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1.  Deciphering associations for lung cancer risk through imputation and analysis of 12 316 cases and 16 831 controls 
European Journal of Human Genetics  2015;23(12):1723-1728.
Recent genome-wide association studies have identified common variants at multiple loci influencing lung cancer risk. To decipher the genetic basis of the association signals at 3q28, 5p15.33, 6p21.33, 9p21 and 12p13.33, we performed a meta-analysis of data from five genome-wide association studies in populations of European ancestry totalling 12 316 lung cancer cases and 16 831 controls using imputation to recover untyped genotypes. For four of the regions, it was possible to refine the association signal identifying a smaller region of interest likely to harbour the functional variant. Our analysis did not provide evidence that any of the associations at the loci being a consequence of synthetic associations rather than linkage disequilibrium with a common risk variant at these risk loci.
doi:10.1038/ejhg.2015.48
PMCID: PMC4795209  PMID: 25804397
2.  Variation in TP63 is associated with lung adenocarcinoma in the UK population 
Background
Variation at TP63 has recently been shown to be associated with lung adenocarcinoma in the Asian population.
Methods
To investigate how this finding translates to the European population we compared the genotypes of SNPs annotating the TP63 locus at 3q28 in 4,462 lung cancer patients, including 911 with adenocarcinoma, and 8,235 controls from the United Kingdom (UK).
Results
A statistically significant association between adenocarcinoma risk and SNP genotype was shown: rs10937405, odds ratio (OR) =1.21, P=1.82x10-4; rs17429138, OR=1.23, P=7.49x10-5; and rs4396880, OR=1.21, P=2.03x10-4. Haplotype analysis was consistent with a single TP63 risk locus defined by SNPs rs10937405, rs17429138 and rs4396880. While no association between SNPs and small cell lung cancer was shown, the rs10937405 and rs439680 associations were significant for squamous cancer (respective P-values, 0.0022 and 0.02).
Conclusions
These findings show TP63 variation is a risk factor for the development of lung adenocarcinoma in the UK population. Furthermore, they provide additional insight into the subtype-specificity of the 3q28 lung cancer association.
Impact
Our data confirm the association of 3q28 with lung adenocarcinoma and that this association is not confined to the Asian population. Elucidating the functional basis of this association will be contingent on future fine mapping of the TP63 loci.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-11-0042
PMCID: PMC5108419  PMID: 21610222
3q28; risk; cancer; lung polymorphism; association study
3.  Identification of lung cancer histology-specific variants applying Bayesian framework variant prioritization approaches within the TRICL and ILCCO consortia 
Brenner, Darren R. | Amos, Christopher I. | Brhane, Yonathan | Timofeeva, Maria N. | Caporaso, Neil | Wang, Yufei | Christiani, David C. | Bickeböller, Heike | Yang, Ping | Albanes, Demetrius | Stevens, Victoria L. | Gapstur, Susan | McKay, James | Boffetta, Paolo | Zaridze, David | Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonilia | Lissowska, Jolanta | Rudnai, Peter | Fabianova, Eleonora | Mates, Dana | Bencko, Vladimir | Foretova, Lenka | Janout, Vladimir | Krokan, Hans E. | Skorpen, Frank | Gabrielsen, Maiken E. | Vatten, Lars | Njølstad, Inger | Chen, Chu | Goodman, Gary | Lathrop, Mark | Vooder, Tõnu | Välk, Kristjan | Nelis, Mari | Metspalu, Andres | Broderick, Peter | Eisen, Timothy | Wu, Xifeng | Zhang, Di | Chen, Wei | Spitz, Margaret R. | Wei, Yongyue | Su, Li | Xie, Dong | She, Jun | Matsuo, Keitaro | Matsuda, Fumihiko | Ito, Hidemi | Risch, Angela | Heinrich, Joachim | Rosenberger, Albert | Muley, Thomas | Dienemann, Hendrik | Field, John K. | Raji, Olaide | Chen, Ying | Gosney, John | Liloglou, Triantafillos | Davies, Michael P.A. | Marcus, Michael | McLaughlin, John | Orlow, Irene | Han, Younghun | Li, Yafang | Zong, Xuchen | Johansson, Mattias | Liu, Geoffrey | Tworoger, Shelley S. | Le Marchand, Loic | Henderson, Brian E. | Wilkens, Lynne R. | Dai, Juncheng | Shen, Hongbing | Houlston, Richard S. | Landi, Maria T. | Brennan, Paul | Hung, Rayjean J.
Carcinogenesis  2015;36(11):1314-1326.
Summary
Using information including variant physical and functional properties, we applied multiple variant prioritization techniques in 13 lung cancer genomic studies. We identified and validated novel regions highlighting the utility of using prioritization analyses to search for robust signals.
Large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have likely uncovered all common variants at the GWAS significance level. Additional variants within the suggestive range (0.0001> P > 5×10−8) are, however, still of interest for identifying causal associations. This analysis aimed to apply novel variant prioritization approaches to identify additional lung cancer variants that may not reach the GWAS level. Effects were combined across studies with a total of 33456 controls and 6756 adenocarcinoma (AC; 13 studies), 5061 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; 12 studies) and 2216 small cell lung cancer cases (9 studies). Based on prior information such as variant physical properties and functional significance, we applied stratified false discovery rates, hierarchical modeling and Bayesian false discovery probabilities for variant prioritization. We conducted a fine mapping analysis as validation of our methods by examining top-ranking novel variants in six independent populations with a total of 3128 cases and 2966 controls. Three novel loci in the suggestive range were identified based on our Bayesian framework analyses: KCNIP4 at 4p15.2 (rs6448050, P = 4.6×10−7) and MTMR2 at 11q21 (rs10501831, P = 3.1×10−6) with SCC, as well as GAREM at 18q12.1 (rs11662168, P = 3.4×10−7) with AC. Use of our prioritization methods validated two of the top three loci associated with SCC (P = 1.05×10−4 for KCNIP4, represented by rs9799795) and AC (P = 2.16×10−4 for GAREM, represented by rs3786309) in the independent fine mapping populations. This study highlights the utility of using prior functional data for sequence variants in prioritization analyses to search for robust signals in the suggestive range.
doi:10.1093/carcin/bgv128
PMCID: PMC4635669  PMID: 26363033
4.  Cytochrome P450 allele CYP3A7*1C associates with adverse outcomes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia, breast and lung cancer 
Cancer research  2016;76(6):1485-1493.
CYP3A enzymes metabolize endogenous hormones and chemotherapeutic agents used to treat cancer, thereby potentially impacting drug effectiveness. Here we refined the genetic basis underlying the functional effects of a CYP3A haplotype on urinary estrone glucuronide (E1G) levels and tested for an association between CYP3A genotype and outcome in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), breast, or lung cancers. The most significantly associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was rs45446698, a SNP that tags the CYP3A7*1C allele; this SNP was associated with a 54% decrease in urinary E1G levels. Genotyping this SNP in 1,008 breast cancer, 1,128 lung cancer, and 347 CLL patients, we found that rs45446698 was associated with breast cancer mortality (hazard ratio [HR]=1.74, P=0.03), all-cause mortality in lung cancer patients (HR=1.43, P=0.009), and CLL progression (HR=1.62, P=0.03). We also found borderline evidence of a statistical interaction between the CYP3A7*1C allele, treatment of patients with a cytotoxic agent that is a CYP3A substrate and clinical outcome (Pinteraction=0.06). The CYP3A7*1C allele, which results in adult expression of the fetal CYP3A7 gene, is likely to be the functional allele influencing levels of circulating endogenous sex hormones and outcome in these various malignancies. Further studies confirming these associations and determining the mechanism by which CYP3A7*1C influences outcome are required. One possibility is that standard chemotherapy regimens that include CYP3A substrates may not be optimal for the approximately 8% of cancer patients who are CYP3A7*1C carriers.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-15-1410
PMCID: PMC4795533  PMID: 26964624
CYP3A7; breast cancer; lung cancer; chronic lymphocytic leukemia
5.  Tumor necrosis factor receptor 2-signaling in CD133-expressing cells in renal clear cell carcinoma 
Oncotarget  2016;7(17):24111-24124.
Compared to normal kidney, renal clear cell carcinomas (ccRCC) contain increased numbers of interstitial, non-hematopoietic CD133+cells that express stem cell markers and exhibit low rates of proliferation. These cells fail to form tumors upon transplantation but support tumor formation by differentiated malignant cells. We hypothesized that killing of ccRCC CD133+ (RCCCD133+) cells by cytotoxic agents might be enhanced by inducing them to divide. Since tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), signalling through TNFR2, induces proliferation of malignant renal tubular epithelial cells, we investigated whether TNFR2 might similarly affect RCCCD133+cells. We compared treating organ cultures of ccRCC vs adjacent nontumour kidney (NK) and RCCCD133+ vs NK CD133+ (NKCD133+) cell cultures with wild-type TNF (wtTNF) or TNF muteins selective for TNFR1 (R1TNF) or TNFR2 (R2TNF). In organ cultures, R2TNF increased expression of TNFR2 and promoted cell cycle entry of both RCCCD133+ and NKCD133+ but effects were greater in RCCCD133+. In contrast, R1TNF increased TNFR1 expression and promoted cell death. Importantly, cyclophosphamide triggered much more cell death in RCCCD133+ and NKCD133+cells pre-treated with R2TNF as compared to untreated controls. We conclude that selective engagement of TNFR2 by TNF can drives RCCCD133+ proliferation and thereby increase sensitivity to cell cycle-dependent cytotoxicity.
doi:10.18632/oncotarget.8125
PMCID: PMC5029688  PMID: 26992212
renal clear cell carcinoma; TNFR2; CD133; cyclophosphamide
6.  Affinity Inequality among Serum Antibodies That Originate in Lymphoid Germinal Centers 
PLoS ONE  2015;10(10):e0139222.
Upon natural infection with pathogens or vaccination, antibodies are produced by a process called affinity maturation. As affinity maturation ensues, average affinity values between an antibody and ligand increase with time. Purified antibodies isolated from serum are invariably heterogeneous with respect to their affinity for the ligands they bind, whether macromolecular antigens or haptens (low molecular weight approximations of epitopes on antigens). However, less is known about how the extent of this heterogeneity evolves with time during affinity maturation. To shed light on this issue, we have taken advantage of previously published data from Eisen and Siskind (1964). Using the ratio of the strongest to the weakest binding subsets as a metric of heterogeneity (or affinity inequality), we analyzed antibodies isolated from individual serum samples. The ratios were initially as high as 50-fold, and decreased over a few weeks after a single injection of small antigen doses to around unity. This decrease in the effective heterogeneity of antibody affinities with time is consistent with Darwinian evolution in the strong selection limit. By contrast, neither the average affinity nor the heterogeneity evolves much with time for high doses of antigen, as competition between clones of the same affinity is minimal.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0139222
PMCID: PMC4596808  PMID: 26444899
7.  The association of rs1051730 genotype on adherence to and consumption of prescribed nicotine replacement therapy dose during a smoking cessation attempt 
Drug and Alcohol Dependence  2015;151:236-240.
Highlights
•We explore the impact of rs1051730 on nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) use in a smoking cessation trial.•Outcomes were NRT prescription adherence rate (%) and daily consumption (mg).•rs1051730 was associated with both outcomes at 7 days post quit attempt.•Each copy of the minor allele corresponded to a 1 mg decrease in daily NRT consumption.•No evidence of effect of genotype on either outcome observed at 28 days.
Introduction
While nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is an effective pharmacological smoking cessation treatment, its efficacy is influenced by adherence to and consumption of the prescribed dose. The genetic variant rs1051730 in the nicotinic receptor gene cluster CHRNA5-A3-B4 influences smoking quantity. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of rs1051730 genotype on adherence to and consumption of NRT prescription following a smoking cessation attempt.
Methods
Secondary analysis of data from a pharmacogenetic smoking cessation trial. Participants (n = 448) were prescribed a daily dose of NRT for four weeks post quit attempt, and monitored during weekly clinic visits. Outcome measures were NRT prescription adherence rate (%) and average daily NRT consumption (mg) at 7- and 28-days after the quit attempt.
Results
An association between rs1051730 genotype and both outcome measures was observed at 7-days after the quit date. Each copy of the minor allele corresponded to a 2.9% decrease in adherence to prescribed NRT dose (P = 0.044), and a 1.0 mg decrease in daily NRT consumption (P = 0.026). Adjusting for number of cigarettes smoked during this period only slightly attenuated these associations. There was no clear statistical evidence of an association between genotype and adherence or consumption at 28-days.
Conclusions
This is the first study to evaluate the impact of rs1051730 genotype on consumption of and adherence to NRT prescription during a smoking cessation attempt. We observed an association between this variant and both outcome measures at 7-days; however, this was only moderate. These findings require replication in an independent sample.
doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.03.035
PMCID: PMC4462564  PMID: 25891233
Smoking; Nicotine replacement therapy; Cessation; Genetics
8.  Common Variation at 1q24.1 (ALDH9A1) Is a Potential Risk Factor for Renal Cancer 
PLoS ONE  2015;10(3):e0122589.
So far six susceptibility loci for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have been discovered by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). To identify additional RCC common risk loci, we performed a meta-analysis of published GWAS (totalling 2,215 cases and 8,566 controls of Western-European background) with imputation using 1000 Genomes Project and UK10K Project data as reference panels and followed up the most significant association signals [22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 3 indels in eight genomic regions] in 383 cases and 2,189 controls from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). A combined analysis identified a promising susceptibility locus mapping to 1q24.1 marked by the imputed SNP rs3845536 (Pcombined =2.30x10-8). Specifically, the signal maps to intron 4 of the ALDH9A1 gene (aldehyde dehydrogenase 9 family, member A1). We further evaluated this potential signal in 2,461 cases and 5,081 controls from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) GWAS of RCC cases and controls from multiple European regions. In contrast to earlier findings no association was shown in the IARC series (P=0.94; Pcombined =2.73x10-5). While variation at 1q24.1 represents a potential risk locus for RCC, future replication analyses are required to substantiate our observation.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0122589
PMCID: PMC4380462  PMID: 25826619
9.  Rare variants of large effect in BRCA2 and CHEK2 affect risk of lung cancer 
Wang, Yufei | McKay, James D. | Rafnar, Thorunn | Wang, Zhaoming | Timofeeva, Maria | Broderick, Peter | Zong, Xuchen | Laplana, Marina | Wei, Yongyue | Han, Younghun | Lloyd, Amy | Delahaye-Sourdeix, Manon | Chubb, Daniel | Gaborieau, Valerie | Wheeler, William | Chatterjee, Nilanjan | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Sulem, Patrick | Liu, Geoffrey | Kaaks, Rudolf | Henrion, Marc | Kinnersley, Ben | Vallée, Maxime | LeCalvez-Kelm, Florence | Stevens, Victoria L. | Gapstur, Susan M. | Chen, Wei V. | Zaridze, David | Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonilia | Lissowska, Jolanta | Rudnai, Peter | Fabianova, Eleonora | Mates, Dana | Bencko, Vladimir | Foretova, Lenka | Janout, Vladimir | Krokan, Hans E. | Gabrielsen, Maiken Elvestad | Skorpen, Frank | Vatten, Lars | Njølstad, Inger | Chen, Chu | Goodman, Gary | Benhamou, Simone | Vooder, Tonu | Valk, Kristjan | Nelis, Mari | Metspalu, Andres | Lener, Marcin | Lubiński, Jan | Johansson, Mattias | Vineis, Paolo | Agudo, Antonio | Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise | Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.Bas | Trichopoulos, Dimitrios | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Johansson, Mikael | Weiderpass, Elisabete | Tjønneland, Anne | Riboli, Elio | Lathrop, Mark | Scelo, Ghislaine | Albanes, Demetrius | Caporaso, Neil E. | Ye, Yuanqing | Gu, Jian | Wu, Xifeng | Spitz, Margaret R. | Dienemann, Hendrik | Rosenberger, Albert | Su, Li | Matakidou, Athena | Eisen, Timothy | Stefansson, Kari | Risch, Angela | Chanock, Stephen J. | Christiani, David C. | Hung, Rayjean J. | Brennan, Paul | Landi, Maria Teresa | Houlston, Richard S. | Amos, Christopher I.
Nature genetics  2014;46(7):736-741.
We conducted imputation to the 1000 Genomes Project of four genome-wide association studies of lung cancer in populations of European ancestry (11,348 cases and 15,861 controls) and genotyped an additional 10,246 cases and 38,295 controls for follow-up. We identified large-effect genome-wide associations for squamous lung cancer with the rare variants of BRCA2-K3326X (rs11571833; odds ratio [OR]=2.47, P=4.74×10−20) and of CHEK2-I157T (rs17879961; OR=0.38 P=1.27×10−13). We also showed an association between common variation at 3q28 (TP63; rs13314271; OR=1.13, P=7.22×10−10) and lung adenocarcinoma previously only reported in Asians. These findings provide further evidence for inherited genetic susceptibility to lung cancer and its biological basis. Additionally, our analysis demonstrates that imputation can identify rare disease-causing variants having substantive effects on cancer risk from pre-existing GWAS data.
doi:10.1038/ng.3002
PMCID: PMC4074058  PMID: 24880342
10.  Pleiotropic Associations of Risk Variants Identified for Other Cancers With Lung Cancer Risk: The PAGE and TRICL Consortia 
Background
Genome-wide association studies have identified hundreds of genetic variants associated with specific cancers. A few of these risk regions have been associated with more than one cancer site; however, a systematic evaluation of the associations between risk variants for other cancers and lung cancer risk has yet to be performed.
Methods
We included 18023 patients with lung cancer and 60543 control subjects from two consortia, Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) and Transdisciplinary Research in Cancer of the Lung (TRICL). We examined 165 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were previously associated with at least one of 16 non–lung cancer sites. Study-specific logistic regression results underwent meta-analysis, and associations were also examined by race/ethnicity, histological cell type, sex, and smoking status. A Bonferroni-corrected P value of 2.5×10–5 was used to assign statistical significance.
Results
The breast cancer SNP LSP1 rs3817198 was associated with an increased risk of lung cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 1.10; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05 to 1.14; P = 2.8×10–6). This association was strongest for women with adenocarcinoma (P = 1.2×10–4) and not statistically significant in men (P = .14) with this cell type (P het by sex = .10). Two glioma risk variants, TERT rs2853676 and CDKN2BAS1 rs4977756, which are located in regions previously associated with lung cancer, were associated with increased risk of adenocarcinoma (OR = 1.16; 95% CI = 1.10 to 1.22; P = 1.1×10–8) and squamous cell carcinoma (OR = 1.13; CI = 1.07 to 1.19; P = 2.5×10–5), respectively.
Conclusions
Our findings demonstrate a novel pleiotropic association between the breast cancer LSP1 risk region marked by variant rs3817198 and lung cancer risk.
doi:10.1093/jnci/dju061
PMCID: PMC3982896  PMID: 24681604
11.  Common variation at 2q22.3 (ZEB2) influences the risk of renal cancer 
Human Molecular Genetics  2012;22(4):825-831.
Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of renal cell cancer (RCC) have identified four susceptibility loci thus far. To identify an additional RCC common susceptibility locus, we conducted a GWAS and performed a meta-analysis with published GWASs (totalling 2215 cases and 8566 controls of European background) and followed up the most significant association signals [nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in eight genomic regions] in 3739 cases and 8786 controls. A combined analysis identified a novel susceptibility locus mapping to 2q22.3 marked by rs12105918 (P = 1.80 × 10−8; odds ratio 1.29, 95% CI: 1.18–1.41). The signal localizes to intron 2 of the ZEB2 gene (zinc finger E box-binding homeobox 2). Our findings suggest that genetic variation in ZEB2 influences the risk of RCC. This finding provides further insights into the genetic and biological basis of inherited genetic susceptibility to RCC.
doi:10.1093/hmg/dds489
PMCID: PMC3554205  PMID: 23184150
12.  Influence of common genetic variation on lung cancer risk: meta-analysis of 14 900 cases and 29 485 controls 
Human Molecular Genetics  2012;21(22):4980-4995.
Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified common genetic variants at 5p15.33, 6p21–6p22 and 15q25.1 associated with lung cancer risk. Several other genetic regions including variants of CHEK2 (22q12), TP53BP1 (15q15) and RAD52 (12p13) have been demonstrated to influence lung cancer risk in candidate- or pathway-based analyses. To identify novel risk variants for lung cancer, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 GWASs, totaling 14 900 cases and 29 485 controls of European descent. Our data provided increased support for previously identified risk loci at 5p15 (P = 7.2 × 10−16), 6p21 (P = 2.3 × 10−14) and 15q25 (P = 2.2 × 10−63). Furthermore, we demonstrated histology-specific effects for 5p15, 6p21 and 12p13 loci but not for the 15q25 region. Subgroup analysis also identified a novel disease locus for squamous cell carcinoma at 9p21 (CDKN2A/p16INK4A/p14ARF/CDKN2B/p15INK4B/ANRIL; rs1333040, P = 3.0 × 10−7) which was replicated in a series of 5415 Han Chinese (P = 0.03; combined analysis, P = 2.3 × 10−8). This large analysis provides additional evidence for the role of inherited genetic susceptibility to lung cancer and insight into biological differences in the development of the different histological types of lung cancer.
doi:10.1093/hmg/dds334
PMCID: PMC3607485  PMID: 22899653
13.  Inherited variation at chromosome 12p13.33 including RAD52 influences squamous cell lung carcinoma risk 
Cancer Discovery  2011;2(2):131-139.
While lung cancer is largely caused by tobacco smoking, inherited genetic factors play a role in its etiology. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in Europeans have robustly demonstrated only three polymorphic variations influencing lung cancer risk. Tumor heterogeneity may have hampered the detection of association signal when all lung cancer subtypes were analyzed together. In a GWAS of 5,355 European smoking lung cancer cases and 4,344 smoking controls, we conducted a pathway-based analysis in lung cancer histologic subtypes with 19,082 SNPs mapping to 917 genes in the HuGE-defined “inflammation” pathway. We identified a susceptibility locus for squamous cell lung carcinoma (SQ) at 12p13.33 (RAD52, rs6489769), and replicated the association in three independent samples totaling 3,359 SQ cases and 9,100 controls (odds ratio=1.20, Pcombined=2.3×10−8).
Significance
The combination of pathway-based approaches and information on disease specific subtypes can improve the identification of cancer susceptibility loci in heterogeneous diseases.
doi:10.1158/2159-8290.CD-11-0246
PMCID: PMC3354721  PMID: 22585858
Lung cancer; histology; squamous cell carcinoma; pathway analysis; RAD52
14.  Chromosome 15q25 (CHRNA3-CHRNA5) Variation Impacts Indirectly on Lung Cancer Risk 
PLoS ONE  2011;6(4):e19085.
Genetic variants at the 15q25 CHRNA5-CHRNA3 locus have been shown to influence lung cancer risk however there is controversy as to whether variants have a direct carcinogenic effect on lung cancer risk or impact indirectly through smoking behavior. We have performed a detailed analysis of the 15q25 risk variants rs12914385 and rs8042374 with smoking behavior and lung cancer risk in 4,343 lung cancer cases and 1,479 controls from the Genetic Lung Cancer Predisposition Study (GELCAPS). A strong association between rs12914385 and rs8042374, and lung cancer risk was shown, odds ratios (OR) were 1.44, (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.29–1.62, P = 3.69×10−10) and 1.35 (95% CI: 1.18–1.55, P = 9.99×10−6) respectively. Each copy of risk alleles at rs12914385 and rs8042374 was associated with increased cigarette consumption of 1.0 and 0.9 cigarettes per day (CPD) (P = 5.18×10−5 and P = 5.65×10−3). These genetically determined modest differences in smoking behavior can be shown to be sufficient to account for the 15q25 association with lung cancer risk. To further verify the indirect effect of 15q25 on the risk, we restricted our analysis of lung cancer risk to never-smokers and conducted a meta-analysis of previously published studies of lung cancer risk in never-smokers. Never-smoker studies published in English were ascertained from PubMed stipulating - lung cancer, risk, genome-wide association, candidate genes. Our study and five previously published studies provided data on 2,405 never-smoker lung cancer cases and 7,622 controls. In the pooled analysis no association has been found between the 15q25 variation and lung cancer risk (OR = 1.09, 95% CI: 0.94–1.28). This study affirms the 15q25 association with smoking and is consistent with an indirect link between genotype and lung cancer risk.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0019085
PMCID: PMC3084737  PMID: 21559498
15.  Deciphering the impact of common genetic variation on lung cancer risk: A genome-wide association study 
Cancer research  2009;69(16):6633-6641.
To explore the impact of common variation on the risk of developing lung cancer we conducted a two-phase genome-wide association (GWA) study. In Phase 1, we compared the genotypes of 511,919 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tagSNPs) in 1,952 cases and 1,438 controls; in Phase 2, 30,568 SNPs were genotyped in 2,465 cases and 3,005 controls. SNP selection was based on best supported P-values from Phase 1 and two other GWA studies of lung cancer. In the combined analysis of Phases 1 and 2, the strongest associations identified were defined by SNPs mapping to 15q25.1 (rs12914385; P = 3.19 × 10−16), 5p15.33 (rs4975616; P = 6.66 × 10−7), and 6p21.33 (rs3117582; P = 9.13 × 10−7). Variation at 15q25.1, but not 5p15.33 or 6p21.33, was strongly associated with smoking behaviour with risk alleles correlated to higher consumption. Variation at 5p15.33 was shown to significantly influence induction of lung cancer histology. Pooling data from the four series provided 21,620 genotypes for 7,560 cases and 8,205 controls. A meta-analysis provided increased support that variation at 15q25.1 (rs8034191; P = 3.24 × 10−26), 5p15.33 (rs4975616; P = 2.99 × 10−9), and 6p21.33 (rs3117582; P = 4.46 × 10−10) influences lung cancer risk. The next best-supported associations were attained at 15q15.2 (rs748404: P = 1.08 × 10−6) and 10q23.31 (rs1926203; P = 1.28 × 10−6). These data indicate few common variants account for 1% of the excess familial risk underscoring the necessity of having additional large sample series for gene discovery.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-09-0680
PMCID: PMC2754318  PMID: 19654303
lung cancer; genome-wide association
16.  Common 5p15.33 and 6p21.33 variants influence lung cancer risk 
Nature genetics  2008;40(12):1407-1409.
We conducted a genome-wide association (GWA) study of lung cancer comparing 511,919 SNP genotypes in 1,952 cases and 1,438 controls. The most significant association was attained at 15q25.1 (rs8042374; P = 7.75 × 10−12), confirming recent observations. Pooling data with two other GWA studies (5,095 cases, 5,200 controls) and with replication in an additional 2,484 cases and 3,036 controls, we identified two newly associated risk loci mapping to 6p21.33 (rs3117582, BAT3-MSH5; Pcombined = 4.97 × 10−10) and 5p15.33 (rs401681, CLPTM1L; Pcombined = 7.90 × 10−9).
doi:10.1038/ng.273
PMCID: PMC2695928  PMID: 18978787
17.  Familial Aggregation of Common Sequence Variants on 15q24-25.1 in Lung Cancer 
Three recent genome-wide association studies identified associations between markers in the chromosomal region 15q24-25.1 and the risk of lung cancer. We conducted a genome-wide association analysis to investigate associations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the risk of lung cancer, in which we used blood DNA from 194 case patients with familial lung cancer and 219 cancer-free control subjects. We identified associations between common sequence variants at 15q24-25.1 (that spanned LOC123688 [a hypothetical gene], PSMA4, CHRNA3, CHRNA5, and CHRNB4) and lung cancer. The risk of lung cancer was more than fivefold higher among those subjects who had both a family history of lung cancer and two copies of high-risk alleles rs8034191 (odds ratio [OR] = 7.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.21 to 23.37) or rs1051730 (OR = 5.67, CI = 2.21 to 14.60, both of which were located in the 15q24-25.1 locus, than among control subjects. Thus, further research to elucidate causal variants in the 15q24-25.1 locus that are associated with lung cancer is warranted.
doi:10.1093/jnci/djn268
PMCID: PMC2538550  PMID: 18780872
18.  Genome-wide association scan of tag SNPs identifies a susceptibility locus for lung cancer at 15q25.1 
Nature genetics  2008;40(5):616-622.
To identify risk variants for lung cancer, we conducted a multistage genome-wide association study. In the discovery phase, we analyzed 315,450 tagging SNPs in 1,154 current and former (ever) smoking cases of European ancestry and 1,137 frequency-matched, ever-smoking controls from Houston, Texas. For replication, we evaluated the ten SNPs most significantly associated with lung cancer in an additional 711 cases and 632 controls from Texas and 2,013 cases and 3,062 controls from the UK. Two SNPs, rs1051730 and rs8034191, mapping to a region of strong linkage disequilibrium within 15q25.1 containing PSMA4 and the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit genes CHRNA3 and CHRNA5, were significantly associated with risk in both replication sets. Combined analysis yielded odds ratios of 1.32 (P < 1 × 10−17) for both SNPs. Haplotype analysis was consistent with there being a single risk variant in this region. We conclude that variation in a region of 15q25.1 containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors genes contributes to lung cancer risk.
doi:10.1038/ng.109
PMCID: PMC2713680  PMID: 18385676

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