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1.  On the nose: genetic and evolutionary aspects of smell 
doi:10.1186/s13323-015-0021-3
PMCID: PMC4331135
2.  Gene Conversion Violates the Stepwise Mutation Model for Microsatellites in Y-Chromosomal Palindromic Repeats 
Human Mutation  2014;35(5):609-617.
The male-specific region of the human Y chromosome (MSY) contains eight large inverted repeats (palindromes), in which high-sequence similarity between repeat arms is maintained by gene conversion. These palindromes also harbor microsatellites, considered to evolve via a stepwise mutation model (SMM). Here, we ask whether gene conversion between palindrome microsatellites contributes to their mutational dynamics. First, we study the duplicated tetranucleotide microsatellite DYS385a,b lying in palindrome P4. We show, by comparing observed data with simulated data under a SMM within haplogroups, that observed heteroallelic combinations in which the modal repeat number difference between copies was large, can give rise to homoallelic combinations with zero-repeats difference, equivalent to many single-step mutations. These are unlikely to be generated under a strict SMM, suggesting the action of gene conversion. Second, we show that the intercopy repeat number difference for a large set of duplicated microsatellites in all palindromes in the MSY reference sequence is significantly reduced compared with that for nonpalindrome-duplicated microsatellites, suggesting that the former are characterized by unusual evolutionary dynamics. These observations indicate that gene conversion violates the SMM for microsatellites in palindromes, homogenizing copies within individual Y chromosomes, but increasing overall haplotype diversity among chromosomes within related groups.
doi:10.1002/humu.22542
PMCID: PMC4233959  PMID: 24610746
Y chromosome; gene conversion; palindrome; microsatellite; stepwise mutation model; DYS385
3.  Trouble at the races 
doi:10.1186/2041-2223-5-14
PMCID: PMC4206859  PMID: 25349690
4.  A global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci 
Purps, Josephine | Siegert, Sabine | Willuweit, Sascha | Nagy, Marion | Alves, Cíntia | Salazar, Renato | Angustia, Sheila M.T. | Santos, Lorna H. | Anslinger, Katja | Bayer, Birgit | Ayub, Qasim | Wei, Wei | Xue, Yali | Tyler-Smith, Chris | Bafalluy, Miriam Baeta | Martínez-Jarreta, Begoña | Egyed, Balazs | Balitzki, Beate | Tschumi, Sibylle | Ballard, David | Court, Denise Syndercombe | Barrantes, Xinia | Bäßler, Gerhard | Wiest, Tina | Berger, Burkhard | Niederstätter, Harald | Parson, Walther | Davis, Carey | Budowle, Bruce | Burri, Helen | Borer, Urs | Koller, Christoph | Carvalho, Elizeu F. | Domingues, Patricia M. | Chamoun, Wafaa Takash | Coble, Michael D. | Hill, Carolyn R. | Corach, Daniel | Caputo, Mariela | D’Amato, Maria E. | Davison, Sean | Decorte, Ronny | Larmuseau, Maarten H.D. | Ottoni, Claudio | Rickards, Olga | Lu, Di | Jiang, Chengtao | Dobosz, Tadeusz | Jonkisz, Anna | Frank, William E. | Furac, Ivana | Gehrig, Christian | Castella, Vincent | Grskovic, Branka | Haas, Cordula | Wobst, Jana | Hadzic, Gavrilo | Drobnic, Katja | Honda, Katsuya | Hou, Yiping | Zhou, Di | Li, Yan | Hu, Shengping | Chen, Shenglan | Immel, Uta-Dorothee | Lessig, Rüdiger | Jakovski, Zlatko | Ilievska, Tanja | Klann, Anja E. | García, Cristina Cano | de Knijff, Peter | Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa | Kondili, Aikaterini | Miniati, Penelope | Vouropoulou, Maria | Kovacevic, Lejla | Marjanovic, Damir | Lindner, Iris | Mansour, Issam | Al-Azem, Mouayyad | Andari, Ansar El | Marino, Miguel | Furfuro, Sandra | Locarno, Laura | Martín, Pablo | Luque, Gracia M. | Alonso, Antonio | Miranda, Luís Souto | Moreira, Helena | Mizuno, Natsuko | Iwashima, Yasuki | Neto, Rodrigo S. Moura | Nogueira, Tatiana L.S. | Silva, Rosane | Nastainczyk-Wulf, Marina | Edelmann, Jeanett | Kohl, Michael | Nie, Shengjie | Wang, Xianping | Cheng, Baowen | Núñez, Carolina | Pancorbo, Marian Martínez de | Olofsson, Jill K. | Morling, Niels | Onofri, Valerio | Tagliabracci, Adriano | Pamjav, Horolma | Volgyi, Antonia | Barany, Gusztav | Pawlowski, Ryszard | Maciejewska, Agnieszka | Pelotti, Susi | Pepinski, Witold | Abreu-Glowacka, Monica | Phillips, Christopher | Cárdenas, Jorge | Rey-Gonzalez, Danel | Salas, Antonio | Brisighelli, Francesca | Capelli, Cristian | Toscanini, Ulises | Piccinini, Andrea | Piglionica, Marilidia | Baldassarra, Stefania L. | Ploski, Rafal | Konarzewska, Magdalena | Jastrzebska, Emila | Robino, Carlo | Sajantila, Antti | Palo, Jukka U. | Guevara, Evelyn | Salvador, Jazelyn | Ungria, Maria Corazon De | Rodriguez, Jae Joseph Russell | Schmidt, Ulrike | Schlauderer, Nicola | Saukko, Pekka | Schneider, Peter M. | Sirker, Miriam | Shin, Kyoung-Jin | Oh, Yu Na | Skitsa, Iulia | Ampati, Alexandra | Smith, Tobi-Gail | Calvit, Lina Solis de | Stenzl, Vlastimil | Capal, Thomas | Tillmar, Andreas | Nilsson, Helena | Turrina, Stefania | De Leo, Domenico | Verzeletti, Andrea | Cortellini, Venusia | Wetton, Jon H. | Gwynne, Gareth M. | Jobling, Mark A. | Whittle, Martin R. | Sumita, Denilce R. | Wolańska-Nowak, Paulina | Yong, Rita Y.Y. | Krawczak, Michael | Nothnagel, Michael | Roewer, Lutz
In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, GATAH4, DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, and DYS643) and using the PowerPlex Y23 System (PPY23, Promega Corporation, Madison, WI). Locus-specific allelic spectra of these markers were determined and a consistently high level of allelic diversity was observed. A considerable number of null, duplicate and off-ladder alleles were revealed. Standard single-locus and haplotype-based parameters were calculated and compared between subsets of Y-STR markers established for forensic casework. The PPY23 marker set provides substantially stronger discriminatory power than other available kits but at the same time reveals the same general patterns of population structure as other marker sets. A strong correlation was observed between the number of Y-STRs included in a marker set and some of the forensic parameters under study. Interestingly a weak but consistent trend toward smaller genetic distances resulting from larger numbers of markers became apparent.
doi:10.1016/j.fsigen.2014.04.008
PMCID: PMC4127773  PMID: 24854874
Gene diversity; Discriminatory power; AMOVA; Population structure; Database
5.  The sperm’s tale 
doi:10.1186/2041-2223-5-6
PMCID: PMC4061525  PMID: 24944782
6.  A Linguistically Informed Autosomal STR Survey of Human Populations Residing in the Greater Himalayan Region 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(3):e91534.
The greater Himalayan region demarcates two of the most prominent linguistic phyla in Asia: Tibeto-Burman and Indo-European. Previous genetic surveys, mainly using Y-chromosome polymorphisms and/or mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms suggested a substantially reduced geneflow between populations belonging to these two phyla. These studies, however, have mainly focussed on populations residing far to the north and/or south of this mountain range, and have not been able to study geneflow patterns within the greater Himalayan region itself. We now report a detailed, linguistically informed, genetic survey of Tibeto-Burman and Indo-European speakers from the Himalayan countries Nepal and Bhutan based on autosomal microsatellite markers and compare these populations with surrounding regions. The genetic differentiation between populations within the Himalayas seems to be much higher than between populations in the neighbouring countries. We also observe a remarkable genetic differentiation between the Tibeto-Burman speaking populations on the one hand and Indo-European speaking populations on the other, suggesting that language and geography have played an equally large role in defining the genetic composition of present-day populations within the Himalayas.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0091534
PMCID: PMC3948894  PMID: 24614536
7.  The music of the genes 
doi:10.1186/2041-2223-5-2
PMCID: PMC3901330  PMID: 24461062
8.  The truth is out there 
doi:10.1186/2041-2223-4-24
PMCID: PMC4121952  PMID: 25097746
9.  Curiosity in the genes: the DNA fingerprinting story 
doi:10.1186/2041-2223-4-20
PMCID: PMC3831598  PMID: 24245602
10.  Recombination Dynamics of a Human Y-Chromosomal Palindrome: Rapid GC-Biased Gene Conversion, Multi-kilobase Conversion Tracts, and Rare Inversions 
PLoS Genetics  2013;9(7):e1003666.
The male-specific region of the human Y chromosome (MSY) includes eight large inverted repeats (palindromes) in which arm-to-arm similarity exceeds 99.9%, due to gene conversion activity. Here, we studied one of these palindromes, P6, in order to illuminate the dynamics of the gene conversion process. We genotyped ten paralogous sequence variants (PSVs) within the arms of P6 in 378 Y chromosomes whose evolutionary relationships within the SNP-defined Y phylogeny are known. This allowed the identification of 146 historical gene conversion events involving individual PSVs, occurring at a rate of 2.9–8.4×10−4 events per generation. A consideration of the nature of nucleotide change and the ancestral state of each PSV showed that the conversion process was significantly biased towards the fixation of G or C nucleotides (GC-biased), and also towards the ancestral state. Determination of haplotypes by long-PCR allowed likely co-conversion of PSVs to be identified, and suggested that conversion tract lengths are large, with a mean of 2068 bp, and a maximum in excess of 9 kb. Despite the frequent formation of recombination intermediates implied by the rapid observed gene conversion activity, resolution via crossover is rare: only three inversions within P6 were detected in the sample. An analysis of chimpanzee and gorilla P6 orthologs showed that the ancestral state bias has existed in all three species, and comparison of human and chimpanzee sequences with the gorilla outgroup confirmed that GC bias of the conversion process has apparently been active in both the human and chimpanzee lineages.
Author Summary
The sex-determining role of the human Y chromosome makes it male-specific, and always present in only a single copy. This solo lifestyle has endowed it with some bizarre features, among which are eight large DNA units constituting about a quarter of the chromosome's length, and containing many genes important for sperm production. These units are called palindromes, since, taking into account the polarity of the DNA strands, the sequence is the same read from either end of the unit. We investigated the details of a process (gene conversion) that transfers sequence variants in one half of a palindrome into the other, thereby maintaining >99.9% similarity between the halves. We analysed patterns of sequence variants within one palindrome in a set of Y chromosomes whose evolutionary relationships are known. This allowed us to identify past gene conversion events, and to demonstrate a bias towards events that eliminate new variants, and retain old ones. Gene conversion has therefore acted during human evolution to retard sequence change in these regions. Analysis of the chimpanzee and gorilla versions of the palindrome shows that the dynamic processes we see in human Y chromosomes have a deep evolutionary history.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1003666
PMCID: PMC3723533  PMID: 23935520
11.  Double trouble 
doi:10.1186/2041-2223-4-12
PMCID: PMC3716941  PMID: 23805891
12.  The impact of recent events on human genetic diversity 
The historical record tells us stories of migrations, population expansions and colonization events in the last few thousand years, but what was their demographic impact? Genetics can throw light on this issue, and has mostly done so through the maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the male-specific Y chromosome. However, there are a number of problems, including marker ascertainment bias, possible influences of natural selection, and the obscuring layers of the palimpsest of historical and prehistorical events. Y-chromosomal lineages are particularly affected by genetic drift, which can be accentuated by recent social selection. A diversity of approaches to expansions in Europe is yielding insights into the histories of Phoenicians, Roma, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings, and new methods for producing and analysing genome-wide data hold much promise. The field would benefit from more consensus on appropriate methods, and better communication between geneticists and experts in other disciplines, such as history, archaeology and linguistics.
doi:10.1098/rstb.2011.0297
PMCID: PMC3267116  PMID: 22312046
human; population history; genetic drift; natural selection; genetic diversity
13.  Flogging a dead horse 
doi:10.1186/2041-2223-4-5
PMCID: PMC3598469  PMID: 23448664
14.  The bishop and the actress 
doi:10.1186/2041-2223-3-27
PMCID: PMC3543190  PMID: 23265272
15.  Significant others 
doi:10.1186/2041-2223-3-21
PMCID: PMC3487975  PMID: 23078838
16.  The jigsaw puzzle of our African ancestry: unsolved, or unsolvable? 
Genome Biology  2011;12(6):118.
A revised root for the Y chromosome phylogeny further fragments the picture of modern human origins that can be reconstructed from genetic, linguistic and archaeological data.
doi:10.1186/gb-2011-12-6-118
PMCID: PMC3218835  PMID: 21722347
17.  Boys and girls 
doi:10.1186/2041-2223-3-13
PMCID: PMC3464707  PMID: 22716283
18.  The iceman cometh 
doi:10.1186/2041-2223-3-8
PMCID: PMC3418206  PMID: 22507562
19.  Inheritance of coronary artery disease in men: an analysis of the role of the Y chromosome 
Lancet  2012;379(9819):915-922.
Summary
Background
A sexual dimorphism exists in the incidence and prevalence of coronary artery disease—men are more commonly affected than are age-matched women. We explored the role of the Y chromosome in coronary artery disease in the context of this sexual inequity.
Methods
We genotyped 11 markers of the male-specific region of the Y chromosome in 3233 biologically unrelated British men from three cohorts: the British Heart Foundation Family Heart Study (BHF-FHS), West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study (WOSCOPS), and Cardiogenics Study. On the basis of this information, each Y chromosome was tracked back into one of 13 ancient lineages defined as haplogroups. We then examined associations between common Y chromosome haplogroups and the risk of coronary artery disease in cross-sectional BHF-FHS and prospective WOSCOPS. Finally, we undertook functional analysis of Y chromosome effects on monocyte and macrophage transcriptome in British men from the Cardiogenics Study.
Findings
Of nine haplogroups identified, two (R1b1b2 and I) accounted for roughly 90% of the Y chromosome variants among British men. Carriers of haplogroup I had about a 50% higher age-adjusted risk of coronary artery disease than did men with other Y chromosome lineages in BHF-FHS (odds ratio 1·75, 95% CI 1·20–2·54, p=0·004), WOSCOPS (1·45, 1·08–1·95, p=0·012), and joint analysis of both populations (1·56, 1·24–1·97, p=0·0002). The association between haplogroup I and increased risk of coronary artery disease was independent of traditional cardiovascular and socioeconomic risk factors. Analysis of macrophage transcriptome in the Cardiogenics Study revealed that 19 molecular pathways showing strong differential expression between men with haplogroup I and other lineages of the Y chromosome were interconnected by common genes related to inflammation and immunity, and that some of them have a strong relevance to atherosclerosis.
Interpretation
The human Y chromosome is associated with risk of coronary artery disease in men of European ancestry, possibly through interactions of immunity and inflammation.
Funding
British Heart Foundation; UK National Institute for Health Research; LEW Carty Charitable Fund; National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia; European Union 6th Framework Programme; Wellcome Trust.
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(11)61453-0
PMCID: PMC3314981  PMID: 22325189
20.  The unexpected always happens 
doi:10.1186/2041-2223-3-5
PMCID: PMC3298498  PMID: 22357349
21.  Appy Christmas 
doi:10.1186/2041-2223-2-25
PMCID: PMC3269372  PMID: 22133463
22.  Father figures 
doi:10.1186/2041-2223-2-21
PMCID: PMC3197485  PMID: 21978739
23.  The Baron's complaint 
doi:10.1186/2041-2223-2-18
PMCID: PMC3170605  PMID: 21851593
24.  Genes and queens 
doi:10.1186/2041-2223-2-14
PMCID: PMC3123638  PMID: 21631926
25.  Love chemistry 
doi:10.1186/2041-2223-2-9
PMCID: PMC3082212  PMID: 21463510

Results 1-25 (44)