PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-7 (7)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Randomized Multicenter and Stratified Phase II Study of Gemcitabine Alone Versus Gemcitabine and Docetaxel in Patients with Metastatic or Relapsed Leiomyosarcomas: A Fédération Nationale des Centres de Lutte Contre le Cancer (FNCLCC) French Sarcoma Group Study (TAXOGEM study) 
The Oncologist  2012;17(9):1213-1220.
This randomized multicenter phase II study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of single-agent gemcitabine versus gemcitabine plus docetaxel as second-line therapy for patients with metastatic or relapsed leiomyosarcoma. Patients were stratified by the leiomyosarcoma's site of origin (uterine versus nonuterine).
Background.
This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of single-agent gemcitabine versus gemcitabine plus docetaxel as second-line therapy in patients with uterine and nonuterine leiomyosarcoma (LMS).
Patients and Methods.
Patients had metastatic or unresectable LMS and had received one prior anthracycline-based regimen. A total of 90 patients received either single-agent gemcitabine (arm A; gemcitabine, 1,000 mg/m2 i.v. for 100 minutes on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle) or a combination of gemcitabine and docetaxel (arm B; gemcitabine, 900 mg/m2 i.v. for 90 minutes on days 1 and 8, plus docetaxel, 100 mg/m2 i.v. for 1 hour on day 8 of a 21-day cycle with lenograstim). The primary endpoint was the objective response rate.
Results.
The objective response rates were 19% and 24% in arm A (gemcitabine) and arm B (gemcitabine plus docetaxel), respectively, for patients with uterine LMS. For patients with nonuterine LMS, the objective response rates were 14% and 5% for arms A and B, respectively. The median progression-free survival times for arms A and B were 5.5 months and 4.7 months, respectively, for patients with uterine LMS. For patients with nonuterine LMS, the median progression-free survival times were 6.3 months and 3.8 months for arms A and B, respectively. One toxic death occurred in arm B.
Conclusions.
Both single-agent gemcitabine and gemcitabine plus docetaxel were found to be effective second-line therapies for leiomyosarcomas, with a 3-month progression-free survival rate of 40% for LMS with both uterine and nonuterine sites of origin. Single-agent gemcitabine yielded results similar to those of gemcitabine plus docetaxel in this trial, but patients using single-agent gemcitabine experienced less toxicity.
doi:10.1634/theoncologist.2011-0467
PMCID: PMC3448415  PMID: 22907974
Leiomyosarcoma; Chemotherapy; Docetaxel; Gemcitabine
2.  Phase I clinical trial combining imatinib mesylate and IL-2 in refractory cancer patients 
Oncoimmunology  2013;2(2):e23079.
Imatinib mesylate (IM) is a small molecule inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinases. In addition to its direct effect on malignant cells, it has been suggested IM may activate of natural killer (NK) cells, hence exerting immunomodulatory functions. In preclinical settings, improved antitumor responses have been observed when IM and interleukin-2 (IL-2), a cytokine that enhances NK cells functions, were combined. The goals of this study were to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of IL-2 combined with IM at a constant dose of 400 mg, the pharmacokinetics of IM and IL-2, as well as toxicity and clinical efficacy of this immunotherapeutic regimen in patients affected by advanced tumors. The treatment consisted in 50 mg/day cyclophosphamide from 21 d before the initiation of IM throughout the first IM cycle (from D-21 to D14), 400 mg/day IM for 14 d (D1 to D14) combined with escalating doses of IL-2 (3, 6, 9 and 12 MIU/day) from days 10 to 14. This treatment was administered at three week intervals to 17 patients. Common side effects of the combination were mild to moderate, including fever, chills, fatigue, nausea and hepatic enzyme elevation. IL-2 dose level II, 6 MIU/day, was determined as the MTD with the following dose-limiting toxicities: systemic capillary leak syndrome, fatigue and anorexia. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed that the area under the curve and the maximum concentration of IM and its main metabolite CGP74588 increased significantly when IM was concomitantly administered with IL-2. In contrast, IM did not modulate IL-2 pharmacokinetics. No objective responses were observed. The best response obtained was stable disease in 8/17 (median duration: 12 weeks). Finally, IL-2 augmented the impregnation of IM and its metabolite. The combination of IM (400 mg/day) and IL-2 (6 MIU/day) in tumors that express IM targets warrants further investigation.
doi:10.4161/onci.23079
PMCID: PMC3601177  PMID: 23525192
cancer; imatinib mesylate; interleukin-2; maximum tolerate dose; pharmacokinetics
3.  Phase I clinical trial combining imatinib mesylate and IL-2 
Oncoimmunology  2013;2(2):e23080.
We performed a Phase I clinical trial from October 2007 to October 2009, enrolling patients affected by refractory solid tumors, to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of interleukin (IL)-2 combined with low dose cyclophosphamide (CTX) and imatinib mesylate (IM). In a companion paper published in this issue of OncoImmunology, we show that the MTD of IL-2 is 6 MIU/day for 5 consecutive days, and that IL-2 increases the impregnation of both IM and of its main metabolite, CGP74588. Among the secondary objectives, we wanted to determine immunological markers that might be associated with progression-free survival (PFS) and/or overall survival (OS). The combination therapy markedly reduced the absolute counts of B, CD4+ T and CD8+ T cells in a manner that was proportional to IL-2 dose. There was a slight (less than 2-fold) increase in the proportion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) among CD4+ T cells in response to IM plus IL-2. The natural killer (NK)-cell compartment was activated, exhibiting a significant upregulation of HLA-DR, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and CD56. The abundance of HLA-DR+ NK cells after one course of combination therapy positively correlated with both PFS and OS. The IL-2-induced rise of the CD4+:CD8+ T-cell ratio calculated after the first cycle of treatment was also positively associated with OS. Overall, the combination of IM and IL-2 promoted the rapid expansion of HLA-DR+ NK cells and increased the CD4+:CD8+ T-cell ratio, both being associated with clinical benefits. This combinatorial regimen warrants further investigation in Phase II clinical trials, possibly in patients affected by gastrointestinal stromal tumors, a setting in which T and NK cells may play an important therapeutic role.
doi:10.4161/onci.23080
PMCID: PMC3601178  PMID: 23525357
NK cells; cancer; imatinib mesylate; innate immunity; interleukin-2; melanoma; regulatory T cells
4.  Non-metastatic unresected paediatric non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas: Results of a pooled analysis from United States and European groups 
Background
Non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas (NRSTS) with initially unresected tumours represent a particular subset of patients with a poor outcome. Various international research groups pooled their data in a joint study in order to investigate prognostic variables and treatment modalities.
Methods
The study population consisted of 304 patients <21 years old treated between 1980 and 2005 using a multimodality therapeutic strategy.
Results
Synovial sarcoma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) were the most frequent histotypes. Most patients received initial chemotherapy: major responses were recorded in 41% and minor in 16% of cases. Overall survival (OS) was 60.0% and 51.5% at 5 and 10 years, respectively, and it was significantly associated with patient's age, histological subtype, tumour site and size, quality of delayed surgical resection, radiotherapy administration and response to induction chemotherapy. MPNST associated to neurofibromatosis type 1 was the tumour type with the worst rate of response to chemotherapy and the worst outcome.
Conclusions
In unresected NRSTS patients, radiotherapy and delayed surgery are of crucial importance. Patients who respond to chemotherapy have better chance of survival. However, given the relatively poor prognosis, research on intensive multimodal treatment approaches and novel strategies is warranted.
doi:10.1016/j.ejca.2010.11.013
PMCID: PMC3539303  PMID: 21145727
Non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas; Unresected sarcoma; Paediatric sarcoma; Synovial sarcoma, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour; Chemotherapy, response to chemotherapy; Radiotherapy; Surgery; Prognostic factors
5.  Results of the GYNECO 02 Study, an FNCLCC Phase III Trial Comparing Hysterectomy with No Hysterectomy in Patients with a (Clinical and Radiological) Complete Response After Chemoradiation Therapy for Stage IB2 or II Cervical Cancer 
The Oncologist  2012;17(1):64-71.
The therapeutic impact of completion surgery (hysterectomy) after chemoradiotherapy was investigated in patients with stage IB or II cervical cancer. Hysterectomy had no therapeutic impact in patients with a clinical and radiological complete response after chemoradiotherapy, but this conclusion is limited by the lack of power.
Learning Objectives
After completing this course, the reader will be able to: Evaluate the therapeutic impact of hysterectomy after chemoradiation therapy in locally advanced cervical cancer.Evaluate the rate of histologic residual disease in patients with complete clinical and radiologic response after chemoradiation therapy.
This article is available for continuing medical education credit at CME.TheOncologist.com
Background.
Concomitant chemoradiation (CRT) (including brachytherapy) is considered the standard management for stage IB2 or II cervical cancer in many countries. Nevertheless, some of them discuss completion surgery (hysterectomy [HT]) after CRT. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic impact of such surgery.
Methods.
A randomized trial was opened in France in 2003 to evaluate the interest in HT after CRT. Inclusion criteria were: (a) stage IB2 or II cervical cancer without extrapelvic disease on conventional imaging; (b) pelvic external radiation therapy (45 Gy with or without parametrial or nodal boost) with concomitant cisplatin chemotherapy (40 mg/m2 per week) followed by uterovaginal brachytherapy (15 Gy to the intermediate risk clinical target volume); and (c) complete clinical and radiological response 6–8 weeks after brachytherapy. Patients were randomized between HT (arm A) and no HT (arm B). Unfortunately this trial was closed because of poor accrual: 61 patients were enrolled (in 2003–2006) and are reported on here.
Results.
Thirty one and 30 patients were enrolled, respectively, in arm A and arm B. Twelve patients recurred (five of them died): respectively, eight and four in arm A and arm B. The 3-year event-free survival rates were 72% (standard error [SE], 9%) and 89% (SE, 6%) (not significant [NS]) in arm A and arm B, respectively. The 3-year overall survival rates were 86% (SE, 6%) and 97% (SE, 3%) (NS) in arm A and arm B, respectively.
Conclusions.
Results of the current trial seem to suggest that completion HT had no therapeutic impact in patients with clinical and radiological complete response after CRT (but this conclusion is limited by the lack of power).
doi:10.1634/theoncologist.2011-0276
PMCID: PMC3267825  PMID: 22234626
Chemoradiation therapy; Surgery; Locally advanced cervical cancer; Nodal involvement; Prognostic factors; Residual disease; Survival
6.  Prognosis and Prognostic Factors of the Micropapillary Pattern in Patients Treated for Stage II and III Serous Borderline Tumors of the Ovary 
The Oncologist  2011;16(2):189-196.
In this study on 168 patients with stage II and stage III serous borderline tumor of the ovary, micropapillary pattern did not appear to signify a poor prognosis. The only prognostic factor for recurrence in these patients was the use of conservative surgery.
Learning Objectives
After completing this course, the reader will be able to: Discuss the prognostic impact of a micropapillary pattern in patients with stage II and III serous borderline ovarian tumors (SBOT).Consider when conservative surgery is an appropriate intervention in patients with SBOT-MP.
This article is available for continuing medical education credit at CME.TheOncologist.com
Background.
To determine the prognosis of a micropapillary (MP) pattern in patients with stage II and stage III serous borderline tumor of the ovary (SBOT).
Methods.
Review of patients with stage II and stage III SBOT treated or referred to our institution with characterization of an MP pattern and its clinical impact.
Results.
In 1969–2006, 168 patients were reviewed. Fifty-six patients had SBOT-MP. The rate of conservative surgery was lower in the SBOT-MP group than in the typical SBOT group, but the rate of patients with more than three peritoneal sites with implants was higher in the SBOT-MP group. The rate of invasive implants was not statistically different between the two groups. Eighteen recurrences were observed (six of them in the form of invasive disease) in the SBOT-MP group. Only one death was observed. The overall survival times and recurrence-free intervals were similar in both groups. The only prognostic factor for recurrence in the SBOT-MP group was the use of conservative surgery.
Conclusions.
In the present series, an MP pattern doesn't appear to signify a poor prognosis. The only prognostic factor for recurrence in SBOT-MP was the use of conservative surgery. Further studies on the MP pattern are needed to evaluate prognosis and the results of conservative surgery.
doi:10.1634/theoncologist.2009-0139
PMCID: PMC3228092  PMID: 21273510
Borderline tumor; Conservative surgery; Micropapillary pattern; Ovary; Peritoneal implants; Recurrence
7.  Prognostic Factors and Morbidities After Completion Surgery in Patients Undergoing Initial Chemoradiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer 
The Oncologist  2010;15(4):405-415.
The study evaluates the prognostic factors and morbidities of patients undergoing completion surgery for locally advanced-stage cervical cancer after initial chemoradiation therapy.
Learning Objectives
After completing this course, the reader will be able to: Rate the prognostic factors for overall survival in patients undergoing completion surgery after initial chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer.In cervical cancer patients undergoing completion surgery, consider using laparoscopy to decrease the morbidity of the surgery.In cervical cancer patients undergoing completion surgery, use PET-CT imaging to improve detection of para-aortic involvement.
This article is available for continuing medical education credit at CME.TheOncologist.com
Purpose.
The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic factors and morbidities of patients undergoing completion surgery for locally advanced-stage cervical cancer after initial chemoradiation therapy (CRT).
Patients and Methods.
Patients fulfilling the following inclusion criteria were studied: stage IB2–IVA cervical carcinoma, tumor initially confined to the pelvic cavity on conventional imaging, pelvic external radiation therapy with delivery of 45 Gy to the pelvic cavity and concomitant chemotherapy (cisplatin, 40 mg/m2 per week) followed by uterovaginal brachytherapy, and completion surgery after the end of radiation therapy including at least a hysterectomy.
Results.
One-hundred fifty patients treated in 1998–2007 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Prognostic factors for overall survival in the multivariate analysis were the presence and level of nodal spread (positive pelvic nodes alone: hazard ratio [HR], 2.03; positive para-aortic nodes: HR, 5.46; p < .001) and the presence and size of residual disease (RD) in the cervix (p = .02). Thirty-seven (25%) patients had 55 postoperative complications. The risk for complications was higher with a radical hysterectomy (p = .04) and the presence of cervical RD (p = .01).
Conclusion.
In this series, the presence and size of RD and histologic nodal involvement were the strongest prognostic factors. Such results suggest that the survival of patients treated using CRT for locally advanced cervical cancer could potentially be enhanced by improving the rate of complete response in the irradiated area (cervix or pelvic nodes) and by initially detecting patients with para-aortic spread so that treatment could be adapted in such patients. The morbidity of completion surgery is high in this context.
doi:10.1634/theoncologist.2009-0295
PMCID: PMC3227965  PMID: 20332143
Chemoradiation therapy; Completion surgery; Locally advanced cervical cancer; Morbidities; Nodal involvement; Prognostic factors; Residual disease; Survival

Results 1-7 (7)