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2.  SOX2 and p63 colocalize at genetic loci in squamous cell carcinomas 
The Journal of Clinical Investigation  2014;124(4):1636-1645.
The transcription factor SOX2 is an essential regulator of pluripotent stem cells and promotes development and maintenance of squamous epithelia. We previously reported that SOX2 is an oncogene and subject to highly recurrent genomic amplification in squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Here, we have further characterized the function of SOX2 in SCC. Using ChIP-seq analysis, we compared SOX2-regulated gene profiles in multiple SCC cell lines to ES cell profiles and determined that SOX2 binds to distinct genomic loci in SCCs. In SCCs, SOX2 preferentially interacts with the transcription factor p63, as opposed to the transcription factor OCT4, which is the preferred SOX2 binding partner in ES cells. SOX2 and p63 exhibited overlapping genomic occupancy at a large number of loci in SCCs; however, coordinate binding of SOX2 and p63 was absent in ES cells. We further demonstrated that SOX2 and p63 jointly regulate gene expression, including the oncogene ETV4, which was essential for SOX2-amplified SCC cell survival. Together, these findings demonstrate that the action of SOX2 in SCC differs substantially from its role in pluripotency. The identification of the SCC-associated interaction between SOX2 and p63 will enable deeper characterization the downstream targets of this interaction in SCC and normal squamous epithelial physiology.
doi:10.1172/JCI71545
PMCID: PMC3973117  PMID: 24590290
3.  Oncogenic and sorafenib-sensitive ARAF mutations in lung adenocarcinoma  
The Journal of Clinical Investigation  2014;124(4):1582-1586.
Targeted cancer therapies often induce “outlier” responses in molecularly defined patient subsets. One patient with advanced-stage lung adenocarcinoma, who was treated with oral sorafenib, demonstrated a near-complete clinical and radiographic remission for 5 years. Whole-genome sequencing and RNA sequencing of primary tumor and normal samples from this patient identified a somatic mutation, ARAF S214C, present in the cancer genome and expressed at high levels. Additional mutations affecting this residue of ARAF and a nearby residue in the related kinase RAF1 were demonstrated across 1% of an independent cohort of lung adenocarcinoma cases. The ARAF mutations were shown to transform immortalized human airway epithelial cells in a sorafenib-sensitive manner. These results suggest that mutant ARAF is an oncogenic driver in lung adenocarcinoma and an indicator of sorafenib response.
doi:10.1172/JCI72763
PMCID: PMC3973082  PMID: 24569458
4.  Evolution and impact of subclonal mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia 
Cell  2013;152(4):714-726.
Summary
Clonal evolution is a key feature of cancer progression and relapse. We studied intratumoral heterogeneity in 149 chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cases by integrating whole-exome sequence and copy number to measure the fraction of cancer cells harboring each somatic mutation. We identified driver mutations as predominantly clonal (e.g., MYD88, trisomy 12 and del(13q)) or subclonal (e.g., SF3B1, TP53), corresponding to earlier and later events in CLL evolution. We sampled leukemia cells from 18 patients at two timepoints. Ten of 12 CLL cases treated with chemotherapy (but only 1 of 6 without treatment) underwent clonal evolution, predominantly involving subclones with driver mutations (e.g., SF3B1, TP53) that expanded over time. Furthermore, presence of a subclonal driver mutation was an independent risk factor for rapid disease progression. Our study thus uncovers patterns of clonal evolution in CLL, providing insights into its stepwise transformation, and links the presence of subclones with adverse clinical outcome.
doi:10.1016/j.cell.2013.01.019
PMCID: PMC3575604  PMID: 23415222
5.  Sequence-Based Discovery of Bradyrhizobium enterica in Cord Colitis Syndrome 
The New England journal of medicine  2013;369(6):517-528.
BACKGROUND
Immunosuppression is associated with a variety of idiopathic clinical syndromes that may have infectious causes. It has been hypothesized that the cord colitis syndrome, a complication of umbilical-cord hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation, is infectious in origin.
METHODS
We performed shotgun DNA sequencing on four archived, paraffin-embedded endoscopic colon-biopsy specimens obtained from two patients with cord colitis. Computational subtraction of human and known microbial sequences and assembly of residual sequences into a bacterial draft genome were performed. We used polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) assays and fluorescence in situ hybridization to determine whether the corresponding bacterium was present in additional patients and controls.
RESULTS
DNA sequencing of the biopsy specimens revealed more than 2.5 million sequencing reads that did not match known organisms. These sequences were computationally assembled into a 7.65-Mb draft genome showing a high degree of homology with genomes of bacteria in the bradyrhizobium genus. The corresponding newly discovered bacterium was provisionally named Bradyrhizobium enterica. PCR identified B. enterica nucleotide sequences in biopsy specimens from all three additional patients with cord colitis whose samples were tested, whereas B. enterica sequences were absent in samples obtained from healthy controls and patients with colon cancer or graft-versus-host disease.
CONCLUSIONS
We assembled a novel bacterial draft genome from the direct sequencing of tissue specimens from patients with cord colitis. Association of these sequences with cord colitis suggests that B. enterica may be an opportunistic human pathogen. (Funded by the National Cancer Institute and others.)
doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1211115
PMCID: PMC3889161  PMID: 23924002
6.  A Pan-Cancer Analysis of Transcriptome Changes Associated with Somatic Mutations in U2AF1 Reveals Commonly Altered Splicing Events 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(1):e87361.
Although recurrent somatic mutations in the splicing factor U2AF1 (also known as U2AF35) have been identified in multiple cancer types, the effects of these mutations on the cancer transcriptome have yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we identified splicing alterations associated with U2AF1 mutations across distinct cancers using DNA and RNA sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Using RNA-Seq data from 182 lung adenocarcinomas and 167 acute myeloid leukemias (AML), in which U2AF1 is somatically mutated in 3–4% of cases, we identified 131 and 369 splicing alterations, respectively, that were significantly associated with U2AF1 mutation. Of these, 30 splicing alterations were statistically significant in both lung adenocarcinoma and AML, including three genes in the Cancer Gene Census, CTNNB1, CHCHD7, and PICALM. Cell line experiments expressing U2AF1 S34F in HeLa cells and in 293T cells provide further support that these altered splicing events are caused by U2AF1 mutation. Consistent with the function of U2AF1 in 3′ splice site recognition, we found that S34F/Y mutations cause preferences for CAG over UAG 3′ splice site sequences. This report demonstrates consistent effects of U2AF1 mutation on splicing in distinct cancer cell types.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0087361
PMCID: PMC3909098  PMID: 24498085
7.  Sensitive detection of somatic point mutations in impure and heterogeneous cancer samples 
Nature biotechnology  2013;31(3):10.1038/nbt.2514.
Detection of somatic point substitutions is a key step in characterizing the cancer genome. Mutations in cancer are rare (0.1–100/Mb) and often occur only in a subset of the sequenced cells, either due to contamination by normal cells or due to tumor heterogeneity. Consequently, mutation calling methods need to be both specific, avoiding false positives, and sensitive to detect clonal and sub-clonal mutations. The decreased sensitivity of existing methods for low allelic fraction mutations highlights the pressing need for improved and systematically evaluated mutation detection methods. Here we present MuTect, a method based on a Bayesian classifier designed to detect somatic mutations with very low allele-fractions, requiring only a few supporting reads, followed by a set of carefully tuned filters that ensure high specificity. We also describe novel benchmarking approaches, which use real sequencing data to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity as a function of sequencing depth, base quality and allelic fraction. Compared with other methods, MuTect has higher sensitivity with similar specificity, especially for mutations with allelic fractions as low as 0.1 and below, making MuTect particularly useful for studying cancer subclones and their evolution in standard exome and genome sequencing data.
doi:10.1038/nbt.2514
PMCID: PMC3833702  PMID: 23396013
8.  Nkx2-1 Represses a Latent Gastric Differentiation Program in Lung Adenocarcinoma 
Molecular cell  2013;50(2):185-199.
SUMMARY
Tissue-specific differentiation programs become dysregulated during cancer evolution. The transcription factor Nkx2-1 is a master regulator of pulmonary differentiation that is downregulated in poorly differentiated lung adenocarcinoma. Here we use conditional murine genetics to determine how the identity of lung epithelial cells changes upon loss of their master cell fate regulator. Nkx2-1 deletion in normal and neoplastic lung causes not only loss of pulmonary identity but also conversion to a gastric lineage. Nkx2-1 is likely to maintain pulmonary identity by recruiting transcription factors Foxa1 and Foxa2 to lung-specific loci thus preventing them from binding gastrointestinal targets. Nkx2-1-negative murine lung tumors mimic mucinous human lung adenocarcinomas, which express gastric markers. Loss of the gastrointestinal transcription factor Hnf4α leads to de-repression of the embryonal protoncogene Hmga2 in Nkx2-1-negative tumors. These observations suggest that loss of both active and latent differentiation programs is required for tumors to reach a primitive, poorly differentiated state.
doi:10.1016/j.molcel.2013.02.018
PMCID: PMC3721642  PMID: 23523371
9.  Genomic sequencing of colorectal adenocarcinomas identifies a recurrent VTI1A-TCF7L2 fusion 
Nature genetics  2011;43(10):964-968.
Prior studies have identified recurrent oncogenic mutations in colorectal adenocarcinoma1 and have surveyed exons of protein-coding genes for mutations in 11 affected individuals2,3. Here we report whole-genome sequencing from nine individuals with colorectal cancer, including primary colorectal tumors and matched adjacent non-tumor tissues, at an average of 30.7× and 31.9× coverage, respectively. We identify an average of 75 somatic rearrangements per tumor, including complex networks of translocations between pairs of chromosomes. Eleven rearrangements encode predicted in-frame fusion proteins, including a fusion of VTI1A and TCF7L2 found in 3 out of 97 colorectal cancers. Although TCF7L2 encodes TCF4, which cooperates with β-catenin4 in colorectal carcinogenesis5,6, the fusion lacks the TCF4 β-catenin–binding domain. We found a colorectal carcinoma cell line harboring the fusion gene to be dependent on VTI1A-TCF7L2 for anchorage-independent growth using RNA interference-mediated knockdown. This study shows previously unidentified levels of genomic rearrangements in colorectal carcinoma that can lead to essential gene fusions and other oncogenic events.
doi:10.1038/ng.936
PMCID: PMC3802528  PMID: 21892161
10.  Targeted therapy for squamous cell lung cancer 
Lung cancer management  2012;1(4):293-300.
SUMMARY
Lung squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) is the second most common subtype of non-small-cell lung cancer and leads to 40,000–50,000 deaths per year in the USA. Management of non-small-cell lung cancer has dramatically changed over the past decade with the introduction of targeted therapeutic agents for genotypically selected individuals with lung adenocarcinoma. These agents lead to improved outcomes, and it has now become the standard of care to perform routine molecular genotyping of lung adenocarcinomas. By contrast, progress in lung SqCC has been modest, and there has yet to be a successful demonstration of targeted therapy in this disease. Here, we review exciting work from ongoing genomic characterization and biomarker validation efforts that have nominated several likely therapeutic targets in lung SqCCs. These studies suggest that targeted therapies are likely to be successful in the treatment of lung SqCCs and should be further explored in both preclinical models and in clinical trials.
doi:10.2217/lmt.12.40
PMCID: PMC3744181  PMID: 23956794
11.  Colorectal Cancers from Distinct Ancestral Populations Show Variations in BRAF Mutation Frequency 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(9):e74950.
It has been demonstrated for some cancers that the frequency of somatic oncogenic mutations may vary in ancestral populations. To determine whether key driver alterations might occur at different frequencies in colorectal cancer, we applied a high-throughput genotyping platform (OncoMap) to query 385 mutations across 33 known cancer genes in colorectal cancer DNA from 83 Asian, 149 Black and 195 White patients. We found that Asian patients had fewer canonical oncogenic mutations in the genes tested (60% vs Black 79% (P = 0.011) and White 77% (P = 0.015)), and that BRAF mutations occurred at a higher frequency in White patients (17% vs Asian 4% (P = 0.004) and Black 7% (P = 0.014)). These results suggest that the use of genomic approaches to elucidate the different ancestral determinants harbored by patient populations may help to more precisely and effectively treat colorectal cancer.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0074950
PMCID: PMC3774610  PMID: 24066160
12.  Ganetespib (STA-9090), a Non-Geldanamycin HSP90 Inhibitor, has Potent Antitumor Activity in In Vitro and In Vivo Models of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer 
Purpose
We describe the anticancer activity of ganetespib, a novel non-geldanamycin heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitor, in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) models.
Experimental Design
The activity of ganetespib was compared to that of the geldanamycin 17-AAG in biochemical assays, cell lines and xenografts, and evaluated in an ERBB2 YVMA-driven mouse lung adenocarcinoma model.
Results
Ganetespib blocked the ability of HSP90 to bind to biotinylated geldanamycin and disrupted the association of HSP90 with its co-chaperone, p23, more potently than 17-AAG. In genomically-defined NSCLC cell lines, ganetespib caused depletion of receptor tyrosine kinases, extinguishing of downstream signaling, inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis with IC50 values ranging 2–30 nM, substantially lower than those required for 17-AAG (20– 3,500 nM). Ganetespib was also approximately 20-fold more potent in isogenic Ba/F3 pro-B cells rendered IL-3 independent by expression of EGFR and ERBB2 mutants. In mice bearing NCI-H1975 (EGFR L858R/T790M) xenografts, ganetespib was rapidly eliminated from plasma and normal tissues but was maintained in tumor with t1/2 58.3 hours, supporting once-weekly dosing experiments, in which ganetespib produced greater tumor growth inhibition than 17-AAG. However, after a single dose, re-expression of mutant EGFR occurred by 72 hours, correlating with reversal of anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects. Consecutive day dosing resulted in xenograft regressions, accompanied by more sustained pharmacodynamic effects. Ganetespib also demonstrated activity against mouse lung adenocarcinomas driven by oncogenic ERBB2 YVMA.
Conclusions
Ganetespib has greater potency than 17-AAG and potential efficacy against several NSCLC subsets, including those harboring EGFR or ERBB2 mutation.
doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-11-2967
PMCID: PMC3477583  PMID: 22806877
HSP90; ERBB Receptor Tyrosine Kinases; NSCLC; Non-Geldanamycin
13.  Mapping the hallmarks of lung adenocarcinoma with massively parallel sequencing 
Cell  2012;150(6):1107-1120.
SUMMARY
Lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of non-small cell lung cancer, is responsible for over 500,000 deaths per year worldwide. Here, we report exome and genome sequences of 183 lung adenocarcinoma tumor/normal DNA pairs. These analyses revealed a mean exonic somatic mutation rate of 12.0 events/megabase and identified the majority of genes previously reported as significantly mutated in lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, we identified statistically recurrent somatic mutations in the splicing factor gene U2AF1 and truncating mutations affecting RBM10 and ARID1A. Analysis of nucleotide context-specific mutation signatures grouped the sample set into distinct clusters that correlated with smoking history and alterations of reported lung adenocarcinoma genes. Whole genome sequence analysis revealed frequent structural re-arrangements, including in-frame exonic alterations within EGFR and SIK2 kinases. The candidate genes identified in this study are attractive targets for biological characterization and therapeutic targeting of lung adenocarcinoma.
doi:10.1016/j.cell.2012.08.029
PMCID: PMC3557932  PMID: 22980975
14.  Gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas of the esophagus, stomach and colon exhibit distinct patterns of genome instability and oncogenesis 
Cancer research  2012;72(17):4383-4393.
A more detailed understanding of the somatic genetic events that drive gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas is necessary to improve diagnosis and therapy. Using data from high-density genomic profiling arrays, we conducted an analysis of somatic copy-number aberrations (SCNAs) in 486 gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas including 296 esophageal and gastric cancers. Focal amplifications were substantially more prevalent in gastric/esophageal adenocarcinomas than colorectal tumors. We identified 64 regions of significant recurrent amplification and deletion, some shared and others unique to the adenocarcinoma types examined. Amplified genes were noted in 37% of gastric/esophageal tumors, including in therapeutically targetable kinases such as ERBB2, FGFR1, FGFR2, EGFR, and MET, suggesting the potential utility of genomic amplifications as biomarkers to guide therapy of gastric and esophageal cancers where targeted therapeutics have been less developed compared to colorectal cancers. Amplified loci implicated genes with known involvement in carcinogenesis but also pointed to regions harboring potentially novel cancer genes, including a recurrent deletion found in 15% of esophageal tumors where the Runt transcription factor subunit RUNX1 was implicated, including by functional experiments in tissue culture. Together, our results defined genomic features that were common and distinct to various gut-derived adenocarcinomas, potentially informing novel opportunities for targeted therapeutic interventions.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-11-3893
PMCID: PMC3432726  PMID: 22751462
Esophagus; stomach; colon; adenocarcinoma; copy-number
15.  A tumor suppressor complex with GAP activity for the Rag GTPases that signal amino acid sufficiency to mTORC1 
Science (New York, N.Y.)  2013;340(6136):1100-1106.
The mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway promotes cell growth in response to many cues, including amino acids, which act through the Rag GTPases to promote mTORC1 translocation to the lysosomal surface, its site of activation. Although progress has been made in identifying positive regulators of the Rags, it is unknown if negative factors also exist. Here, we identify GATOR as a complex that interacts with the Rags and is composed of two subcomplexes we call GATOR1 and 2. Inhibition of GATOR1 subunits (DEPDC5, Nprl2, and Nprl3) makes mTORC1 signaling resistant to amino acid deprivation. In contrast, inhibition of GATOR2 subunits (Mios, WDR24, WDR59, Seh1L, Sec13) suppresses mTORC1 signaling and epistasis analysis shows that GATOR2 negatively regulates DEPDC5. GATOR1 has GTPase activating protein (GAP) activity for RagA and RagB and its components are mutated in human cancer. In cancer cells with inactivating mutations in GATOR1, mTORC1 is hyperactive and insensitive to amino acid starvation and such cells are hypersensitive to rapamycin, an mTORC1 inhibitor. Thus, we identify a key negative regulator of the Rag GTPases and reveal that, like other mTORC1 regulators, Rag function can be deregulated in cancer.
doi:10.1126/science.1232044
PMCID: PMC3728654  PMID: 23723238
16.  A Landscape of Driver Mutations in Melanoma 
Cell  2012;150(2):251-263.
SUMMARY
Despite recent insights into melanoma genetics, systematic surveys for driver mutations are challenged by an abundance of passenger mutations caused by carcinogenic ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. We developed a permutation-based framework to address this challenge, employing mutation data from intronic sequences to control for passenger mutational load on a per gene basis. Analysis of large-scale melanoma exome data by this approach discovered six novel melanoma genes (PPP6C, RAC1, SNX31, TACC1, STK19 and ARID2), three of which - RAC1, PPP6C and STK19 - harbored recurrent and potentially targetable mutations. Integration with chromosomal copy number data contextualized the landscape of driver mutations, providing oncogenic insights in BRAF- and NRAS-driven melanoma as well as those without known NRAS/BRAF mutations. The landscape also clarified a mutational basis for RB and p53 pathway deregulation in this malignancy. Finally, the spectrum of driver mutations provided unequivocal genomic evidence for a direct mutagenic role of UV light in melanoma pathogenesis.
doi:10.1016/j.cell.2012.06.024
PMCID: PMC3600117  PMID: 22817889
17.  Frequent downregulation of the transcription factor Foxa2 in lung cancer through epigenetic silencing 
PURPOSE
We sought to determine the mechanisms of downregulation of the airway transcription factor Foxa2 in lung cancer and the expression status of Foxa2 in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
METHODS
A series of 25 lung cancer cell lines were evaluated for Foxa2 protein expression, FOXA2 mRNA levels, FOXA2 mutations, FOXA2 copy number changes and for evidence of FOXA2 promoter hypermethylation. In addition, 32 NSCLCs were sequenced for FOXA2 mutations and 173 primary NSCLC tumors evaluated for Foxa2 expression using an immunohistochemical assay.
RESULTS
Out of the 25 cell lines, 13 (52%) had undetectable FOXA2 mRNA. The expression of FOXA2 mRNA and Foxa2 protein were congruent in 19/22 cells (p=0.001). FOXA2 mutations were not identified in primary NSCLCs and were infrequent in cell lines. Focal or broad chromosomal deletions involving FOXA2 were not present. The promoter region of FOXA2 had evidence of hypermethylation, with an inverse correlation between FOXA2 mRNA expression and presence of CpG dinucleotide methylation (p<0.0001). In primary NSCLC tumor specimens, there was a high frequency of either absence (42/173, 24.2%) or no/low expression (96/173, 55.4%) of Foxa2. In 130 patients with stage I NSCLC there was a trend towards decreased survival in tumors with no/low expression of Foxa2 (HR of 1.6, 95%CI 0.9–3.1; p=0.122).
CONCLUSIONS
Loss of expression of Foxa2 is frequent in lung cancer cell lines and NSCLCs. The main mechanism of downregulation of Foxa2 is epigenetic silencing through promoter hypermethylation. Further elucidation of the involvement of Foxa2 and other airway transcription factors in the pathogenesis of lung cancer may identify novel therapeutic targets.
doi:10.1016/j.lungcan.2012.01.011
PMCID: PMC3368092  PMID: 22341411
lung cancer; non-small-cell lung cancer; Foxa2; methylation; transcription factors; epigenetic; downregulation; adenocarcinoma; mutation; prognosis
18.  SF3B1 and Other Novel Cancer Genes in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia 
The New England journal of medicine  2011;365(26):2497-2506.
Background
The somatic genetic basis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, a common and clinically heterogeneous leukemia occurring in adults, remains poorly understood.
Methods
We obtained DNA samples from leukemia cells in 91 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and performed massively parallel sequencing of 88 whole exomes and whole genomes, together with sequencing of matched germline DNA, to characterize the spectrum of somatic mutations in this disease.
Results
Nine genes that are mutated at significant frequencies were identified, including four with established roles in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (TP53 in 15% of patients, ATM in 9%, MYD88 in 10%, and NOTCH1 in 4%) and five with unestablished roles (SF3B1, ZMYM3, MAPK1, FBXW7, and DDX3X). SF3B1, which functions at the catalytic core of the spliceosome, was the second most frequently mutated gene (with mutations occurring in 15% of patients). SF3B1 mutations occurred primarily in tumors with deletions in chromosome 11q, which are associated with a poor prognosis in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. We further discovered that tumor samples with mutations in SF3B1 had alterations in pre–messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing.
Conclusions
Our study defines the landscape of somatic mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and highlights pre-mRNA splicing as a critical cellular process contributing to chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1109016
PMCID: PMC3685413  PMID: 22150006
19.  Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase diverts glycolytic flux and contributes to oncogenesis 
Nature genetics  2011;43(9):869-874.
Most tumors display increased glucose metabolism compared to that of normal tissues. The preferential conversion of glucose to lactate in cancer cells (the Warburg Effect) has been emphasized1; however, the extent to which metabolic fluxes originating from glucose are utilized for alternative processes is poorly understood2,3. Here we used a combination of mass spectrometry and NMR with stable isotope labeling to investigate the alternate pathways derived from glucose metabolism in cancer cells. We found that in some cancer cells, a relatively large amount of glycolytic carbon is diverted into serine and glycine biosynthesis through phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH). A bioinformatics analysis of 3131 human cancers revealed that the gene PHGDH at 1p12 is recurrently amplified in a genomic region of focal copy number gain most commonly found in melanoma in which amplification was associated with increased protein expression. Decreased PHGDH expression by RNA interference impaired growth and flux into serine metabolism in PHGDH-amplified cell lines. Increased expression was also associated with breast cancer subtypes and ectopic expression of PHGDH in mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10a) disrupted acinar morphogenesis, induced loss of polarity, and preserved the viability of the extracellular matrix-deprived cells, each being phenotypic alterations that may predispose cells to transformation. Our findings demonstrate that altered metabolic flux from glucose into a specific alternate pathway can be selected during tumor development and may contribute to the pathogenesis of human cancer.
doi:10.1038/ng.890
PMCID: PMC3677549  PMID: 21804546
20.  Exome sequencing identifies recurrent SPOP, FOXA1 and MED12 mutations in prostate cancer 
Nature genetics  2012;44(6):685-689.
Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men worldwide and causes over 250,000 deaths each year1. Overtreatment of indolent disease also results in significant morbidity2. Common genetic alterations in prostate cancer include losses of NKX3.1 (8p21)3,4 and PTEN (10q23)5,6, gains of the androgen receptor gene (AR)7,8 and fusion of ETS-family transcription factor genes with androgen-responsive promoters9–11. Recurrent somatic base-pair substitutions are believed to be less contributory in prostate tumorigenesis12,13 but have not been systematically analyzed in large cohorts. Here we sequenced the exomes of 112 prostate tumor/normal pairs. Novel recurrent mutations were identified in multiple genes, including MED12 and FOXA1. SPOP was the most frequently mutated gene, with mutations involving the SPOP substrate binding cleft in 6–15% of tumors across multiple independent cohorts. SPOP-mutant prostate cancers lacked ETS rearrangements and exhibited a distinct pattern of genomic alterations. Thus, SPOP mutations may define a new molecular subtype of prostate cancer.
doi:10.1038/ng.2279
PMCID: PMC3673022  PMID: 22610119
21.  ERG rearrangement is specific to prostate cancer and does not occur in any other common tumor 
Background
Identification of specific somatic gene alterations is crucial for the insight into the development, progression, and clinical behavior of individual cancer types. The recently discovered recurrent ERG rearrangement in prostate cancer (PCa) might represent a PCa specific alteration that has not been systematically assessed in tumors other than PCa. Aim of this study was to assess, whether the ERG rearrangement and the distinct deletion site between TMPRSS2 and ERG, both predominantly resulting in a TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, occurs in tumors other than PCa.
Design
We assessed 54 different tumor types (2942 samples in total) for their ERG rearrangement status by FISH. To calibrate, we analyzed 285 PCa samples for the ERG rearrangement frequency. Additionally, we interrogated a high-resolution SNP data set across 3131 cancer specimens (26 tumor types) for copy number alterations.
Results
None of the 54 different tumor types assessed by FISH harbored an ERG rearrangement, whereas the PCa samples revealed an ERG rearrangement in 31.2%–49.5%, depending on the cohort. Furthermore, within the 26 tumor types assessed for copy number alterations by SNP, the distinct deletion site between TMPRSS2 and ERG (21q22.2-3) was detectable exclusively in PCa.
Conclusion
Although Ewing's sarcoma and AML have known rearrangements rarely involving ERG, we hypothesize that the ERG rearrangement as well as the distinct deletion site on 21q22.2-3 between TMPRSS2 and ERG, are PCa specific genomic alterations. These observations provide further insight into the oncogenesis of PCa and might be critical for the development of ERG rearrangement assessment as a clinical tool.
doi:10.1038/modpathol.2010.87
PMCID: PMC3606550  PMID: 20473283
ERG rearrangement; prostate cancer; carcinoma
22.  High-Throughput Detection of Actionable Genomic Alterations in Clinical Tumor Samples by Targeted, Massively Parallel Sequencing 
Cancer Discovery  2011;2(1):82-93.
Knowledge of “actionable” somatic genomic alterations present in each tumor (e.g., point mutations, small insertions/deletions, and copy number alterations that direct therapeutic options) should facilitate individualized approaches to cancer treatment. However, clinical implementation of systematic genomic profiling has rarely been achieved beyond limited numbers of oncogene point mutations. To address this challenge, we utilized a targeted, massively parallel sequencing approach to detect tumor genomic alterations in formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) tumor samples. Nearly 400-fold mean sequence coverage was achieved, and single nucleotide sequence variants, small insertions/deletions, and chromosomal copy number alterations were detected simultaneously with high accuracy compared to other methods in clinical use. Putatively actionable genomic alterations, including those that predict sensitivity or resistance to established and experimental therapies, were detected in each tumor sample tested. Thus, targeted deep sequencing of clinical tumor material may enable mutation-driven clinical trials and, ultimately, ”personalized” cancer treatment.
doi:10.1158/2159-8290.CD-11-0184
PMCID: PMC3353152  PMID: 22585170
23.  Prognostically relevant gene signatures of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma 
Because of the high risk of recurrence in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGS-OvCa), the development of outcome predictors could be valuable for patient stratification. Using the catalog of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we developed subtype and survival gene expression signatures, which, when combined, provide a prognostic model of HGS-OvCa classification, named “Classification of Ovarian Cancer” (CLOVAR). We validated CLOVAR on an independent dataset consisting of 879 HGS-OvCa expression profiles. The worst outcome group, accounting for 23% of all cases, was associated with a median survival of 23 months and a platinum resistance rate of 63%, versus a median survival of 46 months and platinum resistance rate of 23% in other cases. Associating the outcome prediction model with BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation status, residual disease after surgery, and disease stage further optimized outcome classification. Ovarian cancer is a disease in urgent need of more effective therapies. The spectrum of outcomes observed here and their association with CLOVAR signatures suggests variations in underlying tumor biology. Prospective validation of the CLOVAR model in the context of additional prognostic variables may provide a rationale for optimal combination of patient and treatment regimens.
doi:10.1172/JCI65833
PMCID: PMC3533304  PMID: 23257362
25.  Glioblastoma-derived Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) carboxyl-terminal deletion mutants are transforming and are sensitive to EGFR-directed therapies 
Cancer research  2011;71(24):7587-7596.
Genomic alterations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene play a crucial role in pathogenesis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). By systematic analysis of GBM genomic data, we have identified and characterized a novel exon 27 deletion mutation occurring within the EGFR carboxyl-terminus domain (CTD) in addition to identifying additional examples of previously reported deletion mutations in this region. We show that the GBM-derived EGFR CTD deletion mutants are able to induce cellular transformation in vitro and in vivo in the absence of ligand and receptor autophosphorylation. Treatment with the EGFR-targeted monoclonal antibody, cetuximab, or the small molecule EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib, effectively impaired tumorigenicity of oncogenic EGFR CTD deletion mutants. Cetuximab in particular prolonged the survival of intracranially xenografted mice with oncogenic EGFR CTD deletion mutants, compared to untreated control mice. Therefore, we propose that erlotinib and especially cetuximab treatment may be a promising therapeutic strategy in GBM patients harboring EGFR CTD deletion mutants.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-11-0821
PMCID: PMC3242822  PMID: 22001862
glioblastoma; epidermal growth factor receptor; cetuximab; EGFR mutation; targeted therapy

Results 1-25 (83)