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1.  Interfaces to PeptideAtlas: a case study of standard data access systems 
Briefings in Bioinformatics  2011;13(5):615-626.
Access to public data sets is important to the scientific community as a resource to develop new experiments or validate new data. Projects such as the PeptideAtlas, Ensembl and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) offer both access to public data and a repository to share their own data. Access to these data sets is often provided through a web page form and a web service API. Access technologies based on web protocols (e.g. http) have been in use for over a decade and are widely adopted across the industry for a variety of functions (e.g. search, commercial transactions, and social media). Each architecture adapts these technologies to provide users with tools to access and share data. Both commonly used web service technologies (e.g. REST and SOAP), and custom-built solutions over HTTP are utilized in providing access to research data. Providing multiple access points ensures that the community can access the data in the simplest and most effective manner for their particular needs. This article examines three common access mechanisms for web accessible data: BioMart, caBIG, and Google Data Sources. These are illustrated by implementing each over the PeptideAtlas repository and reviewed for their suitability based on specific usages common to research. BioMart, Google Data Sources, and caBIG are each suitable for certain uses. The tradeoffs made in the development of the technology are dependent on the uses each was designed for (e.g. security versus speed). This means that an understanding of specific requirements and tradeoffs is necessary before selecting the access technology.
doi:10.1093/bib/bbr067
PMCID: PMC3431717  PMID: 22941959
BioMart; Google Data Sources; caBIG; data access; proteomics
2.  SEQADAPT: an adaptable system for the tracking, storage and analysis of high throughput sequencing experiments 
BMC Bioinformatics  2010;11:377.
Background
High throughput sequencing has become an increasingly important tool for biological research. However, the existing software systems for managing and processing these data have not provided the flexible infrastructure that research requires.
Results
Existing software solutions provide static and well-established algorithms in a restrictive package. However as high throughput sequencing is a rapidly evolving field, such static approaches lack the ability to readily adopt the latest advances and techniques which are often required by researchers. We have used a loosely coupled, service-oriented infrastructure to develop SeqAdapt. This system streamlines data management and allows for rapid integration of novel algorithms. Our approach also allows computational biologists to focus on developing and applying new methods instead of writing boilerplate infrastructure code.
Conclusion
The system is based around the Addama service architecture and is available at our website as a demonstration web application, an installable single download and as a collection of individual customizable services.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-11-377
PMCID: PMC2916924  PMID: 20630057
3.  mspecLINE: bridging knowledge of human disease with the proteome 
Background
Public proteomics databases such as PeptideAtlas contain peptides and proteins identified in mass spectrometry experiments. However, these databases lack information about human disease for researchers studying disease-related proteins. We have developed mspecLINE, a tool that combines knowledge about human disease in MEDLINE with empirical data about the detectable human proteome in PeptideAtlas. mspecLINE associates diseases with proteins by calculating the semantic distance between annotated terms from a controlled biomedical vocabulary. We used an established semantic distance measure that is based on the co-occurrence of disease and protein terms in the MEDLINE bibliographic database.
Results
The mspecLINE web application allows researchers to explore relationships between human diseases and parts of the proteome that are detectable using a mass spectrometer. Given a disease, the tool will display proteins and peptides from PeptideAtlas that may be associated with the disease. It will also display relevant literature from MEDLINE. Furthermore, mspecLINE allows researchers to select proteotypic peptides for specific protein targets in a mass spectrometry assay.
Conclusions
Although mspecLINE applies an information retrieval technique to the MEDLINE database, it is distinct from previous MEDLINE query tools in that it combines the knowledge expressed in scientific literature with empirical proteomics data. The tool provides valuable information about candidate protein targets to researchers studying human disease and is freely available on a public web server.
doi:10.1186/1755-8794-3-7
PMCID: PMC2845087  PMID: 20219133

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