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1.  Structure of Pigment Yellow 181 dimethylsulfoxide N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (1:1:1) solvate from XRPD + DFT-D 
The relatively complex structure of a triclinic disolvate was solved from low-resolution laboratory powder diffraction data through the intermediate use of dummy atoms and the combination with quantum-mechanical calculations.
With only a 2.6 Å resolution laboratory powder diffraction pattern of the θ phase of Pigment Yellow 181 (P.Y. 181) available, crystal-structure solution and Rietveld refinement proved challenging; especially when the crystal structure was shown to be a triclinic dimethylsulfoxide N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (1:1:1) solvate. The crystal structure, which in principle has 28 possible degrees of freedom, was determined in three stages by a combination of simulated annealing, partial Rietveld refinement with dummy atoms replacing the solvent molecules and further simulated annealing. The θ phase not being of commercial interest, additional experiments were not economically feasible and additional dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) calculations were employed to confirm the correctness of the crystal structure. After the correctness of the structure had been ascertained, the bond lengths and valence angles from the DFT-D minimized crystal structure were fed back into the Rietveld refinement as geometrical restraints (‘polymorph-dependent restraints’) to further improve the details of the crystal structure; the positions of the H atoms were also taken from the DFT-D calculations. The final crystal structure is a layered structure with an elaborate network of hydrogen bonds.
doi:10.1107/S2052520615000724
PMCID: PMC4316649  PMID: 25643720
Pigment Yellow 181; X-ray powder diffraction; dispersion-corrected density functional theory
2.  Distinguishing tautomerism in the crystal structure of (Z)-N-(5-ethyl-2,3-di­hydro-1,3,4-thia­diazol-2-yl­idene)-4-methyl­benzene­sulfonamide using DFT-D calculations and 13C solid-state NMR 
The crystal structure of (Z)-N-(5-ethyl-2,3-di­hydro-1,3,4-thia­diazol-2-yl­idene)-4-methyl­benzene­sulfonamide contains an imine tautomer, rather than the previously reported amine tautomer. The tautomers can be distinguished using dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations and by comparison of calculated and measured 13C solid-state NMR spectra.
The crystal structure of the title compound, C11H13N3O2S2, has been determined previously on the basis of refinement against laboratory powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) data, supported by comparison of measured and calculated 13C solid-state NMR spectra [Hangan et al. (2010 ▶). Acta Cryst. B66, 615–621]. The mol­ecule is tautomeric, and was reported as an amine tautomer [systematic name: N-(5-ethyl-1,3,4-thia­diazol-2-yl)-p-toluene­sulfonamide], rather than the correct imine tautomer. The protonation site on the mol­ecule’s 1,3,4-thia­diazole ring is indicated by the inter­molecular contacts in the crystal structure: N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds are established at the correct site, while the alternative protonation site does not establish any notable inter­molecular inter­actions. The two tautomers provide essentially identical Rietveld fits to laboratory PXRD data, and therefore they cannot be directly distinguished in this way. However, the correct tautomer can be distinguished from the incorrect one by previously reported qu­anti­tative criteria based on the extent of structural distortion on optimization of the crystal structure using dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) calculations. Calculation of the 13C SS-NMR spectrum based on the correct imine tautomer also provides considerably better agreement with the measured 13C SS-NMR spectrum.
doi:10.1107/S2053229614015356
PMCID: PMC4174016  PMID: 25093360
crystal structure; powder diffraction; NMR analysis; amine–imine tautomerism; dispersion-corrected DFT
3.  Computational pharmaceutical materials science 
Journal of Cheminformatics  2014;6(Suppl 1):O21.
doi:10.1186/1758-2946-6-S1-O21
PMCID: PMC3980121  PMID: 24765120
4.  Computational pharmaceutical materials science 
Journal of Cheminformatics  2014;6(Suppl 1):O21.
doi:10.1186/1758-2946-6-S1-O21
PMCID: PMC3980121  PMID: 24765120
5.  On the correlation between hydrogen bonding and melting points in the inositols 
IUCrJ  2013;1(Pt 1):61-73.
13 new phases of the inositols, 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexahydroxycyclohexane, were found. Crystal structure determinations and thermal analyses reveal a very complex picture of phases, rotator phases and phase transitions.
Inositol, 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexahydroxycyclohexane, exists in nine stereoisomers with different crystal structures and melting points. In a previous paper on the relationship between the melting points of the inositols and the hydrogen-bonding patterns in their crystal structures [Simperler et al. (2006 ▶). CrystEngComm 8, 589], it was noted that although all inositol crystal structures known at that time contained 12 hydrogen bonds per molecule, their melting points span a large range of about 170 °C. Our preliminary investigations suggested that the highest melting point must be corrected for the effect of molecular symmetry, and that the three lowest melting points may need to be revised. This prompted a full investigation, with additional experiments on six of the nine inositols. Thirteen new phases were discovered; for all of these their crystal structures were examined. The crystal structures of eight ordered phases could be determined, of which seven were obtained from laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data. Five additional phases turned out to be rotator phases and only their unit cells could be determined. Two previously unknown melting points were measured, as well as most enthalpies of melting. Several previously reported melting points were shown to be solid-to-solid phase transitions or decomposition points. Our experiments have revealed a complex picture of phases, rotator phases and phase transitions, in which a simple correlation between melting points and hydrogen-bonding patterns is not feasible.
doi:10.1107/S2052252513026511
PMCID: PMC4104965  PMID: 25075320
inositol; X-ray powder diffraction; melting point; rotator phase; polymorphism
6.  Towards crystal structure prediction of complex organic compounds – a report on the fifth blind test 
Following on from the success of the previous crystal structure prediction blind tests (CSP1999, CSP2001, CSP2004 and CSP2007), a fifth such collaborative project (CSP2010) was organized at the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre. A range of methodologies was used by the participating groups in order to evaluate the ability of the current computational methods to predict the crystal structures of the six organic molecules chosen as targets for this blind test. The first four targets, two rigid molecules, one semi-flexible molecule and a 1:1 salt, matched the criteria for the targets from CSP2007, while the last two targets belonged to two new challenging categories – a larger, much more flexible molecule and a hydrate with more than one polymorph. Each group submitted three predictions for each target it attempted. There was at least one successful prediction for each target, and two groups were able to successfully predict the structure of the large flexible molecule as their first place submission. The results show that while not as many groups successfully predicted the structures of the three smallest molecules as in CSP2007, there is now evidence that methodologies such as dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) are able to reliably do so. The results also highlight the many challenges posed by more complex systems and show that there are still issues to be overcome.
doi:10.1107/S0108768111042868
PMCID: PMC3222142  PMID: 22101543
7.  Towards crystal structure prediction of complex organic compounds – a report on the fifth blind test 
The results of the fifth blind test of crystal structure prediction, which show important success with more challenging large and flexible molecules, are presented and discussed.
Following on from the success of the previous crystal structure prediction blind tests (CSP1999, CSP2001, CSP2004 and CSP2007), a fifth such collaborative project (CSP2010) was organized at the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre. A range of methodologies was used by the participating groups in order to evaluate the ability of the current computational methods to predict the crystal structures of the six organic molecules chosen as targets for this blind test. The first four targets, two rigid molecules, one semi-flexible molecule and a 1:1 salt, matched the criteria for the targets from CSP2007, while the last two targets belonged to two new challenging categories – a larger, much more flexible molecule and a hydrate with more than one polymorph. Each group submitted three predictions for each target it attempted. There was at least one successful prediction for each target, and two groups were able to successfully predict the structure of the large flexible molecule as their first place submission. The results show that while not as many groups successfully predicted the structures of the three smallest molecules as in CSP2007, there is now evidence that methodologies such as dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) are able to reliably do so. The results also highlight the many challenges posed by more complex systems and show that there are still issues to be overcome.
doi:10.1107/S0108768111042868
PMCID: PMC3222142  PMID: 22101543
prediction; blind test; polymorph; crystal structure prediction
8.  Validation of experimental molecular crystal structures with dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations 
The accuracy of a dispersion-corrected density functional theory method is validated against 241 experimental organic crystal structures from Acta Cryst. Section E.
This paper describes the validation of a dispersion-corrected density functional theory (d-DFT) method for the purpose of assessing the correctness of experimental organic crystal structures and enhancing the information content of purely experimental data. 241 experimental organic crystal structures from the August 2008 issue of Acta Cryst. Section E were energy-minimized in full, including unit-cell parameters. The differences between the experimental and the minimized crystal structures were subjected to statistical analysis. The r.m.s. Cartesian displacement excluding H atoms upon energy minimization with flexible unit-cell parameters is selected as a pertinent indicator of the correctness of a crystal structure. All 241 experimental crystal structures are reproduced very well: the average r.m.s. Cartesian displacement for the 241 crystal structures, including 16 disordered structures, is only 0.095 Å (0.084 Å for the 225 ordered structures). R.m.s. Cartesian displacements above 0.25 Å either indicate incorrect experimental crystal structures or reveal interesting structural features such as exceptionally large temperature effects, incorrectly modelled disorder or symmetry breaking H atoms. After validation, the method is applied to nine examples that are known to be ambiguous or subtly incorrect.
doi:10.1107/S0108768110031873
PMCID: PMC2940256  PMID: 20841921
dispersion-corrected density functional theory; organic structures

Results 1-8 (8)