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1.  Epigenome-Guided Analysis of the Transcriptome of Plaque Macrophages during Atherosclerosis Regression Reveals Activation of the Wnt Signaling Pathway 
PLoS Genetics  2014;10(12):e1004828.
We report the first systems biology investigation of regulators controlling arterial plaque macrophage transcriptional changes in response to lipid lowering in vivo in two distinct mouse models of atherosclerosis regression. Transcriptome measurements from plaque macrophages from the Reversa mouse were integrated with measurements from an aortic transplant-based mouse model of plaque regression. Functional relevance of the genes detected as differentially expressed in plaque macrophages in response to lipid lowering in vivo was assessed through analysis of gene functional annotations, overlap with in vitro foam cell studies, and overlap of associated eQTLs with human atherosclerosis/CAD risk SNPs. To identify transcription factors that control plaque macrophage responses to lipid lowering in vivo, we used an integrative strategy – leveraging macrophage epigenomic measurements – to detect enrichment of transcription factor binding sites upstream of genes that are differentially expressed in plaque macrophages during regression. The integrated analysis uncovered eight transcription factor binding site elements that were statistically overrepresented within the 5′ regulatory regions of genes that were upregulated in plaque macrophages in the Reversa model under maximal regression conditions and within the 5′ regulatory regions of genes that were upregulated in the aortic transplant model during regression. Of these, the TCF/LEF binding site was present in promoters of upregulated genes related to cell motility, suggesting that the canonical Wnt signaling pathway may be activated in plaque macrophages during regression. We validated this network-based prediction by demonstrating that β-catenin expression is higher in regressing (vs. control group) plaques in both regression models, and we further demonstrated that stimulation of canonical Wnt signaling increases macrophage migration in vitro. These results suggest involvement of canonical Wnt signaling in macrophage emigration from the plaque during lipid lowering-induced regression, and they illustrate the discovery potential of an epigenome-guided, systems approach to understanding atherosclerosis regression.
Author Summary
Atherosclerosis, a progressive accumulation of lipid-rich plaque within arteries, is an inflammatory disease in which the response of macrophages (a key cell type of the innate immune system) to plasma lipoproteins plays a central role. In humans, the goal of significantly reducing already-established plaque through drug treatments, including statins, remains elusive. In mice, atherosclerosis can be reversed by experimental manipulations that lower circulating lipid levels. A common feature of many regression models is that macrophages transition to a less inflammatory state and emigrate from the plaque. While the molecular regulators that control these responses are largely unknown, we hypothesized that by integrating global measurements of macrophage gene expression in regressing plaques with measurements of the macrophage chromatin landscape, we could identify key molecules that control macrophage responses to the lowering of circulating lipid levels. Our systems biology analysis of plaque macrophages yielded a network in which the Wnt signaling pathway emerged as a candidate upstream regulator. Wnt signaling is known to affect both inflammation and the ability of macrophages to migrate from one location to another, and our targeted validation studies provide evidence that Wnt signaling is increased in plaque macrophages during regression. Our findings both demonstrate the power of a systems approach to uncover candidate regulators of regression and to identify a potential new therapeutic target.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1004828
PMCID: PMC4256277  PMID: 25474352
2.  ATF3 protects against atherosclerosis by suppressing 25-hydroxycholesterol–induced lipid body formation 
The transcription factor ATF3 inhibits lipid body formation in macrophages during atherosclerosis in part by dampening the expression of cholesterol 25-hydroxylase.
Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the accumulation of lipid-loaded macrophages in the arterial wall. We demonstrate that macrophage lipid body formation can be induced by modified lipoproteins or by inflammatory Toll-like receptor agonists. We used an unbiased approach to study the overlap in these pathways to identify regulators that control foam cell formation and atherogenesis. An analysis method integrating epigenomic and transcriptomic datasets with a transcription factor (TF) binding site prediction algorithm suggested that the TF ATF3 may regulate macrophage foam cell formation. Indeed, we found that deletion of this TF results in increased lipid body accumulation, and that ATF3 directly regulates transcription of the gene encoding cholesterol 25-hydroxylase. We further showed that production of 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC) promotes macrophage foam cell formation. Finally, deletion of ATF3 in Apoe−/− mice led to in vivo increases in foam cell formation, aortic 25-HC levels, and disease progression. These results define a previously unknown role for ATF3 in controlling macrophage lipid metabolism and demonstrate that ATF3 is a key intersection point for lipid metabolic and inflammatory pathways in these cells.
doi:10.1084/jem.20111202
PMCID: PMC3328364  PMID: 22473958
3.  Bright Field Microscopy as an Alternative to Whole Cell Fluorescence in Automated Analysis of Macrophage Images 
PLoS ONE  2009;4(10):e7497.
Background
Fluorescence microscopy is the standard tool for detection and analysis of cellular phenomena. This technique, however, has a number of drawbacks such as the limited number of available fluorescent channels in microscopes, overlapping excitation and emission spectra of the stains, and phototoxicity.
Methodology
We here present and validate a method to automatically detect cell population outlines directly from bright field images. By imaging samples with several focus levels forming a bright field -stack, and by measuring the intensity variations of this stack over the -dimension, we construct a new two dimensional projection image of increased contrast. With additional information for locations of each cell, such as stained nuclei, this bright field projection image can be used instead of whole cell fluorescence to locate borders of individual cells, separating touching cells, and enabling single cell analysis. Using the popular CellProfiler freeware cell image analysis software mainly targeted for fluorescence microscopy, we validate our method by automatically segmenting low contrast and rather complex shaped murine macrophage cells.
Significance
The proposed approach frees up a fluorescence channel, which can be used for subcellular studies. It also facilitates cell shape measurement in experiments where whole cell fluorescent staining is either not available, or is dependent on a particular experimental condition. We show that whole cell area detection results using our projected bright field images match closely to the standard approach where cell areas are localized using fluorescence, and conclude that the high contrast bright field projection image can directly replace one fluorescent channel in whole cell quantification. Matlab code for calculating the projections can be downloaded from the supplementary site: http://sites.google.com/site/brightfieldorstaining
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0007497
PMCID: PMC2760782  PMID: 19847301

Results 1-3 (3)