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1.  On the organization of human T-cell receptor loci: log-periodic distribution of T-cell receptor gene segments 
Journal of the Royal Society Interface  2016;13(114):20150911.
The human T-cell repertoire is complex and is generated by the rearrangement of variable (V), diversity (D) and joining (J) segments on the T-cell receptor (TCR) loci. The T-cell repertoire demonstrates self-similarity in terms clonal frequencies when defined by V, D and J gene segment usage; therefore to determine whether the structural ordering of these gene segments on the TCR loci contributes to the observed clonal frequencies, the TCR loci were examined for self-similarity and periodicity in terms of gene segment organization. Logarithmic transformation of numeric sequence order demonstrated that the V and J gene segments for both T-cell receptor α (TRA) and β (TRB) loci are arranged in a self-similar manner when the spacing between the adjacent segments was considered as a function of the size of the neighbouring gene segment, with an average fractal dimension of approximately 1.5. Accounting for the gene segments occurring on helical DNA molecules with a logarithmic distribution, sine and cosine functions of the log-transformed angular coordinates of the start and stop nucleotides of successive TCR gene segments showed an ordered progression from the 5′ to the 3′ end of the locus, supporting a log-periodic organization. T-cell clonal frequency estimates, based on V and J segment usage, from normal stem cell donors were plotted against the V and J segment on TRB locus and demonstrated a periodic distribution. We hypothesize that this quasi-periodic variation in gene-segment representation in the T-cell clonal repertoire may be influenced by the location of the gene segments on the periodic-logarithmically scaled TCR loci. Interactions between the two strands of DNA in the double helix may influence the probability of gene segment usage by means of either constructive or destructive interference resulting from the superposition of the two helices.
doi:10.1098/rsif.2015.0911
PMCID: PMC4759796  PMID: 26763333
T-cell receptor gene segments; self-similarity; T-cell repertoire
2.  PI3K/mTOR INHIBITION MARKEDLY POTENTIATES HDAC INHIBITOR ACTIVITY IN NHL CELLS THROUGH BIM- and MCL-1-DEPENDENT MECHANISMS IN VITRO AND IN VIVO 
Purpose
To explore the efficacy and define mechanisms of action of co-administration of the PI3K/mTOR inhibitor BEZ235 and pan-HDAC inhibitor panobinostat in DLBCL cells.
Experimental Design
Various DLBCL cells were exposed to panobinostat and BEZ235 alone or together after which apoptosis and signaling/survival pathway perturbations were monitored by flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. Genetic strategies defined the functional significance of such changes, and xenograft mouse models were used to assess tumor growth and animal survival.
Results
Panobinostat and BEZ235 interacted synergistically in ABC-, GC-, and double-hit DLBCL cells, and MCL cells, but not normal CD34+ cells. Synergism was associated with pronounced AKT dephosphorylation, GSK3 dephosphorylation/activation, Mcl-1 downregulation, Bim up-regulation and increased Bcl-2/Bcl-xL binding, diminished Bax/Bak binding to Bcl-2/Bcl-xL/Mcl-1, increased γH2A.X phosphorylation and histone H3/H4 acetylation, and abrogation of p21CIP1 induction. BEZ235/panobinostat lethality was not susceptible to stromal/microenvironmental forms of resistance. Genetic strategies confirmed significant functional roles for AKT inactivation, Mcl-1 down-regulation, Bim up-regulation, and Bax/Bak in synergism. Finally, co-administration of BEZ235 with panobinostat in immunocompromised mice bearing SU-DHL4-derived tumors significantly reduced tumor growth in association with similar signaling changes observed in vitro, and increased animal survival compared to single agents.
Conclusions
BEZ235/panobinostat exhibits potent anti-DLBCL activity, including in poor-prognosis ABC- and double-hit sub-types, but not in normal CD34+ cells. Synergism is most likely multi-factorial, involving AKT inactivation/GSK3 activation, Bim up-regulation, Mcl-1 down-regulation, enhanced DNA damage, and is operative in vivo. Combined PI3K/mTOR and HDAC inhibition warrants further attention in DLBCL.
doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-14-0034
PMCID: PMC4166554  PMID: 25070836
PI3K/AKT/mTOR; HDACIs; GSK3; Bim; Mcl-1
3.  Dual inhibition of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL strikingly enhances PI3K inhibition-induced apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia cells through a GSK3- and Bim-dependent mechanism 
Cancer research  2012;73(4):1340-1351.
Effects of concomitant inhibition of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and Bcl-2/Bcl-xL (BCL2L1) were examined in human myeloid leukemia cells. Tetracycline-inducible Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL dual knockdown sharply increased PI3K/AKT/mTOR inhibitor lethality. Conversely, inducible knockdown or dominant-negative AKT increased whereas constitutively active AKT reduced lethality of the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor ABT-737. Furthermore, PI3K/mTOR inhibitors (e.g., BEZ235, PI-103) synergistically increased ABT-737-mediated cell death in multiple leukemia cell lines and reduced colony-formation in leukemic but not normal CD34+ cells. Notably, increased lethality was observed in 4/6 primary AML specimens. Responding, but not non-responding, samples exhibited basal AKT phosphorylation. PI3K/mTOR inhibitors markedly down-regulated Mcl-1 but increased Bim binding to Bcl-2/Bcl-xL; the latter effect was abrogated by ABT-737. Combined treatment also markedly diminished Bax/Bak binding to Mcl-1, Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL. Bax, Bak, or Bim (BCL2L11) knockdown, or Mcl-1 over-expression significantly diminished regimen-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, pharmacologic inhibition or shRNA knockdown of GSK3α/β significantly attenuated Mcl-1 down-regulation and decreased apoptosis. In a systemic AML xenograft model, dual tet-inducible knockdown of Bcl-2/Bcl-xL sharply increased BEZ235 anti-leukemic effects. In a subcutaneous xenograft model, BEZ235 and ABT-737 co-administration significantly diminished tumor growth, down-regulated Mcl-1, activated caspases, and prolonged survival. Together, these findings suggest that anti-leukemic synergism between PI3K/AKT/mTOR inhibitors and BH3 mimetics involves multiple mechanisms, including Mcl-1 down-regulation, release of Bim from Bcl-2/Bcl-xL as well as Bak and Bax from Mcl-1/Bcl-2/Bcl-xL, and GSK3α/β, culminating in Bax/Bak activation and apoptosis. They also argue that combining PI3K/AKT/mTOR inhibitors with BH3-mimetics warrants attention in AML, particularly in the setting of basal AKT activation and/or addiction.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-12-1365
PMCID: PMC3578060  PMID: 23243017
PI3K; Bcl-2; Bcl-xL; apoptosis; leukemia
4.  Inhibition of MCL-1 enhances lapatinib toxicity and overcomes lapatinib resistance via BAK-dependent autophagy 
Cancer biology & therapy  2009;8(21):2084-2096.
Prior studies demonstrated that resistance to the ERBB1/2 inhibitor Lapatinib in HCT116 cells was mediated by increased MCL-1 expression. We examined whether inhibition of BCL-2 family function could restore Lapatinib toxicity in Lapatinib adapted tumor cells and enhance Lapatinib toxicity in naive cells. The BCL-2 family antagonist Obatoclax (GX15-070), that inhibits BCL-2/BCL-Xl/MCL-1 function, enhanced Lapatinib toxicity in parental HCT116 and Lapatinib adapted HCT116 cells. In breast cancer lines, regardless of elevated ERBB1/2 expression, GX15-070 enhanced Lapatinib toxicity within 3–12 h.The promotion of Lapatinib toxicity neither correlated with cleavage of caspase 3 nor was blocked by inhibition caspases; and was not associated with changes in the activities of ERK1/2, JNK1/2 or p38 MAPK but with reduced AKT, mTOR and S6K1 phosphorylation. The promotion of Lapatinib toxicity by GX15-070 correlated with increased cytosolic levels of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) and expression of ATG8 (LC3), and the formation of large vesicles that intensely stained for a transfected LC3-GFP construct. Knockdown of the autophagy regulatory proteins ATG5 or Beclin1 suppressed the induction of LC3-GFP vesicularization and significantly reduced cell killing, whereas knock down of MCL-1 and BCL-Xl enhanced the induction of LC3-GFP vesicularization and significantly enhanced cell killing. Knockdown of Beclin1 and AIF abolished cell killing. Collectively, our data demonstrate that Obatoclax mediated inhibition of MCL-1 rapidly enhances Lapatinib toxicity in tumor cells via a toxic form of autophagy and via AIF release from the mitochondrion.
PMCID: PMC3887451  PMID: 19823038
lapatinib; obatoclax; autophagy; cell death; resistance
6.  Targeting Mcl-1 for the therapy of cancer 
Introduction
Human cancers are genetically and epigenetically heterogeneous and have the capacity to commandeer a variety of cellular processes to aid in their survival, growth and resistance to therapy. One strategy is to overexpress proteins that suppress apoptosis, such as the Bcl-2 family protein Mcl-1. The Mcl-1 protein plays a pivotal role in protecting cells from apoptosis and is overexpressed in a variety of human cancers.
Areas covered
Targeting Mcl-1 for extinction in these cancers, using genetic and pharmacological approaches, represents a potentially effectual means of developing new efficacious cancer therapeutics. Here we review the multiple strategies that have been employed in targeting this fundamental protein, as well as the significant potential these targeting agents provide in not only suppressing cancer growth, but also in reversing resistance to conventional cancer treatments.
Expert Opinion
We discuss the potential issues that arise in targeting Mcl-1 and other Bcl-2 anti-apoptotic proteins, as well problems with acquired resistance. The application of combinatorial approaches that involve inhibiting Mcl-1 and manipulation of additional signaling pathways to enhance therapeutic outcomes is also highlighted. The ability to specifically inhibit key genetic/epigenetic elements and biochemical pathways that maintain the tumor state represent a viable approach for developing rationally based, effective cancer therapies.
doi:10.1517/13543784.2011.609167
PMCID: PMC3205956  PMID: 21851287
7.  The development of MDA-7/IL-24 as a cancer therapeutic 
Pharmacology & therapeutics  2010;128(2):375-384.
The cytokine melanoma differentiation associated gene 7 (mda-7) was identified by subtractive hybridization as a protein whose expression increased during the induction of terminal differentiation, and that was either not expressed or was present at low levels in tumor cells compared to non-transformed cells. Based on conserved structure, chromosomal location and cytokine-like properties, MDA-7, was classified as a member of the interleukin (IL)-10 gene family and designated as MDA-7/IL-24. Multiple studies have demonstrated that expression of MDA-7/IL-24 in a wide variety of tumor cell types, but not in corresponding equivalent non-transformed cells, causes their growth arrest and rapid cell death. In addition, MDA-7/IL-24 has been noted to radiosensitize tumor cells which in part is due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ceramide that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress and suppress protein translation. Phase I clinical trial data has shown that a recombinant adenovirus expressing MDA-7/IL-24 (Ad.mda-7 (INGN-241)) was safe and had measurable tumoricidal effects in over 40% of patients, strongly arguing that MDA-7/IL-24 could have significant therapeutic value. This review describes what is presently known about the impact of MDA-7/IL-24 on tumor cell biology and its potential therapeutic applications.
doi:10.1016/j.pharmthera.2010.08.001
PMCID: PMC2947573  PMID: 20732354
MDA-7; IL-24; Apoptosis; Autophagy; Ceramide; ROS; Ca2+; Clinical trial; Signal transduction; PERK; ER stress; MCL-1
8.  Mechanism by Which Mcl-1 Regulates Cancer-Specific Apoptosis Triggered by mda-7/IL-24, an IL-10-Related Cytokine 
Cancer research  2010;70(12):5034-5045.
Melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7/interleukin-24 (mda-7/IL-24), a cytokine belonging to the IL-10 family, selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells without harming normal cells by promoting an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. The precise molecular mechanism by which the ER stress response culminates in cell death requires further clarification. The present study shows that in prostate carcinoma cells, the mda-7/IL-24-induced ER stress response causes apoptosis by translational inhibition of the antiapoptotic protein myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1). Forced expression of Mcl-1 blocked mda-7/IL-24 lethality, whereas RNA interference or gene knockout of Mcl-1 markedly sensitized transformed cells to mda-7/IL-24. Mcl-1 downregulation by mda-7/IL-24 relieved its association with the proapoptotic protein Bak, causing oligomerization of Bak and leading to cell death. These observations show the profound role of the Bcl-2 protein family member Mcl-1 in regulating cancer-specific apoptosis induced by this cytokine. Thus, our studies provide further insights into the molecular mechanism of ER stress-induced cancer-selective apoptosis by mda-7/IL-24. As Mcl-1 is overexpressed in the majority of prostate cancers, mda-7/IL-24 might provide an effective therapeutic for this disease.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-0563
PMCID: PMC3171699  PMID: 20501829
9.  MDA-7/IL-24 as a cancer therapeutic: from bench to bedside 
Anti-cancer drugs  2010;21(8):725-731.
The novel cytokine melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 (mda-7) was identified by subtractive hybridization in the mid-1990s as a protein whose expression increased during the induction of terminal differentiation, and that was either not expressed or was present at low levels in tumor cells compared to non-transformed cells. Based on conserved structure, chromosomal location and cytokine-like properties, MDA-7, has now been classified as a member of the expanding interleukin (IL)-10 gene family and designated as MDA-7/IL-24. Multiple studies have demonstrated that expression of MDA-7/IL-24 in a wide variety of tumor cell types, but not in corresponding equivalent non-transformed cells, causes their growth arrest and ultimately cell death. In addition, MDA-7/IL-24 has been noted to be a radiosensitizing cytokine, which in part is due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ceramide that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress. Phase I clinical trial data has shown that a recombinant adenovirus expressing MDA-7/IL-24 (Ad.mda-7 (INGN-241)) was safe and had measurable tumoricidal effects in over 40% of patients, which strongly argues that MDA-7/IL-24 may have significant therapeutic value. This review describes what is known about the impact of MDA-7/IL-24 on tumor cell biology and its potential therapeutic applications.
doi:10.1097/CAD.0b013e32833cfbe1
PMCID: PMC2915543  PMID: 20613485
MDA-7: melanoma differentiation associated gene 7
10.  17AAG and MEK1/2 inhibitors kill GI tumor cells via Ca2+-dependent suppression of GRP78/BiP and induction of ceramide and ROS 
Molecular cancer therapeutics  2010;9(5):1378-1395.
The present studies determined in greater detail the molecular mechanisms upstream of the CD95 death receptor by which geldanamycin HSP90 inhibitors and MEK1/2 inhibitors interact to kill carcinoma cells. MEK1/2 inhibition enhanced 17AAG toxicity that was suppressed in cells deleted for mutant active RAS which were non-tumorigenic but was magnified in isogenic tumorigenic cells expressing H-RAS V12 or K-RAS D13. MEK1/2 inhibitor and 17AAG treatment increased intracellular Ca2+ levels and reduced GRP78/BiP expression in a Ca2+ -dependent manner. GRP78/BiP over-expression, however, also suppressed drug-induced intracellular Ca2+ levels. MEK1/2 inhibitor and 17AAG treatment increased ROS levels that were blocked by quenching Ca2+ or over-expression of GRP78/BiP. MEK1/2 inhibitor and 17AAG treatment activated CD95 and inhibition of ceramide synthesis; ROS or Ca2+ quenching blocked CD95 activation. In SW620 cells that are patient matched to SW480 cells, MEK1/2 inhibitor and 17AAG toxicity was significantly reduced that correlated with a lack of CD95 activation and lower expression of ceramide synthase 6 (LASS6). Over-expression of LASS6 in SW620 cells enhanced drug-induced CD95 activation and enhanced tumor cell killing. Inhibition of ceramide signaling abolished drug-induced ROS generation but not drug-induced cytosolic Ca2+ levels. Thus treatment of tumor cells with MEK1/2 inhibitor and 17AAG induces cytosolic Ca2+ and loss of GRP78/BiP function, leading to de novo ceramide synthesis pathway activation that plays a key role in ROS generation and CD95 activation.
doi:10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-09-1131
PMCID: PMC2868106  PMID: 20442308
Geldanamycin; 17AAG; MEK1/2 inhibitor; CD95; c-FLIP-s; GRP78/BiP; autophagy; cell death; ASMase; de novo
11.  Bcl-2 antagonists interact synergistically with bortezomib in DLBCL cells in association with JNK activation and induction of ER stress 
Cancer biology & therapy  2009;8(9):808-819.
Mechanisms underlying interactions between the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib and small molecule Bcl-2 antagonists were examined in GC- and ABC-type human DLBCL (diffuse lymphocytic B-cell lymphoma) cells. Concomitant or sequential exposure to non- or minimally toxic concentrations of bortezomib or other proteasome inhibitors and either HA14-1 or gossypol resulted in a striking increase in Bax/Bak conformational change/translocation, cytochrome c release, caspase activation and synergistic induction of apoptosis in both GC- and ABC-type cells. These events were associated with a sharp increase in activation of the stress kinase JNK and evidence of ER stress induction (e.g., eIF2α phosphorylation, activation of caspases-2 and -4, and Grp78 upregulation). Pharmacologic or genetic (e.g., shRNA knockdown) interruption of JNK signaling attenuated HA14-1/bortezomib lethality and ER stress induction. Genetic disruption of the ER stress pathway (e.g., in cells expressing caspase-4 shRNA or DN-eIF2α) significantly attenuated lethality. The toxicity of this regimen was independent of ROS generation. Finally, HA14-1 significantly increased bortezomib-mediated JNK activation, ER stress induction, and lethality in bortezomib-resistant cells. Collectively these findings indicate that small molecule Bcl-2 antagonists promote bortezomib-mediated mitochondrial injury and lethality in DLBCL cells in association with enhanced JNK activation and ER stress induction. They also raise the possibility that such a strategy may be effective in different DLBCL sub-types (e.g., GC- or ABC), and in bortezomib-resistant disease.
PMCID: PMC2902989  PMID: 19270531
bortezomib; proteasome inhibitors; Bcl-2 antagonist; HA14-1; DLBCL; lymphoma
12.  Vorinostat and sorafenib increase ER stress, autophagy and apoptosis via ceramide-dependent CD95 and PERK activation 
Cancer biology & therapy  2008;7(10):1648-1662.
We recently noted that low doses of sorafenib and vorinostat interact in a synergistic fashion to kill carcinoma cells by activating CD95, and this drug combination is entering phase I trials. The present studies mechanistically extended our initial observations. Low doses of sorafenib and vorinostat, but not the individual agents, caused an acidic sphingomyelinase and fumonisin B1-dependent increase in CD95 surface levels and CD95 association with caspase 8. Knock down of CD95 or FADD expression reduced sorafenib/vorinostat lethality. Signaling by CD95 caused PERK activation that was responsible for both promoting caspase 8 association with CD95 and for increased eIF2α phosphorylation; suppression of eIF2α function abolished drug combination lethality. Cell killing was paralleled by PERK- and eIF2α-dependent lowering of c-FLIP-s protein levels and over-expression of c-FLIP-s maintained cell viability. In a CD95-, FADD- and PERK-dependent fashion, sorafenib and vorinostat increased expression of ATG5 that was responsible for enhanced autophagy. Expression of PDGFRβ and FLT3 were essential for high dose single agent sorafenib treatment to promote autophagy. Suppression of PERK function reduced sorafenib and vorinostat lethality whereas suppression of ATG5 levels elevated sorafenib and vorinostat lethality. Over-expression of c-FLIP-s blocked apoptosis and enhanced drug-induced autophagy. Thus sorafenib and vorinostat promote ceramide-dependent CD95 activation followed by induction of multiple downstream survival regulatory signals: ceramide-CD95-PERK-FADD-pro-caspase 8 (death); ceramide-CD95-PERK-eIF2α -↓c-FLIP-s (death); ceramide-CD95-PERK-ATG5-autophagy (survival).
PMCID: PMC2674577  PMID: 18787411
Vorinostat; Sorafenib; CD95; c-FLIP-s; PDGFRβ; FLT3; autophagy; ceramide; cell death; ASMase
13.  MEK1/2 inhibitors and 17AAG synergize to kill human GI tumor cells in vitro via suppression of c-FLIP-s levels and activation of CD95 
Molecular cancer therapeutics  2008;7(9):2633-2648.
Prior studies have noted that inhibitors of MEK1/2 enhanced geldanamycin lethality in malignant hematopoietic cells by promoting mitochondrial dysfunction. The present studies focused on defining the mechanism(s) by which these agents altered survival in carcinoma cells. MEK1/2 inhibitors (PD184352; AZD6244 (ARRY-142886)) interacted in a synergistic manner with geldanamycins (17AAG, 17DMAG) to kill hepatoma and pancreatic carcinoma cells that correlated with inactivation of ERK1/2 and AKT and with activation of p38 MAPK; p38 MAPK activation was ROS-dependent. Treatment of cells with MEK1/2 inhibitors and 17AAG reduced expression of c-FLIP-s that was mechanistically connected to loss of MEK1/2 and AKT function; inhibition of caspase 8 or over-expression of c-FLIP-s abolished cell killing by MEK1/2 inhibitors and 17AAG. Treatment of cells with MEK1/2 inhibitors and 17AAG caused a p38 MAPK-dependent plasma membrane clustering of CD95 without altering the levels or cleavage of FAS ligand. In parallel, treatment of cells with MEK1/2 inhibitors and 17AAG caused a p38 MAPK-dependent association of caspase 8 with CD95. Inhibition of p38 MAPK or knock down of BID, FADD or CD95 expression suppressed MEK1/2 inhibitor and 17AAG lethality. Similar correlative data were obtained using a xenograft flank tumor model system. Our data demonstrate that treatment of tumor cells with MEK1/2 inhibitors and 17AAG induces activation of the extrinsic pathway and that suppression of c-FLIP-s expression is crucial in transduction of the apoptotic signal from CD95 to promote cell death.
doi:10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-08-0400
PMCID: PMC2585522  PMID: 18790746
CD95; caspase; extrinsic; FLIP
14.  2-Methoxyestradiol-induced apoptosis in human leukemia cells proceeds through a reactive oxygen species and Akt-dependent process 
Oncogene  2005;24(23):3797-3809.
The effects of 2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME)-induced apoptosis was examined in human leukemia cells (U937 and Jurkat) in relation to mitochondrial injury, oxidative damage, and perturbations in signaling pathways. 2ME induced apoptosis in these cells in a dose-dependent manner associated with release of mitochondrial proteins (cytochrome c, AIF), generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), downregulation of Mcl-1 and XIAP, and inactivation (dephosphorylation) of Akt accompanied by activation of JNK. In these cells, enforced activation of Akt by a constitutively active myristolated Akt construct prevented 2ME-mediated mitochondrial injury, XIAP and Mcl-1 downregulation, JNK activation, and apoptosis, but not ROS generation. Conversely, 2ME lethality was potentiated by the phosphatidylinostol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002. Furthermore, in U937 cells, the hydrogen peroxide scavenger catalase and a superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic, TBAP, blocked these events, as well as Akt inactivation. Interruption of the JNK pathway by pharmacologic or genetic (e.g. siRNA) means attenuated 2ME-induced mitochondrial injury, XIAP and Mcl-1 downregulation, and apoptosis. Collectively, these findings suggest a hierarchical model of 2ME-related apoptosis induction in human leukemia cells in which 2ME-induced oxidative injury represents a primary event resulting in Akt inactivation, leading, in turn, to JNK activation, and culminating in XIAP and Mcl-1 downregulation, mitochondrial injury, and apoptosis. They also suggest that in human leukemia cells, the Akt pathway plays a critical role in mediating the response to oxidative stress induced by 2ME.
doi:10.1038/sj.onc.1208530
PMCID: PMC1679904  PMID: 15782127
2ME; apoptosis; leukemia; Akt; ROS
15.  The Kinase Inhibitor Sorafenib Induces Cell Death through a Process Involving Induction of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress▿ †  
Molecular and Cellular Biology  2007;27(15):5499-5513.
Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor that induces apoptosis in human leukemia and other malignant cells. Recently, we demonstrated that sorafenib diminishes Mcl-1 protein expression by inhibiting translation through a MEK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling-independent mechanism and that this phenomenon plays a key functional role in sorafenib-mediated lethality. Here, we report that inducible expression of constitutively active MEK1 fails to protect cells from sorafenib-mediated lethality, indicating that sorafenib-induced cell death is unrelated to MEK1/2-ERK1/2 pathway inactivation. Notably, treatment with sorafenib induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in human leukemia cells (U937) manifested by immediate cytosolic-calcium mobilization, GADD153 and GADD34 protein induction, PKR-like ER kinase (PERK) and eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) phosphorylation, XBP1 splicing, and a general reduction in protein synthesis as assessed by [35S]methionine incorporation. These events were accompanied by pronounced generation of reactive oxygen species through a mechanism dependent upon cytosolic-calcium mobilization and a significant decline in GRP78/Bip protein levels. Interestingly, enforced expression of IRE1α markedly reduced sorafenib-mediated apoptosis, whereas knockdown of IRE1α or XBP1, disruption of PERK activity, or inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation enhanced sorafenib-mediated lethality. Finally, downregulation of caspase-2 or caspase-4 by small interfering RNA significantly diminished apoptosis induced by sorafenib. Together, these findings demonstrate that ER stress represents a central component of a MEK1/2-ERK1/2-independent cell death program triggered by sorafenib.
doi:10.1128/MCB.01080-06
PMCID: PMC1952105  PMID: 17548474
16.  Blockade of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor-Induced RelA/p65 Acetylation and NF-κB Activation Potentiates Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells through a Process Mediated by Oxidative Damage, XIAP Downregulation, and c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase 1 Activation 
Molecular and Cellular Biology  2005;25(13):5429-5444.
NF-κB activation is reciprocally regulated by RelA/p65 acetylation and deacetylation, which are mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylases (HDACs). Here we demonstrate that in leukemia cells, NF-κB activation by the HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) MS-275 and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid was associated with hyperacetylation and nuclear translocation of RelA/p65. The latter events, as well as the association of RelA/p65 with IκBα, were strikingly diminished by either coadministration of the IκBα phosphorylation inhibitor Bay 11-7082 (Bay) or transfection with an IκBα superrepressor. Inhibition of NF-κB by pharmacological inhibitors or genetic strategies markedly potentiated apoptosis induced by HDACIs, and this was accompanied by enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, downregulation of Mn-superoxide dismutase and XIAP, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) activation. Conversely, N-acetyl l-cysteine blocked apoptosis induced by Bay/HDACIs by abrogating ROS generation. Inhibition of JNK1 activation attenuated Bay/HDACI lethality without affecting NF-κB inactivation and ROS generation. Finally, XIAP overexpression dramatically protected cells against the Bay/HDACI regimen but failed to prevent ROS production and JNK1 activation. Together, these data suggest that HDACIs promote the accumulation of acetylated RelA/p65 in the nucleus, leading to NF-κB activation. Moreover, interference with these events by either pharmacological or genetic means leads to a dramatic increase in HDACI-mediated lethality through enhanced oxidative damage, downregulation of NF-κB-dependent antiapoptotic proteins, and stress-related JNK1 activation.
doi:10.1128/MCB.25.13.5429-5444.2005
PMCID: PMC1156999  PMID: 15964800

Results 1-16 (16)