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1.  Body mass index and subjective well-being in young adults: a twin population study 
BMC Public Health  2013;13:231.
Background
Body mass index (BMI) is associated with subjective well-being. Higher BMI is believed to be related with lower well-being. However, the association may not be linear. Therefore, we investigated whether a nonlinear (U-shaped) trend would better describe this relationship, and whether eating disorders might account for the association in young adults.
Methods
FinnTwin16 study evaluated multiple measures of subjective well-being, including life satisfaction, General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-20), satisfaction with leisure time, work, and family relationships, and satisfaction with sex life in young adulthood in the 1975–79 birth cohorts of Finnish twins (n=5240). We studied the relationship between indicators of subjective well-being and BMI both in full birth cohorts and in subgroups stratified by lifetime DSM-IV eating disorders.
Results
We found an inverse U-shaped relationship between all indicators of subjective well-being and BMI in men. There was no overall association between BMI and subjective well-being in women. However, there was an inverse U-shaped relationship between BMI and indicators of subjective well-being in women with a lifetime eating disorder and their healthy female co-twins. Subjective well-being was optimal in the overweight category.
Conclusions
Both underweight and obesity are associated with impaired subjective well-being in young men. The BMI reflecting optimal subjective well-being of young men may be higher than currently recognized. Categorization of body weight in terms of BMI may need to be reassessed in young men. BMI and subjective well-being are related in women with a lifetime eating disorder, but not in the general population of young women.
doi:10.1186/1471-2458-13-231
PMCID: PMC3691623  PMID: 23496885
Body mass index; Subjective well-being; Life satisfaction; GHQ-20; Eating disorders; Twin study
2.  Influence of Serotonin Transporter Gene Polymorphism (5-HTTLPR Polymorphism) on the Relation between Brain 5-HT Transporter Binding and Heart Rate Corrected Cardiac Repolarization Interval 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(1):e50303.
Objective
Serotonin transporter gene polymorphism (5-HTTLPR polymorphism) predicts the degree of structural and functional connectivity in the brain, and less consistently the degree of vulnerability for anxiety and depressive disorders. It is less known how 5-HTTLPR polymorphism influences on the coupling between brain and neuronal cardiovascular control. The present study demonstrates the impact of 5-HTTLPR polymorphism on the relations between heart rate (HR) corrected cardiac repolarization interval (QTc interval) and the brain 5-HTT binding.
Material and Methods
Thirty healthy young adults (fifteen monozygotic twin pairs) (mean age 26±1.3 years, 16 females) were imagined with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using iodine-123 labeled 2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane (nor-β-CIT). Continuous ECG recording was obtained from each participant at supine rest. Signal averaged QTc interval on continuous ECG was calculated and compared with the brain imaging results.
Results
In the two groups [l homozygotes (n = 16, 10 females), s carriers (n = 14, 8 female)] HR and the length of QTc interval were not influenced by 5-HTTLPR polymorphism. There were no significant relations between HR and 5-HTT binding in the brain. There were significant associations between QTc interval and nor-β-CIT binding in the brain in l homozygotes, but not in s carriers (correlations for QTc interval and nor-β-CIT binding of striatum, thalamus and right temporal region were −0.8–−0.9, (p<0.0005), respectively).
Conclusion
The finding of longer QTc interval with less 5-HTT binding availability in major serotonergic binding sites in l homozygotes, but not in s carriers, implicate to differentiated control of QTc interval by 5-HTTLPR polymorphism.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0050303
PMCID: PMC3544835  PMID: 23341873
3.  Adipose Co-expression networks across Finns and Mexicans identify novel triglyceride-associated genes 
BMC Medical Genomics  2012;5:61.
Background
High serum triglyceride (TG) levels is an established risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). Fat is stored in the form of TGs in human adipose tissue. We hypothesized that gene co-expression networks in human adipose tissue may be correlated with serum TG levels and help reveal novel genes involved in TG regulation.
Methods
Gene co-expression networks were constructed from two Finnish and one Mexican study sample using the blockwiseModules R function in Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA). Overlap between TG-associated networks from each of the three study samples were calculated using a Fisher’s Exact test. Gene ontology was used to determine known pathways enriched in each TG-associated network.
Results
We measured gene expression in adipose samples from two Finnish and one Mexican study sample. In each study sample, we observed a gene co-expression network that was significantly associated with serum TG levels. The TG modules observed in Finns and Mexicans significantly overlapped and shared 34 genes. Seven of the 34 genes (ARHGAP30, CCR1, CXCL16, FERMT3, HCST, RNASET2, SELPG) were identified as the key hub genes of all three TG modules. Furthermore, two of the 34 genes (ARHGAP9, LST1) reside in previous TG GWAS regions, suggesting them as the regional candidates underlying the GWAS signals.
Conclusions
This study presents a novel adipose gene co-expression network with 34 genes significantly correlated with serum TG across populations.
doi:10.1186/1755-8794-5-61
PMCID: PMC3543280  PMID: 23217153
Mexicans; Finns; RNA sequencing; Triglycerides; Adipose tissue; Weighted gene co-expression network analysis
4.  Bacterial Endotoxin Activity in Human Serum Is Associated With Dyslipidemia, Insulin Resistance, Obesity, and Chronic Inflammation 
Diabetes Care  2011;34(8):1809-1815.
OBJECTIVE
To investigate whether bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activity in human serum is associated with the components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in type 1 diabetic patients with various degrees of kidney disease and patients with IgA glomerulonephritis (IgAGN).
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
Serum LPS activity was determined with the Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate chromogenic end point assay in type 1 diabetic patients with a normal albumin excretion rate (n = 587), microalbuminuria (n = 144), macroalbuminuria (n = 173); patients with IgAGN (n = 98); and in nondiabetic control subjects (n = 345). The relationships of the LPS/HDL ratio and MetS-associated variables were evaluated with Pearson correlation.
RESULTS
The MetS was more prevalent in type 1 diabetic patients (48%) than in patients with IgAGN (15%). Diabetic patients with macroalbuminuria had a significantly higher serum LPS/HDL ratio than patients with IgAGN. In the normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetic group, patients in the highest LPS/HDL quartile were diagnosed as having the MetS three times more frequently than patients in the lowest quartile (69 vs. 22%; P < 0.001). High LPS activity was associated with higher serum triglyceride concentration, earlier onset of diabetes, increased diastolic blood pressure, and elevated urinary excretion of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1.
CONCLUSIONS
High serum LPS activity is strongly associated with the components of the MetS. Diabetic patients with kidney disease seem to be more susceptible to metabolic endotoxemia than patients with IgAGN. Bacterial endotoxins may thus play an important role in the development of the metabolic and vascular abnormalities commonly seen in obesity and diabetes-related diseases.
doi:10.2337/dc10-2197
PMCID: PMC3142060  PMID: 21636801
5.  An Investigation into the Relationship Between Soft Tissue Body Composition and Bone Mineral Density in a Young Adult Twin Sample 
The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of fat mass (FM) and lean mass (LM) with bone mineral density (BMD) independent of genetic effects. We also assessed the extent to which genetic and environmental influences explain the associations between these phenotypes. Body composition and BMD were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 57 monozygotic and 92 same-sex dizygotic twin pairs, aged 23 to 31 years, chosen to represent a wide range of intrapair differences in body mass index (BMI; 0 to 15.2 kg/m2). Heritability estimates were adjusted for height and gender. In multiple linear regression analysis, intrapair differences in both FM and LM were independently associated with intrapair differences in BMD at most skeletal sites after adjustment for gender and differences in height. Within monozygotic and dizygotic pairs, LM was a significantly stronger predictor of whole-body BMD than FM (p < .01). Additive genetic factors explained 87% [95% confidence interval (CI) 80%–91%), 81% (95% CI 70%–88%), and 61% (95% CI 41%–75%) of the variation in whole-body BMD, LM, and FM, respectively. Additive genetic factors also accounted for 69% to 88% of the covariance between LM and BMD and for 42% to 72% of the covariance between FM and BMD depending on the skeletal site. The genetic correlation between LM and whole-body BMD (rg = 0.46, 95% CI 0.32–0.58) was greater than that of FM and whole-body BMD (rg = 0.25, 95% CI 0.05–0.42). In conclusion, our data indicate that peak BMD is influenced by acquired body weight as well as genetic factors. In young adulthood, LM and BMD may have more genes in common than do FM and BMD. © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
doi:10.1002/jbmr.192
PMCID: PMC3179317  PMID: 20658559
BONE MINERAL DENSITY; FAT MASS; LEAN MASS; TWIN STUDIES; GENETIC CORRELATION
6.  Association of Lipidome Remodeling in the Adipocyte Membrane with Acquired Obesity in Humans 
PLoS Biology  2011;9(6):e1000623.
The authors describe a new approach to studying cellular lipid profiles and propose a compensatory mechanism that may help maintain the normal membrane function of adipocytes in the context of obesity.
Identification of early mechanisms that may lead from obesity towards complications such as metabolic syndrome is of great interest. Here we performed lipidomic analyses of adipose tissue in twin pairs discordant for obesity but still metabolically compensated. In parallel we studied more evolved states of obesity by investigating a separated set of individuals considered to be morbidly obese. Despite lower dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid intake, the obese twin individuals had increased proportions of palmitoleic and arachidonic acids in their adipose tissue, including increased levels of ethanolamine plasmalogens containing arachidonic acid. Information gathered from these experimental groups was used for molecular dynamics simulations of lipid bilayers combined with dependency network analysis of combined clinical, lipidomics, and gene expression data. The simulations suggested that the observed lipid remodeling maintains the biophysical properties of lipid membranes, at the price, however, of increasing their vulnerability to inflammation. Conversely, in morbidly obese subjects, the proportion of plasmalogens containing arachidonic acid in the adipose tissue was markedly decreased. We also show by in vitro Elovl6 knockdown that the lipid network regulating the observed remodeling may be amenable to genetic modulation. Together, our novel approach suggests a physiological mechanism by which adaptation of adipocyte membranes to adipose tissue expansion associates with positive energy balance, potentially leading to higher vulnerability to inflammation in acquired obesity. Further studies will be needed to determine the cause of this effect.
Author Summary
Obesity is characterized by excess body fat, which is predominantly stored in the adipose tissue. When adipose tissue expands too much it stops storing lipid appropriately. The excess lipid accumulates in organs such as muscle, liver, and pancreas, causing metabolic disease. In this study, we aim to identify factors that cause adipose tissue to malfunction when it reaches its limit of expansion. We performed lipidomic analyses of human adipose tissue in twin pairs discordant for obesity—that is, one of the twins was lean and one was obese—but still metabolically healthy. We identified multiple changes in membrane phospholipids. Using computer modeling, we show that “lean” and “obese” membrane lipid compositions have the same physical properties despite their different compositions. We hypothesize that this represents allostasis—changes in lipid membrane composition in obesity occur to protect the physical properties of the membranes. However, protective changes cannot occur without a cost, and accordingly we demonstrate that switching to the “obese” lipid composition is associated with higher levels of adipose tissue inflammation. In a separate group of metabolically unhealthy obese individuals we investigated how the processes that regulate the “lean” and “obese” lipid profiles are changed. To determine how these lipid membrane changes are regulated we constructed an in silico network model that identified key control points and potential molecular players. We validated this network by performing genetic manipulations in cell models. Therapeutic targeting of this network may open new opportunities for the prevention or treatment of obesity-related metabolic complications.
doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1000623
PMCID: PMC3110175  PMID: 21666801
7.  Meta-analysis identifies 13 new loci associated with waist-hip ratio and reveals sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fat distribution 
Heid, Iris M. | Jackson, Anne U. | Randall, Joshua C. | Winkler, Thomas W. | Qi, Lu | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Zillikens, M. Carola | Speliotes, Elizabeth K. | Mägi, Reedik | Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie | White, Charles C. | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | Harris, Tamara B. | Berndt, Sonja I. | Ingelsson, Erik | Willer, Cristen J. | Weedon, Michael N. | Luan, Jian'an | Vedantam, Sailaja | Esko, Tõnu | Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O. | Kutalik, Zoltán | Li, Shengxu | Monda, Keri L. | Dixon, Anna L. | Holmes, Christopher C. | Kaplan, Lee M. | Liang, Liming | Min, Josine L. | Moffatt, Miriam F. | Molony, Cliona | Nicholson, George | Schadt, Eric E. | Zondervan, Krina T. | Feitosa, Mary F. | Ferreira, Teresa | Allen, Hana Lango | Weyant, Robert J. | Wheeler, Eleanor | Wood, Andrew R. | Estrada, Karol | Goddard, Michael E. | Lettre, Guillaume | Mangino, Massimo | Nyholt, Dale R. | Purcell, Shaun | Vernon Smith, Albert | Visscher, Peter M. | Yang, Jian | McCaroll, Steven A. | Nemesh, James | Voight, Benjamin F. | Absher, Devin | Amin, Najaf | Aspelund, Thor | Coin, Lachlan | Glazer, Nicole L. | Hayward, Caroline | Heard-Costa, Nancy L. | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Johansson, Åsa | Johnson, Toby | Kaakinen, Marika | Kapur, Karen | Ketkar, Shamika | Knowles, Joshua W. | Kraft, Peter | Kraja, Aldi T. | Lamina, Claudia | Leitzmann, Michael F. | McKnight, Barbara | Morris, Andrew P. | Ong, Ken K. | Perry, John R.B. | Peters, Marjolein J. | Polasek, Ozren | Prokopenko, Inga | Rayner, Nigel W. | Ripatti, Samuli | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Robertson, Neil R. | Sanna, Serena | Sovio, Ulla | Surakka, Ida | Teumer, Alexander | van Wingerden, Sophie | Vitart, Veronique | Zhao, Jing Hua | Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine | Chines, Peter S. | Fisher, Eva | Kulzer, Jennifer R. | Lecoeur, Cecile | Narisu, Narisu | Sandholt, Camilla | Scott, Laura J. | Silander, Kaisa | Stark, Klaus | Tammesoo, Mari-Liis | Teslovich, Tanya M. | John Timpson, Nicholas | Watanabe, Richard M. | Welch, Ryan | Chasman, Daniel I. | Cooper, Matthew N. | Jansson, John-Olov | Kettunen, Johannes | Lawrence, Robert W. | Pellikka, Niina | Perola, Markus | Vandenput, Liesbeth | Alavere, Helene | Almgren, Peter | Atwood, Larry D. | Bennett, Amanda J. | Biffar, Reiner | Bonnycastle, Lori L. | Bornstein, Stefan R. | Buchanan, Thomas A. | Campbell, Harry | Day, Ian N.M. | Dei, Mariano | Dörr, Marcus | Elliott, Paul | Erdos, Michael R. | Eriksson, Johan G. | Freimer, Nelson B. | Fu, Mao | Gaget, Stefan | Geus, Eco J.C. | Gjesing, Anette P. | Grallert, Harald | Gräßler, Jürgen | Groves, Christopher J. | Guiducci, Candace | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Hassanali, Neelam | Havulinna, Aki S. | Herzig, Karl-Heinz | Hicks, Andrew A. | Hui, Jennie | Igl, Wilmar | Jousilahti, Pekka | Jula, Antti | Kajantie, Eero | Kinnunen, Leena | Kolcic, Ivana | Koskinen, Seppo | Kovacs, Peter | Kroemer, Heyo K. | Krzelj, Vjekoslav | Kuusisto, Johanna | Kvaloy, Kirsti | Laitinen, Jaana | Lantieri, Olivier | Lathrop, G. Mark | Lokki, Marja-Liisa | Luben, Robert N. | Ludwig, Barbara | McArdle, Wendy L. | McCarthy, Anne | Morken, Mario A. | Nelis, Mari | Neville, Matt J. | Paré, Guillaume | Parker, Alex N. | Peden, John F. | Pichler, Irene | Pietiläinen, Kirsi H. | Platou, Carl G.P. | Pouta, Anneli | Ridderstråle, Martin | Samani, Nilesh J. | Saramies, Jouko | Sinisalo, Juha | Smit, Jan H. | Strawbridge, Rona J. | Stringham, Heather M. | Swift, Amy J. | Teder-Laving, Maris | Thomson, Brian | Usala, Gianluca | van Meurs, Joyce B.J. | van Ommen, Gert-Jan | Vatin, Vincent | Volpato, Claudia B. | Wallaschofski, Henri | Walters, G. Bragi | Widen, Elisabeth | Wild, Sarah H. | Willemsen, Gonneke | Witte, Daniel R. | Zgaga, Lina | Zitting, Paavo | Beilby, John P. | James, Alan L. | Kähönen, Mika | Lehtimäki, Terho | Nieminen, Markku S. | Ohlsson, Claes | Palmer, Lyle J. | Raitakari, Olli | Ridker, Paul M. | Stumvoll, Michael | Tönjes, Anke | Viikari, Jorma | Balkau, Beverley | Ben-Shlomo, Yoav | Bergman, Richard N. | Boeing, Heiner | Smith, George Davey | Ebrahim, Shah | Froguel, Philippe | Hansen, Torben | Hengstenberg, Christian | Hveem, Kristian | Isomaa, Bo | Jørgensen, Torben | Karpe, Fredrik | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Laakso, Markku | Lawlor, Debbie A. | Marre, Michel | Meitinger, Thomas | Metspalu, Andres | Midthjell, Kristian | Pedersen, Oluf | Salomaa, Veikko | Schwarz, Peter E.H. | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Valle, Timo T. | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Arnold, Alice M. | Beckmann, Jacques S. | Bergmann, Sven | Boerwinkle, Eric | Boomsma, Dorret I. | Caulfield, Mark J. | Collins, Francis S. | Eiriksdottir, Gudny | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Gyllensten, Ulf | Hamsten, Anders | Hattersley, Andrew T. | Hofman, Albert | Hu, Frank B. | Illig, Thomas | Iribarren, Carlos | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Kao, W.H. Linda | Kaprio, Jaakko | Launer, Lenore J. | Munroe, Patricia B. | Oostra, Ben | Penninx, Brenda W. | Pramstaller, Peter P. | Psaty, Bruce M. | Quertermous, Thomas | Rissanen, Aila | Rudan, Igor | Shuldiner, Alan R. | Soranzo, Nicole | Spector, Timothy D. | Syvanen, Ann-Christine | Uda, Manuela | Uitterlinden, André | Völzke, Henry | Vollenweider, Peter | Wilson, James F. | Witteman, Jacqueline C. | Wright, Alan F. | Abecasis, Gonçalo R. | Boehnke, Michael | Borecki, Ingrid B. | Deloukas, Panos | Frayling, Timothy M. | Groop, Leif C. | Haritunians, Talin | Hunter, David J. | Kaplan, Robert C. | North, Kari E. | O'Connell, Jeffrey R. | Peltonen, Leena | Schlessinger, David | Strachan, David P. | Hirschhorn, Joel N. | Assimes, Themistocles L. | Wichmann, H.-Erich | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Stefansson, Kari | Cupples, L. Adrienne | Loos, Ruth J.F. | Barroso, Inês | McCarthy, Mark I. | Fox, Caroline S. | Mohlke, Karen L. | Lindgren, Cecilia M.
Nature genetics  2010;42(11):949-960.
Waist-hip ratio (WHR) is a measure of body fat distribution and a predictor of metabolic consequences independent of overall adiposity. WHR is heritable, but few genetic variants influencing this trait have been identified. We conducted a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies for WHR adjusted for body-mass-index (up to 77,167 participants), following up 16 loci in an additional 29 studies (up to 113,636 subjects). We identified 13 novel loci in or near RSPO3, VEGFA, TBX15-WARS2, NFE2L3, GRB14, DNM3-PIGC, ITPR2-SSPN, LY86, HOXC13, ADAMTS9, ZNRF3-KREMEN1, NISCH-STAB1, and CPEB4 (P 1.9 × 10−9 to 1.8 × 10−40), and the known signal at LYPLAL1. Seven of these loci exhibited marked sexual dimorphism, all with a stronger effect on WHR in women than men (P for sex-difference 1.9 × 10−3 to 1.2 × 10−13). These findings provide evidence for multiple loci that modulate body fat distribution, independent of overall adiposity, and reveal powerful gene-by-sex interactions.
doi:10.1038/ng.685
PMCID: PMC3000924  PMID: 20935629
genome-wide association; waist-hip-ratio; body fat distribution; central obesity; meta-analysis; genetics; visceral adipose tissue; metabolism; body composition; Expression Quantitative Trait Loci; sex difference
8.  Meta-analysis identifies 13 new loci associated with waist-hip ratio and reveals sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fat distribution 
Heid, Iris M | Jackson, Anne U | Randall, Joshua C | Winkler, Thomas W | Qi, Lu | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Zillikens, M Carola | Speliotes, Elizabeth K | Mägi, Reedik | Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie | White, Charles C | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | Harris, Tamara B | Berndt, Sonja I | Ingelsson, Erik | Willer, Cristen J | Weedon, Michael N | Luan, Jian’An | Vedantam, Sailaja | Esko, Tõnu | Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O | Kutalik, Zoltán | Li, Shengxu | Monda, Keri L | Dixon, Anna L | Holmes, Christopher C | Kaplan, Lee M | Liang, Liming | Min, Josine L | Moffatt, Miriam F | Molony, Cliona | Nicholson, George | Schadt, Eric E | Zondervan, Krina T | Feitosa, Mary F | Ferreira, Teresa | Allen, Hana Lango | Weyant, Robert J | Wheeler, Eleanor | Wood, Andrew R | Estrada, Karol | Goddard, Michael E | Lettre, Guillaume | Mangino, Massimo | Nyholt, Dale R | Purcell, Shaun | Smith, Albert Vernon | Visscher, Peter M | Yang, Jian | McCarroll, Steven A | Nemesh, James | Voight, Benjamin F | Absher, Devin | Amin, Najaf | Aspelund, Thor | Coin, Lachlan | Glazer, Nicole L | Hayward, Caroline | Heard-costa, Nancy L | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Johansson, Åsa | Johnson, Toby | Kaakinen, Marika | Kapur, Karen | Ketkar, Shamika | Knowles, Joshua W | Kraft, Peter | Kraja, Aldi T | Lamina, Claudia | Leitzmann, Michael F | McKnight, Barbara | Morris, Andrew P | Ong, Ken K | Perry, John R B | Peters, Marjolein J | Polasek, Ozren | Prokopenko, Inga | Rayner, Nigel W | Ripatti, Samuli | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Robertson, Neil R | Sanna, Serena | Sovio, Ulla | Surakka, Ida | Teumer, Alexander | van Wingerden, Sophie | Vitart, Veronique | Zhao, Jing Hua | Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine | Chines, Peter S | Fisher, Eva | Kulzer, Jennifer R | Lecoeur, Cecile | Narisu, Narisu | Sandholt, Camilla | Scott, Laura J | Silander, Kaisa | Stark, Klaus | Tammesoo, Mari-Liis | Teslovich, Tanya M | Timpson, Nicholas John | Watanabe, Richard M | Welch, Ryan | Chasman, Daniel I | Cooper, Matthew N | Jansson, John-Olov | Kettunen, Johannes | Lawrence, Robert W | Pellikka, Niina | Perola, Markus | Vandenput, Liesbeth | Alavere, Helene | Almgren, Peter | Atwood, Larry D | Bennett, Amanda J | Biffar, Reiner | Bonnycastle, Lori L | Bornstein, Stefan R | Buchanan, Thomas A | Campbell, Harry | Day, Ian N M | Dei, Mariano | Dörr, Marcus | Elliott, Paul | Erdos, Michael R | Eriksson, Johan G | Freimer, Nelson B | Fu, Mao | Gaget, Stefan | Geus, Eco J C | Gjesing, Anette P | Grallert, Harald | Gräßler, Jürgen | Groves, Christopher J | Guiducci, Candace | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Hassanali, Neelam | Havulinna, Aki S | Herzig, Karl-Heinz | Hicks, Andrew A | Hui, Jennie | Igl, Wilmar | Jousilahti, Pekka | Jula, Antti | Kajantie, Eero | Kinnunen, Leena | Kolcic, Ivana | Koskinen, Seppo | Kovacs, Peter | Kroemer, Heyo K | Krzelj, Vjekoslav | Kuusisto, Johanna | Kvaloy, Kirsti | Laitinen, Jaana | Lantieri, Olivier | Lathrop, G Mark | Lokki, Marja-Liisa | Luben, Robert N | Ludwig, Barbara | McArdle, Wendy L | McCarthy, Anne | Morken, Mario A | Nelis, Mari | Neville, Matt J | Paré, Guillaume | Parker, Alex N | Peden, John F | Pichler, Irene | Pietiläinen, Kirsi H | Platou, Carl G P | Pouta, Anneli | Ridderstråle, Martin | Samani, Nilesh J | Saramies, Jouko | Sinisalo, Juha | Smit, Jan H | Strawbridge, Rona J | Stringham, Heather M | Swift, Amy J | Teder-Laving, Maris | Thomson, Brian | Usala, Gianluca | van Meurs, Joyce B J | van Ommen, Gert-Jan | Vatin, Vincent | Volpato, Claudia B | Wallaschofski, Henri | Walters, G Bragi | Widen, Elisabeth | Wild, Sarah H | Willemsen, Gonneke | Witte, Daniel R | Zgaga, Lina | Zitting, Paavo | Beilby, John P | James, Alan L | Kähönen, Mika | Lehtimäki, Terho | Nieminen, Markku S | Ohlsson, Claes | Palmer, Lyle J | Raitakari, Olli | Ridker, Paul M | Stumvoll, Michael | Tönjes, Anke | Viikari, Jorma | Balkau, Beverley | Ben-Shlomo, Yoav | Bergman, Richard N | Boeing, Heiner | Smith, George Davey | Ebrahim, Shah | Froguel, Philippe | Hansen, Torben | Hengstenberg, Christian | Hveem, Kristian | Isomaa, Bo | Jørgensen, Torben | Karpe, Fredrik | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Laakso, Markku | Lawlor, Debbie A | Marre, Michel | Meitinger, Thomas | Metspalu, Andres | Midthjell, Kristian | Pedersen, Oluf | Salomaa, Veikko | Schwarz, Peter E H | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Valle, Timo T | Wareham, Nicholas J | Arnold, Alice M | Beckmann, Jacques S | Bergmann, Sven | Boerwinkle, Eric | Boomsma, Dorret I | Caulfield, Mark J | Collins, Francis S | Eiriksdottir, Gudny | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Gyllensten, Ulf | Hamsten, Anders | Hattersley, Andrew T | Hofman, Albert | Hu, Frank B | Illig, Thomas | Iribarren, Carlos | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Kao, W H Linda | Kaprio, Jaakko | Launer, Lenore J | Munroe, Patricia B | Oostra, Ben | Penninx, Brenda W | Pramstaller, Peter P | Psaty, Bruce M | Quertermous, Thomas | Rissanen, Aila | Rudan, Igor | Shuldiner, Alan R | Soranzo, Nicole | Spector, Timothy D | Syvanen, Ann-Christine | Uda, Manuela | Uitterlinden, André | Völzke, Henry | Vollenweider, Peter | Wilson, James F | Witteman, Jacqueline C | Wright, Alan F | Abecasis, Gonçalo R | Boehnke, Michael | Borecki, Ingrid B | Deloukas, Panos | Frayling, Timothy M | Groop, Leif C | Haritunians, Talin | Hunter, David J | Kaplan, Robert C | North, Kari E | O’connell, Jeffrey R | Peltonen, Leena | Schlessinger, David | Strachan, David P | Hirschhorn, Joel N | Assimes, Themistocles L | Wichmann, H-Erich | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | van Duijn, Cornelia M | Stefansson, Kari | Cupples, L Adrienne | Loos, Ruth J F | Barroso, Inês | McCarthy, Mark I | Fox, Caroline S | Mohlke, Karen L | Lindgren, Cecilia M
Nature genetics  2010;42(11):949-960.
Waist-hip ratio (WHR) is a measure of body fat distribution and a predictor of metabolic consequences independent of overall adiposity. WHR is heritable, but few genetic variants influencing this trait have been identified. We conducted a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies for WHR adjusted for body mass index (comprising up to 77,167 participants), following up 16 loci in an additional 29 studies (comprising up to 113,636 subjects). We identified 13 new loci in or near RSPO3, VEGFA, TBX15-WARS2, NFE2L3, GRB14, DNM3-PIGC, ITPR2-SSPN, LY86, HOXC13, ADAMTS9, ZNRF3-KREMEN1, NISCH-STAB1 and CPEB4 (P = 1.9 × 10−9 to P = 1.8 × 10−40) and the known signal at LYPLAL1. Seven of these loci exhibited marked sexual dimorphism, all with a stronger effect on WHR in women than men (P for sex difference = 1.9 × 10−3 to P = 1.2 × 10−13). These findings provide evidence for multiple loci that modulate body fat distribution independent of overall adiposity and reveal strong gene-by-sex interactions.
doi:10.1038/ng.685
PMCID: PMC3000924  PMID: 20935629
9.  Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal eighteen new loci associated with body mass index 
Speliotes, Elizabeth K. | Willer, Cristen J. | Berndt, Sonja I. | Monda, Keri L. | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Jackson, Anne U. | Allen, Hana Lango | Lindgren, Cecilia M. | Luan, Jian’an | Mägi, Reedik | Randall, Joshua C. | Vedantam, Sailaja | Winkler, Thomas W. | Qi, Lu | Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie | Heid, Iris M. | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Stringham, Heather M. | Weedon, Michael N. | Wheeler, Eleanor | Wood, Andrew R. | Ferreira, Teresa | Weyant, Robert J. | Segré, Ayellet V. | Estrada, Karol | Liang, Liming | Nemesh, James | Park, Ju-Hyun | Gustafsson, Stefan | Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O. | Yang, Jian | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | Esko, Tõnu | Feitosa, Mary F. | Kutalik, Zoltán | Mangino, Massimo | Raychaudhuri, Soumya | Scherag, Andre | Smith, Albert Vernon | Welch, Ryan | Zhao, Jing Hua | Aben, Katja K. | Absher, Devin M. | Amin, Najaf | Dixon, Anna L. | Fisher, Eva | Glazer, Nicole L. | Goddard, Michael E. | Heard-Costa, Nancy L. | Hoesel, Volker | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Johansson, Åsa | Johnson, Toby | Ketkar, Shamika | Lamina, Claudia | Li, Shengxu | Moffatt, Miriam F. | Myers, Richard H. | Narisu, Narisu | Perry, John R.B. | Peters, Marjolein J. | Preuss, Michael | Ripatti, Samuli | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Sandholt, Camilla | Scott, Laura J. | Timpson, Nicholas J. | Tyrer, Jonathan P. | van Wingerden, Sophie | Watanabe, Richard M. | White, Charles C. | Wiklund, Fredrik | Barlassina, Christina | Chasman, Daniel I. | Cooper, Matthew N. | Jansson, John-Olov | Lawrence, Robert W. | Pellikka, Niina | Prokopenko, Inga | Shi, Jianxin | Thiering, Elisabeth | Alavere, Helene | Alibrandi, Maria T. S. | Almgren, Peter | Arnold, Alice M. | Aspelund, Thor | Atwood, Larry D. | Balkau, Beverley | Balmforth, Anthony J. | Bennett, Amanda J. | Ben-Shlomo, Yoav | Bergman, Richard N. | Bergmann, Sven | Biebermann, Heike | Blakemore, Alexandra I.F. | Boes, Tanja | Bonnycastle, Lori L. | Bornstein, Stefan R. | Brown, Morris J. | Buchanan, Thomas A. | Busonero, Fabio | Campbell, Harry | Cappuccio, Francesco P. | Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine | Chen, Yii-Der Ida | Chen, Chih-Mei | Chines, Peter S. | Clarke, Robert | Coin, Lachlan | Connell, John | Day, Ian N.M. | Heijer, Martin den | Duan, Jubao | Ebrahim, Shah | Elliott, Paul | Elosua, Roberto | Eiriksdottir, Gudny | Erdos, Michael R. | Eriksson, Johan G. | Facheris, Maurizio F. | Felix, Stephan B. | Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela | Folsom, Aaron R. | Friedrich, Nele | Freimer, Nelson B. | Fu, Mao | Gaget, Stefan | Gejman, Pablo V. | Geus, Eco J.C. | Gieger, Christian | Gjesing, Anette P. | Goel, Anuj | Goyette, Philippe | Grallert, Harald | Gräßler, Jürgen | Greenawalt, Danielle M. | Groves, Christopher J. | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Guiducci, Candace | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Hassanali, Neelam | Hall, Alistair S. | Havulinna, Aki S. | Hayward, Caroline | Heath, Andrew C. | Hengstenberg, Christian | Hicks, Andrew A. | Hinney, Anke | Hofman, Albert | Homuth, Georg | Hui, Jennie | Igl, Wilmar | Iribarren, Carlos | Isomaa, Bo | Jacobs, Kevin B. | Jarick, Ivonne | Jewell, Elizabeth | John, Ulrich | Jørgensen, Torben | Jousilahti, Pekka | Jula, Antti | Kaakinen, Marika | Kajantie, Eero | Kaplan, Lee M. | Kathiresan, Sekar | Kettunen, Johannes | Kinnunen, Leena | Knowles, Joshua W. | Kolcic, Ivana | König, Inke R. | Koskinen, Seppo | Kovacs, Peter | Kuusisto, Johanna | Kraft, Peter | Kvaløy, Kirsti | Laitinen, Jaana | Lantieri, Olivier | Lanzani, Chiara | Launer, Lenore J. | Lecoeur, Cecile | Lehtimäki, Terho | Lettre, Guillaume | Liu, Jianjun | Lokki, Marja-Liisa | Lorentzon, Mattias | Luben, Robert N. | Ludwig, Barbara | Manunta, Paolo | Marek, Diana | Marre, Michel | Martin, Nicholas G. | McArdle, Wendy L. | McCarthy, Anne | McKnight, Barbara | Meitinger, Thomas | Melander, Olle | Meyre, David | Midthjell, Kristian | Montgomery, Grant W. | Morken, Mario A. | Morris, Andrew P. | Mulic, Rosanda | Ngwa, Julius S. | Nelis, Mari | Neville, Matt J. | Nyholt, Dale R. | O’Donnell, Christopher J. | O’Rahilly, Stephen | Ong, Ken K. | Oostra, Ben | Paré, Guillaume | Parker, Alex N. | Perola, Markus | Pichler, Irene | Pietiläinen, Kirsi H. | Platou, Carl G.P. | Polasek, Ozren | Pouta, Anneli | Rafelt, Suzanne | Raitakari, Olli | Rayner, Nigel W. | Ridderstråle, Martin | Rief, Winfried | Ruokonen, Aimo | Robertson, Neil R. | Rzehak, Peter | Salomaa, Veikko | Sanders, Alan R. | Sandhu, Manjinder S. | Sanna, Serena | Saramies, Jouko | Savolainen, Markku J. | Scherag, Susann | Schipf, Sabine | Schreiber, Stefan | Schunkert, Heribert | Silander, Kaisa | Sinisalo, Juha | Siscovick, David S. | Smit, Jan H. | Soranzo, Nicole | Sovio, Ulla | Stephens, Jonathan | Surakka, Ida | Swift, Amy J. | Tammesoo, Mari-Liis | Tardif, Jean-Claude | Teder-Laving, Maris | Teslovich, Tanya M. | Thompson, John R. | Thomson, Brian | Tönjes, Anke | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | van Meurs, Joyce B.J. | van Ommen, Gert-Jan | Vatin, Vincent | Viikari, Jorma | Visvikis-Siest, Sophie | Vitart, Veronique | Vogel, Carla I. G. | Voight, Benjamin F. | Waite, Lindsay L. | Wallaschofski, Henri | Walters, G. Bragi | Widen, Elisabeth | Wiegand, Susanna | Wild, Sarah H. | Willemsen, Gonneke | Witte, Daniel R. | Witteman, Jacqueline C. | Xu, Jianfeng | Zhang, Qunyuan | Zgaga, Lina | Ziegler, Andreas | Zitting, Paavo | Beilby, John P. | Farooqi, I. Sadaf | Hebebrand, Johannes | Huikuri, Heikki V. | James, Alan L. | Kähönen, Mika | Levinson, Douglas F. | Macciardi, Fabio | Nieminen, Markku S. | Ohlsson, Claes | Palmer, Lyle J. | Ridker, Paul M. | Stumvoll, Michael | Beckmann, Jacques S. | Boeing, Heiner | Boerwinkle, Eric | Boomsma, Dorret I. | Caulfield, Mark J. | Chanock, Stephen J. | Collins, Francis S. | Cupples, L. Adrienne | Smith, George Davey | Erdmann, Jeanette | Froguel, Philippe | Grönberg, Henrik | Gyllensten, Ulf | Hall, Per | Hansen, Torben | Harris, Tamara B. | Hattersley, Andrew T. | Hayes, Richard B. | Heinrich, Joachim | Hu, Frank B. | Hveem, Kristian | Illig, Thomas | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Kaprio, Jaakko | Karpe, Fredrik | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Kiemeney, Lambertus A. | Krude, Heiko | Laakso, Markku | Lawlor, Debbie A. | Metspalu, Andres | Munroe, Patricia B. | Ouwehand, Willem H. | Pedersen, Oluf | Penninx, Brenda W. | Peters, Annette | Pramstaller, Peter P. | Quertermous, Thomas | Reinehr, Thomas | Rissanen, Aila | Rudan, Igor | Samani, Nilesh J. | Schwarz, Peter E.H. | Shuldiner, Alan R. | Spector, Timothy D. | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Uda, Manuela | Uitterlinden, André | Valle, Timo T. | Wabitsch, Martin | Waeber, Gérard | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Watkins, Hugh | Wilson, James F. | Wright, Alan F. | Zillikens, M. Carola | Chatterjee, Nilanjan | McCarroll, Steven A. | Purcell, Shaun | Schadt, Eric E. | Visscher, Peter M. | Assimes, Themistocles L. | Borecki, Ingrid B. | Deloukas, Panos | Fox, Caroline S. | Groop, Leif C. | Haritunians, Talin | Hunter, David J. | Kaplan, Robert C. | Mohlke, Karen L. | O’Connell, Jeffrey R. | Peltonen, Leena | Schlessinger, David | Strachan, David P. | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Wichmann, H.-Erich | Frayling, Timothy M. | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Abecasis, Gonçalo R. | Barroso, Inês | Boehnke, Michael | Stefansson, Kari | North, Kari E. | McCarthy, Mark I. | Hirschhorn, Joel N. | Ingelsson, Erik | Loos, Ruth J.F.
Nature genetics  2010;42(11):937-948.
Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but the underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity-susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index (BMI) and ~2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals, with targeted follow-up of 42 SNPs in up to 125,931 additional individuals. We confirmed 14 known obesity-susceptibility loci and identified 18 new loci associated with BMI (P<5×10−8), one of which includes a copy number variant near GPRC5B. Some loci (MC4R, POMC, SH2B1, BDNF) map near key hypothalamic regulators of energy balance, and one is near GIPR, an incretin receptor. Furthermore, genes in other newly-associated loci may provide novel insights into human body weight regulation.
doi:10.1038/ng.686
PMCID: PMC3014648  PMID: 20935630
10.  Hundreds of variants clustered in genomic loci and biological pathways affect human height 
Lango Allen, Hana | Estrada, Karol | Lettre, Guillaume | Berndt, Sonja I. | Weedon, Michael N. | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Willer, Cristen J. | Jackson, Anne U. | Vedantam, Sailaja | Raychaudhuri, Soumya | Ferreira, Teresa | Wood, Andrew R. | Weyant, Robert J. | Segrè, Ayellet V. | Speliotes, Elizabeth K. | Wheeler, Eleanor | Soranzo, Nicole | Park, Ju-Hyun | Yang, Jian | Gudbjartsson, Daniel | Heard-Costa, Nancy L. | Randall, Joshua C. | Qi, Lu | Smith, Albert Vernon | Mägi, Reedik | Pastinen, Tomi | Liang, Liming | Heid, Iris M. | Luan, Jian'an | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Winkler, Thomas W. | Goddard, Michael E. | Lo, Ken Sin | Palmer, Cameron | Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie | Aulchenko, Yurii S. | Johansson, Åsa | Zillikens, M.Carola | Feitosa, Mary F. | Esko, Tõnu | Johnson, Toby | Ketkar, Shamika | Kraft, Peter | Mangino, Massimo | Prokopenko, Inga | Absher, Devin | Albrecht, Eva | Ernst, Florian | Glazer, Nicole L. | Hayward, Caroline | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Jacobs, Kevin B. | Knowles, Joshua W. | Kutalik, Zoltán | Monda, Keri L. | Polasek, Ozren | Preuss, Michael | Rayner, Nigel W. | Robertson, Neil R. | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Tyrer, Jonathan P. | Voight, Benjamin F. | Wiklund, Fredrik | Xu, Jianfeng | Zhao, Jing Hua | Nyholt, Dale R. | Pellikka, Niina | Perola, Markus | Perry, John R.B. | Surakka, Ida | Tammesoo, Mari-Liis | Altmaier, Elizabeth L. | Amin, Najaf | Aspelund, Thor | Bhangale, Tushar | Boucher, Gabrielle | Chasman, Daniel I. | Chen, Constance | Coin, Lachlan | Cooper, Matthew N. | Dixon, Anna L. | Gibson, Quince | Grundberg, Elin | Hao, Ke | Junttila, M. Juhani | Kaplan, Lee M. | Kettunen, Johannes | König, Inke R. | Kwan, Tony | Lawrence, Robert W. | Levinson, Douglas F. | Lorentzon, Mattias | McKnight, Barbara | Morris, Andrew P. | Müller, Martina | Ngwa, Julius Suh | Purcell, Shaun | Rafelt, Suzanne | Salem, Rany M. | Salvi, Erika | Sanna, Serena | Shi, Jianxin | Sovio, Ulla | Thompson, John R. | Turchin, Michael C. | Vandenput, Liesbeth | Verlaan, Dominique J. | Vitart, Veronique | White, Charles C. | Ziegler, Andreas | Almgren, Peter | Balmforth, Anthony J. | Campbell, Harry | Citterio, Lorena | De Grandi, Alessandro | Dominiczak, Anna | Duan, Jubao | Elliott, Paul | Elosua, Roberto | Eriksson, Johan G. | Freimer, Nelson B. | Geus, Eco J.C. | Glorioso, Nicola | Haiqing, Shen | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Havulinna, Aki S. | Hicks, Andrew A. | Hui, Jennie | Igl, Wilmar | Illig, Thomas | Jula, Antti | Kajantie, Eero | Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O. | Koiranen, Markku | Kolcic, Ivana | Koskinen, Seppo | Kovacs, Peter | Laitinen, Jaana | Liu, Jianjun | Lokki, Marja-Liisa | Marusic, Ana | Maschio, Andrea | Meitinger, Thomas | Mulas, Antonella | Paré, Guillaume | Parker, Alex N. | Peden, John F. | Petersmann, Astrid | Pichler, Irene | Pietiläinen, Kirsi H. | Pouta, Anneli | Ridderstråle, Martin | Rotter, Jerome I. | Sambrook, Jennifer G. | Sanders, Alan R. | Schmidt, Carsten Oliver | Sinisalo, Juha | Smit, Jan H. | Stringham, Heather M. | Walters, G.Bragi | Widen, Elisabeth | Wild, Sarah H. | Willemsen, Gonneke | Zagato, Laura | Zgaga, Lina | Zitting, Paavo | Alavere, Helene | Farrall, Martin | McArdle, Wendy L. | Nelis, Mari | Peters, Marjolein J. | Ripatti, Samuli | van Meurs, Joyce B.J. | Aben, Katja K. | Ardlie, Kristin G | Beckmann, Jacques S. | Beilby, John P. | Bergman, Richard N. | Bergmann, Sven | Collins, Francis S. | Cusi, Daniele | den Heijer, Martin | Eiriksdottir, Gudny | Gejman, Pablo V. | Hall, Alistair S. | Hamsten, Anders | Huikuri, Heikki V. | Iribarren, Carlos | Kähönen, Mika | Kaprio, Jaakko | Kathiresan, Sekar | Kiemeney, Lambertus | Kocher, Thomas | Launer, Lenore J. | Lehtimäki, Terho | Melander, Olle | Mosley, Tom H. | Musk, Arthur W. | Nieminen, Markku S. | O'Donnell, Christopher J. | Ohlsson, Claes | Oostra, Ben | Palmer, Lyle J. | Raitakari, Olli | Ridker, Paul M. | Rioux, John D. | Rissanen, Aila | Rivolta, Carlo | Schunkert, Heribert | Shuldiner, Alan R. | Siscovick, David S. | Stumvoll, Michael | Tönjes, Anke | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | van Ommen, Gert-Jan | Viikari, Jorma | Heath, Andrew C. | Martin, Nicholas G. | Montgomery, Grant W. | Province, Michael A. | Kayser, Manfred | Arnold, Alice M. | Atwood, Larry D. | Boerwinkle, Eric | Chanock, Stephen J. | Deloukas, Panos | Gieger, Christian | Grönberg, Henrik | Hall, Per | Hattersley, Andrew T. | Hengstenberg, Christian | Hoffman, Wolfgang | Lathrop, G.Mark | Salomaa, Veikko | Schreiber, Stefan | Uda, Manuela | Waterworth, Dawn | Wright, Alan F. | Assimes, Themistocles L. | Barroso, Inês | Hofman, Albert | Mohlke, Karen L. | Boomsma, Dorret I. | Caulfield, Mark J. | Cupples, L.Adrienne | Erdmann, Jeanette | Fox, Caroline S. | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Gyllensten, Ulf | Harris, Tamara B. | Hayes, Richard B. | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Mooser, Vincent | Munroe, Patricia B. | Ouwehand, Willem H. | Penninx, Brenda W. | Pramstaller, Peter P. | Quertermous, Thomas | Rudan, Igor | Samani, Nilesh J. | Spector, Timothy D. | Völzke, Henry | Watkins, Hugh | Wilson, James F. | Groop, Leif C. | Haritunians, Talin | Hu, Frank B. | Kaplan, Robert C. | Metspalu, Andres | North, Kari E. | Schlessinger, David | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Hunter, David J. | O'Connell, Jeffrey R. | Strachan, David P. | Wichmann, H.-Erich | Borecki, Ingrid B. | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Schadt, Eric E. | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Peltonen, Leena | Uitterlinden, André | Visscher, Peter M. | Chatterjee, Nilanjan | Loos, Ruth J.F. | Boehnke, Michael | McCarthy, Mark I. | Ingelsson, Erik | Lindgren, Cecilia M. | Abecasis, Gonçalo R. | Stefansson, Kari | Frayling, Timothy M. | Hirschhorn, Joel N
Nature  2010;467(7317):832-838.
Most common human traits and diseases have a polygenic pattern of inheritance: DNA sequence variants at many genetic loci influence phenotype. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified >600 variants associated with human traits1, but these typically explain small fractions of phenotypic variation, raising questions about the utility of further studies. Here, using 183,727 individuals, we show that hundreds of genetic variants, in at least 180 loci, influence adult height, a highly heritable and classic polygenic trait2,3. The large number of loci reveals patterns with important implications for genetic studies of common human diseases and traits. First, the 180 loci are not random, but instead are enriched for genes that are connected in biological pathways (P=0.016), and that underlie skeletal growth defects (P<0.001). Second, the likely causal gene is often located near the most strongly associated variant: in 13 of 21 loci containing a known skeletal growth gene, that gene was closest to the associated variant. Third, at least 19 loci have multiple independently associated variants, suggesting that allelic heterogeneity is a frequent feature of polygenic traits, that comprehensive explorations of already-discovered loci should discover additional variants, and that an appreciable fraction of associated loci may have been identified. Fourth, associated variants are enriched for likely functional effects on genes, being over-represented amongst variants that alter amino acid structure of proteins and expression levels of nearby genes. Our data explain ∼10% of the phenotypic variation in height, and we estimate that unidentified common variants of similar effect sizes would increase this figure to ∼16% of phenotypic variation (∼20% of heritable variation). Although additional approaches are needed to fully dissect the genetic architecture of polygenic human traits, our findings indicate that GWA studies can identify large numbers of loci that implicate biologically relevant genes and pathways.
doi:10.1038/nature09410
PMCID: PMC2955183  PMID: 20881960
11.  Use of Genome-Wide Expression Data to Mine the “Gray Zone” of GWA Studies Leads to Novel Candidate Obesity Genes 
PLoS Genetics  2010;6(6):e1000976.
To get beyond the “low-hanging fruits” so far identified by genome-wide association (GWA) studies, new methods must be developed in order to discover the numerous remaining genes that estimates of heritability indicate should be contributing to complex human phenotypes, such as obesity. Here we describe a novel integrative method for complex disease gene identification utilizing both genome-wide transcript profiling of adipose tissue samples and consequent analysis of genome-wide association data generated in large SNP scans. We infer causality of genes with obesity by employing a unique set of monozygotic twin pairs discordant for BMI (n = 13 pairs, age 24–28 years, 15.4 kg mean weight difference) and contrast the transcript profiles with those from a larger sample of non-related adult individuals (N = 77). Using this approach, we were able to identify 27 genes with possibly causal roles in determining the degree of human adiposity. Testing for association of SNP variants in these 27 genes in the population samples of the large ENGAGE consortium (N = 21,000) revealed a significant deviation of P-values from the expected (P = 4×10−4). A total of 13 genes contained SNPs nominally associated with BMI. The top finding was blood coagulation factor F13A1 identified as a novel obesity gene also replicated in a second GWA set of ∼2,000 individuals. This study presents a new approach to utilizing gene expression studies for informing choice of candidate genes for complex human phenotypes, such as obesity.
Author Summary
Obesity has a strong genetic component and an estimated 45%–85% of the variation in adult relative weight is genetically determined. Many genes have recently been identified in genome-wide association studies. The individual effects of the identified genes, however, have been very modest, and their identification required very large sample sizes. New approaches are therefore needed to uncover further genetic variants that contribute to the development of obesity and related conditions. Much can be learned from studying the expression of genes in adipose tissue of obese and non-obese subjects, but it is very difficult to distinguish which genes' expression differences represent reactions to obesity from those related to causal processes. We studied monozygotic twin pairs discordant for obesity and contrasted the gene expression profiles of obese and lean co-twins (controlling for genetic variation) to those from unrelated individuals to try to discern the cause-and-effect relationships of the identified changes in gene expression in fat. Testing the identified genes in 21,000 individuals identified numerous new genes with possible roles in the development of obesity. Among the top findings was a gene involved in blood coagulation (Factor XIIIA1), possibly linking obesity with known complications including deep vein thrombosis, heart attack, and stroke.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1000976
PMCID: PMC2880558  PMID: 20532202
12.  LEISURE ACTIVITY PATTERNS AND THEIR ASSOCIATIONS WITH OVERWEIGHT: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY AMONG ADOLESCENTS 
Journal of adolescence  2009;32(5):1089-1103.
We examined longitudinal associations between individual leisure activities (television viewing, video viewing, computer games, listening to music, board games, musical instrument playing, reading, arts, crafts, socializing, clubs or scouts, sports, outdoor activities) and being overweight using logistic regression and latent class analysis in a cohort of Finnish twins responding to self-report questionnaires at 11–12 (N=5184), 14, and 17 years. We also studied activity patterns (“Active and sociable”, “Active but less sociable”, “Passive but sociable”, “Passive and solitary”) thought to represent different lifestyles. Among boys, activity patterns did not predict becoming overweight, but sports and playing an instrument reduced the risk and arts and listening to music increased it. Among girls, few individual leisure activities predicted becoming overweight. However, girls in the “Passive and solitary” cluster carried the greatest risk of becoming overweight in late adolescence. Studying leisure activities related to overweight may help focus specific interventions on high risk groups.
doi:10.1016/j.adolescence.2009.03.006
PMCID: PMC2735596  PMID: 19345989
leisure activities; hobbies; overweight; obesity; body mass index; adolescent; cohort studies
13.  GENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON BODY MASS INDEX DURING ADOLESCENCE: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY AMONG FINNISH TWINS 
Objective
To study genetic and environmental factors affecting body mass index (BMI) and BMI phenotypic correlations across adolescence.
Design
Prospective, population-based, twin cohort study.
Subjects and methods
We used twin modeling in 2413 monozygotic and same-sex and opposite-sex dizygotic Finnish twin pairs born in 1983–1987 and assessed by self-report questionnaires at 11–12, 14, and 17 years.
Results
Heritability of BMI was estimated to be 0.58–0.69 among 11–12- and 14-year-old boys and girls, 0.83 among 17-year-old boys and 0.74 among girls. Common environmental effects shared by siblings were 0.15–0.24 among 11–12- and 14-year-old boys and girls but no longer discernible at 17 y. Unique environmental effects were 0.15–0.23. Additive genetic factors explained 90–96% of the BMI phenotypic correlations across adolescence, whereas unique environmental factors explained the rest. Common environment had no effect on BMI phenotypic correlations.
Conclusions
The genetic contribution to BMI is strong during adolescence, and it mainly explains BMI phenotypic correlations across adolescence. Common environmental factors have an effect on BMI during early adolescence, but that effect disappears by late adolescence.
doi:10.1038/ijo.2009.51
PMCID: PMC2704063  PMID: 19337205
body mass index; adolescent; twins; genetics; growth and development; sex specific effects
14.  Epidemiology of Anorexia Nervosa in Men: A Nationwide Study of Finnish Twins 
PLoS ONE  2009;4(2):e4402.
Background
To examine the epidemiology of anorexia nervosa in men, we screened Finnish male twins born in 1975–79.
Methods and Findings
Men (N = 2122) from FinnTwin16 birth cohorts were screened for lifetime eating disorders by a questionnaire. The screen positives (N = 18), their male co-twins (N = 10) and those with lifetime minimum BMI≤17.5 (N = 21) were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV anorexia nervosa. The incidence rate of anorexia nervosa for the presumed peak age of risk (10–24y) was 15.7 per 100 000 person-years; its lifetime prevalence was 0.24%. All probands had recovered from eating disorders, but suffered from substantial psychiatric comorbidity, which also manifested in their co-twins. Additionally, male co-twins displayed significant dissatisfaction with body musculature, a male-specific feature of body dysmorphic disorder.
Conclusions
Anorexia nervosa in males in the community is more common, transient and accompanied by more substantial comorbidity than previously thought.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0004402
PMCID: PMC2635934  PMID: 19204790
15.  Global Transcript Profiles of Fat in Monozygotic Twins Discordant for BMI: Pathways behind Acquired Obesity  
PLoS Medicine  2008;5(3):e51.
Background
The acquired component of complex traits is difficult to dissect in humans. Obesity represents such a trait, in which the metabolic and molecular consequences emerge from complex interactions of genes and environment. With the substantial morbidity associated with obesity, a deeper understanding of the concurrent metabolic changes is of considerable importance. The goal of this study was to investigate this important acquired component and expose obesity-induced changes in biological pathways in an identical genetic background.
Methods and Findings
We used a special study design of “clonal controls,” rare monozygotic twins discordant for obesity identified through a national registry of 2,453 young, healthy twin pairs. A total of 14 pairs were studied (eight male, six female; white), with a mean ± standard deviation (SD) age 25.8 ± 1.4 y and a body mass index (BMI) difference 5.2 ± 1.8 kg/m2. Sequence analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in subcutaneous fat and peripheral leukocytes revealed no aberrant heteroplasmy between the co-twins. However, mtDNA copy number was reduced by 47% in the obese co-twin's fat. In addition, novel pathway analyses of the adipose tissue transcription profiles exposed significant down-regulation of mitochondrial branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolism (p < 0.0001). In line with this finding, serum levels of insulin secretion-enhancing BCAAs were increased in obese male co-twins (9% increase, p = 0.025). Lending clinical relevance to the findings, in both sexes the observed aberrations in mitochondrial amino acid metabolism pathways in fat correlated closely with liver fat accumulation, insulin resistance, and hyperinsulinemia, early aberrations of acquired obesity in these healthy young adults.
Conclusions
Our findings emphasize a substantial role of mitochondrial energy- and amino acid metabolism in obesity and development of insulin resistance.
Leena Peltonen and colleagues uncover the metabolic changes that result from obesity through an analysis of genetically identical twin pairs in which one was obese and the other was not.
Editors' Summary
Background.
Around the world, the proportion of people who are obese (people with an unhealthy amount of body fat) is increasing. In the US, for example, 1 adult in 7 was obese in the mid 1970s. That is, their body mass index (BMI)—their weight in kilograms divided by their height in meters squared—was more than 30. Nowadays, 1 US adult in 3 has a BMI this high and, by 2025, it is predicted that 1 in 2 will be obese. This obesity epidemic is being driven by lifestyle changes that encourage the over-consumption of energy-rich foods and discourage regular physical activity. The resultant energy imbalance leads to weight gain (the excess energy is stored as body fat or adipose tissue) and also triggers numerous metabolic changes, alterations in the chemical processes that convert food into the energy and various substances needed to support life. These obesity-related metabolic changes increase a person's risk of developing adverse health conditions such as diabetes, a condition in which dangerously high levels of sugar from food accumulate in the blood.
Why Was This Study Done?
The changes in human fat in obesity have not been completely understood, although the abnormal metabolism of adipose tissue is increasingly seen as playing a critical part in excessive weight gain. It has been very difficult to decipher which molecular and metabolic changes associated with obesity are the result of becoming obese, and which might contribute towards the acquisition of obesity in humans in the first place. To discover more about the influence of environment on obesity-induced metabolic changes, the researchers in this study have investigated these changes in pairs of genetically identical twins.
What Did the Researchers Do and Find?
The researchers recruited 14 pairs of genetically identical Finnish twins born between 1975 and 1979 who were “obesity discordant”—that is, one twin of each pair had a BMI of about 25 (not obese); the other had a BMI of about 30 (obese). The researchers took fat and blood samples from each twin, determined the insulin sensitivity of each, and measured the body composition and various fat stores of each. They found that the obese twins had more subcutaneous, intra-abdominal, and liver fat and were less insulin sensitive than the non-obese twins. Insulin sensitivity correlated with the amount of liver fat. Analysis of gene expression in the fat samples showed that 19 gene pathways (mainly inflammatory pathways) were expressed more strongly (up-regulated) in the obese twins than the non-obese twins, whereas seven pathways were down-regulated. The most highly down-regulated pathway was a mitochondrial pathway involved in amino acid breakdown, but mitochondrial energy metabolism pathways were also down-regulated. Finally, mitochondrial DNA copy number in fat was reduced in the obese twins by nearly half, a novel observation that could partly account for the obesity-induced metabolic defects of these individuals.
What Do These Findings Mean?
These and other findings identify several pathways that are involved in the development of obesity and insulin resistance. In particular, they suggest that changes in mitochondrial energy production pathways and in mitochondrial amino acid metabolism pathways could play important roles in the development of obesity and of insulin resistance and in the accumulation of liver fat even in young obese people. The study design involving identical twins has here produced some evidence for aberrations in molecules critical for acquired obesity. The results suggest that careful management of obesity by lifestyle changes has the potential to correct the obesity-related metabolic changes in fat that would otherwise lead to diabetes and other adverse health conditions in obese individuals. In addition, they suggest that the development of therapies designed to correct mitochondrial metabolism might help to reduce the illnesses associated with obesity.
Additional Information.
Please access these Web sites via the online version of this summary at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0050051.
The MedlinePlus encyclopedia has pages on obesity and diabetes (in English and Spanish)
The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides information on all aspects of obesity (in English and Spanish)
The UK National Health Service's health Web site (NHS Direct) provides information about obesity
The International Obesity Taskforce provides information about preventing obesity and on diabetes and obesity
The UK Foods Standards Agency and the United States Department of Agriculture provide online tools and useful advice about healthy eating for adults and children
Information is available for patients and carers from the US National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse on diabetes, including information on insulin resistance
doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.0050051
PMCID: PMC2265758  PMID: 18336063
16.  Physical inactivity and obesity: A vicious circle 
Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.)  2008;16(2):409-414.
Objective
Physical activity (PA) begins to decline in adolescence with concomitant increase in weight. We hypothesized that a vicious circle may arise between decreasing physical activity and weight gain from adolescence to early adulthood.
Research Methods and Procedures
PA and self-perceived physical fitness assessed in adolescence (16-18 years) were used to predict the development of obesity (BMI≥30 kg/m2) and abdominal obesity (waist≥88 cm in females and ≥102 cm in males) at age 25 in 4240 twin individuals (90% of twins born in Finland 1975-1979). Ten 25-year-old monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs discordant for obesity (16 kg weight difference) were then carefully evaluated for current PA (triaxial accelerometer), total energy expenditure (TEE, doubly labeled water), and basal metabolic rate (BMR, indirect calorimetry).
Results
Physical inactivity in adolescence strongly predicted the risk of obesity (OR 3.9, 95%CI 1.4-10.9) and abdominal obesity (4.8, 1.9-12.0) at age 25, even after adjusting for baseline and current BMI. Poor physical fitness in adolescence also increased the risk of overall (5.1, 2.0-12.7) and abdominal obesity (3.2, 1.5-6.7) in adulthood. Physical inactivity was both causative and secondary to the development of obesity discordance in the MZ pairs. TEE did not differ between the MZ co-twins. PA levels were lower whereas BMR was higher in the obese co-twins.
Discussion
Physical inactivity in adolescence strongly and independently predicts total and especially abdominal obesity in young adulthood, favoring the development of a self-perpetuating vicious circle of obesity and physical inactivity. Physical (in)activity should be a major target of obesity prevention in the young.
doi:10.1038/oby.2007.72
PMCID: PMC2249563  PMID: 18239652
longitudinal; twin studies; body mass index; waist circumference; energy expenditure
17.  Genetic and environmental factors affecting self-esteem from age 14 to 17: a longitudinal study of Finnish twins 
Psychological medicine  2007;37(11):1625-1633.
Background
We analysed genetic and environmental influences on self-esteem and its stability across adolescence.
Methods
Finnish twins born in 1983–1987 were assessed by questionnaire at ages 14y (N= 4132 twin individuals) and 17y (N=3841 twin individuals). Self esteem was measured using the Rosenberg global self-esteem scale and analyzed using quantitative genetic methods for twin data in the Mx statistical package.
Results
The heritability of self-esteem was 0.62 (95% CI 0.56–0.68) in 14-y-old boys and 0.40 (95% CI 0.26–0.54) in 14-y-old girls, while the corresponding estimates at age 17y were 0.48 (95% CI 0.39–0.56) and 0.29 (95% CI 0.11–0.45). Rosenberg self-esteem scores at age 14 y and 17 y were modestly correlated (r=0.44 in boys, r=0.46 in girls). In boys, the correlation was mainly (82%) due to genetic factors, with residual co-variation due to unique environment. In girls, genetic (31%) and common environmental (61%) factors largely explained the correlation.
Conclusions
In adolescence, self-esteem seems to be differently regulated in boys versus girls. A key challenge for future research is to identify environmental influences contributing to self-esteem during adolescence and how these factors interact with genetic influences.
doi:10.1017/S0033291707000840
PMCID: PMC2084483  PMID: 17537282
Self-esteem; twin study; longitudinal study; adolescence
18.  Serotonin transporter binding of [123I]ADAM in bulimic women, their healthy twin sisters, and healthy women: a SPET study 
BMC Psychiatry  2007;7:19.
Background
Bulimia Nervosa (BN) is believed to be caused by an interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Previous studies support the existence of a bulimia-related endophenotype as well as disturbances in serotonin (5-HT) transmission. We studied serotonin transporter (SERT) binding in BN, and to investigate the possibility of a SERT-related endophenotype for BN, did this in a sample of female twins. We hypothesized clearly reduced SERT binding in BN women as opposed to healthy women, and intermediate SERT binding in unaffected co-twins.
Methods
We studied 13 female twins with BN (9 with purging and 4 with non-purging BN) and 25 healthy women, including 6 healthy twin sisters of BN patients and 19 women from 10 healthy twin pairs. [123I]ADAM, a selective SERT radioligand for single photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging, was used to assess SERT availability in the midbrain and the thalamus.
Results
No differences in SERT binding were evident when comparing the BN women, their unaffected co-twins and the healthy controls (p = 0.14). The healthy sisters of the BN patients and the healthy control women had similar SERT binding in both brain regions. In a post hoc subgroup analysis, the purging bulimics had higher SERT binding than the healthy women in the midbrain (p = 0.03), but not in the thalamus.
Conclusion
Our finding of increased SERT binding in the midbrain in the purging BN women raises the possibility that this subgroup of bulimics might differ in serotonergic function from the non-purging ones. The similarity of the unaffected co-twins and the healthy controls doesn't support our initial assumption of a SERT-related endophenotype for BN. Due to the small sample size, our results need to be interpreted with caution and verified in a larger sample.
doi:10.1186/1471-244X-7-19
PMCID: PMC1891098  PMID: 17511889
19.  Are computer and cell phone use associated with body mass index and overweight? A population study among twin adolescents 
BMC Public Health  2007;7:24.
Background
Overweight in children and adolescents has reached dimensions of a global epidemic during recent years. Simultaneously, information and communication technology use has rapidly increased.
Methods
A population-based sample of Finnish twins born in 1983–1987 (N = 4098) was assessed by self-report questionnaires at 17 y during 2000–2005. The association of overweight (defined by Cole's BMI-for-age cut-offs) with computer and cell phone use and ownership was analyzed by logistic regression and their association with BMI by linear regression models. The effect of twinship was taken into account by correcting for clustered sampling of families. All models were adjusted for gender, physical exercise, and parents' education and occupational class.
Results
The proportion of adolescents who did not have a computer at home decreased from 18% to 8% from 2000 to 2005. Compared to them, having a home computer (without an Internet connection) was associated with a higher risk of overweight (odds ratio 2.3, 95% CI 1.4 to 3.8) and BMI (beta coefficient 0.57, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.98). However, having a computer with an Internet connection was not associated with weight status. Belonging to the highest quintile (OR 1.8 95% CI 1.2 to 2.8) and second-highest quintile (OR 1.6 95% CI 1.1 to 2.4) of weekly computer use was positively associated with overweight. The proportion of adolescents without a personal cell phone decreased from 12% to 1% across 2000 to 2005. There was a positive linear trend of increasing monthly phone bill with BMI (beta 0.18, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.30), but the association of a cell phone bill with overweight was very weak.
Conclusion
Time spent using a home computer was associated with an increased risk of overweight. Cell phone use correlated weakly with BMI. Increasing use of information and communication technology may be related to the obesity epidemic among adolescents.
doi:10.1186/1471-2458-7-24
PMCID: PMC1820777  PMID: 17324280
20.  Acquired Obesity Is Associated with Changes in the Serum Lipidomic Profile Independent of Genetic Effects – A Monozygotic Twin Study 
PLoS ONE  2007;2(2):e218.
Both genetic and environmental factors are involved in the etiology of obesity and the associated lipid disturbances. We determined whether acquired obesity is associated with changes in global serum lipid profiles independent of genetic factors in young adult monozygotic (MZ) twins. 14 healthy MZ pairs discordant for obesity (10 to 25 kg weight difference) and ten weight concordant control pairs aged 24–27 years were identified from a large population-based study. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the euglycemic clamp technique, and body composition by DEXA (% body fat) and by MRI (subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat). Global characterization of lipid molecular species in serum was performed by a lipidomics strategy using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Obesity, independent of genetic influences, was primarily related to increases in lysophosphatidylcholines, lipids found in proinflammatory and proatherogenic conditions and to decreases in ether phospholipids, which are known to have antioxidant properties. These lipid changes were associated with insulin resistance, a pathogonomic characteristic of acquired obesity in these young adult twins. Our results show that obesity, already in its early stages and independent of genetic influences, is associated with deleterious alterations in the lipid metabolism known to facilitate atherogenesis, inflammation and insulin resistance.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0000218
PMCID: PMC1789242  PMID: 17299598
21.  Is the Prevalence of Overactive Bladder Overestimated? A Population-Based Study in Finland 
PLoS ONE  2007;2(2):e195.
Background
In earlier studies, one in six adults had overactive bladder which may impair quality of life. However, earlier studies have either not been population-based or have suffered from methodological limitations. Our aim was to assess the prevalence of overactive bladder symptoms, based on a representative study population and using consistent definitions and exclusions.
Methodology/Principal Findings
The aim of the study was to assess the age-standardized prevalence of overactive bladder defined as urinary urgency, with or without urgency incontinence, usually with urinary frequency and nocturia in the absence of urinary tract infection or other obvious pathology. In 2003–2004, a questionnaire was mailed to 6,000 randomly selected Finns aged 18–79 years who were identified from the Finnish Population Register Centre. Information on voiding symptoms was collected using the validated Danish Prostatic Symptom Score, with additional frequency and nocturia questions. Corrected prevalence was calculated with adjustment for selection bias due to non-response. The questionnaire also elicited co-morbidity and socio-demographic information. Of the 6,000 subjects, 62.4% participated. The prevalence of overactive bladder was 6.5% (95% CI, 5.5% to 7.6%) for men and 9.3% (CI, 7.9% to 10.6%) for women. Exclusion of men with benign prostatic hyperplasia reduced prevalence among men by approximately one percentage point (to 5.6% [CI, 4.5% to 6.6%]). Among subjects with overactive bladder, urgency incontinence, frequency, and nocturia were reported by 11%, 23%, and 56% of men and 27%, 38%, and 40% of women, respectively. However, only 31% of men and 35% of women with frequency, and 31% of subjects of both sexes with nocturia reported overactive bladder.
Conclusions/Significance
Our results indicate a prevalence of overactive bladder as low as 8% suggesting that, in previous studies, occurrence has been overestimated due to vague criteria and selected study populations regarding age distribution and low participation.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0000195
PMCID: PMC1805814  PMID: 17332843
22.  Muscle dissatisfaction in young adult men 
Backround
Appearance concerns are of increasing importance in young men's lives. We investigated whether muscle dissatisfaction is associated with psychological symptoms, dietary supplement or anabolic steroid use, or physical activity in young men.
Methods
As a part of a questionnaire assessment of health-related behaviors in the population-based FinnTwin16 study, we assessed factors associated with muscle dissatisfaction in 1245 men aged 22–27 using logistic regression models.
Results
Of men, 30% experienced high muscle dissatisfaction, while 12% used supplements/steroids. Of highly muscle-dissatisfied men, 21.5% used supplements/steroids. Mean body mass index, waist circumference, or leisure aerobic activity index did not differ between individuals with high/low muscle dissatisfaction. Muscle dissatisfaction was significantly associated with a psychological and psychosomatic problems, alcohol and drug use, lower height satisfaction, sedentary lifestyle, poor subjective physical fitness, and lower life satisfaction.
Conclusion
Muscle dissatisfaction and supplement/steroid use are relatively common, and are associated with psychological distress and markers of sedentary lifestyle.
doi:10.1186/1745-0179-2-6
PMCID: PMC1501012  PMID: 16594989
23.  Intention to Lose Weight, Weight Changes, and 18-y Mortality in Overweight Individuals without Co-Morbidities 
PLoS Medicine  2005;2(6):e171.
Background
Weight loss in the obese improves risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. However, several studies have shown inconsistent long-term effects of weight loss on mortality. We investigated the influence on mortality of intention to lose weight and subsequent weight changes among overweight individuals without known co-morbidities.
Methods and Findings
In 1975, a cohort of individuals reported height, weight, and current attempts (defined as “intention”) to lose weight, and in 1981, they reported current weight. Mortality of the 2,957 participants with body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2 in 1975 and without pre-existing or current diseases was followed from 1982 through 1999, and 268 participants died. The association of intention to lose weight in 1975 and actual weight change until 1981 with mortality was analysed while controlling for behavioural and psychosocial risk factors and hypertension as possible confounders. Compared with the group not intending to lose and able to maintain stable weight, the hazard ratios (with 95% confidence intervals) in the group intending to lose weight were 0.84 (0.49–1.48) for those with stable weight, 1.86 (1.22–2.87) for those losing weight, and 0.93 (0.55–1.56) for those gaining weight. In the group not intending to lose weight, hazard ratios were 1.17 (0.82–1.66) for those who did lose weight, and 1.57 (1.08–2.30) for those gaining weight.
Conclusion
Deliberate weight loss in overweight individuals without known co-morbidities may be hazardous in the long term. The health effects of weight loss are complex, possibly composed of oppositely acting processes, and need more research.
Deliberate weight loss in overweight individuals without known illness is not obviously beneficial, and may be hazardous in the long term.
doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.0020171
PMCID: PMC1160579  PMID: 15971946
24.  The SLC6A14 gene shows evidence of association with obesity 
Journal of Clinical Investigation  2003;112(11):1762-1772.
In our previous genome-wide scan of Finnish nuclear families, obesity was linked to chromosome Xq24. Here we analyzed this 15-Mb region by genotyping 9 microsatellite markers and 36 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for 11 positional and functional candidate genes in an extended sample of 218 obese Finnish sibling pairs (sibpairs) (BMI > 30 kg/m2). Evidence of linkage emerged mainly from the obese male sibpairs, suggesting a gender-specific effect for the underlying gene. By constructing haplotypes among the obese male sibpairs, we restricted the region from 15 Mb to 4 Mb, between markers DXS8088 and DXS8067. Regional functional candidate genes were tested for association in an initial sample of 117 cases and 182 controls. Significant evidence was observed for association for an SNP in the 3′-untranslated region of the solute carrier family 6 member 14 (SLC6A14) gene (P = 0.0002) and for SNP haplotypes of the SLC6A14 gene (P = 0.0007–0.006). Furthermore, an independent replication study sample of 837 cases and 968 controls from Finland and Sweden also showed significant differences in allele frequencies between obese and non-obese individuals (P = 0.003). The SLC6A14 gene is an interesting novel candidate for obesity because it encodes an amino acid transporter, which potentially regulates tryptophan availability for serotonin synthesis and thus possibly affects appetite control.
doi:10.1172/JCI200317491
PMCID: PMC281637  PMID: 14660752

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