. At one year, 216 quit smoking for more than 30 days while 662 continued smoking. Compared to subjects who smoked 30 cigarettes per day at baseline, the odds of a reduced metabolism genotype was 52% higher in subjects smoking 20–29 cigarettes per day and 86% higher in subjects smoking less than 20 cigarettes per day (p-trend = 0.016). Reduced metabolism genotypes appeared unrelated to quitting. Though related to smoking dose, CYP2A6 may not influence cessation.
doi:10.3109/10826084.2013.778280
PMCID: PMC3788637  PMID: 23528144
smoking cessation; smoking initiation; cigarette smoking; genetics; cytochrome P450; nicotine metabolism
5.  Genetic variability in DNA repair and cell cycle control pathway genes and risk of smoking-related lung cancer 
Molecular carcinogenesis  2011;51(Suppl 1):E11-E20.
DNA repair and cell cycle control play an important role in the repair of DNA damage caused by cigarette smoking. Given this role, functionally relevant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes in these pathways may well affect the risk of smoking-related lung cancer. We examined the relationship between 240 SNPs in DNA repair and cell cycle control pathway genes and lung cancer risk in a case-control study of white current and ex-cigarette smokers (722 cases and 929 controls). Additive, dominant and recessive genetic models were evaluated for each SNP. A genetic risk summary score was also constructed. Odds ratios (OR) for lung cancer risk and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated using logistic regression models. Thirty-eight SNPs were associated with lung cancer risk in our study population at P<0.05. The strongest associations were observed for rs2074508 in GTF2H4 (Padditive=0.003), rs10500298 in LIG1 (Precessive=2.7×10−4), rs747658 and rs3219073 in PARP1 (rs747658: Padditive=5.8×10−5; rs3219073: Padditive=4.6×10−5), and rs1799782 and rs3213255 in XRCC1 (rs1799782: Pdominant=0.006; rs3213255: Precessive=0.004). Compared to individuals with first quartile (lowest) risk summary scores, individuals with third and fourth quartile summary score results were at increased risk for lung cancer (OR: 2.21, 95% CI: 1.66–2.95 and OR: 3.44, 95% CI: 2.58–4.59, respectively; Ptrend<0.0001). Our data suggests that variation in DNA repair and cell cycle control pathway genes is associated with smoking-related lung cancer risk. Additionally, combining genotype information for SNPs in these pathways may assist in classifying current and ex-cigarette smokers according to lung cancer risk.
doi:10.1002/mc.20858
PMCID: PMC3289753  PMID: 21976407
SNP; case-control; lung cancer
6.  Effects of ERCC2 Lys751Gln (A35931C) and CCND1 (G870A) polymorphism on outcome of advanced-stage squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck are treatment dependent 
Background
Germline variation in DNA damage response may explain variable treatment outcomes from squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Grouping patients according to stage and radiation treatment, we compared SCCHN survival according to ERCC2 A35931C (Lys751Gln, rs13181) and CCND1 G870A (Pro241Pro, rs9344) genotypes.
Methods
Recruiting a hospital-based SCCHN case series (all white, 24.7% female, mean age 58.4 years), this treatment outcome cohort study genotyped n=275 stage III-IV cases initially treated with radiation (with or without chemotherapy) and n=80 stage III-IV and n=130 stage I-II cases initially treated without radiation or chemotherapy and used Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analysis to compare genotype groups according to overall, disease-specific, progression-free, and recurrence-free survival.
Results
ERCC2-35931 AA predicted worse survival in stage III-IV treated with radiation (multiply adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15-2.40; HR over the first three follow-up years 1.92, 95% CI 1.28-2.88) and better survival in stage III-IV not treated with radiation (HR 0.26, 95% CI 0.11-0.62). Unassociated with survival in stage III-IV treated with radiation (HR 1.00, 95% CI 0.67-1.51), CCND1-870 GG predicted better survival in stage III-IV not treated with radiation (HR 0.14, 95% CI 0.04-0.50). Survival in stage I-II did not depend on ERCC2 A35931C or CCND1 G870A genotype.
Conclusions
Promoting tumor progression in untreated patients, germline differences in DNA repair or cell cycle control may improve treatment outcome in patients treated with DNA damaging agents.
Impact
ERCC2 A35931C may help distinguish advanced stage SCCHN with better outcomes from radiation treatment.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-11-0520
PMCID: PMC3210907  PMID: 21890746
7.  Genome-Wide Association Study of Survival in Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Platinum-Based Chemotherapy 
Background
Interindividual variation in genetic background may influence the response to chemotherapy and overall survival for patients with advanced-stage non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
Methods
To identify genetic variants associated with poor overall survival in these patients, we conducted a genome-wide scan of 307 260 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 327 advanced-stage NSCLC patients who received platinum-based chemotherapy with or without radiation at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (the discovery population). A fast-track replication was performed for 315 patients from the Mayo Clinic followed by a second validation at the University of Pittsburgh in 420 patients enrolled in the Spanish Lung Cancer Group PLATAX clinical trial. A pooled analysis combining the Mayo Clinic and PLATAX populations or all three populations was also used to validate the results. We assessed the association of each SNP with overall survival by multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. All statistical tests were two-sided.
Results
SNP rs1878022 in the chemokine-like receptor 1 (CMKLR1) was statistically significantly associated with poor overall survival in the MD Anderson discovery population (hazard ratio [HR] of death = 1.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.32 to 1.92, P = 1.42 × 10−6), in the PLATAX clinical trial (HR of death = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.00 to 1.51, P = .05), in the pooled Mayo Clinic and PLATAX validation (HR of death = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.06 to 1.40, P = .005), and in pooled analysis of all three populations (HR of death = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.19 to 1.48, P = 5.13 × 10−7). Carrying a variant genotype of rs10937823 was associated with decreased overall survival (HR of death = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.42 to 2.33, P = 1.73 × 10−6) in the pooled MD Anderson and Mayo Clinic populations but not in the PLATAX trial patient population (HR of death = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.69 to 1.35).
Conclusion
These results have the potential to contribute to the future development of personalized chemotherapy treatments for individual NSCLC patients.
doi:10.1093/jnci/djr075
PMCID: PMC3096796  PMID: 21483023
8.  A sex-specific association between a 15q25 variant and upper aerodigestive tract cancers 
Background
Sequence variants located at 15q25 have been associated with lung cancer and propensity to smoke. We recently reported an association between rs16969968 and risk of upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancers (oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx and esophagus) in women (odds ratio (OR) =1.24, P=0.003) with little effect in men (OR=1.04, P=0.35).
Methods
In a coordinated genotyping study within the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium, we have sought to replicate these findings in an additional 4,604 cases and 6,239 controls from 10 independent UADT cancer case-control studies.
Results
rs16969968 was again associated with UADT cancers in women (OR=1.21, 95% confidence interval(CI)=1.08–1.36, P=0.001) and a similar lack of observed effect in men (OR=1.02, 95%CI=0.95–1.09, P=0.66) (P-heterogeneity=0.01). In a pooled analysis of the original and current studies, totaling 8,572 UADT cancer cases and 11,558 controls, the association was observed among females (OR=1.22, 95%CI=1.12–1.34, P=7×10−6) but not males (OR=1.02, 95%CI=0.97–1.08, P=0.35) (P-heterogeneity=6×10−4). There was little evidence for a sex difference in the association between this variant and cigarettes smoked per day, with male and female rs16969968 variant carriers smoking approximately the same amount more in the 11,991 ever smokers in the pooled analysis of the 14 studies (P-heterogeneity=0.86).
Conclusions
This study has confirmed a sex difference in the association between the 15q25 variant rs16969968 and UADT cancers.
Impact
Further research is warranted to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these observations.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-10-1008
PMCID: PMC3070066  PMID: 21335511
genetic variants; 15q25; nicotinic acetylcholine receptor; upper aerodigestive tract cancers; cigarettes per day
9.  Correction: A Genome-Wide Association Study of Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancers Conducted within the INHANCE Consortium 
McKay, James D. | Truong, Therese | Gaborieau, Valerie | Chabrier, Amelie | Chuang, Shu-Chun | Byrnes, Graham | Zaridze, David | Shangina, Oxana | Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila | Lissowska, Jolanta | Rudnai, Peter | Fabianova, Eleonora | Bucur, Alexandru | Bencko, Vladimir | Holcatova, Ivana | Janout, Vladimir | Foretova, Lenka | Lagiou, Pagona | Trichopoulos, Dimitrios | Benhamou, Simone | Bouchardy, Christine | Ahrens, Wolfgang | Merletti, Franco | Richiardi, Lorenzo | Talamini, Renato | Barzan, Luigi | Kjaerheim, Kristina | Macfarlane, Gary J. | Macfarlane, Tatiana V. | Simonato, Lorenzo | Canova, Cristina | Agudo, Antonio | Castellsagué, Xavier | Lowry, Ray | Conway, David I. | McKinney, Patricia A. | Healy, Claire M. | Toner, Mary E. | Znaor, Ariana | Curado, Maria Paula | Koifman, Sergio | Menezes, Ana | Wünsch-Filho, Victor | Neto, José Eluf | Garrote, Leticia Fernández | Boccia, Stefania | Cadoni, Gabriella | Arzani, Dario | Olshan, Andrew F. | Weissler, Mark C. | Funkhouser, William K. | Luo, Jingchun | Lubiński, Jan | Trubicka, Joanna | Lener, Marcin | Oszutowska, Dorota | Schwartz, Stephen M. | Chen, Chu | Fish, Sherianne | Doody, David R. | Muscat, Joshua E. | Lazarus, Philip | Gallagher, Carla J. | Chang, Shen-Chih | Zhang, Zuo-Feng | Wei, Qingyi | Sturgis, Erich M. | Wang, Li-E | Franceschi, Silvia | Herrero, Rolando | Kelsey, Karl T. | McClean, Michael D. | Marsit, Carmen J. | Nelson, Heather H. | Romkes, Marjorie | Buch, Shama | Nukui, Tomoko | Zhong, Shilong | Lacko, Martin | Manni, Johannes J. | Peters, Wilbert H. M. | Hung, Rayjean J. | McLaughlin, John | Vatten, Lars | Njølstad, Inger | Goodman, Gary E. | Field, John K. | Liloglou, Triantafillos | Vineis, Paolo | Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise | Palli, Domenico | Tumino, Rosario | Krogh, Vittorio | Panico, Salvatore | González, Carlos A. | Quirós, J. Ramón | Martínez, Carmen | Navarro, Carmen | Ardanaz, Eva | Larrañaga, Nerea | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Key, Timothy | Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas | Peeters, Petra H. M. | Trichopoulou, Antonia | Linseisen, Jakob | Boeing, Heiner | Hallmans, Göran | Overvad, Kim | Tjønneland, Anne | Kumle, Merethe | Riboli, Elio | Välk, Kristjan | Voodern, Tõnu | Metspalu, Andres | Zelenika, Diana | Boland, Anne | Delepine, Marc | Foglio, Mario | Lechner, Doris | Blanché, Hélène | Gut, Ivo G. | Galan, Pilar | Heath, Simon | Hashibe, Mia | Hayes, Richard B. | Boffetta, Paolo | Lathrop, Mark | Brennan, Paul
PLoS Genetics  2011;7(4):10.1371/annotation/9952526f-2f1f-47f3-af0f-1a7cf6f0abc1.
doi:10.1371/annotation/9952526f-2f1f-47f3-af0f-1a7cf6f0abc1
PMCID: PMC3084181
10.  A Genome-Wide Association Study of Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancers Conducted within the INHANCE Consortium 
McKay, James D. | Truong, Therese | Gaborieau, Valerie | Chabrier, Amelie | Chuang, Shu-Chun | Byrnes, Graham | Zaridze, David | Shangina, Oxana | Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila | Lissowska, Jolanta | Rudnai, Peter | Fabianova, Eleonora | Bucur, Alexandru | Bencko, Vladimir | Holcatova, Ivana | Janout, Vladimir | Foretova, Lenka | Lagiou, Pagona | Trichopoulos, Dimitrios | Benhamou, Simone | Bouchardy, Christine | Ahrens, Wolfgang | Merletti, Franco | Richiardi, Lorenzo | Talamini, Renato | Barzan, Luigi | Kjaerheim, Kristina | Macfarlane, Gary J. | Macfarlane, Tatiana V. | Simonato, Lorenzo | Canova, Cristina | Agudo, Antonio | Castellsagué, Xavier | Lowry, Ray | Conway, David I. | McKinney, Patricia A. | Healy, Claire M. | Toner, Mary E. | Znaor, Ariana | Curado, Maria Paula | Koifman, Sergio | Menezes, Ana | Wünsch-Filho, Victor | Neto, José Eluf | Garrote, Leticia Fernández | Boccia, Stefania | Cadoni, Gabriella | Arzani, Dario | Olshan, Andrew F. | Weissler, Mark C. | Funkhouser, William K. | Luo, Jingchun | Lubiński, Jan | Trubicka, Joanna | Lener, Marcin | Oszutowska, Dorota | Schwartz, Stephen M. | Chen, Chu | Fish, Sherianne | Doody, David R. | Muscat, Joshua E. | Lazarus, Philip | Gallagher, Carla J. | Chang, Shen-Chih | Zhang, Zuo-Feng | Wei, Qingyi | Sturgis, Erich M. | Wang, Li-E | Franceschi, Silvia | Herrero, Rolando | Kelsey, Karl T. | McClean, Michael D. | Marsit, Carmen J. | Nelson, Heather H. | Romkes, Marjorie | Buch, Shama | Nukui, Tomoko | Zhong, Shilong | Lacko, Martin | Manni, Johannes J. | Peters, Wilbert H. M. | Hung, Rayjean J. | McLaughlin, John | Vatten, Lars | Njølstad, Inger | Goodman, Gary E. | Field, John K. | Liloglou, Triantafillos | Vineis, Paolo | Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise | Palli, Domenico | Tumino, Rosario | Krogh, Vittorio | Panico, Salvatore | González, Carlos A. | Quirós, J. Ramón | Martínez, Carmen | Navarro, Carmen | Ardanaz, Eva | Larrañaga, Nerea | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Key, Timothy | Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas | Peeters, Petra H. M. | Trichopoulou, Antonia | Linseisen, Jakob | Boeing, Heiner | Hallmans, Göran | Overvad, Kim | Tjønneland, Anne | Kumle, Merethe | Riboli, Elio | Välk, Kristjan | Voodern, Tõnu | Metspalu, Andres | Zelenika, Diana | Boland, Anne | Delepine, Marc | Foglio, Mario | Lechner, Doris | Blanché, Hélène | Gut, Ivo G. | Galan, Pilar | Heath, Simon | Hashibe, Mia | Hayes, Richard B. | Boffetta, Paolo | Lathrop, Mark | Brennan, Paul
PLoS Genetics  2011;7(3):e1001333.
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in identifying common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to etiologically complex disease. We conducted a GWAS to identify common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to upper aero-digestive tract (UADT) cancers. Genome-wide genotyping was carried out using the Illumina HumanHap300 beadchips in 2,091 UADT cancer cases and 3,513 controls from two large European multi-centre UADT cancer studies, as well as 4,821 generic controls. The 19 top-ranked variants were investigated further in an additional 6,514 UADT cancer cases and 7,892 controls of European descent from an additional 13 UADT cancer studies participating in the INHANCE consortium. Five common variants presented evidence for significant association in the combined analysis (p≤5×10−7). Two novel variants were identified, a 4q21 variant (rs1494961, p = 1×10−8) located near DNA repair related genes HEL308 and FAM175A (or Abraxas) and a 12q24 variant (rs4767364, p = 2×10−8) located in an extended linkage disequilibrium region that contains multiple genes including the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene. Three remaining variants are located in the ADH gene cluster and were identified previously in a candidate gene study involving some of these samples. The association between these three variants and UADT cancers was independently replicated in 5,092 UADT cancer cases and 6,794 controls non-overlapping samples presented here (rs1573496-ADH7, p = 5×10−8; rs1229984-ADH1B, p = 7×10−9; and rs698-ADH1C, p = 0.02). These results implicate two variants at 4q21 and 12q24 and further highlight three ADH variants in UADT cancer susceptibility.
Author Summary
We have used a two-phased study approach to identify common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to upper aero-digestive tract cancer. Using Illumina HumanHap300 beadchips, 2,091 UADT cancer cases and 3,513 controls from two large European multi-centre UADT cancer studies, as well as 4,821 generic controls, were genotyped for a panel 317,000 genetic variants that represent the majority of common genetic in the human genome. The 19 top-ranked variants were then studied in an additional series of 6,514 UADT cancer cases and 7,892 controls of European descent from an additional 13 UADT cancer studies. Five variants were significantly associated with UADT cancer risk after the completion of both stages, including three residing within the alcohol dehydrogenase genes (ADH1B, ADH1C, ADH7) that have been previously described. Two additional variants were found, one near the ALDH2 gene and a second variant located in HEL308, a DNA repair gene. These results implicate two variants 4q21 and 12q24 and further highlight three ADH variants UADT cancer susceptibility.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1001333
PMCID: PMC3060072  PMID: 21437268
11.  The impact of genetic variation in DRD2 and SLC6A3 on smoking cessation in cohort of participants one year after enrollment in a lung cancer screening study 
Smoking cessation strategies continue to have disappointing results. By determining the interindividual genetic differences that influence smoking behaviors, we may be able to develop tailored strategies that increase the likelihood of successful cessation. This study attempts to determine genetic influences on the relationship between the dopamine pathway and smoking cessation by examining associations with a variable number tandem repeat variation in SLC6A3 and the DRD2 variants TaqIA (A2 vs. A1), TaqIB (B2 vs. B1), C957T (C vs. T), and -141C Ins/Del (C vs. Del). Baseline smokers in the Pittsburgh Lung Screening Study who provided information on smoking status one year later were evaluated. We frequency-matched those who were not abstinent at one year to those who were abstinent at one year by gender, decade of age, and time of enrollment (three month intervals) in a three to one ratio (N=881). Logistic regression was used to identify the effect of genotype on abstinence at one year. In a model containing the matching variables and other genotypes, DRD2 TaqIA was significantly associated with being abstinent at one year (p=0.01). Compared to participants who were homozygous TaqIA major allele (A2A2), participants who carried at least one minor allele (A1) were less likely to quit (Odds Ratio: 0.47, 95% CI: 0.24–0.94). The other dopamine receptor genotypes and the SLC6A3 genotype were not associated with smoking status at one-year. The association between DRD2 TaqIA and smoking cessation supports the hypothesis that genetic variation in the dopamine pathway influences smoking cessation.
doi:10.1002/ajmg.b.30801
PMCID: PMC2730224  PMID: 18563706
tobacco use cessation; genotype; case-control study; dopamine

Results 1-11 (11)