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1.  Angiopoietin-Like 4 Mediates PPAR Delta Effect on Lipoprotein Lipase-Dependent Fatty Acid Uptake but Not on Beta-Oxidation in Myotubes 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(10):e46212.
Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) delta is an important regulator of fatty acid (FA) metabolism. Angiopoietin-like 4 (Angptl4), a multifunctional protein, is one of the major targets of PPAR delta in skeletal muscle cells. Here we investigated the regulation of Angptl4 and its role in mediating PPAR delta functions using human, rat and mouse myotubes. Expression of Angptl4 was upregulated during myotubes differentiation and by oleic acid, insulin and PPAR delta agonist GW501516. Treatment with GW501516 or Angptl4 overexpression inhibited both lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity and LPL-dependent uptake of FAs whereas uptake of BSA-bound FAs was not affected by either treatment. Activation of retinoic X receptor (RXR), PPAR delta functional partner, using bexarotene upregulated Angptl4 expression and inhibited LPL activity in a PPAR delta dependent fashion. Silencing of Angptl4 blocked the effect of GW501516 and bexarotene on LPL activity. Treatment with GW501516 but not Angptl4 overexpression significantly increased palmitate oxidation. Furthermore, Angptl4 overexpression did not affect the capacity of GW501516 to increase palmitate oxidation. Basal and insulin stimulated glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis and glucose oxidation were not significantly modulated by Angptl4 overexpression. Our findings suggest that FAs-PPARdelta/RXR-Angptl4 axis controls the LPL-dependent uptake of FAs in myotubes, whereas the effect of PPAR delta activation on beta-oxidation is independent of Angptl4.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0046212
PMCID: PMC3464237  PMID: 23056264
2.  OSBP-Related Proteins (ORPs) in Human Adipose Depots and Cultured Adipocytes: Evidence for Impacts on the Adipocyte Phenotype 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(9):e45352.
Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) homologues, ORPs, are implicated in lipid homeostatic control, vesicle transport, and cell signaling. We analyzed here the quantity of ORP mRNAs in human subcutaneous (s.c.) and visceral adipose depots, as well as in the Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) adipocyte cell model. All of the ORP mRNAs were present in the s.c and visceral adipose tissues, and the two depots shared an almost identical ORP mRNA expression pattern. SGBS adipocytes displayed a similar pattern, suggesting that the adipose tissue ORP expression pattern mainly derives from adipocytes. During SGBS cell adipogenic differentiation, ORP2, ORP3, ORP4, ORP7, and ORP8 mRNAs were down-regulated, while ORP11 was induced. To assess the impacts of ORPs on adipocyte differentiation, ORP3 and ORP8, proteins down-regulated during adipogenesis, were overexpressed in differentiating SGBS adipocytes, while ORP11, a protein induced during adipogenesis, was silenced. ORP8 overexpression resulted in reduced expression of the aP2 mRNA, while down-regulation of adiponectin and aP2 was observed in ORP11 silenced cells. Furthermore, ORP8 overexpression or silencing of ORP11 markedly decreased cellular triglyceride storage. These data identify the patterns of ORP expression in human adipose depots and SGBS adipocytes, and provide the first evidence for a functional impact of ORPs on the adipocyte phenotype.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0045352
PMCID: PMC3448648  PMID: 23028956
3.  R1: The relationship between plasma Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (Angptl4) levels, ANGPTL4 genotype and coronary heart disease risk 
Objective
To investigate the relationship between Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (Angptl4) levels, CHD biomarkers and ANGPTL4 variants.
Methods and Results
Plasma Angptl4 was quantified in 666 subjects of the Northwick Park Heart Study II using a validated ELISA. Seven ANGPTL4 SNPs were genotyped and CHD biomarkers assessed in the whole cohort (n=2775). Weighted mean (±SD) plasma Angptl4 levels were 10.0(±11.0) ng/ml. Plasma Angptl4 concentration correlated positively with age (r=0.15, P<0.001), body fat mass (r=0.19, P=0.003) but negatively with plasma HDL-cholesterol (r=−0.13, P=0.01). No correlation with triglycerides was observed. T266M was independently associated with plasma Angptl4 levels (P<0.001), but not associated with triglycerides or with CHD risk in the meta-analysis of five studies (4,061 cases/15,395 controls). E40K showed no independent association with plasma Angptl4 levels. In HEK293 and Huh7 cells compared to wild-type, E40K and T266M showed significantly altered synthesis and secretion, respectively.
Conclusions
These data suggest that circulating Angptl4 levels do not influence triglyceride levels or CHD risk since (1) Angptl4 levels were not correlated with triglycerides, (2) T266M, although associated with Angptl4 levels, showed no association with plasma triglycerides (3) Triglyceride-lowering E40K did not influence Angptl4 levels. These results provide new insights into the role of Angptl4 in triglyceride metabolism.
doi:10.1161/ATVBAHA.110.212209
PMCID: PMC3319296  PMID: 20829508
Angplt4; E40K; T266M; cardiovascular disease; LPL
4.  Genetic Association and Interaction Analysis of USF1 and APOA5 on Lipid Levels and Atherosclerosis 
Objective
USF1 is a ubiquitous transcription factor governing the expression of numerous genes of lipid and glucose metabolism. APOA5 is a well-established candidate gene regulating triglyceride (TG) levels and has been identified as a downstream target of upstream stimulatory factor. No detailed studies about the effect of APOA5 on atherosclerotic lesion formation have been conducted, nor has its potential interaction with USF1 been examined.
Methods and Results
We analyzed allelic variants of USF1 and APOA5 in families (n=516) ascertained for atherogenic dyslipidemia and in an autopsy series of middle-aged men (n=300) with precise quantitative measurements of atherosclerotic lesions. The impact of previously associated APOA5 variants on TGs was observed in the dyslipidemic families, and variant rs3135506 was associated with size of fibrotic aortic lesions in the autopsy series. The USF1 variant rs2516839, associated previously with atherosclerotic lesions, showed an effect on TGs in members of the dyslipidemic families with documented coronary artery disease. We provide preliminary evidence of gene-gene interaction between these variants in an autopsy series with a fibrotic lesion area in the abdominal aorta (P=0.0028), with TGs in dyslipidemic coronary artery disease subjects (P=0.03), and with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P=0.008) in a large population cohort of coronary artery disease patients (n=1065) in which the interaction for TGs was not replicated.
Conclusion
Our findings in these unique samples reinforce the roles of APOA5 and USF1 variants on cardiovascular phenotypes and suggest that both genes contribute to lipid levels and aortic atherosclerosis individually and possibly through epistatic effects.
doi:10.1161/ATVBAHA.109.188912
PMCID: PMC3224996  PMID: 19910639
genes; USF1; APOA5; lipids; atherosclerosis; epistasis
5.  Human apoA-I increases macrophage foam cell derived PLTP activity without affecting the PLTP mass 
Background
phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) plays important roles in lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis and is expressed by macrophages and macrophage foam cells (MFCs). The aim of the present study was to determine whether the major protein from HDL, apoA-I, affects PLTP derived from MFCs.
Results
as cell model we used human THP-1 monocytes incubated with acetylated LDL, to generate MFC. The addition of apoA-I to the cell media increased apoE secretion from the cells, in a concentration dependent fashion, without affecting cellular apoE levels. In contrast, apoA-I had no effect on PLTP synthesis and secretion, but strongly induced the PLTP activity in the media. ApoA-I also increased phospholipid transfer activity of PLTP isolated from human plasma. This effect was dependent on apoA-I concentration but independent on apoA-I lipidation status. ApoE, ApoA-II and apoA-IV, but not immunoglobulins or bovine serum albumin, also increased PLTP activity. We also report that apoA-I protects PLTP from heat inactivation.
Conclusion
apoA-I enhances the phospholipid transfer activity of PLTP secreted from macrophage foam cells without affecting the PLTP mass.
doi:10.1186/1476-511X-9-59
PMCID: PMC2890626  PMID: 20534134
6.  Effects of Fenofibrate Treatment on Cardiovascular Disease Risk in 9,795 Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes and Various Components of the Metabolic Syndrome 
Diabetes Care  2009;32(3):493-498.
OBJECTIVE—We explored whether cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and the effects of fenofibrate differed in subjects with and without metabolic syndrome and according to various features of metabolic syndrome defined by the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) in subjects with type 2 diabetes in the Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD) study.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its features was calculated. Cox proportional models adjusted for age, sex, CVD status, and baseline A1C levels were used to determine the independent contributions of metabolic syndrome features to total CVD event rates and the effects of fenofibrate.
RESULTS—More than 80% of FIELD participants met the ATP III criteria for metabolic syndrome. Each ATP III feature of metabolic syndrome, apart from increased waist circumference, increased the absolute risk of CVD events over 5 years by at least 3%. Those with marked dyslipidemia (elevated triglycerides ≥2.3 mmol/l and low HDL cholesterol) were at the highest risk of CVD (17.8% over 5 years). Fenofibrate significantly reduced CVD events in those with low HDL cholesterol or hypertension. The largest effect of fenofibrate to reduce CVD risk was observed in subjects with marked dyslipidemia in whom a 27% relative risk reduction (95% CI 9–42, P = 0.005; number needed to treat = 23) was observed. Subjects with no prior CVD had greater risk reductions than the entire group.
CONCLUSIONS—Metabolic syndrome components identify higher CVD risk in individuals with type 2 diabetes, so the absolute benefits of fenofibrate are likely to be greater when metabolic syndrome features are present. The highest risk and greatest benefits of fenofibrate are seen among those with marked hypertriglyceridemia.
doi:10.2337/dc08-1543
PMCID: PMC2646035  PMID: 18984774
7.  Correction: A Novel Method to Adjust Efficacy Estimates for Uptake of Other Active Treatments in Long-Term Clinical Trials 
PLoS ONE  2010;5(1):10.1371/annotation/54433693-04e0-4f30-9a99-38fe3c5bb16b.
doi:10.1371/annotation/54433693-04e0-4f30-9a99-38fe3c5bb16b
PMCID: PMC2811202
8.  A Novel Method to Adjust Efficacy Estimates for Uptake of Other Active Treatments in Long-Term Clinical Trials 
PLoS ONE  2010;5(1):e8580.
Background
When rates of uptake of other drugs differ between treatment arms in long-term trials, the true benefit or harm of the treatment may be underestimated. Methods to allow for such contamination have often been limited by failing to preserve the randomization comparisons. In the Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD) study, patients were randomized to fenofibrate or placebo, but during the trial many started additional drugs, particularly statins, more so in the placebo group. The effects of fenofibrate estimated by intention-to-treat were likely to have been attenuated. We aimed to quantify this effect and to develop a method for use in other long-term trials.
Methodology/Principal Findings
We applied efficacies of statins and other cardiovascular drugs from meta-analyses of randomized trials to adjust the effect of fenofibrate in a penalized Cox model. We assumed that future cardiovascular disease events were reduced by an average of 24% by statins, and 20% by a first other major cardiovascular drug. We applied these estimates to each patient who took these drugs for the period they were on them. We also adjusted the analysis by the rate of discontinuing fenofibrate. Among 4,900 placebo patients, average statin use was 16% over five years. Among 4,895 assigned fenofibrate, statin use was 8% and nonuse of fenofibrate was 10%. In placebo patients, use of cardiovascular drugs was 1% to 3% higher. Before adjustment, fenofibrate was associated with an 11% reduction in coronary events (coronary heart disease death or myocardial infarction) (P = 0.16) and an 11% reduction in cardiovascular disease events (P = 0.04). After adjustment, the effects of fenofibrate on coronary events and cardiovascular disease events were 16% (P = 0.06) and 15% (P = 0.008), respectively.
Conclusions/Significance
This novel application of a penalized Cox model for adjustment of a trial estimate of treatment efficacy incorporates evidence-based estimates for other therapies, preserves comparisons between the randomized groups, and is applicable to other long-term trials. In the FIELD study example, the effects of fenofibrate on the risks of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease events were underestimated by up to one-third in the original analysis.
Trial Registration
Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN64783481
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0008580
PMCID: PMC2798963  PMID: 20072614
9.  ApoE Polymorphism Is Associated With C-Reactive Protein in Low-HDL Family Members and in Normolipidemic Subjects 
Mediators of Inflammation  2006;2006(3):12587.
The study was aimed to compare inflammatory parameters between carriers of apoE4 isoforms (apoE4/3, apoE4/2, and apoE4/4 phenotypes) and those of carrying apoE3 isoform without apoE4 isoform (apoE3/3 phenotypes and apoE2/3 phenotypes). The concentrations of serum hsCRP, sVCAM-1, sICAM-1, and sE-selectin were measured in 211 subjects from Finnish low-HDL families and in 157 normolipidemic subjects. The subjects with apoE4 isoform had lower concentrations of serum hsCRP both in low-HDL family members (p < 0.05) and in normolipidemic subjects (p < 0.01). The differences in serum CRP values remained significant after adjustment for age, BMI, smoking status, hypertension, gender, lipoprotein variables, and family number. We conclude that apoE phenotype has a strong influence on serum CRP values.
doi:10.1155/MI/2006/12587
PMCID: PMC1592602  PMID: 16951484
10.  The Two Variants of Oxysterol Binding Protein-related Protein-1 Display Different Tissue Expression Patterns, Have Different Intracellular Localization, and Are Functionally Distinct 
Molecular Biology of the Cell  2003;14(3):903-915.
Oxysterol binding protein (OSBP) homologs comprise a family of 12 proteins in humans (Jaworski et al., 2001; Lehto et al., 2001). Two variants of OSBP-related protein (ORP) 1 have been identified: a short one that consists of the carboxy-terminal ligand binding domain only (ORP1S, 437 aa) and a longer N-terminally extended form (ORP1L, 950 aa) encompassing three ankyrin repeats and a pleckstrin homology domain (PHD). We now report that the two mRNAs show marked differences in tissue expression. ORP1S predominates in skeletal muscle and heart, whereas ORP1L is the most abundant form in brain and lung. On differentiation of primary human monocytes into macrophages, both ORP1S and ORP1L mRNAs were induced, the up-regulation of ORP1L being >100-fold. The intracellular localization of the two ORP1 variants was found to be different. Whereas ORP1S is largely cytosolic, the ORP1L variant localizes to late endosomes. A significant amount of ORP1S but only little ORP1L was found in the nucleus. The ORP1L ankyrin repeat region (aa 1–237) was found to localize to late endosomes such as the full-length protein. This localization was even more pronounced for a fragment that additionally includes the PHD (aa 1–408). The amino-terminal region of ORP1L consisting of the ankyrin repeat and PHDs is therefore likely to be responsible for the targeting of ORP1L to late endosomes. Interestingly, overexpression of ORP1L was found to enhance the LXRα-mediated transactivation of a reporter gene, whereas ORP1S failed to influence this process. The results suggest that the two forms of ORP1 are functionally distinct and that ORP1L is involved in control of cellular lipid metabolism.
doi:10.1091/mbc.E02-08-0459
PMCID: PMC151568  PMID: 12631712

Results 1-10 (10)