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1.  Pain Research Forum: application of scientific social media frameworks in neuroscience 
Background: Social media has the potential to accelerate the pace of biomedical research through online collaboration, discussions, and faster sharing of information. Focused web-based scientific social collaboratories such as the Alzheimer Research Forum have been successful in engaging scientists in open discussions of the latest research and identifying gaps in knowledge. However, until recently, tools to rapidly create such communities and provide high-bandwidth information exchange between collaboratories in related fields did not exist.
Methods: We have addressed this need by constructing a reusable framework to build online biomedical communities, based on Drupal, an open-source content management system. The framework incorporates elements of Semantic Web technology combined with social media. Here we present, as an exemplar of a web community built on our framework, the Pain Research Forum (PRF) (http://painresearchforum.org). PRF is a community of chronic pain researchers, established with the goal of fostering collaboration and communication among pain researchers.
Results: Launched in 2011, PRF has over 1300 registered members with permission to submit content. It currently hosts over 150 topical news articles on research; more than 30 active or archived forum discussions and journal club features; a webinar series; an editor-curated weekly updated listing of relevant papers; and several other resources for the pain research community. All content is licensed for reuse under a Creative Commons license; the software is freely available. The framework was reused to develop other sites, notably the Multiple Sclerosis Discovery Forum (http://msdiscovery.org) and StemBook (http://stembook.org).
Discussion: Web-based collaboratories are a crucial integrative tool supporting rapid information transmission and translation in several important research areas. In this article, we discuss the success factors, lessons learned, and ongoing challenges in using PRF as a driving force to develop tools for online collaboration in neuroscience. We also indicate ways these tools can be applied to other areas and uses.
doi:10.3389/fninf.2014.00021
PMCID: PMC3949323  PMID: 24653693
social media; neuropathic pain; content management systems; Drupal
2.  Relative Humidity and the Killing of Bacteria 
Applied Microbiology  1961;9(6):567-571.
The viability of washed moist cells of Serratia marcescens after storage has been measured in relation to variations in the prior treatment of the cells and in conditions of storage. The factors considered were: (i) water content during storage; (ii) method of arriving at water content (partial drying in vacuum or freeze-drying and addition of water); (iii) presence or absence of air during storage.
Increasingly rapid decay occurs as the water content at which the cells are stored is diminished from above 90% to 20 or 30% (“critical” water content). It occurs in presence or absence of air and it occurs whether the final water content is approached by removal of water from wet cells or by addition of water to freeze-dried cells.
The rate of decay during storage at 20 to 30% water is somewhat diminished by the presence of air (“protective” effect of air).
As the water content is further reduced to less than 10%, the stability of cells stored in a vacuum approaches that of wet cells. In presence of air the reverse is true: the stability decreases until at less than 1% water, the decay rate is about as great as at the “critical” water content (“toxic” effect of air).
Particularly rapid decay of S. marcescens at the “critical” water content has escaped attention in aerosol studies because accurate control of relative humidity (RH) in this region, RH 94 to 99%, is virtually impossible in such studies. On the other hand, values of decay rates referred to measured water contents are quite unreliable in the 20 to 80% RH zone because the corresponding variation of water content is too small to measure reliably. Thus data of the kind reported in this paper cannot be directly compared to the published results of studies of air-borne bacteria, although they are relevant to the practical question of air-borne infection in humid atmospheres.
PMCID: PMC1057789  PMID: 13865722

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