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1.  Discharge patterning in rat olfactory bulb mitral cells in vivo 
Physiological Reports  2014;2(10):e12021.
Abstract
Here we present a detailed statistical analysis of the discharge characteristics of mitral cells of the main olfactory bulb of urethane‐anesthetized rats. Neurons were recorded from the mitral cell layer, and antidromically identified by stimuli applied to the lateral olfactory tract. All mitral cells displayed repeated, prolonged bursts of action potentials typically lasting >100 sec and separated by similarly long intervals; about half were completely silent between bursts. No such bursting was observed in nonmitral cells recorded in close proximity to mitral cells. Bursts were asynchronous among even adjacent mitral cells. The intraburst activity of most mitral cells showed strong entrainment to the spontaneous respiratory rhythm; similar entrainment was seen in some, but not all nonmitral cells. All mitral cells displayed a peak of excitability at ~25 msec after spikes, as reflected by a peak in the interspike interval distribution and in the corresponding hazard function. About half also showed a peak at about 6 msec, reflecting the common occurrence of doublet spikes. Nonmitral cells showed no such doublet spikes. Bursts typically increased in intensity over the first 20–30 sec of a burst, during which time doublets were rare or absent. After 20–30 sec (in cells that exhibited doublets), doublets occurred frequently for as long as the burst persisted, in trains of up to 10 doublets. The last doublet was followed by an extended relative refractory period the duration of which was independent of train length. In cells that were excited by application of a particular odor, responsiveness was apparently greater during silent periods between bursts than during bursts. Conversely in cells that were inhibited by a particular odor, responsiveness was only apparent when cells were active. Extensive raw (event timing) data from the cells, together with details of those analyses, are provided as supplementary material, freely available for secondary use by others.
Here we present a detailed statistical analysis of the discharge characteristics of mitral cells of the main olfactory bulb of urethane‐anesthetized rats. Extensive raw (event timing) data from the cells, together with details of those analyses, are provided as supplementary material, freely available for secondary use by others.
doi:10.14814/phy2.12021
PMCID: PMC4254087  PMID: 25281614
Mitral cells; olfactory bulb
2.  Oxytocin, Feeding, and Satiety 
Oxytocin neurons have a physiological role in food intake and energy balance. Central administration of oxytocin is powerfully anorexigenic, reducing food intake and meal duration. The central mechanisms underlying this effect of oxytocin have become better understood in the past few years. Parvocellular neurons of the paraventricular nucleus project to the caudal brainstem to regulate feeding via autonomic functions including the gastrointestinal vago-vagal reflex. In contrast, magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei release oxytocin from their dendrites to diffuse to distant hypothalamic targets involved in satiety. The ventromedial hypothalamus, for example, expresses a high density of oxytocin receptors but does not contain detectable oxytocin nerve fibers. Magnocellular neurons represent targets for the anorexigenic neuropeptide α-melanocyte stimulating hormone. In addition to homeostatic control, oxytocin may also have a role in reward-related feeding. Evidence suggests that oxytocin can selectively suppress sugar intake and that it may have a role in limiting the intake of palatable food by inhibiting the reward pathway.
doi:10.3389/fendo.2013.00035
PMCID: PMC3603288  PMID: 23518828
oxytocin; food; appetite; satiety; reward
3.  Loss of β-III spectrin leads to Purkinje cell dysfunction recapitulating the behaviour and neuropathology of SCA5 in humans 
Mutations in SPTBN2, the gene encoding β-III spectrin, cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 in humans (SCA5), a neurodegenerative disorder resulting in loss of motor coordination. How these mutations give rise to progressive ataxia and what the precise role β-III spectrin plays in normal cerebellar physiology are unknown. We developed a mouse lacking full length β-III spectrin and found that homozygous mice reproduced features of SCA5 including gait abnormalities, tremor, deteriorating motor coordination, Purkinje cell loss and cerebellar atrophy (molecular layer thinning). In vivo analysis reveals an age-related reduction in simple spike firing rate in surviving β-III−/− Purkinje cells while in vitro studies show these neurons to have reduced spontaneous firing, smaller sodium currents and dysregulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Our data suggest an early loss of EAAT4- (protein interactor of β-III spectrin) and subsequent loss of GLAST-mediated uptake may play a role in neuronal pathology. These findings implicate a loss of β-III spectrin function in SCA5 pathogenesis and indicate there are at least two physiological effects of β-III spectrin loss that underpin a progressive loss of inhibitory cerebellar output, namely an intrinsic Purkinje cell membrane defect due to reduced sodium currents and alterations in glutamate signaling.
doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.6065-09.2010
PMCID: PMC2857506  PMID: 20371805
ataxia; cerebellum; motor coordination; glutamate transporters; excitotoxicity; neurodegeneration

Results 1-3 (3)