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1.  Related to testes-specific, vespid and pathogenesis protein-1 is regulated by methylation in glioblastoma 
Oncology Letters  2014;7(4):1209-1212.
Related to testes-specific, vespid and pathogenesis protein-1 (RTVP-1), also known as glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1, is highly expressed and has oncogenic features in glioblastoma (GBM; World Health Organization class IV). Promoter methylation has been found to control RTVP-1 expression in prostate carcinoma, Wilms’ tumor, acute myeloid leukemia and melanoma. In this bi-institutional study, the methylation status of RTVP-1 in astrocytic brain malignancies (GBM and oligodendroglioma) was examined. The RTVP-1 promoter was hypomethylated in GBM compared with non-tumor brain samples, but was hypermethylated in oligodendroglioma. RTVP-1 methylation correlated with RTVP-1 expression at the mRNA level. In GBM, hypermethylation of the RTVP-1 promoter was associated with improved overall survival although with no statistical significance.
doi:10.3892/ol.2014.1829
PMCID: PMC3961359  PMID: 24944694
glioblastoma; related to testes-specific vespid and pathogenesis protein-1; glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1; methylation
2.  Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae in Ticks Collected from Wild Animals in Israel 
We report molecular evidence for the presence of spotted fever group rickettsiae (SFGR) in ticks collected from roe deer, addax, red foxes, and wild boars in Israel. Rickettsia aeschlimannii was detected in Hyalomma marginatum and Hyalomma detritum while Rickettsia massiliae was present in Rhipicephalus turanicus ticks. Furthermore, a novel uncultured SFGR was detected in Haemaphysalis adleri and Haemaphysalis parva ticks from golden jackals. The pathogenicity of the novel SFGR for humans is unknown; however, the presence of multiple SFGR agents should be considered when serological surveillance data from Israel are interpreted because of significant antigenic cross-reactivity among Rickettsia. The epidemiology and ecology of SFGR in Israel appear to be more complicated than was previously believed.
doi:10.4269/ajtmh.2011.10-0623
PMCID: PMC3205642  PMID: 22049050
3.  Fatal Rickettsia conorii subsp. israelensis Infection, Israel 
Emerging Infectious Diseases  2008;14(5):821-824.
Fatal Rickettsia conorii subsp. israelensis Infection, Israel
Underdiagnosis of fatal spotted fever may be attributed to nonspecific clinical features and insensitive acute-phase serologic studies. We describe the importance of molecular and immunohistochemical methods in establishing the postmortem diagnosis of locally acquired Israeli spotted fever due to Rickettsia conorii subsp. israelensis in a traveler returning to Israel from India.
doi:10.3201/eid1405.071278
PMCID: PMC2600240  PMID: 18439372
PCR; Israel; epidemiology; Rickettsia infections; Rickettsia conorii; genetics; pathogenicity; travel; dispatch

Results 1-3 (3)