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1.  Maternal Sleep Duration and Complaints of Vital Exhaustion during Pregnancy is Associated with Placental Abruption 
OBJECTIVE
Sleep disorders are associated with cardiovascular complications and preterm delivery (PTD). Insufficient sleep results in metabolic alterations and increased inflammation, both known to contribute to placental abruption (abruption), a determinant of PTD. We examined associations of abruption with sleep duration and complaints of vital exhaustion.
METHODS
The study included 164 abruption cases and 160 controls in a multicenter study in Peru. Data on habitual sleep duration and vital exhaustion during the first 6 months of pregnancy were elicited during interviews conducted following delivery. Women were categorized according to short, normal and long sleep duration (≤6, 7-8 and ≥9 h); and frequency of feeling exhausted. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated.
RESULTS
Short and long sleep durations were associated with increased odds of abruption. The ORs of abruption in relation to short (≤6 h) and long (≥9 h) sleep duration were 2.0 (95%CI 1.1-3.7) and 2.1 (95%CI 1.1-4.1), compared with normal sleep duration (7-8 h). Complaints of vital exhaustion were also associated with abruption (OR=2.37; 95%CI 1.46-3.85), and were independent of sleep duration.
CONCLUSION
We extend the existing literature and support the thesis that maternal sleep habits and disorders should be assessed among pregnant women.
doi:10.3109/14767058.2014.916682
PMCID: PMC4241173  PMID: 24749793
sleep duration; exhaustion; placental abruption; pregnancy
2.  Association of Childhood Physical and Sexual Abuse with Intimate Partner Violence, Poor General Health and Depressive Symptoms among Pregnant Women 
PLoS ONE  2015;10(1):e0116609.
Objective
We examined associations of childhood physical and sexual abuse with risk of intimate partner violence (IPV). We also evaluated the extent to which childhood abuse was associated with self-reported general health status and symptoms of antepartum depression in a cohort of pregnant Peruvian women.
Methods
In-person interviews were conducted to collect information regarding history of childhood abuse and IPV from 1,521 women during early pregnancy. Antepartum depressive symptomatology was evaluated using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Multivariable logistic regression procedures were used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI).
Results
Any childhood abuse was associated with 2.2-fold increased odds of lifetime IPV (95%CI: 1.72–2.83). Compared with women who reported no childhood abuse, those who reported both, childhood physical and sexual abuse had a 7.14-fold lifetime risk of physical and sexual IPV (95%CI: 4.15–12.26). The odds of experiencing physical and sexual abuse by an intimate partner in the past year was 3.33-fold higher among women with a history of childhood physical and sexual abuse as compared to women who were not abused as children (95%CI 1.60–6.89). Childhood abuse was associated with higher odds of self-reported poor health status during early pregnancy (aOR = 1.32, 95%CI: 1.04–1.68) and with symptoms of antepartum depression (aOR = 2.07, 95%CI: 1.58–2.71).
Conclusion
These data indicate that childhood sexual and physical abuse is associated with IPV, poor general health and depressive symptoms in early pregnancy. The high prevalence of childhood trauma and its enduring effects of on women’s health warrant concerted global health efforts in preventing violence.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0116609
PMCID: PMC4312043  PMID: 25635902
3.  Construct Validity and Factor Structure of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Epworth Sleepiness Scale in a Multi-National Study of African, South East Asian and South American College Students 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(12):e116383.
Background
The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) are questionnaires used to assess sleep quality and excessive daytime sleepiness in clinical and population-based studies. The present study aimed to evaluate the construct validity and factor structure of the PSQI and ESS questionnaires among young adults in four countries (Chile, Ethiopia, Peru and Thailand).
Methods
A cross-sectional study was conducted among 8,481 undergraduate students. Students were invited to complete a self-administered questionnaire that collected information about lifestyle, demographic, and sleep characteristics. In each country, the construct validity and factorial structures of PSQI and ESS questionnaires were tested through exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses (EFA and CFA).
Results
The largest component-total correlation coefficient for sleep quality as assessed using PSQI was noted in Chile (r = 0.71) while the smallest component-total correlation coefficient was noted for sleep medication use in Peru (r = 0.28). The largest component-total correlation coefficient for excessive daytime sleepiness as assessed using ESS was found for item 1 (sitting/reading) in Chile (r = 0.65) while the lowest item-total correlation was observed for item 6 (sitting and talking to someone) in Thailand (r = 0.35). Using both EFA and CFA a two-factor model was found for PSQI questionnaire in Chile, Ethiopia and Thailand while a three-factor model was found for Peru. For the ESS questionnaire, we noted two factors for all four countries
Conclusion
Overall, we documented cross-cultural comparability of sleep quality and excessive daytime sleepiness measures using the PSQI and ESS questionnaires among Asian, South American and African young adults. Although both the PSQI and ESS were originally developed as single-factor questionnaires, the results of our EFA and CFA revealed the multi- dimensionality of the scales suggesting limited usefulness of the global PSQI and ESS scores to assess sleep quality and excessive daytime sleepiness.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0116383
PMCID: PMC4281247  PMID: 25551586
4.  Placental Genome and Maternal-Placental Genetic Interactions: A Genome-Wide and Candidate Gene Association Study of Placental Abruption 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(12):e116346.
While available evidence supports the role of genetics in the pathogenesis of placental abruption (PA), PA-related placental genome variations and maternal-placental genetic interactions have not been investigated. Maternal blood and placental samples collected from participants in the Peruvian Abruptio Placentae Epidemiology study were genotyped using Illumina’s Cardio-Metabochip platform. We examined 118,782 genome-wide SNPs and 333 SNPs in 32 candidate genes from mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation pathways in placental DNA from 280 PA cases and 244 controls. We assessed maternal-placental interactions in the candidate gene SNPS and two imprinted regions (IGF2/H19 and C19MC). Univariate and penalized logistic regression models were fit to estimate odds ratios. We examined the combined effect of multiple SNPs on PA risk using weighted genetic risk scores (WGRS) with repeated ten-fold cross-validations. A multinomial model was used to investigate maternal-placental genetic interactions. In placental genome-wide and candidate gene analyses, no SNP was significant after false discovery rate correction. The top genome-wide association study (GWAS) hits were rs544201, rs1484464 (CTNNA2), rs4149570 (TNFRSF1A) and rs13055470 (ZNRF3) (p-values: 1.11e-05 to 3.54e-05). The top 200 SNPs of the GWAS overrepresented genes involved in cell cycle, growth and proliferation. The top candidate gene hits were rs16949118 (COX10) and rs7609948 (THRB) (p-values: 6.00e-03 and 8.19e-03). Participants in the highest quartile of WGRS based on cross-validations using SNPs selected from the GWAS and candidate gene analyses had a 8.40-fold (95% CI: 5.8–12.56) and a 4.46-fold (95% CI: 2.94–6.72) higher odds of PA compared to participants in the lowest quartile. We found maternal-placental genetic interactions on PA risk for two SNPs in PPARG (chr3∶12313450 and chr3∶12412978) and maternal imprinting effects for multiple SNPs in the C19MC and IGF2/H19 regions. Variations in the placental genome and interactions between maternal-placental genetic variations may contribute to PA risk. Larger studies may help advance our understanding of PA pathogenesis.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0116346
PMCID: PMC4280220  PMID: 25549360
5.  Sleep duration, vital exhaustion, and odds of spontaneous preterm birth: a case–control study 
Background
Preterm birth is a leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide, resulting in a pressing need to identify risk factors leading to effective interventions. Limited evidence suggests potential relationships between maternal sleep or vital exhaustion and preterm birth, yet the literature is generally inconclusive.
Methods
We examined the relationship between maternal sleep duration and vital exhaustion in the first six months of pregnancy and spontaneous (non-medically indicated) preterm birth among 479 Peruvian women who delivered a preterm singleton infant (<37 weeks gestation) and 480 term controls who delivered a singleton infant at term (≥37 weeks gestation). Maternal nightly sleep and reports of vital exhaustion were ascertained through in-person interviews. Spontaneous preterm birth cases were further categorized as those following either spontaneous preterm labor or preterm premature rupture of membranes. In addition, cases were categorized as very (<32 weeks), moderate (32–33 weeks), and late (34- <37 weeks) preterm birth for additional analyses. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
Results
After adjusting for confounders, we found that short sleep duration (≤6 hours) was significantly associated with preterm birth (aOR = 1.56; 95% CI 1.11-2.19) compared to 7–8 hours of sleep. Vital exhaustion was also associated with increased odds of preterm birth (aOR = 2.41; 95% CI 1.79-3.23) compared to no exhaustion (Ptrend <0.001). These associations remained significant for spontaneous preterm labor and preterm premature rupture of membranes. We also found evidence of joint effects of sleep duration and vital exhaustion on the odds of spontaneous preterm birth.
Conclusions
The results of this case–control study suggest maternal sleep duration, particularly short sleep duration, and vital exhaustion may be risk factors for spontaneous preterm birth. These findings call for increased clinical attention to maternal sleep and the study of potential intervention strategies to improve sleep in early pregnancy with the aim of decreasing risk of preterm birth.
doi:10.1186/1471-2393-14-337
PMCID: PMC4190429  PMID: 25261975
Sleep duration; Exhaustion; Preterm birth; Pregnancy
6.  Sleep Quality, Sleep Patterns and Consumption of Energy Drinks and Other Caffeinated Beverages among Peruvian College Students 
Health  2013;5(8B):26-35.
Objectives
To evaluate sleep quality in relation to lifestyle characteristics including consumption of energy drinks and other caffeinated beverages among Peruvian college students.
Methods
A total of 2,458 college students were invited to complete a self-administered questionnaire that collected information about a variety of behaviors including consumption of energy drinks, caffeinated and alcoholic beverages. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to assess sleep quality. Logistic regression procedures were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for poor sleep quality in relation to lifestyle characteristics.
Results
A total of 965 males and 1,493 female students were enrolled in the study. 52.0% of males and 58.4% of females experienced poor sleep quality (p=0.002). Females (OR=1.28; 95% CI 1.08–1.51) and those who reported consuming ≥ 3 stimulant beverages per week (OR=1.88; 95% CI 1.42–2.50) had higher odds of poor sleep quality. Students who consumed 1–19 alcoholic beverages monthly (OR=1.90; 95% CI 1.46–2.49) had a higher odds of long sleep latency. Consumption of ≥ 3 stimulant beverages per week was associated with daytime dysfunction due to sleep loss (OR=1.45; 95% CI 1.10–1.90), short sleep duration (OR= 1.49; 95% CI 1.14–1.94), and use of sleep medication (OR= 2.10; 95% CI 1.35–3.28).
Conclusions
Consumption of energy drinks, other caffeinated beverages and alcoholic beverages are risk factors of poor sleep quality. Increased awareness of these associations should promote interventions to improve students’ lifestyle habits, including consumption of alcoholic and caffeinated beverages, and overall health.
doi:10.4236/health.2013.58A2005
PMCID: PMC4169115  PMID: 25243056
7.  Risk of Spontaneous Preterm Birth in Relation to Maternal Exposure to Intimate Partner Violence During Pregnancy in Peru 
Maternal and child health journal  2013;17(3):485-492.
Objective
Intimate partner violence (IPV) is increasingly recognized as an important cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity. We assessed the relation between IPV and risk of spontaneous preterm birth (PTB) among Peruvian women.
Methods
The study was conducted among 479 pregnant women who delivered a preterm singleton infant (<37 weeks gestation) and 480 controls (≥37 weeks gestation). Participants’ exposure to physical and emotional violence during pregnancy was collected during in-person interviews conducted after delivery and while patients were in hospital. Odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated from logistic regression models.
Results
The prevalence of any IPV during pregnancy was 52.2% among cases and 34.6% among controls. Compared with those reporting no exposure to IPV during pregnancy, women reporting any exposure had a 2.1-fold increased risk of PTB (95% CI 1.59–2.68). The association was attenuated slightly after adjusting for maternal age, pre-pregnancy weight, and other covariates (OR=1.99; 95% CI: 1.52–2.61). Emotional abuse in the absence of physical violence was associated with a 1.6-fold (95% CI 1.21–2.15) increased risk of PTB. Emotional and physical abuse during pregnancy was associated with a 4.7-fold increased risk of PTB (95% CI 2.74–7.92). Associations of similar directions and magnitudes were observed when PTB were sub-categorized according to clinical presentation or severity.
Conclusion
IPV among pregnant women is common and is associated with an increased risk of PTB. Our findings and those of others support recent calls for coordinated global health efforts to prevent violence against women.
doi:10.1007/s10995-012-1012-0
PMCID: PMC3565008  PMID: 22527763
Preterm birth; intimate partner violence; pregnant women; Peru
8.  Risk of spontaneous preterm birth in relation to maternal experience of serious life events during pregnancy 
Background
The purpose of this study was to examine the risk of preterm birth (PTB) in relation to serious life events experienced during pregnancy in Peruvian women.
Methods
This case-control study included 479 PTB cases and 480 term controls. In-person interviews asked information regarding sociodemographics, medical and reproductive histories, and serious life events experienced during pregnancy. Multivariate logistic regression procedures were used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
Results
Compared with women who did not experience a serious life event during pregnancy, those who experienced the following life events had a more than two-fold increased odds of PTB: death of first-degree relative (adjusted OR 2.10; 95% CI 1.38–3.20), divorce or separation (adjusted OR 2.09; 95% CI 1.10–4.00), financial troubles (adjusted OR 2.70; 95% CI 1.85–3.94), or serious fight with partner (adjusted OR 2.40; 95% CI 1.78–3.17). Women who experienced any serious life events during pregnancy had higher odds (adjusted OR 2.29; 95% CI 1.65–3.18) of suffering spontaneous preterm labor and preterm premature rupture of membranes (adjusted OR 2.19; 95% CI 1.56–3.08), compared with women who did not experience any such events. Associations of similar directions and extent were observed for severity of PTB (ie, very, moderate, or late PTB). The magnitude of the associations increased as increased frequency of serious life events (Ptrend <0.001).
Conclusion
Experiencing serious life events during pregnancy was associated with increased odds of PTB among Peruvian women. Interventions aimed at assisting women experiencing serious life events may reduce the risk of PTB. Future studies should include objective measures of stress and stress response to understand better the biological underpinnings of these associations.
doi:10.2147/IJWH.S54269
PMCID: PMC3938466  PMID: 24591850
preterm birth; serious life events; Peru
9.  Risk of Spontaneous Preterm Birth in Relation to Maternal Depressive, Anxiety and Stress Symptoms 
Objective
To examine the risk of preterm birth (PTB) in relation to maternal psychiatric symptoms during pregnancy in Peruvian women.
Methods
This case control study included 479 PTB cases and 480 term controls. In-person interviews were conducted to assess women’s depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21). Multivariable logistic regression procedures were used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).
Results
Compared with women reporting no or minimal depressive symptoms, the aOR (95% CI) for PTB associated with consecutive severity of depressive symptoms based on the PHQ-9 assessment method were as follows: mild 2.22 (95% CI 1.64–3.00) and moderate-severe 3.67 (95% CI 2.09–6.46). The corresponding aORs for mild, moderate, and moderate- severe depressive symptoms based on the DASS-21 assessment were, 1.00 (reference), 3.82 (95% CI 1.90–7.66) and 2.90 (95% CI 1.66–5.04), respectively. A positive gradient was observed for the odds of PTB with severity of anxiety (ptrend <0.001) and stress symptoms (ptrend <0.001).
Conclusions
The odds of PTB are increased in pregnant Peruvian women with psychiatric symptoms. Efforts to screen and treat affected women may modify risks of PTB and possibly other associated disorders.
PMCID: PMC3662498  PMID: 23447915
10.  Genome-wide and candidate gene association studies of placental abruption 
Placental abruption (PA), a pregnancy-related vascular disorder, is a leading cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. The success of identifying genetic susceptibility loci for PA, a multi-factorial heritable disorder, has been limited. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and candidate gene association study using 470 PA cases and 473 controls from Lima, Peru. Genotyping for common genetic variations (single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) was conducted using the Illumina Cardio-Metabo Chip platform. Common variations in 35 genes that participate in mitochondrial biogenesis (MB) and oxidative phosphorylation (OS) were selected for the candidate gene study. Regression models were fit to examine associations of each SNP with risk of PA. In pathway analyses, we examined functions and functional relationships of genes represented by the top GWAS hits. Genetic risk scores (GRS), based on top hits of the GWAS and candidate gene analyses, respectively, were computed using the risk allele counting method. The top hit in the GWAS analyses was rs1238566 (empirical P-value=1.04e-4 and FDR-adjusted P-value=5.65E-04) in FLI-1 gene, a megakaryocyte-specific transcription factor. Networks of genes involved in lipid metabolism and cell signaling were significantly enriched by the 51 genes whose SNPs were among the top 200 GWAS hits (P-value <2.1e-3). SNPs known to regulate MB (e.g. CAMK2B, NR1H3, PPARG, PRKCA, and THRB) and OP (e.g., COX5A, and NDUF family of genes) were associated with PA risk (P-value <0.05). GRS was significantly associated with PA risk (trend P-value <0.001 and 0.01 for GWAS and candidate gene based GRS, respectively). Our study suggests that integrating multiple analytical strategies in genetic association studies can provide opportunities for identifying genetic risk factors and novel molecular mechanisms that underlie PA.
PMCID: PMC3773564  PMID: 24046805
Placental abruption; genome-wide association study; pathway analyses; candidate gene; genetic risk score
11.  Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) During Pregnancy: A Pilot Intervention Program in Lima, Peru 
Journal of interpersonal violence  2010;25(11):2054-2076.
This pilot study examined the effectiveness of standard care and an empowerment intervention for abused pregnant women. Severe psychological abuse was most prevalent (42.2%) among this sample of women. Compared with women in the standard care group at the post-intervention survey, women in the empowerment group were more likely to hide money (44.6% vs. 34.3%), establish a code with family or friends (19.6% vs. 16.2%), ask neighbors to call police if violence began (6.9% vs. 1.0%), had available bank account numbers (17.1% vs. 3.1%), had valuable jewelry (8.4% vs. 3.8%), and had available a hidden bag with extra clothing (9.0% vs. 3.1%). However, there was no statistically significant difference in health-related quality of life, adoption of safety behaviors, and use of community resources between women in the two groups. Simply asking pregnant women about abuse and offering referral could potentially interrupt and prevent further abuse.
doi:10.1177/0886260509354517
PMCID: PMC3741342  PMID: 20145196
Intimate partner violence; Pregnant women; Intervention; Peru
12.  Maternal blood mitochondrial DNA copy number and placental abruption risk: results from a preliminary study 
Oxidative stress and impaired placental function – pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of placental abruption – have their origins extending to mitochondrial dysfunction. To the best of our knowledge, there are no published reports of associations of placental abruption with circulating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number – a novel biomarker of systemic mitochondrial dysfunction. This pilot case-control study was comprised of 233 placental abruption cases and 238 non-abruption controls. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to assess the relative copy number of mtDNA in maternal whole blood samples collected at delivery. Logistic regression procedures were used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). There was some evidence of an increased odds of placental abruption with the highest quartile of mtDNA copy number (P for trend = 0.09) after controlling for confounders. The odds of placental abruption was elevated among women with higher mtDNA copy number (≥336.9) as compared with those with lower values (<336.9) (adjusted OR = 1.60; 95% CI 1.04-2.46). Women diagnosed with preeclampsia and with elevated mtDNA copy number had a dramatically increased odds of placental abruption as compared with normotensive women without elevated mtDNA copy number (adjusted OR = 6.66; 95% CI 2.58-17.16). Maternal mitochondrial dysfunction appears to be associated with placental abruption in the presence of preeclampsia. Replication in other studies, particularly prospective cohort studies and those that allow for tissue specific assessment of mitochondrial dysfunction (e.g., the placenta) are needed to further understand cellular and genomic biomarkers of normal and abnormal placental function.
PMCID: PMC3709116  PMID: 23875065
Placental abruption; mitochondrion; mitochondrial DNA; pregnancy; biomarkers
13.  Association Between Intimate Partner Violence, Migraine and Probable Migraine 
Headache  2010;51(2):208-219.
Objective
Intimate partner violence (IPV) among women is a global public health problem. The association between childhood maltreatment and migraine is well established, but not the association between IPV and migraine. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the relationship between type and severity of IPV and migraine in a large cohort of Peruvian women.
Methods
Women who delivered singleton infants (N=2,066) at the Instituto Nacional Materno Perinatal, Lima, Peru were interviewed during their post-partum hospital stay. Participants were queried about their lifetime experiences with headaches and migraine, and with physical and sexual violence. The International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-2) diagnostic criteria were used to classify participants according to their migraine status. Questions on physical and sexual violence were adapted from the protocol of Demographic Health Survey Questionnaires and Modules: Domestic Violence Module and the World Health Organization (WHO) Multi-Country Study on Violence against Women. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire Depression Subset. Logistic regression was used to estimate multivariate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).
Results
Compared with women without a history of violence, women with experiences of lifetime physical or sexual violence (aOR=1.44, 95% CI 1.19–1.75), physical violence only (aOR=1.36, 95% CI 1.10–1.68), sexual violence only (aOR=1.76, 95% CI 0.97–3.21) and both physical and sexual violence (aOR=1.61, 95% CI 1.12–2.31) had increased odds of any migraine after adjusting for maternal age, parity and access to basic foods. There was no gradient of increased odds of any migraine with severity of physical violence. The relationship between IPV and any migraine was strongest among women with depressive symptoms. The odds of any migraine was increased 2.25-fold (95% CI 1.75–2.28) among abused women who also had depressive symptoms compared with non-abused and non-depressed women. Associations from sensitivity analyses that segregated women according to probable migraine (ICHD-2 category 1.6.1) and migraine (ICHD-2 category 1.1) diagnoses were of similar magnitudes as those reported here for women with any migraine diagnoses. IPV, particularly sexual violence, appears to be a risk factor for migraine.
Conclusion
Our findings suggest the potential importance of considering a history of violence among migraineurs.
doi:10.1111/j.1526-4610.2010.01777.x
PMCID: PMC3662491  PMID: 20946432
14.  A genome-wide association study of variations in maternal cardiometabolic genes and risk of placental abruption 
Accumulating evidence suggests that placental abruption has a complex multifactorial pathogenesis that involves cardiovascular risk and metabolic dysfunction. However, comprehensive assessment of variations in genes involved in cardiometabolic traits associated with the risk of placental abruption is lacking. We conducted a case-control study investigating associations of variations in maternal cardiometabolic genes (characterized using 217,697 SNPs on the Illumina Cardio-Metabo Chip) with risk of placental abruption. A total of 253 abruption cases and 258 controls were selected from among participants enrolled in the Peruvian Abruptio Placentae Epidemiology Study in Lima, Peru. In the genome-wide association analyses, top hits did not surpass genome-wide significance. However, we observed suggestive associations of placental abruption with several SNPs, including SNPs in SMAD2 (P-value=1.88e-6), MIR17HG (P-value=7.8e-6], and DGKB (P-value=8.35e-6] loci. In candidate gene analyses, we observed associations of variations in a priori selected genes involved in coagulation, rennin-angiotensin, angiogenesis, inflammation, and B-vitamin metabolism with the risk of abruption. Our study suggests that variations in maternal cardiovascular and metabolic genes may be associated with risk of placental abruption. Future studies with large sample sizes are warranted.
PMCID: PMC3508543  PMID: 23205182
Placental abruption; pregnancy complications; Cardio-Metabo chip; genetic association; single nucleotide polymorphism; genome-wide association study
15.  Risk of Placental Abruption in Relation to Maternal Depressive, Anxiety and Stress Symptoms 
Journal of affective disorders  2010;130(1-2):280-284.
Background
Little is known about the influence of psychiatric factors on the etiology of placental abruption (PA), an obstetrical condition that complicates 1-2% of pregnancies. We examined the risk of AP in relation to maternal psychiatric symptoms during pregnancy.
Methods
This case-control study included 373 AP cases and 368 controls delivered at five medical centers in Lima, Peru. Depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21). Multivariable logistic regression models were fit to calculate odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for confounders.
Results
Depressive symptoms of increasing severity (using the DASS depression subscale) was associated with AP (p for trend=0.02). Compared with women with no depressive symptoms, the aOR (95%CI) for AP associated with each level of severity of depression symptoms based on the DASS assessment were as follows: mild 1.84 (0.91-3.74); moderate 1.25 (0.67-2.33); and severe 4.68 (0.98-22.4). The corresponding ORs for mild, moderate, and moderately severe depressive symptoms based on the PHQ assessment were 1.10 (0.79-1.54), 3.31 (1.45-7.57), and 5.01 (1.06-23.6), respectively. A positive gradient was observed for the odds of AP with severity of anxiety (p for trend=0.002) and stress symptoms (p for trend=0.002).
Limitations
These cross-sectionally collected data may be subject to recall bias.
Conclusions
Maternal psychiatric disorders may be associated with an increased occurrence of AP. Larger studies that allow for more precise evaluations of maternal psychiatric health in relation to AP risk are warranted.
doi:10.1016/j.jad.2010.07.024
PMCID: PMC2994998  PMID: 20692040
placental abruption; epidemiology; pregnancy; depression; anxiety; risk factors
16.  Depressive Symptoms and Migraine Comorbidity among Pregnant Peruvian Women 
Journal of affective disorders  2009;122(1-2):149-153.
Background
Migraine and depression are known to be comorbid conditions in non-pregnant women and men. However, the migraine-depression comorbidity among pregnant women, particularly women in developing countries has not been evaluated. Therefore, we evaluated the migraine-depressive symptom relationship in a large cohort of pregnant Peruvian women.
Methods
Women who delivered singleton infants (N=2,293) at the Instituto Nacional Materno Perinatal, Lima, Peru were interviewed during the postpartum hospital stay. Women were asked questions related to their lifetime and pregnancy experiences with headaches and migraines. Responses to these questions enabled the classification of “probable” and “strict” migraines according to the International Headache Society diagnostic criteria. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire Depression Subset. Logistic regression procedures were used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
Results
Approximately 32% of the women reported a history of migraine, while 41% reported experiencing moderate to severe depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Compared with women without a history of migraine, women with strict migraine had AORs of 2.12 (95% CI 1.54–2.93), 1.85 (95% CI 1.16–2.96) and 2.23 (95% CI 1.08–4.62) for moderate, moderately severe and severe depressive symptoms, respectively.
Conclusion
This is the first report of a cross-sectional association between migraine and depressive symptoms in pregnant women. If our findings are confirmed, pregnant women with a history of migraine may benefit from increased vigilance for screening and treating depressive symptoms.
doi:10.1016/j.jad.2009.07.014
PMCID: PMC2835839  PMID: 19695709
Migraine; Depressive symptoms; Pregnant women; Peru
17.  Risk of placental abruption in relation to migraines and headaches 
BMC Women's Health  2010;10:30.
Background
Migraine, a common chronic-intermittent disorder of idiopathic origin characterized by severe debilitating headaches and autonomic nervous system dysfunction, and placental abruption, the premature separation of the placenta, share many common pathophysiological characteristics. Moreover, endothelial dysfunction, platelet activation, hypercoagulation, and inflammation are common to both disorders. We assessed risk of placental abruption in relation to maternal history of migraine before and during pregnancy in Peruvian women.
Methods
Cases were 375 women with pregnancies complicated by placental abruption, and controls were 368 women without an abruption. During in-person interviews conducted following delivery, women were asked if they had physician-diagnosed migraine, and they were asked questions that allowed headaches and migraine to be classified according to criteria established by the International Headache Society. Logistic regression procedures were used to calculate odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for confounders.
Results
Overall, a lifetime history of any headaches or migraine was associated with an increased odds of placental abruption (aOR = 1.60; 95% CI 1.16-2.20). A lifetime history of migraine was associated with a 2.14-fold increased odds of placental abruption (aOR = 2.14; 95% CI 1.22-3.75). The odds of placental abruption was 2.11 (95% CI 1.00-4.45) for migraineurs without aura; and 1.59 (95% 0.70-3.62) for migraineurs with aura. A lifetime history of tension-type headache was also increased with placental abruption (aOR = 1.61; 95% CI 1.01-2.57).
Conclusions
This study adds placental abruption to a growing list of pregnancy complications associated with maternal headache/migraine disorders. Nevertheless, prospective cohort studies are needed to more rigorously evaluate the extent to which migraines and/or its treatments are associated with the occurrence of placental abruption.
doi:10.1186/1472-6874-10-30
PMCID: PMC2984417  PMID: 20977769
18.  Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its relationship with leisure time physical activity among Peruvian adults 
Background
Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is an important risk factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Previous studies have suggested an inverse relationship between physical activity and MetS. However, these findings were inconsistent; and few investigators have examined these associations among South Americans. We estimated the prevalence of MetS and its association with leisure time physical activity (LTPA) among Peruvian adults.
Materials and methods
This cross-sectional study of 1,675 individuals (619 men and 1056 women) was conducted among residents in Lima and Callao, Peru. Information about LTPA, socio-demographic, and other lifestyle characteristics were collected by interview. The presence of MetS was defined using the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) criteria.
Results
Overall, the prevalence of MetS was 26.9% and was more common among women (29.9%) than men (21.6%). Habitual participation in LTPA was associated with a 23% reduced risk of MetS (OR=0.77; 95% CI: 0.60–1.03). There was an inverse trend of MetS risk with amount of LTPA (p=0.016). Compared with non-exercisers, those who exercised < 150 minutes/week had a 21% reduced risk of MetS (AOR= 0.79; 95% CI 0.60–1.04). Individuals who exercised ≥ 150 minutes/week, compared with non-exercisers, had a 42% reduced risk of MetS (AOR=0.58; 95% CI: 0.36–0.93). Associations of similar magnitudes were observed when men and women were studied separately.
Conclusion
These data document a high prevalence of MetS and suggest an association with LTPA among urban dwelling Peruvians. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these observations and to examine interventions that may promote increased physical activity in this population.
doi:10.1111/j.1365-2362.2009.02191.x
PMCID: PMC2771696  PMID: 19563445
Metabolic Syndrome; Physical Activity; Peru
19.  Association between insulin resistance and c-reactive protein among Peruvian adults 
Objective
Insulin resistance (IR), a reduced physiological response of peripheral tissues to the action of insulin, is one of the major causes of type 2 diabetes. We sought to evaluate the relationship between serum C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of systemic inflammation, and prevalence of IR among Peruvian adults.
Methods
This population based study of 1,525 individuals (569 men and 956 women; mean age 39 years old) was conducted among residents in Lima and Callao, Peru. Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and CRP concentrations were measured using standard approaches. Insulin resistance was assessed using the homeostasis model (HOMA-IR). Categories of CRP were defined by the following tertiles: <0.81 mg/l, 0.81-2.53 mg/l, and >2.53 mg/l. Logistic regression procedures were employed to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).
Results
Elevated CRP were significantly associated with increased mean fasting insulin and mean HOMA-IR concentrations (p < 0.001). Women with CRP concentration >2.53 mg/l (upper tertile) had a 2.18-fold increased risk of IR (OR = 2.18 95% CI 1.51-3.16) as compared with those in the lowest tertile (<0.81 mg/l). Among men, those in the upper tertile had a 2.54-fold increased risk of IR (OR = 2.54 95% CI 1.54-4.20) as compared with those in the lowest tertile.
Conclusion
Our observations among Peruvians suggest that chronic systemic inflammation, as evidenced by elevated CRP, may be of etiologic importance in insulin resistance and diabetes.
doi:10.1186/1758-5996-2-30
PMCID: PMC2883970  PMID: 20482756
20.  Associations of depression and depressive symptoms with preeclampsia: results from a Peruvian case-control study 
BMC Women's Health  2007;7:15.
Background
Preeclampsia involves endothelial dysfunction, platelet dysfunction/activation and sympathetic over-activity similar to cardiovascular disorders (CVD). Depression, an independent risk factor for progression of CVD, was found to be associated with an increased risk of preeclampsia among Finnish women. We examined the relation between depression/depressive symptoms and preeclampsia risk among Peruvian women.
Methods
The study included 339 preeclamptic cases and 337 normotensive controls. Depression and depressive symptoms during pregnancy were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated from logistic regression models.
Results
The prevalence of moderate depression was 11.5% among cases and 5.3% among controls. The corresponding figures for moderate-severe depression were 3.5% for cases and 2.1% for controls. Compared with non-depressed women, those with moderate depression had a 2.3-fold increased risk of preeclampsia (95% CI: 1.2–4.4), while moderate-severe depression was associated with a 3.2-fold (95% CI: 1.1–9.6) increased risk of preeclampsia. Associations of each of the 9-items of the PHQ-9 depression screening module with preeclampsia risk were also observed.
Conclusion
Our findings are consistent with the only other published report on this topic. Collectively, available data support recent calls for expanded efforts to study and address depression among pregnant women.
doi:10.1186/1472-6874-7-15
PMCID: PMC2148036  PMID: 17900360
21.  18S Ribosomal DNA-Based PCR for Diagnosis of Trichomonas vaginalis 
Journal of Clinical Microbiology  2000;38(7):2683-2687.
Trichomonas vaginalis remains the most common sexually transmitted parasite in the world and is considered a major risk factor in the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus. A PCR technique using primers targeting a specific region of the 18S rRNA gene of T. vaginalis was developed. The PCR test was standardized using 15 reference strains, giving a single product of 312 bp in all strains. No amplification was observed when DNA from related organisms or human DNA was used as a target. The test was evaluated on 372 vaginal swab specimens and 361 urine samples from women attending infertility and obstetric clinics at two separate hospitals in Lima, Peru. Compared to T. vaginalis culture, the overall sensitivity and specificity of PCR of vaginal swab samples was 100% and 98%, respectively. The PCR of urine samples was 100% sensitive and 99.7% specific compared to culture of vaginal swab, but the sensitivity drops to 83.3% when compared to PCR of vaginal swabs. All culture-positive samples were found to be positive by PCR in either urine or vaginal secretion. None of the PCR-negative samples were positive by culture. The origin of the amplification was confirmed by digestion of PCR products with HaeIII. This PCR assay, which is easy to perform and has a high sensitivity and specificity, should be useful for routine diagnosis of T. vaginalis infection.
PMCID: PMC86998  PMID: 10878064

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