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1.  Diffuse alterations in grey and white matter associated with cognitive impairment in Shwachman–Diamond syndrome: Evidence from a multimodal approach 
NeuroImage : Clinical  2015;7:721-731.
Shwachman–Diamond syndrome is a rare recessive genetic disease caused by mutations in SBDS gene, at chromosome 7q11. Phenotypically, the syndrome is characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, bone marrow dysfunction, skeletal dysplasia and variable cognitive impairments. Structural brain abnormalities (smaller head circumference and decreased brain volume) have also been reported. No correlation studies between brain abnormalities and neuropsychological features have yet been performed. In this study we investigate neuroanatomical findings, neurofunctional pathways and cognitive functioning of Shwachman–Diamond syndrome subjects compared with healthy controls. To be eligible for inclusion, participants were required to have known SBDS mutations on both alleles, no history of cranial trauma or any standard contraindication to magnetic resonance imaging. Appropriate tests were used to assess cognitive functions. The static images were acquired on a 3 × 0 T magnetic resonance scanner and blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected both during the execution of the Stroop task and at rest. Diffusion tensor imaging was used to assess brain white matter. The Tract-based Spatial Statistics package and probabilistic tractography were used to characterize white matter pathways.
Nine participants (5 males), half of all the subjects aged 9–19 years included in the Italian Shwachman–Diamond Syndrome Registry, were evaluated and compared with nine healthy subjects, matched for sex and age. The patients performed less well than norms and controls on cognitive tasks (p = 0.0002).
Overall, cortical thickness was greater in the patients, both in the left (+10%) and in the right (+15%) hemisphere, significantly differently increased in the temporal (left and right, p = 0.04), and right parietal (p = 0.03) lobes and in Brodmann area 44 (p = 0.04) of the right frontal lobe. The greatest increases were observed in the left limbic-anterior cingulate cortex (≥43%, p < 0.0004). Only in Broca's area in the left hemisphere did the patients show a thinner cortical thickness than that of controls (p = 0.01).
Diffusion tensor imaging showed large, significant difference increases in both fractional anisotropy (+37%, p < 0.0001) and mean diffusivity (+35%, p < 0.005); the Tract-based Spatial Statistics analysis identified six abnormal clusters of white matter fibres in the fronto-callosal, right fronto-external capsulae, left fronto-parietal, right pontine, temporo-mesial and left anterior–medial–temporal regions. Brain areas activated during the Stroop task and those active during the resting state, are different, fewer and smaller in patients and correlate with worse performance (p = 0.002).
Cognitive impairment in Shwachman–Diamond syndrome subjects is associated with diffuse brain anomalies in the grey matter (verbal skills with BA44 and BA20 in the right hemisphere; perceptual skills with BA5, 37, 20, 21, 42 in the left hemisphere) and white matter connectivity (verbal skills with alterations in the fronto-occipital fasciculus and with the inferior-longitudinal fasciculus; perceptual skills with the arcuate fasciculus, limbic and ponto-cerebellar fasciculus; memory skills with the arcuate fasciculus; executive functions with the anterior cingulated and arcuate fasciculus).
Highlights
•We correlate brain structure and connectivity with cognition in Shwachman–Diamond patients.•Cortical thickness was greater in the patients than in controls.•Six abnormal clusters of white matter fibres were identified in patients.•Brain areas activated during a Stroop task and at rest were different in patients.•Cognitive impairment in patients is associated with diffuse brain anomalies.
doi:10.1016/j.nicl.2015.02.014
PMCID: PMC4375735  PMID: 25844324
BOLD, blood oxygen level-dependent; BA, Brodmann area; CTA, cortical thickness analysis; DTI, diffusion tensor imaging; EPI, Echo-planar Imaging; FA, fractional anisotropy; FDT, Diffusion Toolbox; GLM, General Linear Model; ICA, independent component analysis; MD, mean diffusivity; PD, parallel diffusivity; PT, probabilistic tractography; RD, radial diffusivity; rs-fMRI, resting state fMRI; SDS, Shwachman–Diamond syndrome; TBSS, Tract-based Spatial Statistics.; Shwachman–Diamond syndrome; Cognitive impairment; Structural MRI; Functional MRI; Diffusion tensor imaging; Tract-based Spatial Statistics
2.  GENETIC MODIFIERS OF LIVER DISEASE IN CYSTIC FIBROSIS 
Context
A subset (~3–5%) of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) develops severe liver disease (CFLD) with portal hypertension.
Objective
To assess whether any of 9 polymorphisms in 5 candidate genes (SERPINA1, ACE, GSTP1, MBL2, and TGFB1) are associated with severe liver disease in CF patients.
Design, Setting, and Participants
A 2-stage design was used in this case–control study. CFLD subjects were enrolled from 63 U.S., 32 Canadian, and 18 CF centers outside of North America, with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) as the coordinating site. In the initial study, we studied 124 CFLD patients (enrolled 1/1999–12/2004) and 843 CF controls (patients without CFLD) by genotyping 9 polymorphisms in 5 genes previously implicated as modifiers of liver disease in CF. In the second stage, the SERPINA1 Z allele and TGFB1 codon 10 genotype were tested in an additional 136 CFLD patients (enrolled 1/2005–2/2007) and 1088 CF controls.
Main Outcome Measures
We compared differences in distribution of genotypes in CF patients with severe liver disease versus CF patients without CFLD.
Results
The initial study showed CFLD to be associated with the SERPINA1 (also known as α1-antiprotease and α1-antitrypsin) Z allele (P value=3.3×10−6; odds ratio (OR) 4.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.31–9.61), and with transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFB1) codon 10 CC genotype (P=2.8×10−3; OR 1.53, CI 1.16–2.03). In the replication study, CFLD was associated with the SERPINA1 Z allele (P=1.4×10−3; OR 3.42, CI 1.54–7.59), but not with TGFB1 codon 10. A combined analysis of the initial and replication studies by logistic regression showed CFLD to be associated with SERPINA1 Z allele (P=1.5×10−8; OR 5.04, CI 2.88–8.83).
Conclusion
The SERPINA1 Z allele is a risk factor for liver disease in CF. Patients who carry the Z allele are at greater odds (OR ~5) to develop severe liver disease with portal hypertension.
doi:10.1001/jama.2009.1295
PMCID: PMC3711243  PMID: 19738092
3.  Pancreatic phenotype in infants with cystic fibrosis identified by mutation screening 
Archives of Disease in Childhood  2007;92(10):842-846.
Objective
To determine the pancreatic phenotype of infants with cystic fibrosis (CF) diagnosed in the first week of life by a combined immunoreactive trypsin/mutation screening program.
Design
A prospective evaluation of pancreatic function in infants with CF at the time of neonatal diagnosis and up to the age of 12.
Setting
Two different centres (Verona, Italy and Westmead, Australia) to enable comparison of results between two regions where <60% or ⩾90% of patients, respectively, have at least one single ΔF508 a mutation.
Patients
315 children with CF including 149 at Verona and 166 at Westmead.
Interventions
Fat balance studies over 3–5 days and pancreatic stimulation tests with main outcome measures being faecal fat or pancreatic colipase secretion. Patients with malabsorption are pancreatic insufficient (PI) or with normal absorption and pancreatic sufficient (PS).
Results
34 infants (23%) at Verona and 46 (28%) at Westmead were PS at diagnosis. 15% of those with two class I, II or III “severe” mutations and 26/28 (93%) of those with class IV or V mutations were PS at this early age. Of the 80 infants with PS, 20 became PI before the age of 12. All 20 had two severe mutations.
Conclusion
Neonatal mutational screening programs for CF are less likely to detect PS patients with non‐ΔF508 mutations. Of PS patients who are detected, those with two severe class I, II or III mutations are at particularly high risk of becoming PI during early childhood.
doi:10.1136/adc.2006.107581
PMCID: PMC2083233  PMID: 17449517

Results 1-3 (3)