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1.  Chylomicronemia mutations yield new insights into interactions between lipoprotein lipase and GPIHBP1 
Human Molecular Genetics  2012;21(13):2961-2972.
Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a 448-amino-acid head-to-tail dimeric enzyme that hydrolyzes triglycerides within capillaries. LPL is secreted by parenchymal cells into the interstitial spaces; it then binds to GPIHBP1 (glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein-binding protein 1) on the basolateral face of endothelial cells and is transported to the capillary lumen. A pair of amino acid substitutions, C418Y and E421K, abolish LPL binding to GPIHBP1, suggesting that the C-terminal portion of LPL is important for GPIHBP1 binding. However, a role for LPL's N terminus has not been excluded, and published evidence has suggested that only full-length homodimers are capable of binding GPIHBP1. Here, we show that LPL's C-terminal domain is sufficient for GPIHBP1 binding. We found, serendipitously, that two LPL missense mutations, G409R and E410V, render LPL susceptible to cleavage at residue 297 (a known furin cleavage site). The C terminus of these mutants (residues 298–448), bound to GPIHBP1 avidly, independent of the N-terminal fragment. We also generated an LPL construct with an in-frame deletion of the N-terminal catalytic domain (residues 50–289); this mutant was secreted but also was cleaved at residue 297. Once again, the C-terminal domain (residues 298–448) bound GPIHBP1 avidly. The binding of the C-terminal fragment to GPIHBP1 was eliminated by C418Y or E421K mutations. After exposure to denaturing conditions, the C-terminal fragment of LPL refolds and binds GPIHBP1 avidly. Thus, the binding of LPL to GPIHBP1 requires only the C-terminal portion of LPL and does not depend on full-length LPL homodimers.
doi:10.1093/hmg/dds127
PMCID: PMC3373243  PMID: 22493000
2.  Binding Preferences for GPIHBP1, a GPI-Anchored Protein of Capillary Endothelial Cells 
Objective
GPIHBP1, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored Ly6 protein of capillary endothelial cells, binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) avidly, but its ability to bind related lipase family members has never been evaluated. We sought to define the ability of GPIHBP1 to bind other lipase family members as well as other apolipoproteins and lipoproteins.
Methods and Results
As judged by cell-based and cell-free binding assays, LPL binds to GPIHBP1 but other members of the lipase family do not. We also examined the binding of apoAV–phospholipid disks to GPIHBP1. ApoAV binds avidly to GPIHBP1-transfected cells; this binding requires GPIHBP1’s amino-terminal acidic domain and is independent of its cysteine-rich Ly6 domain (the latter domain is essential for LPL binding). GPIHBP1-transfected cells did not bind HDL. Chylomicrons binds avidly to GPIHBP1-transfected CHO cells, but this binding is dependent on GPIHBP1’s ability to bind LPL within the cell culture medium.
Conclusions
GPIHBP1 binds LPL but does not bind other lipase family members. GPIHBP1 binds apoAV but did not bind apoAI or HDL. The ability of GPIHBP1-transfected CHO cells to bind chylomicrons is mediated by LPL; chylomicron binding does not occur unless GPIHBP1 first captures LPL from the cell culture medium.
doi:10.1161/ATVBAHA.110.214718
PMCID: PMC3004026  PMID: 20966398
lipoprotein lipase; chylomicronemia; hypertriglyceridemia; GPIHBP1
3.  Cholesterol Intake Modulates Plasma Triglyceride Levels in GPIHBP1-deficient Mice 
Objective
Adult GPIHBP1-deficient mice (Gpihbp1−/−) have severe hypertriglyceridemia; however, the plasma triglyceride levels are only mildly elevated during the suckling phase when lipoprotein lipase (Lpl) is expressed at high levels in the liver. Lpl expression in the liver can be induced in adult mice with dietary cholesterol. We therefore hypothesized that plasma triglyceride levels in adult Gpihbp1−/− mice would be sensitive to cholesterol intake.
Methods and Results
After 4–8 weeks on a western diet containing 0.15% cholesterol, plasma triglyceride levels in Gpihbp1−/− mice were 10,000–12,000 mg/dl. When 0.005% ezetimibe was added to the diet to block cholesterol absorption, Lpl expression in the liver was reduced significantly, and the plasma triglyceride levels were significantly higher (>15,000 mg/dl). We also assessed plasma triglyceride levels in Gpihbp1−/− mice fed western diets containing either high (1.3%) or low (0.05%) amounts of cholesterol. The high-cholesterol diet significantly increased Lpl expression in the liver and lowered plasma triglyceride levels.
Conclusions
Treatment of Gpihbp1−/− mice with ezetimibe lowers Lpl expression in the liver and increases plasma triglyceride levels. A high-cholesterol diet had the opposite effects. Thus, cholesterol intake modulates plasma triglyceride levels in Gpihbp1−/− mice.
doi:10.1161/ATVBAHA.110.214403
PMCID: PMC2959134  PMID: 20814015
lipoprotein lipase; chylomicronemia; hypertriglyceridemia; GPIHBP1
4.  GPIHBP1 Is Responsible for the Entry of Lipoprotein Lipase into Capillaries 
Cell metabolism  2010;12(1):42-52.
SUMMARY
The lipolytic processing of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is the central event in plasma lipid metabolism, providing lipids for storage in adipose tissue and fuel for vital organs such as the heart. LPL is synthesized and secreted by myocytes and adipocytes but then finds its way into the lumen of capillaries, where it hydrolyzes lipoprotein triglycerides. The mechanism by which LPL reaches the lumen of capillaries represents one of the most persistent mysteries of plasma lipid metabolism. Here, we show that GPIHBP1 is responsible for the transport of LPL into capillaries. In Gpihbp1-deficient mice, LPL is mislocalized to the interstitial spaces surrounding myocytes and adipocytes. Also, we show that GPIHBP1 is located at the basolateral surface of capillary endothelial cells and actively transports LPL across endothelial cells. Our experiments define the function of GPIHBP1 in triglyceride metabolism and provide a mechanism for the transport of LPL into capillaries.
doi:10.1016/j.cmet.2010.04.016
PMCID: PMC2913606  PMID: 20620994
5.  Complementation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae coq7 Mutants by Mitochondrial Targeting of the Escherichia coli UbiF Polypeptide 
The Journal of biological chemistry  2006;281(24):16401-16409.
Coenzyme Q (ubiquinone or Q) functions in the respiratory electron transport chain and serves as a lipophilic antioxidant. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Q biosynthesis requires nine Coq proteins (Coq1–Coq9). Previous work suggests both an enzymatic activity and a structural role for the yeast Coq7 protein. To define the functional roles of yeast Coq7p we test whether Escherichia coli ubiF can functionally substitute for yeast COQ7. The ubiF gene encodes a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that shares no homology to the Coq7 protein and is required for the final monooxygenase step of Q biosynthesis in E. coli. The ubiF gene expressed at low copy restores growth of a coq7 point mutant (E194K) on medium containing a non-fermentable carbon source, but fails to rescue a coq7 null mutant. However, expression of ubiF from a multicopy vector restores growth and Q synthesis for both mutants, although with a higher efficiency in the point mutant. We attribute the more efficient rescue of the coq7 point mutant to higher steady state levels of the Coq3, Coq4, and Coq6 proteins and to the presence of demethoxyubiquinone, the substrate of UbiF. Coq7p co-migrates with the Coq3 and Coq4 polypeptides as a high molecular mass complex. Here we show that addition of Q to the growth media also stabilizes the Coq3 and Coq4 polypeptides in the coq7 null mutant. The data suggest that Coq7p, and the lipid quinones (demethoxyubiquinone and Q) function to stabilize other Coq polypeptides.
doi:10.1074/jbc.M513267200
PMCID: PMC3066048  PMID: 16624818
6.  GPIHBP1—an endothelial cell molecule important for the lipolytic processing of chylomicrons 
Current opinion in lipidology  2007;18(4):389-396.
Purpose of review
This review summarizes recent data indicating that glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein–binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1) plays a key role in the lipolytic processing of chylomicrons.
Recent findings
Lipoprotein lipase (LpL) hydrolyzes triglycerides in chylomicrons at the luminal surface of the capillaries in heart, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle. However, the endothelial cell molecule that facilitates the lipolytic processing of chylomicrons has never been clearly defined. Mice lacking GPIHBP1 manifest chylomicronemia, with plasma triglyceride levels as high as 5,000 mg/dl. In wild-type mice, GPIHBP1 is expressed on the luminal surface of capillaries in heart, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle. Cells transfected with GPIHBP1 bind both chylomicrons and LpL avidly.
Summary
The chylomicronemia in Gpihbp1-deficient mice, the fact that GPIHBP1 is located within the lumen of capillaries, and the fact that GPIHBP1 binds LpL and chylomicrons suggest that GPIHBP1 is a key platform for the lipolytic processing of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins.
doi:10.1097/MOL.0b013e3281527914
PMCID: PMC2888298  PMID: 17620854
Chylomicronemia; lipoprotein lipase; hypertriglyceridemia; GPI-anchored proteins
7.  Chylomicronemia With a Mutant GPIHBP1 (Q115P) That Cannot Bind Lipoprotein Lipase 
Objective
GPIHBP1 is an endothelial cell protein that binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and chylomicrons. Because GPIHBP1 deficiency causes chylomicronemia in mice, we sought to determine whether some cases of chylomicronemia in humans could be attributable to defective GPIHBP1 proteins.
Methods and Results
Patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia (n=60, with plasma triglycerides above the 95th percentile for age and gender) were screened for mutations in GPIHBP1. A homozygous GPIHBP1 mutation (c.344A>C) that changed a highly conserved glutamine at residue 115 to a proline (p.Q115P) was identified in a 33-year-old male with lifelong chylomicronemia. The patient had failure-to-thrive as a child but had no history of pancreatitis. He had no mutations in LPL, APOA5, or APOC2. The Q115P substitution did not affect the ability of GPIHBP1 to reach the cell surface. However, unlike wild-type GPIHBP1, GPIHBP1-Q115P lacked the ability to bind LPL or chylomicrons (d <1.006 g/mL lipoproteins from Gpihbp1−/− mice). Mouse GPIHBP1 with the corresponding mutation (Q114P) also could not bind LPL.
Conclusions
A homozygous missense mutation in GPIHBP1 (Q115P) was identified in a patient with chylomicronemia. The mutation eliminated the ability of GPIHBP1 to bind LPL and chylomicrons, strongly suggesting that it caused the patient’s chylomicronemia.
doi:10.1161/ATVBAHA.109.186577
PMCID: PMC2811263  PMID: 19304573
lipoprotein; lipase; human; chylomicronemia; hypertriglyceridemia; GPIHBP1
8.  GPIHBP1 and lipolysis: an update 
Current opinion in lipidology  2009;20(3):211-216.
Purpose of review
This review will provide an update on the structure of GPIHBP1, a 28-kDa glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein, and its role in the lipolytic processing of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins.
Recent findings
Gpihbp1 knockout mice on a chow diet have milky plasma and plasma triglyceride levels of more than 3000 mg/dl. GPIHBP1 is located on the luminal surface of endothelial cells in tissues where lipolysis occurs: heart, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue. The pattern of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) release into the plasma after an intravenous injection of heparin is abnormal in Gpihbp1-deficient mice, suggesting that GPIHBP1 plays a direct role in binding LPL within the tissues of mice. Transfection of CHO cells with a GPIHBP1 expression vector confers on cells the ability to bind both LPL and chylomicrons. Two regions of GPIHBP1 are required for the binding of LPL – an amino-terminal acidic domain and the cysteine-rich Ly6 domain. GPIHBP1 expression in mice changes with fasting and refeeding and is regulated in part by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ.
Summary
GPIHBP1, an endothelial cell-surface glycoprotein, binds LPL and is required for the lipolytic processing of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins.
doi:10.1097/MOL.0b013e32832ac026
PMCID: PMC2810420  PMID: 19369870
chylomicrons; endothelial; lipoprotein lipase; PPARγ
9.  The Yeast Coq4 Polypeptide Organizes a Mitochondrial Protein Complex Essential for Coenzyme Q Biosynthesis 
Biochimica et biophysica acta  2008;1791(1):69-75.
Summary
Coenzyme Q is a redox active lipid essential for aerobic respiration. The Coq4 polypeptide is required for Q biosynthesis and growth on non-fermentable carbon sources, however its exact function in this pathway is not known. Here we probe the functional roles of Coq4p in a yeast Q biosynthetic polypeptide complex. A yeast coq4-1 mutant harboring an E226K substitution is unable to grow on nonfermentable carbon sources. The coq4-1 yeast mutant retains significant Coq3p O-methyltransferase activity, and mitochondria isolated from coq4-1 and coq4-2 (E121K) yeast point mutants contain normal steady state levels of Coq polypeptides, unlike the decreased levels of Coq polypeptides generally found in strains harboring coq gene deletions. Digitonin-solubilized mitochondrial extracts prepared from yeast coq4 point mutants show that Coq3p and Coq4 polypeptides no longer co-migrate as high molecular mass complexes by one- and two-dimensional Blue Native-PAGE. Similarly, gel filtration chromatography confirms that O-methyltransferase activity, Coq3p, Coq4p, and Coq7p migration are disorganized in the coq4-1 mutant mitochondria. The data suggest that Coq4p plays an essential role in organizing a Coq enzyme complex required for Q biosynthesis.
doi:10.1016/j.bbalip.2008.10.006
PMCID: PMC2627766  PMID: 19022396
Saccharomyces cerevisiae; Ubiquinone; Coenzyme Q; mitochondria; respiratory electron transport; Coq4
10.  Normal binding of lipoprotein lipase, chylomicrons, and apo-AV to GPIHBP1 containing a G56R amino acid substitution 
Biochimica et biophysica acta  2007;1771(12):1464-1468.
Summary
GPIHBP1 is an endothelial cell protein that serves as a platform for lipoprotein lipase–mediated processing of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins within the capillaries of heart, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle. The absence of GPIHBP1 causes severe chylomicronemia. A hallmark of GPIHBP1 is the ability to bind lipoprotein lipase, chylomicrons, and apolipoprotein (apo-) AV. A homozygous G56R mutation in GPIHBP1 was recently identified in two brothers with chylomicronemia, and the authors of that study suggested that the G56R substitution was responsible for the hyperlipidemia. In this study, we created a human GPIHBP1 expression vector, introduced the G56R mutation, and tested the ability of the mutant GPIHBP1 to reach the cell surface and bind lipoprotein lipase, chylomicrons, and apo-AV. Our studies revealed that the G56R substitution did not affect the ability of GPIHBP1 to reach the cell surface, nor did the amino acid substitution have any discernible effect on the binding of lipoprotein lipase, chylomicrons, or apo-AV.
doi:10.1016/j.bbalip.2007.10.005
PMCID: PMC2266775  PMID: 17997385
chylomicronemia; GPIHBP1; hypertriglyceridemia; apolipoprotein AV; lipoprotein lipase
11.  Saccharomyces cerevisiae Coq9 Polypeptide is a Subunit of the Mitochondrial Coenzyme Q Biosynthetic Complex 
Coenzyme Q (Q) is a redox active lipid that is an essential component of the electron transport chain. Here, we show that steady state levels of Coq3, Coq4, Coq6, Coq7 and Coq9 polypeptides in yeast mitochondria are dependent on the expression of each of the other COQ genes. Submitochondrial localization studies indicate Coq9p is a peripheral membrane protein on the matrix side of the mitochondrial inner membrane. To investigate whether Coq9p is a component of a complex of Q-biosynthetic proteins, the native molecular mass of Coq9p was determined by Blue Native-PAGE. Coq9p was found to co-migrate with Coq3p and Coq4p at a molecular mass of approximately 1 MDa. A direct physical interaction was shown by the immunoprecipitation of HA-tagged Coq9 polypeptide with Coq4p, Coq5p, Coq6p and Coq7p. These findings, together with other work identifying Coq3p and Coq4p interactions, identify at least six Coq polypeptides in a multi-subunit Q biosynthetic complex.
doi:10.1016/j.abb.2007.02.016
PMCID: PMC2080827  PMID: 17391640
12.  Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein–binding protein 1 plays a critical role in the lipolytic processing of chylomicrons 
Cell metabolism  2007;5(4):279-291.
Summary
The triglycerides in chylomicrons are hydrolyzed by lipoprotein lipase (LpL) along the luminal surface of the capillaries. However, the endothelial cell molecule that facilitates chylomicron processing by LpL has not yet been defined. Here, we show that glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein–binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1) plays a critical role in the lipolytic processing of chylomicrons. Gpihbp1-deficient mice exhibit a striking accumulation of chylomicrons in the plasma, even on a low-fat diet, resulting in milky plasma and plasma triglyceride levels as high as 5,000 mg/dl. Normally, Gpihbp1 is expressed highly in heart and adipose tissue, the same tissues that express high levels of LpL. In these tissues, GPIHBP1 is located on the luminal face of the capillary endothelium. Expression of GPIHBP1 in cultured cells confers the ability to bind both LpL and chylomicrons. These studies strongly suggest that GPIHBP1 is an important platform for the LpL-mediated processing of chylomicrons in capillaries.
doi:10.1016/j.cmet.2007.02.002
PMCID: PMC1913910  PMID: 17403372

Results 1-12 (12)