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1.  OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION DOSES TO OPERATORS PERFORMING FLUOROSCOPICALLY-GUIDED PROCEDURES 
Health physics  2012;103(1):80-99.
In the past 30 years, the numbers and types of fluoroscopically-guided (FG) procedures have increased dramatically. The objective of the present study is to provide estimated radiation doses to physician specialists, other than cardiologists, who perform FG procedures. We searched Medline to identify English-language journal articles reporting radiation exposures to these physicians. We then identified several primarily therapeutic FG procedures that met specific criteria: well-defined procedures for which there were at least five published reports of estimated radiation doses to the operator, procedures performed frequently in current medical practice, and inclusion of physicians from multiple medical specialties. These procedures were percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), vertebroplasty, orthopedic extremity nailing for treatment of fractures, biliary tract procedures, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation (TIPS), head/neck endovascular therapeutic procedures, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). We abstracted radiation doses and other associated data, and estimated effective dose to operators. Operators received estimated doses per patient procedure equivalent to doses received by interventional cardiologists. The estimated effective dose per case ranged from 1.7 – 56μSv for PCNL, 0.1 – 101 μSv for vertebroplasty, 2.5 – 88μSv for orthopedic extremity nailing, 2.0 – 46μSv for biliary tract procedures, 2.5 – 74μSv for TIPS, 1.8 – 53μSv for head/neck endovascular therapeutic procedures, and 0.2 – 49μSv for ERCP. Overall, mean operator radiation dose per case measured over personal protective devices at different anatomic sites on the head and body ranged from 19 – 800 (median = 113) μSv at eye level, 6 – 1180 (median = 75)μSv at the neck, and 2 – 1600 (median = 302) μSv at the trunk. Operators’ hands often received greater doses than the eyes, neck or trunk. Large variations in operator doses suggest that optimizing procedure protocols and proper use of protective devices and shields might reduce occupational radiation dose substantially.
doi:10.1097/HP.0b013e31824dae76
PMCID: PMC3951010  PMID: 22647920
interventional procedure; fluoroscopically-guided procedure; occupational exposure; radiation protection
3.  Cancer Risks Associated with External Radiation From Diagnostic Imaging Procedures 
CA: a cancer journal for clinicians  2012;10.3322/caac.21132.
The 600% increase in medical radiation exposure to the US population since 1980 has provided immense benefit, but potential future cancer risks to patients. Most of the increase is from diagnostic radiologic procedures. The objectives of this review are to summarize epidemiologic data on cancer risks associated with diagnostic procedures, describe how exposures from recent diagnostic procedures relate to radiation levels linked with cancer occurrence, and propose a framework of strategies to reduce radiation from diagnostic imaging in patients. We briefly review radiation dose definitions, mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis, key epidemiologic studies of medical and other radiation sources and cancer risks, and dose trends from diagnostic procedures. We describe cancer risks from experimental studies, future projected risks from current imaging procedures, and the potential for higher risks in genetically susceptible populations. To reduce future projected cancers from diagnostic procedures, we advocate widespread use of evidence-based appropriateness criteria for decisions about imaging procedures, oversight of equipment to deliver reliably the minimum radiation required to attain clinical objectives, development of electronic lifetime records of imaging procedures for patients and their physicians, and commitment by medical training programs, professional societies, and radiation protection organizations to educate all stakeholders in reducing radiation from diagnostic procedures.
doi:10.3322/caac.21132
PMCID: PMC3548988  PMID: 22307864
4.  Minimising radiation exposure to physicians performing fluoroscopically guided cardiac catheterisation procedures: a review 
Radiation Protection Dosimetry  2009;133(4):227-233.
What is known about radiation exposure to physicians who perform cardiac interventions is reviewed and various factors that affect their exposure are discussed. There are wide variations in the radiation dose (up to 1000-fold) per procedure. Despite extensive improvements in equipment and technology, there has been little or no reduction in dose over time. The wide variation and lack of reduction in operator doses strongly suggests that more attention must be paid to factors influencing the operator dose. Numerous patient, physician and shielding factors influence the operator dose to different degrees. Operators can change some of these factors immediately, at minimal or no cost, with a substantial reduction in dose and potential cancer risk.
doi:10.1093/rpd/ncp052
PMCID: PMC2902901  PMID: 19329511
6.  Radiation dose and cancer risk among pediatric patients undergoing interventional neuroradiology procedures 
Pediatric Radiology  2006;36(Suppl 2):159-162.
Background
During interventional neuroradiology procedures, patients can be exposed to moderate to high levels of radiation. Special considerations are required to protect children, who are generally more sensitive to the short- and long-term detrimental effects of radiation exposure. Estimates of dose to the skin of children from certain interventional procedures have been published elsewhere, but we are not aware of data on dose to the brain or on the long-term risk of cancer from brain radiation.
Objectives
Our goals were to estimate radiation doses to the brain in 50 pediatric patients who had undergone cerebral embolization and to assess their lifetime risks of developing radiation-related brain cancer.
Materials and methods
Entrance-peak skin dose and various assumptions on conditions of exposure were used as input for dosimetric calculations to estimate the spatial pattern of dose within the brain and the average dose to the whole brain for each child. The average dose and the age of the child at time of exposure were used to estimate the lifetime risk of developing radiation-related brain cancer.
Results
Among the 50 patients, average radiation doses to the brain were estimated to vary from 100 mGy to 1,300 mGy if exposed to non-collimated fields and from 20 mGy to 160 mGy for collimated, moving fields. The lifetime risk of developing brain cancer was estimated to be increased by 2% to 80% as a result of the exposure. Given the very small lifetime background risk of brain tumor, the excess number of cases will be small even though the relative increase might be as high as 80%.
Conclusion
ALARA principles of collimation and dose optimization are the most effective means to minimize the risk of future radiation-related cancer.
doi:10.1007/s00247-006-0206-2
PMCID: PMC2663652  PMID: 16862414
Brain radiation exposure; Neurointerventional procedures; Lifetime risk radiation-induced carcinogenesis

Results 1-6 (6)