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1.  Genetic and epigenetic analysis of monozygotic twins discordant for testicular cancer 
Despite the notion that monozygotic (identical) twins share 100% identical genetic information, genetic differences among monozygotic twin pairs do occur and can be explained by mechanisms occurring during post-zygotic events. Despite such twins being fundamentally “identical”, these post-zygotic genetic changes may give rise to phenotypic differences and genetic diseases. Consequently, studies of monozygotic twin pairs discordant for specific genetic diseases represent an important tool for the identification of disease genes. We used array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and methylation arrays to search for genetic and epigenetic differences in blood drawn from four monozygotic twin pairs discordant for testicular germ cell tumors. No consistent differences were identified. A larger twin study would be required to achieve confident discovery of very subtle differences between monozygotic twins discordant for testicular germ cell tumors.
PMCID: PMC4214260  PMID: 25379132
Testicular germ cell tumor; twin study; epigenetics; familial cancer; array CGH; methylation
2.  New Views on the Pathogenesis of High-grade Pelvic Serous Carcinoma with Suggestions for Advancing Future Research 
Gynecologic oncology  2012;127(3):645-650.
doi:10.1016/j.ygyno.2012.08.023
PMCID: PMC4237609  PMID: 22940485
Ovarian Cancer; Pathogenesis; Seed and Soil; Fallopian Tube; Serous
3.  Relationships between computer-extracted mammographic texture pattern features and BRCA1/2 mutation status: a cross-sectional study 
Introduction
Mammographic density is similar among women at risk of either sporadic or BRCA1/2-related breast cancer. It has been suggested that digitized mammographic images contain computer-extractable information within the parenchymal pattern, which may contribute to distinguishing between BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and non-carriers.
Methods
We compared mammographic texture pattern features in digitized mammograms from women with deleterious BRCA1/2 mutations (n = 137) versus non-carriers (n = 100). Subjects were stratified into training (107 carriers, 70 non-carriers) and testing (30 carriers, 30 non-carriers) datasets. Masked to mutation status, texture features were extracted from a retro-areolar region-of-interest in each subject’s digitized mammogram. Stepwise linear regression analysis of the training dataset identified variables to be included in a radiographic texture analysis (RTA) classifier model aimed at distinguishing BRCA1/2 carriers from non-carriers. The selected features were combined using a Bayesian Artificial Neural Network (BANN) algorithm, which produced a probability score rating the likelihood of each subject’s belonging to the mutation-positive group. These probability scores were evaluated in the independent testing dataset to determine whether their distribution differed between BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and non-carriers. A receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to estimate the model’s discriminatory capacity.
Results
In the testing dataset, a one standard deviation (SD) increase in the probability score from the BANN-trained classifier was associated with a two-fold increase in the odds of predicting BRCA1/2 mutation status: unadjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.00, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.59, 2.51, P = 0.02; age-adjusted OR = 1.93, 95% CI: 1.53, 2.42, P = 0.03. Additional adjustment for percent mammographic density did little to change the OR. The area under the curve for the BANN-trained classifier to distinguish between BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and non-carriers was 0.68 for features alone and 0.72 for the features plus percent mammographic density.
Conclusions
Our findings suggest that, unlike percent mammographic density, computer-extracted mammographic texture pattern features are associated with carrying BRCA1/2 mutations. Although still at an early stage, our novel RTA classifier has potential for improving mammographic image interpretation by permitting real-time risk stratification among women undergoing screening mammography.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13058-014-0424-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s13058-014-0424-8
PMCID: PMC4268674  PMID: 25159706
4.  Disclosure of Positive BRCA1/2-Mutation Status in Young Couples: The Journey From Uncertainty to Bonding Through Partner Support 
BRCA1/2-positive women who learn their mutation status early in the life-course face unique challenges related to navigating the tasks of young adulthood. Using qualitative methods and grounded theory, the authors analyzed in-depth interviews with 11 women aged 26 to 35 who learned their mutation status before marriage. Their narratives illustrate the complexity of relationship formation, and highlight the potential for relationship-bonding and intimacy-building in the course of sharing mutation information. Disclosing BRCA mutation status to dating partners is often preceded by feelings of fear and anxiety, yet many participants reported that doing so has positive effects on relationships. Partners’ abilities to respond with interest, empathy, and affection are associated with in creased future intimacy, consistent with generally accepted principles within the family/couple systems field. Individual cancer risk perception and familial cancer experiences may affect the disclosure experience, which can be understood via Attachment Theory. Our findings provide clinical insight, identify new areas for research, and suggest ways to assist this unique population in their adjustment to being BRCA mutation-positive.
doi:10.1037/a0012914
PMCID: PMC4131236  PMID: 25132793
BRCA1/2; breast/ovarian cancer risk perception; partner disclosure; couple relationships; qualitative research
5.  Testicular germ cell tumor susceptibility associated with the UCK2 locus on chromosome 1q23 
Human Molecular Genetics  2013;22(13):2748-2753.
Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified multiple common genetic variants associated with an increased risk of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). A previous GWAS reported a possible TGCT susceptibility locus on chromosome 1q23 in the UCK2 gene, but failed to reach genome-wide significance following replication. We interrogated this region by conducting a meta-analysis of two independent GWASs including a total of 940 TGCT cases and 1559 controls for 122 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 1q23 and followed up the most significant SNPs in an additional 2202 TGCT cases and 2386 controls from four case–control studies. We observed genome-wide significant associations for several UCK2 markers, the most significant of which was for rs3790665 (PCombined = 6.0 × 10−9). Additional support is provided from an independent familial study of TGCT where a significant over-transmission for rs3790665 with TGCT risk was observed (PFBAT = 2.3 × 10−3). Here, we provide substantial evidence for the association between UCK2 genetic variation and TGCT risk.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddt109
PMCID: PMC3674801  PMID: 23462292
6.  DNA Glycosylases Involved in Base Excision Repair May Be Associated with Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers 
Osorio, Ana | Milne, Roger L. | Kuchenbaecker, Karoline | Vaclová, Tereza | Pita, Guillermo | Alonso, Rosario | Peterlongo, Paolo | Blanco, Ignacio | de la Hoya, Miguel | Duran, Mercedes | Díez, Orland | Ramón y Cajal, Teresa | Konstantopoulou, Irene | Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina | Andrés Conejero, Raquel | Soucy, Penny | McGuffog, Lesley | Barrowdale, Daniel | Lee, Andrew | SWE-BRCA,  | Arver, Brita | Rantala, Johanna | Loman, Niklas | Ehrencrona, Hans | Olopade, Olufunmilayo I. | Beattie, Mary S. | Domchek, Susan M. | Nathanson, Katherine | Rebbeck, Timothy R. | Arun, Banu K. | Karlan, Beth Y. | Walsh, Christine | Lester, Jenny | John, Esther M. | Whittemore, Alice S. | Daly, Mary B. | Southey, Melissa | Hopper, John | Terry, Mary B. | Buys, Saundra S. | Janavicius, Ramunas | Dorfling, Cecilia M. | van Rensburg, Elizabeth J. | Steele, Linda | Neuhausen, Susan L. | Ding, Yuan Chun | Hansen, Thomas v. O. | Jønson, Lars | Ejlertsen, Bent | Gerdes, Anne-Marie | Infante, Mar | Herráez, Belén | Moreno, Leticia Thais | Weitzel, Jeffrey N. | Herzog, Josef | Weeman, Kisa | Manoukian, Siranoush | Peissel, Bernard | Zaffaroni, Daniela | Scuvera, Giulietta | Bonanni, Bernardo | Mariette, Frederique | Volorio, Sara | Viel, Alessandra | Varesco, Liliana | Papi, Laura | Ottini, Laura | Tibiletti, Maria Grazia | Radice, Paolo | Yannoukakos, Drakoulis | Garber, Judy | Ellis, Steve | Frost, Debra | Platte, Radka | Fineberg, Elena | Evans, Gareth | Lalloo, Fiona | Izatt, Louise | Eeles, Ros | Adlard, Julian | Davidson, Rosemarie | Cole, Trevor | Eccles, Diana | Cook, Jackie | Hodgson, Shirley | Brewer, Carole | Tischkowitz, Marc | Douglas, Fiona | Porteous, Mary | Side, Lucy | Walker, Lisa | Morrison, Patrick | Donaldson, Alan | Kennedy, John | Foo, Claire | Godwin, Andrew K. | Schmutzler, Rita Katharina | Wappenschmidt, Barbara | Rhiem, Kerstin | Engel, Christoph | Meindl, Alfons | Ditsch, Nina | Arnold, Norbert | Plendl, Hans Jörg | Niederacher, Dieter | Sutter, Christian | Wang-Gohrke, Shan | Steinemann, Doris | Preisler-Adams, Sabine | Kast, Karin | Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda | Gehrig, Andrea | Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique | Sinilnikova, Olga M. | Mazoyer, Sylvie | Damiola, Francesca | Poppe, Bruce | Claes, Kathleen | Piedmonte, Marion | Tucker, Kathy | Backes, Floor | Rodríguez, Gustavo | Brewster, Wendy | Wakeley, Katie | Rutherford, Thomas | Caldés, Trinidad | Nevanlinna, Heli | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Rookus, Matti A. | van Os, Theo A. M. | van der Kolk, Lizet | de Lange, J. L. | Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J. | van der Hout, A. H. | van Asperen, Christi J. | Gómez Garcia, Encarna B. | Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline | Collée, J. Margriet | van Deurzen, Carolien H. M. | van der Luijt, Rob B. | Devilee, Peter | HEBON,  | Olah, Edith | Lázaro, Conxi | Teulé, Alex | Menéndez, Mireia | Jakubowska, Anna | Cybulski, Cezary | Gronwald, Jacek | Lubinski, Jan | Durda, Katarzyna | Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna | Johannsson, Oskar Th. | Maugard, Christine | Montagna, Marco | Tognazzo, Silvia | Teixeira, Manuel R. | Healey, Sue | Investigators, kConFab | Olswold, Curtis | Guidugli, Lucia | Lindor, Noralane | Slager, Susan | Szabo, Csilla I. | Vijai, Joseph | Robson, Mark | Kauff, Noah | Zhang, Liying | Rau-Murthy, Rohini | Fink-Retter, Anneliese | Singer, Christian F. | Rappaport, Christine | Geschwantler Kaulich, Daphne | Pfeiler, Georg | Tea, Muy-Kheng | Berger, Andreas | Phelan, Catherine M. | Greene, Mark H. | Mai, Phuong L. | Lejbkowicz, Flavio | Andrulis, Irene | Mulligan, Anna Marie | Glendon, Gord | Toland, Amanda Ewart | Bojesen, Anders | Pedersen, Inge Sokilde | Sunde, Lone | Thomassen, Mads | Kruse, Torben A. | Jensen, Uffe Birk | Friedman, Eitan | Laitman, Yael | Shimon, Shani Paluch | Simard, Jacques | Easton, Douglas F. | Offit, Kenneth | Couch, Fergus J. | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Antoniou, Antonis C. | Benitez, Javier
PLoS Genetics  2014;10(4):e1004256.
Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the components of the BER pathway, PARP1 (poly ADP ribose polymerase), and both BRCA1 and BRCA2. In the present study, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of 18 genes involved in BER using a tagging SNP approach in a large series of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. 144 SNPs were analyzed in a two stage study involving 23,463 carriers from the CIMBA consortium (the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2). Eleven SNPs showed evidence of association with breast and/or ovarian cancer at p<0.05 in the combined analysis. Four of the five genes for which strongest evidence of association was observed were DNA glycosylases. The strongest evidence was for rs1466785 in the NEIL2 (endonuclease VIII-like 2) gene (HR: 1.09, 95% CI (1.03–1.16), p = 2.7×10−3) for association with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers, and rs2304277 in the OGG1 (8-guanine DNA glycosylase) gene, with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR: 1.12 95%CI: 1.03–1.21, p = 4.8×10−3). DNA glycosylases involved in the first steps of the BER pathway may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and should be more comprehensively studied.
Author Summary
Women harboring a germ-line mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk to develop breast and/or ovarian cancer. However, not all carriers develop cancer and high variability exists regarding age of onset of the disease and type of tumor. One of the causes of this variability lies in other genetic factors that modulate the phenotype, the so-called modifier genes. Identification of these genes might have important implications for risk assessment and decision making regarding prevention of the disease. Given that BRCA1 and BRCA2 participate in the repair of DNA double strand breaks, here we have investigated whether variations, Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), in genes participating in other DNA repair pathway may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA carriers. We have selected the Base Excision Repair pathway because BRCA defective cells are extremely sensitive to the inhibition of one of its components, PARP1. Thanks to a large international collaborative effort, we have been able to identify at least two SNPs that are associated with increased cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers respectively. These findings could have implications not only for risk assessment, but also for treatment of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with PARP inhibitors.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1004256
PMCID: PMC3974638  PMID: 24698998
7.  In Their Own Words: Treating Very Young BRCA1/2 Mutation-Positive Women with Care and Caution 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(2):e87696.
Purpose
Young women who have been identified as carrying a deleterious mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 face a unique set of challenges related to managing cancer risk during a demographically-dense stage of life. They may struggle with decision-making in the absence of clear age-specific guidelines for medical management and because they have not yet fully developed the capacity to make life-altering decisions confidently. This study sought a patient-centered perspective on the dilemmas faced by 18–24 year olds who completed BRCA1/2 gene mutation testing prior to their 25th birthdays.
Patients and Method
This study integrated qualitative data from three independent investigations of BRCA1/2-positive women recruited through cancer risk clinics, hospital-based research centers, and online organizations. All 32 participants were women aged 21–25 who tested positive for a BRCA1/2 gene mutation between 2 and 60 months prior to data collection. Investigators used techniques of grounded theory and interpretive description to conduct both within and cross-study analysis.
Results
Participants expressed needs for (1) greater clarity in recommendations for screening and prevention before age 25, especially with consideration of early and regular exposure to radiation associated with mammography or to hormones used in birth control, and (2) ongoing contact with providers to discuss risk management protocols as they become available.
Conclusions
Health care needs during the young adult years evolve with the cognitive capacity to address abrupt and pressing change. Specific needs of women in this population include a desire to balance autonomous decision-making with supportive guidance, a need for clear, accurate and consistent medical recommendations. Optimally, these women are best cared for by a team of genetically-oriented providers as part of a sustained program of ongoing support, rather than seen in an episodic, crisis-driven fashion. A discussion of insurance issues and provider-patient cultural differences is presented.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0087696
PMCID: PMC3938837  PMID: 24586286
8.  Familial testicular germ cell tumor: no associated syndromic pattern identified 
Background
Testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) is the most common malignancy in young men. Familial clustering, epidemiologic evidence of increased risk with family or personal history, and the association of TGCT with genitourinary (GU) tract anomalies have suggested an underlying genetic predisposition. Linkage data have not identified a rare, highly-penetrant, single gene in familial TGCT (FTGCT) cases. Based on its association with congenital GU tract anomalies and suggestions that there is an intrauterine origin to TGCT, we hypothesized the existence of unrecognized dysmorphic features in FTGCT.
Methods
We evaluated 38 FTGCT individuals and 41 first-degree relatives from 22 multiple-case families with detailed dysmorphology examinations, physician-based medical history and physical examination, laboratory testing, and genitourinary imaging studies.
Results
The prevalence of major abnormalities and minor variants did not significantly differ between either FTGCT individuals or their first-degree relatives when compared with normal population controls, except for tall stature, macrocephaly, flat midface, and retro-/micrognathia. However, these four traits were not manifest as a constellation of features in any one individual or family. We did detect an excess prevalence of the genitourinary anomalies cryptorchidism and congenital inguinal hernia in our population, as previously described in sporadic TGCT, but no congenital renal, retroperitoneal or mediastinal anomalies were detected.
Conclusions
Overall, our study did not identify a constellation of dysmorphic features in FTGCT individuals, which is consistent with results of genetic studies suggesting that multiple low-penetrance genes are likely responsible for FTGCT susceptibility.
doi:10.1186/1897-4287-12-3
PMCID: PMC3937045  PMID: 24559313
Familial testicular cancer; Dysmorphology; Developmental anomalies
9.  Cancer Risk among Patients with Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy 
Jama  2011;306(22):2480-2486.
Context
Myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD) is an autosomal dominant multisystem neuromuscular disorder characterized by unstable nucleotide repeat expansions. Case reports have suggested that MMD patients may be at increased risk of malignancy, putative risks which have never been quantified.
Objective
To quantitatively evaluate cancer risk in patients with MMD, overall, and by sex and age.
Design, Setting, and Participants
We identified 1,658 patients with an MMD discharge diagnosis in the Swedish Inpatient Hospital or Danish Patient Discharge Registries between 1977 and 2008. We linked these patients to their corresponding cancer registry. Patients were followed from date of first MMD-related inpatient or outpatient contact, to first cancer diagnosis, death, emigration, or completion of cancer registration.
Main Outcome Measures
Risks of all cancers combined, and by anatomic site, stratified by sex and age.
Results
104 patients with an inpatient or outpatient discharge diagnosis of MMD developed cancer during post-discharge follow-up. This corresponds to an observed cancer rate of 73.4/10,000 person-years in MMD versus an expected rate of 36.9/10,000 in the general Swedish and Danish populations combined (SIR =2.0, 95% CI =1.6–2.4). Specifically, we observed significant excess risks of cancers of the endometrium (observed rate=16.1/10,000 person-years: SIR=7.6, 95%CI=4.0–13.2), brain (observed rate=4.9/10,000 person-years: SIR=5.3, 95%CI=2.3–10.4), ovary (observed rate=10.3/10,000 person-years: SIR=5.2, 95% CI=2.3–10.2), and colon (observed rate=7.1/10,000 person-years: SIR=2.9, 95%CI=1.5–5.1). Cancer risks were similar in females and males after excluding genital organ tumors (SIR=1.9, 95% CI=1.4–2.5 vs. 1.8, 95% CI=1.3–2.5, respectively, p-heterogeneity=0.81; observed rates=64.5 and 47.7/10,000 person-years in women and men, respectively), The same pattern of cancer excess was observed first in the Swedish, and then in the Danish cohorts, which were studied sequentially and initially analyzed independently.
Conclusions
MMD patients identified from the Swedish and Danish patient registries were at increased risk of cancer both overall and for selected anatomic sites.
doi:10.1001/jama.2011.1796
PMCID: PMC3286183  PMID: 22166607
Myotonic dystrophy; genomic instability; cancer risk
10.  Meta-analysis identifies four new loci associated with testicular germ cell tumor 
Nature genetics  2013;45(6):10.1038/ng.2634.
We conducted a meta-analysis to identify new loci for testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) susceptibility. In the discovery phase, 931 affected individuals and 1,975 controls from three genome wide association studies (GWAS) were analyzed. Replication was conducted in six independent sample sets totaling 3,211 affected individuals and 7,591 controls. In the combined analysis, TGCT risk was significantly associated with markers at four novel loci: 4q22.2 in HPGDS (per allele odds ratio (OR) 1.19, 95%CI 1.12–1.26, P = 1.11×10−8); 7p22.3 in MAD1L1 (OR 1.21, 95%CI 1.14–1.29, P = 5.59×10−9); 16q22.3 in RFWD3 (OR 1.26, 95%CI 1.18–1.34, P = 5.15×10−12); and 17q22 (rs9905704; OR 1.27, 95%CI 1.18–1.33; P = 4.32×10−13, and rs7221274; OR 1.20, 95%CI 1.12–1.28 P = 4.04×10−9), a locus which includes TEX14, RAD51C and PPM1E. The new TGCT susceptibility loci contain biologically plausible genes encoding proteins important for male germ cell development, chromosomal segregation and DNA damage response.
doi:10.1038/ng.2634
PMCID: PMC3723930  PMID: 23666239
11.  Quantifying Cancer Absolute Risk and Cancer Mortality in the Presence of Competing Events after a Myotonic Dystrophy Diagnosis 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(11):e79851.
Recent studies show that patients with myotonic dystrophy (DM) have an increased risk of specific malignancies, but estimates of absolute cancer risk accounting for competing events are lacking. Using the Swedish Patient Registry, we identified 1,081 patients with an inpatient and/or outpatient diagnosis of DM between 1987 and 2007. Date and cause of death and date of cancer diagnosis were extracted from the Swedish Cause of Death and Cancer Registries. We calculated non-parametric estimates of absolute cancer risk and cancer mortality accounting for the high non-cancer competing mortality associated with DM. Absolute cancer risk after DM diagnosis was 1.6% (95% CI=0.4-4%), 5% (95% CI=3-9%) and 9% (95% CI=6-13%) at ages 40, 50 and 60 years, respectively. Females had a higher absolute risk of all cancers combined than males: 9% (95% CI=4-14), and 13% (95% CI=9-20) vs. 2% (95%CI= 0.7-6) and 4% (95%CI=2-8) by ages 50 and 60 years, respectively) and developed cancer at younger ages (median age =51 years, range=22-74 vs. 57, range=43-84, respectively, p=0.02). Cancer deaths accounted for 10% of all deaths, with an absolute cancer mortality risk of 2% (95%CI=1-4.5%), 4% (95%CI=2-6%), and 6% (95%CI=4-9%) by ages 50, 60, and 70 years, respectively. No gender difference in cancer-specific mortality was observed (p=0.6). In conclusion, cancer significantly contributes to morbidity and mortality in DM patients, even after accounting for high competing DM mortality from non-neoplastic causes. It is important to apply population-appropriate, validated cancer screening strategies in DM patients.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0079851
PMCID: PMC3827449  PMID: 24236163
12.  Promoter methylation of candidate genes associated with familial testicular cancer 
Recent genomic studies have identified risk SNPs in or near eight genes associated with testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT). Mouse models suggest a role for Dnd1 epigenetics in TGCT susceptibility, and we have recently reported that transgenerational inheritance of epigenetic events may be associated with familial TGCT risk. We now investigate whether aberrant promoter methylation of selected candidate genes is associated with familial TGCT risk. Pyrosequencing assays were designed to evaluate CpG methylation in the promoters of selected genes in peripheral blood DNA from 153 TGCT affecteds and 116 healthy male relatives from 101 multiple-case families. Wilcoxon rank-sum tests and logistic regression models were used to investigate associations between promoter methylation and TGCT. We also quantified gene product expression of these genes, using quantitative PCR. We observed increased PDE11A, SPRY4 and BAK1 promoter methylation, and decreased KITLG promoter methylation, in familial TGCT cases versus healthy male family controls. A significant upward risk trend was observed for PDE11A when comparing the middle and highest tertiles of methylation to the lowest [odds ratio (OR) =1.55, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.82-2.93, and 1.94, 95% CI 1.03-3.66], respectively; P trend=0.042). A significant inverse association was observed for KITLG when comparing the middle and lowest tertiles to the highest (OR=2.15, 95% CI 1.12-4.11, and 2.15, 95% CI 1.12-4.14, respectively; P trend=0.031). There was a weak inverse correlation between promoter methylation and KITLG expression. Our results suggest that familial TGCT susceptibility may be associated with promoter methylation of previously-identified TGCT risk-modifying genes. Larger studies are warranted.
PMCID: PMC3459216  PMID: 23050052
Promoter methylation; testicular germ cell tumors; familial testicular cancer; epidemiology; candidate gene
13.  Evaluation of chromosome 6p22 as a breast cancer risk modifier locus in a follow-up study of BRCA2 mutation carriers 
Several common germline variants identified through genome-wide association studies of breast cancer risk in the general population have recently been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. When combined, these variants can identify marked differences in the absolute risk of developing breast cancer for mutation carriers, suggesting that additional modifier loci may further enhance individual risk assessment for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Recently, a common variant on 6p22 (rs9393597) was found to be associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers [Hazard ratio (HR)=1.55, 95% CI 1.25–1.92, p=6.0×10−5]. This observation was based on data from GWAS studies in which, despite statistical correction for multiple comparisons, the possibility of false discovery remains a concern. Here we report on an analysis of this variant in an additional 6,165 BRCA1 and 3,900 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). In this replication analysis, rs9393597 was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers [HR=1.09, 95% CI 0.96–1.24, p=0.18]. No association with ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers or with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers was observed. This follow-up study suggests that, contrary to our initial report, this variant is not associated with breast cancer risk among individuals with germline BRCA2 mutations.
doi:10.1007/s10549-012-2255-6
PMCID: PMC3482828  PMID: 23011509
BRCA1; BRCA2; genetic modifier; association study
14.  Correlates of Tumor Development in Patients with Myotonic Dystrophy 
Journal of neurology  2012;259(10):2161-2166.
Patients with myotonic dystrophy (DM) have recently been reported to be at increased risk of tumor development, but clinical associations related to this observation are unknown. We calculated the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of self-reported tumor development by patients’ demographic and clinical characteristics to evaluate factors associated with tumor development in DM patients, using data from the National Registry of Myotonic Dystrophy and Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy Patients and Family Members. Of the 911 participants, 47.5% were male and 85.7% had DM type 1 (DM1). Compared with DM1, patients with DM type 2 (DM2) were older at Registry enrollment (median age =55 vs. 44 years, p<0.0001) and at DM diagnosis (median age= 48 vs. 30 years, p<0.0001); and more likely to be females (p=0.001). At enrollment, 95 (10.4%) DM patients reported a history of benign or malignant tumor. Tumors were associated with female gender (OR=1.9, 95% CI=1.2–3.1, p=0.007) and DM1 (OR=2.1, 95% CI=1.1–4.1, p=0.03). In a subgroup analysis of patients with blood-based DNA testing results (397 DM1, 54 DM2), repeat expansion size was not associated with tumor risk in DM1 (p=0.26) or DM2 (p=0.34). In conclusion, female gender and DM1 subtype, but not DNA repeat expansion size, were associated with increased risk of tumors in DM. Follow-up studies are warranted to determine if oncogenes associated with dystrophia myotonica-protein kinase (DMPK) are altered in DM, and to determine if repeat expansion size, as in our study, is not associated with tumor development.
doi:10.1007/s00415-012-6476-8
PMCID: PMC3469723  PMID: 22619053
Myotonic dystrophy; comorbidity; neoplasms; risk factors; repeat expansion size
15.  Li-Fraumeni syndrome: report of a clinical research workshop and creation of a research consortium 
Cancer genetics  2012;205(10):479-487.
Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare dominantly inherited cancer predisposition syndrome that was first described in 1969. In most families, it is caused by germline mutations in the TP53 gene and is characterized by early onset of multiple specific cancers and very high lifetime cumulative cancer risk. Despite significant progress in understanding the molecular biology of TP53, the optimal clinical management of this syndrome is poorly defined. We convened a workshop on November 2, 2010, at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, bringing together clinicians and scientists, as well as individuals from families with LFS, to review the state of the science, address clinical management issues, stimulate collaborative research, and engage the LFS family community. This workshop also led to the creation of the Li-Fraumeni Exploration (LiFE) Research Consortium.
doi:10.1016/j.cancergen.2012.06.008
PMCID: PMC3593717  PMID: 22939227
Li-Fraumeni syndrome; hereditary cancer predisposition syndrome; TP53 mutations
16.  Challenges Related to Developing Serum-based Biomarkers for Early Ovarian Cancer Detection 
In this issue of the journal, Cramer et al. (page XXX) and Zhu et al. (page XXX) report carefully designed phase-3 assessments of candidate ovarian cancer screening biomarkers. The main conclusion is that CA-125 remains the “best of a bad lot”; the new candidates have fallen short of expectations. We review factors impeding the development of an effective ovarian cancer screening strategy, highlight the requirements related to validating proposed screening biomarkers, and emphasize the risks from premature clinical applications of unvalidated tests, all underscoring the need for new research strategies.
doi:10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-11-0053
PMCID: PMC3077065  PMID: 21372029
17.  Association Between BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations and Survival in Women with Invasive Epithelial Ovarian Cancer 
Bolton, Kelly L. | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Goh, Cindy | Sadetzki, Siegal | Ramus, Susan J. | Karlan, Beth Y. | Lambrechts, Diether | Despierre, Evelyn | Barrowdale, Daniel | McGuffog, Lesley | Healey, Sue | Easton, Douglas F. | Sinilnikova, Olga | Benitez, Javier | García, María J. | Neuhausen, Susan | Gail, Mitchell H. | Hartge, Patricia | Peock, Susan | Frost, Debra | Evans, D. Gareth | Eeles, Ros | Godwin, Andrew K. | Daly, Mary B. | Kwong, Ava | Ma, Edmond SK | Lázaro, Conxi | Blanco, Ignacio | Montagna, Marco | D’Andrea, Emma | Nicoletto, Ornella | Investigators, kConFab | Johnatty, Sharon E. | Kjær, Susanne Krüger | Jensen, Allan | Høgdall, Estrid | Goode, Ellen L. | Fridley, Brooke L. | Loud, Jennifer T. | Greene, Mark H. | Mai, Phuong L. | Chetrit, Angela | Lubin, Flora | Hirsh-Yechezkel, Galit | Glendon, Gord | Andrulis, Irene L. | Toland, Amanda E. | Senter, Leigha | Gore, Martin E. | Gourley, Charlie | Michie, Caroline O | Song, Honglin | Tyrer, Jonathan | Whittemore, Alice S. | McGuire, Valerie | Sieh, Weiva | Kristoffersson, Ulf | Olsson, Håkan | Borg, Åke | Levine, Douglas A. | Steele, Linda | Beattie, Mary S. | Chan, Salina | Nussbaum, Robert | Moysich, Kirsten B. | Gross, Jenny | Cass, Ilana | Walsh, Christine | Li, Andrew J. | Leuchter, Ronald | Gordon, Ora | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Gayther, Simon A. | Chanock, Stephen J. | Antoniou, Antonis C. | Pharoah, Paul D.P.
Context
Approximately 10 percent of women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) carry deleterious germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. A recent report suggested that BRCA2 related EOC was associated with an improved prognosis, but the effect of BRCA1 remains unclear.
Objective
To characterize the survival of BRCA carriers with EOC compared to non-carriers and to determine whether BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers show similar survival patterns.
Design, Setting, and Participants
We pooled data from 26 studies on the survival of women with ovarian cancer. This included data on 1,213 EOC cases with pathogenic germline mutations in BRCA1 (909) or BRCA2 (304) and 2,666 non-carriers recruited and followed for variable times between 1987 and 2010; the median year of diagnosis was 1998.
Main Outcome Measures
Five year overall mortality.
Results
The five-year overall survival was 36 percent (95% CI: 34–38) for non-carriers, 44 percent (95% CI: 40–48) for BRCA1 carriers and 52 percent (95% CI: 46–58) for BRCA2 carriers. After adjusting for study and year of diagnosis, BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers showed a more favorable survival than non-carriers (BRCA1, HR=0.78; 95% CI=0.68–0.89, P=2×10−4; BRCA2, HR = 0.61; 95% CI=0.50–0.76, P=6×10−6). These survival differences remained after additional adjustment for stage, grade, histology and age at diagnosis (BRCA1, HR=0.73, 95% CI=0.64–0.84, P=2×10−5; BRCA2, HR = 0.49, 95% CI=0.39–0.61, P=3×10−10).
Conclusions
Among patients with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer, having a germline mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 was associated with improved 5-year overall survival.
doi:10.1001/jama.2012.20
PMCID: PMC3727895  PMID: 22274685
18.  Serum IGF1, IGF2, and IGFBP3 and risk of advanced colorectal adenoma 
The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway is involved in cell proliferation and differentiation. Elevated serum IGF1 levels have been associated with increased colorectal cancer risk; however, studies of this association with colorectal adenoma are inconclusive. We examined serum IGF1, IGF2, and IGFBP3 levels in relation to risk of advanced colorectal adenoma in a case-control study within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. A total of 764 advanced, left-sided colorectal adenoma cases and 775 controls frequency-matched on gender and ethnicity, without evidence of a left-sided polyp on sigmoidoscopy were included in the current study. Serum levels of IGF1, IGF2, and IGFBP3 were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in serum samples collected at baseline. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the associations adjusting for age, race, sex, year of blood draw, body mass index, smoking, and education. Higher IGF1 levels were associated with increased adenoma risk: ORs = 1.58 (95% CI=1.16–2.16), 1.42 (95% CI=1.04–1.93), and 1.80 (95% CI=1.30–2.47) for the second, third, and fourth quartiles, respectively (Ptrend=0.002). Elevated IGF2 levels were also associated with increased adenoma risk (OR=1.43, 95% CI=1.05–1.96 for the fourth vs. first quartile, Ptrend=0.02), but the association was no longer significant after adjustment for IGF1 (Ptrend=0.28). IGFBP3 levels were not associated with adenoma risk. Our analysis showed a significant positive association between circulating IGF1 levels and risk of advanced colorectal adenoma, suggesting that IGF1 is associated with the pivotal precursor to colorectal cancer.
doi:10.1002/ijc.26438
PMCID: PMC3288254  PMID: 21932422
colorectal adenoma; insulin-like growth factor
19.  Does Bilateral Salpingectomy with Ovarian Retention Warrant Consideration as a Temporary Bridge to Risk-Reducing Bilateral Oophorectomy in BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers? 
Risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) is the most definitive surgical intervention for ovarian cancer risk reduction among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. For women who have completed child-bearing but who are not ready for RRSO, bilateral salpingectomy with ovarian retention (BSOR) might serve as a temporary measure while definitive risk-reducing surgery is being contemplated. Here we summarize recent insights into the pathogenesis of hereditary ovarian cancer which might provide a basis for considering the proposed BSOR management strategy and outline the evidence for and against this potential risk-reducing intervention. Based on the evidence presented, we suggest that there may be sufficient merit in this proposed intervention to consider evaluating it formally, perhaps through an intergroup-based clinical trial. In the meanwhile, we believe that BSOR should be considered an investigational risk management option of unproven clinical utility, particularly since delay in bilateral oophorectomy could theoretically reduce the protective effect against breast cancer that has been documented in women undergoing RRSO.
doi:10.1016/j.ajog.2010.05.038
PMCID: PMC3138129  PMID: 20619389
bilateral oophorectomy; bilateral salpingectomy; BRCA1/2 mutation carriers; ovarian cancer risk; risk-reducing surgery
20.  Potential Usefulness of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms to Identify Persons at High Cancer Risk: An Evaluation of Seven Common Cancers 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2012;30(17):2157-2162.
Purpose
To estimate the likely number and predictive strength of cancer-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are yet to be discovered for seven common cancers.
Methods
From the statistical power of published genome-wide association studies, we estimated the number of undetected susceptibility loci and the distribution of effect sizes for all cancers. Assuming a log-normal model for risks and multiplicative relative risks for SNPs, family history (FH), and known risk factors, we estimated the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and the proportion of patients with risks above risk thresholds for screening. From additional prevalence data, we estimated the positive predictive value and the ratio of non–patient cases to patient cases (false-positive ratio) for various risk thresholds.
Results
Age-specific discriminatory accuracy (AUC) for models including FH and foreseeable SNPs ranged from 0.575 for ovarian cancer to 0.694 for prostate cancer. The proportions of patients in the highest decile of population risk ranged from 16.2% for ovarian cancer to 29.4% for prostate cancer. The corresponding false-positive ratios were 241 for colorectal cancer, 610 for ovarian cancer, and 138 or 280 for breast cancer in women age 50 to 54 or 40 to 44 years, respectively.
Conclusion
Foreseeable common SNP discoveries may not permit identification of small subsets of patients that contain most cancers. Usefulness of screening could be diminished by many false positives. Additional strong risk factors are needed to improve risk discrimination.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2011.40.1943
PMCID: PMC3397697  PMID: 22585702
21.  A Prospective Study of Risk-Reducing Salpingo-oophorectomy and Longitudinal CA-125 Screening among Women at Increased Genetic Risk of Ovarian Cancer: Design and Baseline Characteristics: A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study 
Background
Women who are genetically predisposed to ovarian cancer are at very high risk of developing this disease. Although risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) and various screening regimens are currently recommended to reduce ovarian cancer risk, the optimal management strategy has not been established nor have multiple additional issues been adequately addressed. We developed a collaboration among the Clinical Genetics Branch (National Cancer Institute’s Intramural Research Program), the Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG), and the Cancer Genetics Network to address these issues.
Methods
This is a prospective, international, two-cohort, nonrandomized study of women at genetic risk of ovarian cancer, who chose either to undergo RRSO or screening, at study enrollment. Primary study objectives include quantifying and comparing ovarian and breast cancer incidence in the two study groups, assessing feasibility and selected performance characteristics of a novel ovarian cancer screening strategy (the Risk of Ovarian Cancer Algorithm), evaluating various aspects of quality of life and nononcologic morbidity related to various interventions in at-risk women, and creating a biospecimen repository for subsequent translational research.
Results
Study accrual is complete as of November 2006; 2,605 participants enrolled: 1,030 (40%) into the surgical cohort and 1,575 (60%) into the screening cohort. Five years of prospective follow-up ends in November 2011. Verification of BRCA mutation carrier status is under way, either through patient-provided reports from clinical genetic testing done before enrollment or through research-based genetic testing being conducted as part of the protocol. Patient eligibility is currently under evaluation and baseline, surgical, pathology, and outcome data are still being collected. The study design and selected baseline characteristics of cohort members are summarized.
Conclusion
This National Cancer Institute intramural/extramural collaboration will provide invaluable prospectively collected observational data on women at high familial ovarian cancer risk, including substantial numbers of women carrying BRCA1/2 mutations. These data will aid in elucidating the effect of RRSO on breast/ovarian cancer risk and the effects of two management strategies, on quality of life and other issues that may influence patient care, as well as providing preliminary estimates of test specificity and positive predictive value of a novel ovarian cancer screening strategy.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-07-2703
PMCID: PMC3125978  PMID: 18349277
22.  Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk 
Couch, Fergus J. | Wang, Xianshu | McGuffog, Lesley | Lee, Andrew | Olswold, Curtis | Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B. | Soucy, Penny | Fredericksen, Zachary | Barrowdale, Daniel | Dennis, Joe | Gaudet, Mia M. | Dicks, Ed | Kosel, Matthew | Healey, Sue | Sinilnikova, Olga M. | Lee, Adam | Bacot, François | Vincent, Daniel | Hogervorst, Frans B. L. | Peock, Susan | Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique | Jakubowska, Anna | Investigators, kConFab | Radice, Paolo | Schmutzler, Rita Katharina | Domchek, Susan M. | Piedmonte, Marion | Singer, Christian F. | Friedman, Eitan | Thomassen, Mads | Hansen, Thomas V. O. | Neuhausen, Susan L. | Szabo, Csilla I. | Blanco, Ignacio | Greene, Mark H. | Karlan, Beth Y. | Garber, Judy | Phelan, Catherine M. | Weitzel, Jeffrey N. | Montagna, Marco | Olah, Edith | Andrulis, Irene L. | Godwin, Andrew K. | Yannoukakos, Drakoulis | Goldgar, David E. | Caldes, Trinidad | Nevanlinna, Heli | Osorio, Ana | Terry, Mary Beth | Daly, Mary B. | van Rensburg, Elizabeth J. | Hamann, Ute | Ramus, Susan J. | Ewart Toland, Amanda | Caligo, Maria A. | Olopade, Olufunmilayo I. | Tung, Nadine | Claes, Kathleen | Beattie, Mary S. | Southey, Melissa C. | Imyanitov, Evgeny N. | Tischkowitz, Marc | Janavicius, Ramunas | John, Esther M. | Kwong, Ava | Diez, Orland | Balmaña, Judith | Barkardottir, Rosa B. | Arun, Banu K. | Rennert, Gad | Teo, Soo-Hwang | Ganz, Patricia A. | Campbell, Ian | van der Hout, Annemarie H. | van Deurzen, Carolien H. M. | Seynaeve, Caroline | Gómez Garcia, Encarna B. | van Leeuwen, Flora E. | Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J. | Gille, Johannes J. P. | Ausems, Margreet G. E. M. | Blok, Marinus J. | Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L. | Rookus, Matti A. | Devilee, Peter | Verhoef, Senno | van Os, Theo A. M. | Wijnen, Juul T. | Frost, Debra | Ellis, Steve | Fineberg, Elena | Platte, Radka | Evans, D. Gareth | Izatt, Louise | Eeles, Rosalind A. | Adlard, Julian | Eccles, Diana M. | Cook, Jackie | Brewer, Carole | Douglas, Fiona | Hodgson, Shirley | Morrison, Patrick J. | Side, Lucy E. | Donaldson, Alan | Houghton, Catherine | Rogers, Mark T. | Dorkins, Huw | Eason, Jacqueline | Gregory, Helen | McCann, Emma | Murray, Alex | Calender, Alain | Hardouin, Agnès | Berthet, Pascaline | Delnatte, Capucine | Nogues, Catherine | Lasset, Christine | Houdayer, Claude | Leroux, Dominique | Rouleau, Etienne | Prieur, Fabienne | Damiola, Francesca | Sobol, Hagay | Coupier, Isabelle | Venat-Bouvet, Laurence | Castera, Laurent | Gauthier-Villars, Marion | Léoné, Mélanie | Pujol, Pascal | Mazoyer, Sylvie | Bignon, Yves-Jean | Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta | Gronwald, Jacek | Lubinski, Jan | Durda, Katarzyna | Jaworska, Katarzyna | Huzarski, Tomasz | Spurdle, Amanda B. | Viel, Alessandra | Peissel, Bernard | Bonanni, Bernardo | Melloni, Giulia | Ottini, Laura | Papi, Laura | Varesco, Liliana | Tibiletti, Maria Grazia | Peterlongo, Paolo | Volorio, Sara | Manoukian, Siranoush | Pensotti, Valeria | Arnold, Norbert | Engel, Christoph | Deissler, Helmut | Gadzicki, Dorothea | Gehrig, Andrea | Kast, Karin | Rhiem, Kerstin | Meindl, Alfons | Niederacher, Dieter | Ditsch, Nina | Plendl, Hansjoerg | Preisler-Adams, Sabine | Engert, Stefanie | Sutter, Christian | Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda | Wappenschmidt, Barbara | Weber, Bernhard H. F. | Arver, Brita | Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie | Loman, Niklas | Rosenquist, Richard | Einbeigi, Zakaria | Nathanson, Katherine L. | Rebbeck, Timothy R. | Blank, Stephanie V. | Cohn, David E. | Rodriguez, Gustavo C. | Small, Laurie | Friedlander, Michael | Bae-Jump, Victoria L. | Fink-Retter, Anneliese | Rappaport, Christine | Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne | Pfeiler, Georg | Tea, Muy-Kheng | Lindor, Noralane M. | Kaufman, Bella | Shimon Paluch, Shani | Laitman, Yael | Skytte, Anne-Bine | Gerdes, Anne-Marie | Pedersen, Inge Sokilde | Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl | Kruse, Torben A. | Jensen, Uffe Birk | Vijai, Joseph | Sarrel, Kara | Robson, Mark | Kauff, Noah | Mulligan, Anna Marie | Glendon, Gord | Ozcelik, Hilmi | Ejlertsen, Bent | Nielsen, Finn C. | Jønson, Lars | Andersen, Mette K. | Ding, Yuan Chun | Steele, Linda | Foretova, Lenka | Teulé, Alex | Lazaro, Conxi | Brunet, Joan | Pujana, Miquel Angel | Mai, Phuong L. | Loud, Jennifer T. | Walsh, Christine | Lester, Jenny | Orsulic, Sandra | Narod, Steven A. | Herzog, Josef | Sand, Sharon R. | Tognazzo, Silvia | Agata, Simona | Vaszko, Tibor | Weaver, Joellen | Stavropoulou, Alexandra V. | Buys, Saundra S. | Romero, Atocha | de la Hoya, Miguel | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Muranen, Taru A. | Duran, Mercedes | Chung, Wendy K. | Lasa, Adriana | Dorfling, Cecilia M. | Miron, Alexander | Benitez, Javier | Senter, Leigha | Huo, Dezheng | Chan, Salina B. | Sokolenko, Anna P. | Chiquette, Jocelyne | Tihomirova, Laima | Friebel, Tara M. | Agnarsson, Bjarni A. | Lu, Karen H. | Lejbkowicz, Flavio | James, Paul A. | Hall, Per | Dunning, Alison M. | Tessier, Daniel | Cunningham, Julie | Slager, Susan L. | Wang, Chen | Hart, Steven | Stevens, Kristen | Simard, Jacques | Pastinen, Tomi | Pankratz, Vernon S. | Offit, Kenneth | Easton, Douglas F. | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Antoniou, Antonis C.
PLoS Genetics  2013;9(3):e1003212.
BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7×10−8, HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09–1.20). In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4×10−8, HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38) and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4×10−8, HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38). The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10−4). These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%–50% compared to 81%–100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers.
Author Summary
BRCA1 mutation carriers have increased and variable risks of breast and ovarian cancer. To identify modifiers of breast and ovarian cancer risk in this population, a multi-stage GWAS of 14,351 BRCA1 mutation carriers was performed. Loci 1q32 and TCF7L2 at 10q25.3 were associated with breast cancer risk, and two loci at 4q32.2 and 17q21.31 were associated with ovarian cancer risk. The 4q32.3 ovarian cancer locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or in BRCA2 carriers and is the first indication of a BRCA1-specific risk locus for either breast or ovarian cancer. Furthermore, modeling the influence of these modifiers on cumulative risk of breast and ovarian cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers for the first time showed that a wide range of individual absolute risks of each cancer can be estimated. These differences suggest that genetic risk modifiers may be incorporated into the clinical management of BRCA1 mutation carriers.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1003212
PMCID: PMC3609646  PMID: 23544013
23.  Identification of a BRCA2-Specific Modifier Locus at 6p24 Related to Breast Cancer Risk 
Gaudet, Mia M. | Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B. | Vijai, Joseph | Klein, Robert J. | Kirchhoff, Tomas | McGuffog, Lesley | Barrowdale, Daniel | Dunning, Alison M. | Lee, Andrew | Dennis, Joe | Healey, Sue | Dicks, Ed | Soucy, Penny | Sinilnikova, Olga M. | Pankratz, Vernon S. | Wang, Xianshu | Eldridge, Ronald C. | Tessier, Daniel C. | Vincent, Daniel | Bacot, Francois | Hogervorst, Frans B. L. | Peock, Susan | Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique | Peterlongo, Paolo | Schmutzler, Rita K. | Nathanson, Katherine L. | Piedmonte, Marion | Singer, Christian F. | Thomassen, Mads | Hansen, Thomas v. O. | Neuhausen, Susan L. | Blanco, Ignacio | Greene, Mark H. | Garber, Judith | Weitzel, Jeffrey N. | Andrulis, Irene L. | Goldgar, David E. | D'Andrea, Emma | Caldes, Trinidad | Nevanlinna, Heli | Osorio, Ana | van Rensburg, Elizabeth J. | Arason, Adalgeir | Rennert, Gad | van den Ouweland, Ans M. W. | van der Hout, Annemarie H. | Kets, Carolien M. | Aalfs, Cora M. | Wijnen, Juul T. | Ausems, Margreet G. E. M. | Frost, Debra | Ellis, Steve | Fineberg, Elena | Platte, Radka | Evans, D. Gareth | Jacobs, Chris | Adlard, Julian | Tischkowitz, Marc | Porteous, Mary E. | Damiola, Francesca | Golmard, Lisa | Barjhoux, Laure | Longy, Michel | Belotti, Muriel | Ferrer, Sandra Fert | Mazoyer, Sylvie | Spurdle, Amanda B. | Manoukian, Siranoush | Barile, Monica | Genuardi, Maurizio | Arnold, Norbert | Meindl, Alfons | Sutter, Christian | Wappenschmidt, Barbara | Domchek, Susan M. | Pfeiler, Georg | Friedman, Eitan | Jensen, Uffe Birk | Robson, Mark | Shah, Sohela | Lazaro, Conxi | Mai, Phuong L. | Benitez, Javier | Southey, Melissa C. | Schmidt, Marjanka K. | Fasching, Peter A. | Peto, Julian | Humphreys, Manjeet K. | Wang, Qin | Michailidou, Kyriaki | Sawyer, Elinor J. | Burwinkel, Barbara | Guénel, Pascal | Bojesen, Stig E. | Milne, Roger L. | Brenner, Hermann | Lochmann, Magdalena | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Dörk, Thilo | Margolin, Sara | Mannermaa, Arto | Lambrechts, Diether | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Radice, Paolo | Giles, Graham G. | Haiman, Christopher A. | Winqvist, Robert | Devillee, Peter | García-Closas, Montserrat | Schoof, Nils | Hooning, Maartje J. | Cox, Angela | Pharoah, Paul D. P. | Jakubowska, Anna | Orr, Nick | González-Neira, Anna | Pita, Guillermo | Alonso, M. Rosario | Hall, Per | Couch, Fergus J. | Simard, Jacques | Altshuler, David | Easton, Douglas F. | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Antoniou, Antonis C. | Offit, Kenneth
PLoS Genetics  2013;9(3):e1003173.
Common genetic variants contribute to the observed variation in breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers; those known to date have all been found through population-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS). To comprehensively identify breast cancer risk modifying loci for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we conducted a deep replication of an ongoing GWAS discovery study. Using the ranked P-values of the breast cancer associations with the imputed genotype of 1.4 M SNPs, 19,029 SNPs were selected and designed for inclusion on a custom Illumina array that included a total of 211,155 SNPs as part of a multi-consortial project. DNA samples from 3,881 breast cancer affected and 4,330 unaffected BRCA2 mutation carriers from 47 studies belonging to the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 were genotyped and available for analysis. We replicated previously reported breast cancer susceptibility alleles in these BRCA2 mutation carriers and for several regions (including FGFR2, MAP3K1, CDKN2A/B, and PTHLH) identified SNPs that have stronger evidence of association than those previously published. We also identified a novel susceptibility allele at 6p24 that was inversely associated with risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers (rs9348512; per allele HR = 0.85, 95% CI 0.80–0.90, P = 3.9×10−8). This SNP was not associated with breast cancer risk either in the general population or in BRCA1 mutation carriers. The locus lies within a region containing TFAP2A, which encodes a transcriptional activation protein that interacts with several tumor suppressor genes. This report identifies the first breast cancer risk locus specific to a BRCA2 mutation background. This comprehensive update of novel and previously reported breast cancer susceptibility loci contributes to the establishment of a panel of SNPs that modify breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers. This panel may have clinical utility for women with BRCA2 mutations weighing options for medical prevention of breast cancer.
Author Summary
Women who carry BRCA2 mutations have an increased risk of breast cancer that varies widely. To identify common genetic variants that modify the breast cancer risk associated with BRCA2 mutations, we have built upon our previous work in which we examined genetic variants across the genome in relation to breast cancer risk among BRCA2 mutation carriers. Using a custom genotyping platform with 211,155 genetic variants known as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we genotyped 3,881 women who had breast cancer and 4,330 women without breast cancer, which represents the largest possible, international collection of BRCA2 mutation carriers. We identified that a SNP located at 6p24 in the genome was associated with lower risk of breast cancer. Importantly, this SNP was not associated with breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers or in a general population of women, indicating that the breast cancer association with this SNP might be specific to BRCA2 mutation carriers. Combining this BRCA2-specific SNP with 13 other breast cancer risk SNPs also known to modify risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers, we were able to derive a risk prediction model that could be useful in helping women with BRCA2 mutations weigh their risk-reduction strategy options.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1003173
PMCID: PMC3609647  PMID: 23544012
24.  A non-synonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers 
Ding, Yuan C. | McGuffog, Lesley | Healey, Sue | Friedman, Eitan | Laitman, Yael | Shani-Shimon–Paluch,  | Kaufman, Bella | Liljegren, Annelie | Lindblom, Annika | Olsson, Håkan | Kristoffersson, Ulf | Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie | Melin, Beatrice | Domchek, Susan M. | Nathanson, Katherine L. | Rebbeck, Timothy R. | Jakubowska, Anna | Lubinski, Jan | Jaworska, Katarzyna | Durda, Katarzyna | Gronwald, Jacek | Huzarski, Tomasz | Cybulski, Cezary | Byrski, Tomasz | Osorio, Ana | Cajal, Teresa Ramóny | Stavropoulou, Alexandra V | Benítez, Javier | Hamann, Ute | Rookus, Matti | Aalfs, Cora M. | de Lange, Judith L. | Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J. | Oosterwijk, Jan C. | van Asperen, Christi J. | García, Encarna B. Gómez | Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline | Jager, Agnes | van der Luijt, Rob B. | Easton, Douglas F. | Peock, Susan | Frost, Debra | Ellis, Steve D. | Platte, Radka | Fineberg, Elena | Evans, D. Gareth | Lalloo, Fiona | Izatt, Louise | Eeles, Ros | Adlard, Julian | Davidson, Rosemarie | Eccles, Diana | Cole, Trevor | Cook, Jackie | Brewer, Carole | Tischkowitz, Marc | Godwin, Andrew K. | Pathak, Harsh | Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique | Sinilnikova, Olga M. | Mazoyer, Sylvie | Barjhoux, Laure | Léoné, Mélanie | Gauthier-Villars, Marion | Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie | de Pauw, Antoine | Hardouin, Agnès | Berthet, Pascaline | Dreyfus, Hélène | Ferrer, Sandra Fert | Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès | Sokolowska, Johanna | Buys, Saundra | Daly, Mary | Miron, Alex | Terry, Mary Beth | Chung, Wendy | John, Esther M | Southey, Melissa | Goldgar, David | Singer, Christian F | Maria, Muy-Kheng Tea | Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne | Fink-Retter, Anneliese | Hansen, Thomas v. O. | Ejlertsen, Bent | Johannsson, Oskar Th. | Offit, Kenneth | Sarrel, Kara | Gaudet, Mia M. | Vijai, Joseph | Robson, Mark | Piedmonte, Marion R | Andrews, Lesley | Cohn, David | DeMars, Leslie R. | DiSilvestro, Paul | Rodriguez, Gustavo | Toland, Amanda Ewart | Montagna, Marco | Agata, Simona | Imyanitov, Evgeny | Isaacs, Claudine | Janavicius, Ramunas | Lazaro, Conxi | Blanco, Ignacio | Ramus, Susan J | Sucheston, Lara | Karlan, Beth Y. | Gross, Jenny | Ganz, Patricia A. | Beattie, Mary S. | Schmutzler, Rita K. | Wappenschmidt, Barbara | Meindl, Alfons | Arnold, Norbert | Niederacher, Dieter | Preisler-Adams, Sabine | Gadzicki, Dorotehea | Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda | Deissler, Helmut | Gehrig, Andrea | Sutter, Christian | Kast, Karin | Nevanlinna, Heli | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Simard, Jacques | Spurdle, Amanda B. | Beesley, Jonathan | Chen, Xiaoqing | Tomlinson, Gail E. | Weitzel, Jeffrey | Garber, Judy E. | Olopade, Olufunmilayo I. | Rubinstein, Wendy S. | Tung, Nadine | Blum, Joanne L. | Narod, Steven A. | Brummel, Sean | Gillen, Daniel L. | Lindor, Noralane | Fredericksen, Zachary | Pankratz, Vernon S. | Couch, Fergus J. | Radice, Paolo | Peterlongo, Paolo | Greene, Mark H. | Loud, Jennifer T. | Mai, Phuong L. | Andrulis, Irene L. | Glendon, Gord | Ozcelik, Hilmi | Gerdes, Anne-Marie | Thomassen, Mads | Jensen, Uffe Birk | Skytte, Anne-Bine | Caligo, Maria A. | Lee, Andrew | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Antoniou, Antonis C | Neuhausen, Susan L.
Background
We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated with breast cancer risk in a larger cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.
Methods
IRS1 rs1801123, rs1330645, and rs1801278 were genotyped in samples from 36 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Data were analyzed by a retrospective cohort approach modeling the associations with breast and ovarian cancer risks simultaneously. Analyses were stratified by BRCA1 and BRCA2 status and mutation class in BRCA1 carriers.
Results
Rs1801278 (Gly972Arg) was associated with ovarian cancer risk for both BRCA1 [Hazard ratio (HR) = 1.43; 95% CI: 1.06–1.92; p = 0.019] and BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR=2.21; 95% CI: 1.39–3.52, p=0.0008). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, the breast cancer risk was higher in carriers with class 2 mutations than class 1 (mutations (class 2 HR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.28–2.70; class 1 HR=0.86, 95%CI:0.69–1.09; p-for difference=0.0006). Rs13306465 was associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers (HR = 2.42; p = 0.03).
Conclusion
The IRS1 Gly972Arg SNP, which affects insulin-like growth factor and insulin signaling, modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers.
Impact
These findings may prove useful for risk prediction for breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-12-0229
PMCID: PMC3415567  PMID: 22729394
Breast cancer; Ovarian cancer; BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers; insulin receptor substrate 1; Insulin-like growth factor /insulin (IGF/INS) signaling
25.  Correction: Common Genetic Variants and Modification of Penetrance of BRCA2-Associated Breast Cancer 
Gaudet, Mia M. | Kirchhoff, Tomas | Green, Todd | Vijai, Joseph | Korn, Joshua M. | Guiducci, Candace | Segrè, Ayellet V. | McGee, Kate | McGuffog, Lesley | Kartsonaki, Christiana | Morrison, Jonathan | Healey, Sue | Sinilnikova, Olga M. | Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique | Mazoyer, Sylvie | Gauthier-Villars, Marion | Sobol, Hagay | Longy, Michel | Frenay, Marc | GEMO Study Collaborators,  | Hogervorst, Frans B. L. | Rookus, Matti A. | Collée, J. Margriet | Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline | van Roozendaal, Kees E. P. | Piedmonte, Marion | Rubinstein, Wendy | Nerenstone, Stacy | Van Le, Linda | Blank, Stephanie V. | Caldés, Trinidad | de la Hoya, Miguel | Nevanlinna, Heli | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Lazaro, Conxi | Blanco, Ignacio | Arason, Adalgeir | Johannsson, Oskar T. | Barkardottir, Rosa B. | Devilee, Peter | Olopade, Olofunmilayo I. | Neuhausen, Susan L. | Wang, Xianshu | Fredericksen, Zachary S. | Peterlongo, Paolo | Manoukian, Siranoush | Barile, Monica | Viel, Alessandra | Radice, Paolo | Phelan, Catherine M. | Narod, Steven | Rennert, Gad | Lejbkowicz, Flavio | Flugelman, Anath | Andrulis, Irene L. | Glendon, Gord | Ozcelik, Hilmi | Toland, Amanda E. | Montagna, Marco | D'Andrea, Emma | Friedman, Eitan | Laitman, Yael | Borg, Ake | Beattie, Mary | Ramus, Susan J. | Domchek, Susan M. | Nathanson, Katherine L. | Rebbeck, Tim | Spurdle, Amanda B. | Chen, Xiaoqing | Holland, Helene | John, Esther M. | Hopper, John L. | Buys, Saundra S. | Daly, Mary B. | Southey, Melissa C. | Terry, Mary Beth | Tung, Nadine | Overeem Hansen, Thomas V. | Nielsen, Finn C. | Greene, Mark H. | Mai, Phuong L. | Osorio, Ana | Durán, Mercedes | Andres, Raquel | Benítez, Javier | Weitzel, Jeffrey N. | Garber, Judy | Hamann, Ute | Peock, Susan | Cook, Margaret | Oliver, Clare | Frost, Debra | Platte, Radka | Evans, D. Gareth | Lalloo, Fiona | Eeles, Ros | Izatt, Louise | Walker, Lisa | Eason, Jacqueline | Barwell, Julian | Godwin, Andrew K. | Schmutzler, Rita K. | Wappenschmidt, Barbara | Engert, Stefanie | Arnold, Norbert | Gadzicki, Dorothea | Dean, Michael | Gold, Bert | Klein, Robert J. | Couch, Fergus J. | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Easton, Douglas F. | Daly, Mark J. | Antoniou, Antonis C. | Altshuler, David M. | Offit, Kenneth
PLoS Genetics  2010;6(11):10.1371/annotation/59ea8540-4e63-4f4a-a79e-f68765fdeac7.
doi:10.1371/annotation/59ea8540-4e63-4f4a-a79e-f68765fdeac7
PMCID: PMC2988688

Results 1-25 (81)