PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-8 (8)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Early Phrenic Motor Neuron Loss and Transient Respiratory Abnormalities after Unilateral Cervical Spinal Cord Contusion 
Journal of Neurotrauma  2013;30(12):1092-1099.
Abstract
Contusion-type cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the most common forms of SCI observed in patients. In particular, injuries targeting the C3–C5 region affect the pool of phrenic motor neurons (PhMNs) that innervates the diaphragm, resulting in significant and often chronic respiratory dysfunction. Using a previously described rat model of unilateral midcervical C4 contusion with the Infinite Horizon Impactor, we have characterized the early time course of PhMN degeneration and consequent respiratory deficits following injury, as this knowledge is important for designing relevant treatment strategies targeting protection and plasticity of PhMN circuitry. PhMN loss (48% of the ipsilateral pool) occurred almost entirely during the first 24 h post-injury, resulting in persistent phrenic nerve axonal degeneration and denervation at the diaphragm neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Reduced diaphragm compound muscle action potential amplitudes following phrenic nerve stimulation were observed as early as the first day post-injury (30% of pre-injury maximum amplitude), with slow functional improvement over time that was associated with partial reinnervation at the diaphragm NMJ. Consistent with ipsilateral diaphragmatic compromise, the injury resulted in rapid, yet only transient, changes in overall ventilatory parameters measured via whole-body plethysmography, including increased respiratory rate, decreased tidal volume, and decreased peak inspiratory flow. Despite significant ipsilateral PhMN loss, the respiratory system has the capacity to quickly compensate for partially impaired hemidiaphragm function, suggesting that C4 hemicontusion in rats is a model of SCI that manifests subacute respiratory abnormalities. Collectively, these findings demonstrate significant and persistent diaphragm compromise in a clinically relevant model of midcervical contusion SCI; however, the therapeutic window for PhMN protection is restricted to early time points post-injury. On the contrary, preventing loss of innervation by PhMNs and/or inducing plasticity in spared PhMN axons at the diaphragm NMJ are relevant long-term targets.
doi:10.1089/neu.2012.2728
PMCID: PMC3689927  PMID: 23534670
cervical; contusion; PhMN; rat; SCI
2.  Degeneration of Phrenic Motor Neurons Induces Long-Term Diaphragm Deficits following Mid-Cervical Spinal Contusion in Mice 
Journal of Neurotrauma  2012;29(18):2748-2760.
Abstract
A primary cause of morbidity and mortality following cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is respiratory compromise, regardless of the level of trauma. In particular, SCI at mid-cervical regions targets degeneration of both descending bulbospinal respiratory axons and cell bodies of phrenic motor neurons, resulting in deficits in the function of the diaphragm, the primary muscle of inspiration. Contusion-type trauma to the cervical spinal cord is one of the most common forms of human SCI; however, few studies have evaluated mid-cervical contusion in animal models or characterized consequent histopathological and functional effects of degeneration of phrenic motor neuron–diaphragm circuitry. We have generated a mouse model of cervical contusion SCI that unilaterally targets both C4 and C5 levels, the location of the phrenic motor neuron pool, and have examined histological and functional outcomes for up to 6 weeks post-injury. We report that phrenic motor neuron loss in cervical spinal cord, phrenic nerve axonal degeneration, and denervation at diaphragm neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) resulted in compromised ipsilateral diaphragm function, as demonstrated by persistent reduction in diaphragm compound muscle action potential amplitudes following phrenic nerve stimulation and abnormalities in spontaneous diaphragm electromyography (EMG) recordings. This injury paradigm is reproducible, does not require ventilatory assistance, and provides proof-of-principle that generation of unilateral cervical contusion is a feasible strategy for modeling diaphragmatic/respiratory deficits in mice. This study and its accompanying analyses pave the way for using transgenic mouse technology to explore the function of specific genes in the pathophysiology of phrenic motor neuron degeneration and respiratory dysfunction following cervical SCI.
doi:10.1089/neu.2012.2467
PMCID: PMC3521144  PMID: 23176637
cervical; contusion; mice; phrenic motor neuron; SCI
3.  Reduction in expression of the astrocyte glutamate transporter, GLT1, worsens functional and histological outcomes following traumatic spinal cord injury 
Glia  2011;59(12):1996-2005.
The astrocyte glutamate transporter, GLT1, is responsible for the vast majority of glutamate uptake in the adult central nervous system (CNS), thereby regulating extracellular glutamate homeostasis and preventing excitotoxicity. Glutamate dysregulation plays a central role in outcome following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). To determine the role of GLT1 in secondary cell loss following SCI, mice heterozygous for the GLT1 astrocyte glutamate transporter (GLT1+/−) and wild-type mice received thoracic crush SCI. Compared to wild-type controls, GLT1+/− mice had an attenuated recovery in hindlimb motor function, increased lesion size, and decreased tissue sparing. GLT1+/− mice showed a decrease in intraspinal GLT1 protein and functional glutamate uptake compared to wild-type mice, accompanied by increased apoptosis and neuronal loss following crush injury. These results suggest that astrocyte GLT1 plays a role in limiting secondary cell death following SCI, and also show that compromise of key astrocyte functions has significant effects on outcome following traumatic CNS injury. These findings also suggest that increasing intraspinal GLT1 expression may represent a therapeutically relevant target for SCI treatment.
doi:10.1002/glia.21241
PMCID: PMC3269541  PMID: 21882244
secondary injury; GLT1+/− mice; crush injury; glutamate uptake; excitotoxicity
4.  Human Glial-Restricted Progenitor Transplantation into Cervical Spinal Cord of the SOD1G93A Mouse Model of ALS 
PLoS ONE  2011;6(10):e25968.
Cellular abnormalities are not limited to motor neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). There are numerous observations of astrocyte dysfunction in both humans with ALS and in SOD1G93A rodents, a widely studied ALS model. The present study therapeutically targeted astrocyte replacement in this model via transplantation of human Glial-Restricted Progenitors (hGRPs), lineage-restricted progenitors derived from human fetal neural tissue. Our previous findings demonstrated that transplantation of rodent-derived GRPs into cervical spinal cord ventral gray matter (in order to target therapy to diaphragmatic function) resulted in therapeutic efficacy in the SOD1G93A rat. Those findings demonstrated the feasibility and efficacy of transplantation-based astrocyte replacement for ALS, and also show that targeted multi-segmental cell delivery to cervical spinal cord is a promising therapeutic strategy, particularly because of its relevance to addressing respiratory compromise associated with ALS. The present study investigated the safety and in vivo survival, distribution, differentiation, and potential efficacy of hGRPs in the SOD1G93A mouse. hGRP transplants robustly survived and migrated in both gray and white matter and differentiated into astrocytes in SOD1G93A mice spinal cord, despite ongoing disease progression. However, cervical spinal cord transplants did not result in motor neuron protection or any therapeutic benefits on functional outcome measures. This study provides an in vivo characterization of this glial progenitor cell and provides a foundation for understanding their capacity for survival, integration within host tissues, differentiation into glial subtypes, migration, and lack of toxicity or tumor formation.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0025968
PMCID: PMC3187829  PMID: 21998733
5.  Peripheral Hyperstimulation Alters Site of Disease Onset and Course in SOD1 Rats 
Neurobiology of disease  2010;39(3):252-264.
In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the exogenous temporal triggers that result in initial motor neuron death are not understood. Overactivation and consequent accelerated loss of vulnerable motor neurons is one theory of disease initiation. The vulnerability of motor neurons in response to chronic peripheral nerve hyperstimulation was tested in the SOD1G93A rat model of ALS. A novel in vivo technique for peripheral phrenic nerve stimulation was developed via intra-diaphragm muscle electrode implantation at the phrenic motor endpoint. Chronic bilateral phrenic nerve hyperstimulation in SOD1G93A rats accelerated disease progression, including shortened lifespan, hastened motor neuron loss and increased denervation at diaphragm neuromuscular junctions. Hyperstimulation also resulted in focal decline in adjacent forelimb function. These results show that peripheral phrenic nerve hyperstimulation accelerates cell death of vulnerable spinal motor neurons, modifies both temporal and anatomical onset of disease, and leads to involvement of disease in adjacent anatomical regions in this ALS model.
doi:10.1016/j.nbd.2010.03.021
PMCID: PMC2910141  PMID: 20381620
motor neuron; neurodegeneration; ALS; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; SOD1; phrenic nerve; diaphragm; diaphragm pacing; diaphragm stimulation; respiratory; disease onset; environment
6.  Focal Transplantation-based Astrocyte Replacement is Neuroprotective in a Model of Motor Neuron Disease 
Nature neuroscience  2008;11(11):1294-1301.
Cellular abnormalities in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are not limited to motor neurons. Astrocyte dysfunction occurs in human ALS and SOD1G93A animal models. Therefore, the value of focal enrichment of normal astrocytes was investigated using transplantation of lineage-restricted astrocyte precursors, Glial-Restricted Precursors (GRPs). GRPs were transplanted around cervical spinal cord respiratory motor neuron pools, the principal cells responsible for death in this neurodegenerative disease. GRPs survived in diseased tissue, differentiated efficiently into astrocytes, and reduced microgliosis in SOD1G93A rat cervical spinal cord. GRPs extended survival and disease duration, attenuated motor neuron loss, and slowed declines in fore-limb motor and respiratory physiological function. Neuroprotection was mediated in part by the primary astrocyte glutamate transporter, GLT1. These findings demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of transplantation-based astrocyte replacement, and show that targeted multi-segmental cell delivery to cervical spinal cord is a promising therapeutic strategy for slowing focal motor neuron loss associated with ALS.
doi:10.1038/nn.2210
PMCID: PMC2656686  PMID: 18931666
stem cell; grafting; transplantation; motor neuron; neurodegeneration; replacement; neuroprotection; non-cell autonomous; astroglia; astrocyte; neural precursor cell; progenitor; lineage-restricted precursor; glial precursor; ALS; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; SOD1
7.  Intraparenchymal spinal cord delivery of adeno-associated virus IGF-1 is protective in the SOD1G93A model of ALS 
Brain research  2007;1185:256-265.
The potent neuroprotective activities of neurotrophic factors, including insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), make them promising candidates for treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In an effort to maximize rate of motor neuron transduction, achieve high levels of spinal IGF-1, and thus enhance therapeutic benefit, we injected an adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2)-based vector encoding human IGF-1 (CERE-130) into lumbar spinal cord parenchyma of SOD1G93A mice. We observed robust and long-term intraspinal IGF-1 expression and partial rescue of lumbar spinal cord motor neurons, as well as sex-specific delayed disease onset, weight loss, decline in hindlimb grip strength and increased animal survival.
doi:10.1016/j.brainres.2007.09.034
PMCID: PMC2265207  PMID: 17963733
Adeno; associated virus; insulin; like growth factor 1; gene therapy; neurodegeneration; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; neuroprotection
8.  Differential fate of multipotent and lineage-restricted neural precursors following transplantation into the adult CNS 
Neuron glia biology  2004;1(2):113-126.
Multiple classes of precursor cells have been isolated and characterized from the developing spinal cord including multipotent neuroepithelial (NEP) stem cells and lineage-restricted precursors for neurons (NRPs) and glia (GRPs). We have compared the survival, differentiation and integration of multipotent NEP cells with lineage-restricted NRPs and GRPs using cells isolated from transgenic rats that express the human placental alkaline phosphatase gene. Our results demonstrate that grafted NEP cells survive poorly, with no cells observed 3 days after transplant in the adult hippocampus, striatum and spinal cord, indicating that most CNS regions are not compatible with transplants of multipotent cells derived from fetal CNS. By contrast, at 3 weeks and 5 weeks post-engraftment, lineage-restricted precursors showed selective migration along white-matter tracts and robust survival in all three CNS regions. The grafted precursors expressed the mature neuronal markers NeuN and MAP2, the astrocytic marker GFAP, the oligodendrocytic markers RIP, NG2 and Sox-10, and the synaptic marker synaptophysin. Similar behavior was observed when these precursors were transplanted into the injured spinal cord. Predifferentiated, multipotent NEP cells also survive and integrate, which indicates that lineage-restricted CNS precursors are well suited for transplantation into the adult CNS and provide a promising cellular replacement candidate.
doi:10.1017/s1740925x04000213
PMCID: PMC1389711  PMID: 16520830
Stem cells; neurons; glial cells; neural progenitors; spinal cord injury

Results 1-8 (8)