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author:("kuru, sunny")
1.  Insulin use, prescription patterns, regimens and costs.-a narrative from a developing country 
Background
Achieving good glycemic control is of paramount importance in the reduction of diabetes mellitus (DM) associated morbidity and mortality. Insulin plays a key role in the management of DM but unfortunately whilst some healthcare providers present insulin as a treatment of last resort , patients on insulin often have insulin related issues such as needle phobias, fear of hypoglycaemia, weight gain and in developing countries, costs. This Report aims at assessing insulin prescription pattern, insulin costs and issues associated with adherence.
Methods
This was a Cross-sectional observation Study whereby 160 patients with DM who were on insulin solely or in combination with oral hypoglycaemic agents were recruited over a 6 month period. Information obtained from the Study subjects pertained to their histories of DM, types of insulin, insulin costs, adherence issues and insulin delivery devices. Long and short term glycaemic control were determined and evaluated for possible relation to insulin adherence. Test statistics used were chi square, t test and binary regression.
Results
Insulin adherence was noted in 123-77% of the Study subjects and this was comparable between persons with type 1 DM and those with type 2 DM. The mean glycosylated haemoglobin values were significantly higher in those who admitted to non insulin adherence compared to those who adhered to their insulin regimen (9.7% (2.3) Vs 8.6% (2.1), p = 0.01). Reasons proffered by Respondents for non insulin adherence included high costs-15(41%), inconvenience −15 (41%) and needle pain-79)18%. A greater proportion of persons who self injected insulin adhered to insulin prescriptions compared to those who did not self inject and thus had better glycaemic control. Shorter duration of DM and older age were found to be predictors of adherence to insulin prescription.
The monthly mean costs of insulin for those who earned an income was 5212.8 Nigerian naira which is equivalent to 33.1 US dollars and we estimated that persons on a minimum wage would spend 29% of their monthly income on the procurement of insulin.
Conclusions
Health related costs, age, duration of DM and insulin associated side effects are some of the factors implicated in adherence to insulin prescription.
doi:10.1186/1758-5996-4-50
PMCID: PMC3538575  PMID: 23199230
2.  The metabolic syndrome in thyroid disease: A report from Nigeria 
Background:
The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and its components in people with thyroid disorders.
Materials and Methods:
112 subjects with a history of thyroid disorders were consecutively enrolled for the study. Clinical data were obtained by interviewing the patients and referring to their case folders and prescriptions. The subjects were categorized into three: thyrotoxic, those with hypothyroidism and those with nontoxic goiters, based on clinical parameters and or thyroid function tests. The study subjects were weighed and their anthropometric indices were documented. The laboratory parameters that were analyzed included total cholesterol, high-density and low-density cholesterol and triglyceride. Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test and chi-square test.
Results:
The study subjects were aged between 14 and 76 years, with a mean age of 44.5 years, and the female:male ratio was 97:15. The mean age and anthropometric indices were comparable in subjects with thyrotoxicosis, hypothyroidism and euthyroidism. The overall prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was 28% and the frequency of occurrence of the metabolic syndrome in subjects with thyrotoxicosis, hypothyroidism and nontoxic goiter was 24%, 40% and 42%, respectively. The commonest occurring metabolic syndrome defining criterion was dysglycemia, while hypertension and elevated triglyceride were the least documented of the criteria.
Conclusion:
Metabolic syndrome occurs in 1 in every 4 persons with thyroid disorders, and as such, routine screening for this cardiovascular risk factor may be of benefit in this group of people, especially in those with hypothyroidism.
doi:10.4103/2230-8210.95688
PMCID: PMC3354852  PMID: 22629511
Metabolic syndrome; Nigeria; thyroid
3.  Epidemiology of thyroid diseases in Africa 
Background:
Thyroid disorders are common endocrine disorders encountered in the African continent. Environmental and nutritional factors are often implicated in the occurrence of some thyroid disorders that occur in this part of the world. This is a narrative review that seeks to document the pattern, prevalence, and management of thyroid disorders in the continent.
Materials and Methods:
The search engine used for this review were PubMed and Google scholar. All available articles on thyroid disorders from the sub-African continent, published until May 2011, were included.
Results:
Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) which top the list of thyroid disorders and remain the commonest cause of thyroid disorders in the continent is often affected not only by the iodine status in the region but sometimes also by selenium deficiency and thiocyanate toxicity. The reported prevalence rates of endemic goiter range from 1% to 90% depending on the area of study with myxedematous cretinism still a prominent feature of IDD in only a few regions of the continent. The extent of autoimmune thyroid disorders remains unknown because of underdiagnosis and underreporting but the few available studies note a prevalence rate of 1.2% to 9.9% of which Graves diseases is the commonest of these groups of disorders. Rarer causes of thyroid dysfunction such as thyroid tuberculosis and amiodarone related causes are also documented in this review. The onset of new thyroid diseases following amiodarone usage was documented in 27.6% of persons treated for arrhythmia. Reports on thyroid malignancies (CA) in Africa abound and differentiated thyroid malignancies are noted to occur more commonly than the other forms of thyroid CA. The documented prevalence rates of thyroid CA in the African continent are as follows (papillary: 6.7–72.1%, follicular: 4.9–68%, anaplastic: 5–21.4%, and medullary: 2.6%–13.8%). For the differentiated thyroid CA, there is a changing trend toward the more frequent occurrence of papillary CA compared to follicular CA and this may be attributable to widespread iodization programs. Our review shows that diagnosis and evaluation of thyroid disorders are reliant in most regions of the continent on clinical acumen and suboptimal diagnostic facilities and expertise are what obtain in many practices. The frequently employed management options of thyroid disorders in the continent are pharmacological and surgical treatment modalities.
Conclusion:
Diagnosis and management of thyroid disorders in the African continent remain suboptimal. Thyroid registries may be helpful to determine the scope of the burden of thyroid disorders since this knowledge may help change policies on the approach to the management of these disorders.
doi:10.4103/2230-8210.83331
PMCID: PMC3169867  PMID: 21966659
Africa; epidemiology; thyroid

Results 1-3 (3)