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1.  High Urinary Tungsten Concentration Is Associated with Stroke in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2010 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(11):e77546.
Background
In recent years there has been an exponential increase in tungsten demand, potentially increasing human exposure to the metal. Currently, the toxicology of tungsten is poorly understood, but mounting evidence suggests that both the elemental metal and its alloys have cytotoxic effects. Here, we investigate the association between tungsten and cardiovascular disease (CVD) or stroke using six waves of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).
Methods
We investigated associations using crude and adjusted logistic regression models in a cohort of 8614 adults (18–74 years) with 193 reported stroke diagnoses and 428 reported diagnoses of CVD. We also stratified our data to characterize associations in a subset of younger individuals (18–50 years).
Results
Elevated tungsten concentrations were strongly associated with an increase in the prevalence of stroke, independent of typical risk factors (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.66, 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI): 1.17, 2.34). The association between tungsten and stroke in the young age category was still evident (OR: 2.17, 95% CI: 1.33, 3.53).
Conclusion
This study represents the most comprehensive analysis of the human health effects of tungsten to date. Individuals with higher urinary tungsten concentrations have double the odds of reported stroke. We hypothesize that the pathological pathway resulting from tungsten exposure may involve oxidative stress.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0077546
PMCID: PMC3823878  PMID: 24244278
2.  Leukocyte CCR2 Expression Is Associated with Mini-Mental State Examination Score in Older Adults 
Rejuvenation Research  2012;15(4):395-404.
Abstract
Introduction
Circulating inflammatory markers may play an important role in cognitive impairment at older ages. Mice deficient for the chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2) develop an accelerated Alzheimer-like pathology. CCR2 is also important in neurogenesis. To identify human gene transcripts most closely associated with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores, we undertook a genome-wide and inflammation specific transcriptome screen in circulating leukocytes from a population-based sample.
Methods
We measured in vivo transcript levels by microarray analysis in 691 subjects (mean age 72.6 years) in the InCHIANTI study (Invecchiare in Chianti, aging in the Chianti area). We assessed expression associations with MMSE performance at RNA collection and prior 9-year change in MMSE score in linear regression models.
Results
In genome-wide analysis, raised CCR2 expression was cross-sectionally the most strongly associated transcript with lower MMSE score (beta=−0.16, p=5.1×10−6, false discovery rate (FDR; q=0.077). Amongst inflammatory transcripts, only CCR2 expression was associated with both MMSE score and accelerated decline in score over the preceding 9 years (beta=−0.16, p=5.1×10−6, q=0.003; and beta=−0.13, p=5.5×10−5, q=0.03, respectively). CCR2 expression was also positively associated with apolipoprotein E (ApoE) e4 Alzheimer disease risk haplotype.
Conclusions
We show for the first time that CCR2 expression is associated with lower MMSE scores in an older human population. Laboratory models of Ccr2-mediated β-amyloid removal and regulation of neurogenesis affecting cognitive function may be applicable in humans. CCR2-mediated pathways may provide a possible focus for intervention to potentiate protective reactions to Alzheimer pathology in older people, including for people with an adverse ApoE haplotype.
doi:10.1089/rej.2011.1302
PMCID: PMC3419848  PMID: 22607625
3.  Imputation of Variants from the 1000 Genomes Project Modestly Improves Known Associations and Can Identify Low-frequency Variant - Phenotype Associations Undetected by HapMap Based Imputation 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(5):e64343.
Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have been limited by the reliance on common variants present on microarrays or imputable from the HapMap Project data. More recently, the completion of the 1000 Genomes Project has provided variant and haplotype information for several million variants derived from sequencing over 1,000 individuals. To help understand the extent to which more variants (including low frequency (1% ≤ MAF <5%) and rare variants (<1%)) can enhance previously identified associations and identify novel loci, we selected 93 quantitative circulating factors where data was available from the InCHIANTI population study. These phenotypes included cytokines, binding proteins, hormones, vitamins and ions. We selected these phenotypes because many have known strong genetic associations and are potentially important to help understand disease processes. We performed a genome-wide scan for these 93 phenotypes in InCHIANTI. We identified 21 signals and 33 signals that reached P<5×10−8 based on HapMap and 1000 Genomes imputation, respectively, and 9 and 11 that reached a stricter, likely conservative, threshold of P<5×10−11 respectively. Imputation of 1000 Genomes genotype data modestly improved the strength of known associations. Of 20 associations detected at P<5×10−8 in both analyses (17 of which represent well replicated signals in the NHGRI catalogue), six were captured by the same index SNP, five were nominally more strongly associated in 1000 Genomes imputed data and one was nominally more strongly associated in HapMap imputed data. We also detected an association between a low frequency variant and phenotype that was previously missed by HapMap based imputation approaches. An association between rs112635299 and alpha-1 globulin near the SERPINA gene represented the known association between rs28929474 (MAF = 0.007) and alpha1-antitrypsin that predisposes to emphysema (P = 2.5×10−12). Our data provide important proof of principle that 1000 Genomes imputation will detect novel, low frequency-large effect associations.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0064343
PMCID: PMC3655956  PMID: 23696881
4.  Correction: Urinary Bisphenol A Concentration and Angiography-Defined Coronary Artery Stenosis 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(11):10.1371/annotation/5f293018-48a3-40ae-96b7-04438d1d9cb9.
doi:10.1371/annotation/5f293018-48a3-40ae-96b7-04438d1d9cb9
PMCID: PMC3553206
5.  CCAAT-Enhancer-Binding Protein-Beta (CEBPB) Expression In-Vivo is Associated with Muscle Strength 
Aging cell  2012;11(2):262-268.
Introduction
Declining muscle strength is a core feature of aging. Several mechanisms have been postulated, including CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-beta (C/EBP-β) triggered macrophage-mediated muscle fibre regeneration after micro-injury, evidenced in a mouse model. We aimed to identify in-vivo circulating leukocyte gene expression changes associated with muscle strength in the human adult population.
Methods
We undertook a genome wide expression microarray screen, using peripheral blood RNA samples from InCHIANTI study participants (ages 30–104 yrs). Logged expression intensities were regressed with muscle strength using models adjusted for multiple confounders. Key results were validated by real-time PCR. The Short Physical Performance Battery score (SPPB) tested walk speed, chair stand and balance.
Results
CEBPB expression levels were associated with muscle strength (beta coefficient = 0.20560, p=1.03*10−6, false discovery rate q=0.014). The estimated handgrip strength in 70 year old men in the lowest CEBPB expression tertile was 35.2 kg compared to 41.2 kg in the top tertile. CEBPB expression was also associated with hip, knee, ankle and shoulder strength and the SPPB performance score (p=0.018). Near study-wide associations were also noted for TGFB3 (p=3.4*10−5, q=0.12) and CEBPD expression (p=9.67E−5, q=0.18) but not for CEBPA expression.
Conclusions
We report here a novel finding that raised CEBPB expression in circulating leukocyte derived RNA samples in-vivo is associated with greater muscle strength and better physical performance in humans. This association may be consistent with mouse model evidence of CEBPB triggered muscle repair: if this mechanism is confirmed it may provide a target for intervention to protect and enhance aging muscle.
doi:10.1111/j.1474-9726.2011.00782.x
PMCID: PMC3486692  PMID: 22152057
macrophage; inflammation; transcription; regeneration; population; mechanism
6.  Human aging is characterized by focused changes in gene expression and deregulation of alternative splicing 
Aging cell  2011;10(5):868-878.
Summary
Aging is a major risk factor for chronic disease in the human population, but there is little human data on gene expression alterations that accompany the process. We examined human peripheral blood leucocyte in-vivo RNA in a large-scale transcriptomic microarray study (subjects aged 30 to 104 years). We tested associations between probe expression intensity and advancing age (adjusting for confounding factors), initially in a discovery set (n = 458), following-up findings in a replication set (n=240). We confirmed expression of key results by real-time PCR. Of 16,571 expressed probes, only 295 (2%) were robustly associated with age. Just six probes were required for a highly efficient model for distinguishing between young and old (Area Under the Curve in replication set; 95%). The focussed nature of age-related gene expression may therefore provide potential biomarkers of aging. Similarly, only 7 of 1065 biological or metabolic pathways were age-associated, in Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA), notably including the processing of messenger RNAs (mRNAs); (p<0.002, FDR q<0.05). This is supported by our observation of age-associated disruption to the balance of alternatively-expressed isoforms for selected genes, suggesting that modification of mRNA processing may be a feature of human aging.
doi:10.1111/j.1474-9726.2011.00726.x
PMCID: PMC3173580  PMID: 21668623
Aging; Gene expression; mRNA processing; Cell senescence; predictive model
7.  Urinary Bisphenol A Concentration and Angiography-Defined Coronary Artery Stenosis 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(8):e43378.
Background
Bisphenol A is widely used in food and drinks packaging. There is evidence of associations between raised urinary bisphenol A (uBPA) and increased incidence of reported cardiovascular diagnoses.
Methodology/Principal Findings
To estimate associations between BPA exposure and angiographically graded coronary atherosclerosis. 591 patients participating in The Metabonomics and Genomics in Coronary Artery Disease (MaGiCAD) study in Cambridgeshire UK, comparing urinary BPA (uBPA) with grades of severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) on angiography. Linear models were adjusted for BMI, occupational social class and diabetes status. Severe (one to three vessel) CAD was present in 385 patients, 86 had intermediate disease (n = 86) and 120 had normal coronary arteries. The (unadjusted) median uBPA concentration was 1.28 ng/mL with normal coronary arteries, and 1.53 ng/mL with severe CAD. Compared to those with normal coronary arteries, uBPA concentration was significantly higher in those with severe CAD (OR per uBPA SD = 5.96 ng/ml OR = 1.43, CI 1.03 to 1.98, p = 0.033), and near significant for intermediate disease (OR = 1.69, CI 0.98 to 2.94, p = 0.061). There was no significant uBPA difference between patients with severe CAD (needing surgery) and the remaining groups combined.
Conclusions/Significance
BPA exposure was higher in those with severe coronary artery stenoses compared to those with no vessel disease. Larger studies are needed to estimate true dose response relationships. The mechanisms underlying the association remain to be established.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0043378
PMCID: PMC3419714  PMID: 22916252
8.  Age-related impairments of mobility associated with cobalt and other heavy metals: Data from NHANES 1999-2004 
Introduction
Exposure to heavy metals can promote oxidative stress and damage to cellular components, and may accelerate age-related disease and disability.. Physical mobility is a validated biomarker of age-related disability and is predictive of hospitalization and mortality.
Aim
To examine associations between selected heavy metals and impaired lower limb mobility in a representative older human population.
Methods
Data for 1615 adults aged ≥60 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999 to 2004 were used to identify associations between urinary concentrations of 10 metals with self-reported and measured walking impairments (at p<0.01). Models were adjusted for confounding factors, including smoking.
Results
In models adjusted for age, sex and ethnicity, elevated levels of cadmium, cobalt and uranium were associated with impairment of the ability to walk a quarter mile. In fully adjusted models, cobalt was the only metal that remained associated: the odds ratio for reporting walking problems with a 1-unit increase in logged cobalt concentration (μg L-1) was 1.43 (95% CI 1.12 to 1.84). Cobalt was also the only metal associated with an increased measured time to walk a 20 foot course (p=0.008). In analyses of disease categories to explain the mobility finding, cobalt was associated with physician diagnosed arthritis (1-unit increase OR=1.22 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.49, p=0.045).
Conclusions
Low level cobalt exposure, assessed through urinary concentrations of this essential heavy metal may be a risk factor for age-related physical impairments. Independent replication is needed to confirm this association.
doi:10.1080/15287390802647336
PMCID: PMC3404487  PMID: 19199147
Cobalt; aging; NHANES; arthritis; gait speed
9.  Predictors of Extraordinary Survival in the Iowa Established Populations for Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly: Cohort follow-up to ‘Extinction’ 
OBJECTIVES
To identify predictors of extraordinary survival (ES).
DESIGN
Longitudinal study of a cohort of elderly people followed up until almost all have died
SETTING
Two counties in Iowa, USA, a part of the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly.
PARTICIPANTS
2890 community-dwelling citizens, 65–85 years at baseline, surviving at least three years.
MEASUREMENTS
Data relating to age, sex, birth order, parental longevity, marital status, education, family income, social support, self-reported health, chronic diseases, blood pressure, body mass index, physical ability, exercises, life attitude and mental health were obtained. Extraordinary survivors were defined as those belonging to approximately top 10% longest survivors for their sex group.
RESULTS
253 ES were far more likely to have never smoked. In basic models (age/sex/smoking adjusted) for earlier-life factors, parent’s longevity, being earlier in the birth order (in women only) and BMI at age 50 were associated with ES.
In similar models for predictors at age 65–85 years (later-life or baseline), ES was associated with excellent self-reported health, fewest chronic diseases, better physical mobility, memory and positive attitude towards life, but not with depression, anxiety or sleep. In multi-variable models, attitude towards life was not an independent predictor. On a cumulative score of independent predictors, women in the top third of longevity attributes were 9.26 (CI 4.38–19.57, p<0.0001) times as likely to reach ES compared to bottom third.
CONCLUSION
Extraordinary survivors had fewer ‘classical’ risk factors and were in better health than their contemporaneous controls. Earlier-life, possibly genetic factors appear less predictive in men.
doi:10.1111/j.1532-5415.2011.03451.x
PMCID: PMC3246274  PMID: 21649635
Extraordinary survivor; oldest old; predictors; heritable
10.  Vitamin D and Cognitive Impairment in the Elderly U.S. Population 
Background.
Recent European studies suggest that vitamin D deficiency may be associated with increased odds of cognitive impairment in older persons, although findings from the United States are equivocal. Our objective was to investigate the association between vitamin D deficiency and cognitive impairment in the elderly U.S. population.
Methods.
Three thousand and three hundred twenty-five adults aged 65 years or more completed cognitive assessments, medical examinations, and physical performance measures and provided blood samples in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a nationally representative cross-sectional study of the U.S. noninstitutionalized population. We determined whether low levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) were associated with increased odds of cognitive impairment using logistic regression models. Cognitive impairment was assessed using measures of immediate and delayed verbal memory, orientation, and attention (impairment was defined as the worst 10% of the distribution of combined scores).
Results.
The multivariate adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of cognitive impairment in participants who were 25(OH)D insufficient (≥50 < 75 nmol/L), deficient (≥25 < 50 nmol/L), and severely deficient (<25 nmol/L) in comparison with those sufficient (≥75 nmol/L) were 0.9 (0.6–1.3), 1.4 (1.0–2.1), and 3.9 (1.5–10.4), respectively (p for linear trend = .02). Log-transformed levels of 25(OH)D were also significantly associated with the odds of cognitive impairment (p = .02).
Conclusions.
These findings suggest that vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased odds of cognitive impairment in the elderly U.S. population. Further exploration of a possible causal relationship between vitamin D deficiency and cognitive impairment is warranted.
doi:10.1093/gerona/glq185
PMCID: PMC3011960  PMID: 21041201
Cognitive impairment; Cognition; Dementia; Vitamin D; Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D
11.  Bisphenol A Exposure Is Associated with in Vivo Estrogenic Gene Expression in Adults 
Environmental Health Perspectives  2011;119(12):1788-1793.
Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a synthetic estrogen commonly used in polycarbonate plastic and resin-lined food and beverage containers. Exposure of animal and cell models to doses of BPA below the recommended tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 50 μg/kg/day have been shown to alter specific estrogen-responsive gene expression, but this has not previously been shown in humans.
Objective: We investigated associations between BPA exposure and in vivo estrogenic gene expression in humans.
Methods: We studied 96 adult men from the InCHIANTI population study and examined in vivo expression of six estrogen receptor, estrogen-related receptor, and androgen receptor genes in peripheral blood leukocytes.
Results: The geometric mean urinary BPA concentration was 3.65 ng/mL [95% confidence interval (CI): 3.13, 4.28], giving an estimated mean excretion of 5.84 μg/day (95% CI: 5.00, 6.85), significantly below the current TDI. In age-adjusted models, there were positive associations between higher BPA concentrations and higher ESR2 [estrogen receptor 2 (ER beta)] expression (unstandardized linear regression coefficient = 0.1804; 95% CI: 0.0388, 0.3221; p = 0.013) and ESRRA (estrogen related receptor alpha) expression (coefficient = 0.1718; 95% CI: 0.0213, 0.3223; p = 0.026): These associations were little changed after adjusting for potential confounders, including obesity, serum lipid concentrations, and white cell subtype percentages. Upper-tertile BPA excretors (urinary BPA > 4.6 ng/mL) had 65% higher mean ESR2 expression than did lower-tertile BPA excretors (0–2.4 ng/mL).
Conclusions: Because activation of nuclear-receptor–mediated pathways by BPA is consistently found in laboratory studies, such activation in humans provides evidence that BPA is likely to function as a xenoestrogen in this sample of adults.
doi:10.1289/ehp.1103809
PMCID: PMC3261992  PMID: 21831745
bisphenol A; endocrine disruption; estrogen receptor-β; estrogen-related receptor-α; human biomonitoring; InCHIANTI; toxicogenomics
12.  Report from the second cytomegalovirus and immunosenescence workshop 
The Second International Workshop on CMV & Immunosenescence was held in Cambridge, UK, 2-4th December, 2010. The presentations covered four separate sessions: cytomegalovirus and T cell phenotypes; T cell memory frequency, inflation and immunosenescence; cytomegalovirus in aging, mortality and disease states; and the immunobiology of cytomegalovirus-specific T cells and effects of the virus on vaccination. This commentary summarizes the major findings of these presentations and references subsequently published work from the presenter laboratory where appropriate and draws together major themes that were subsequently discussed along with new areas of interest that were highlighted by this discussion.
doi:10.1186/1742-4933-8-10
PMCID: PMC3222598  PMID: 22035114
13.  Genetic Determinants of Serum Testosterone Concentrations in Men 
PLoS Genetics  2011;7(10):e1002313.
Testosterone concentrations in men are associated with cardiovascular morbidity, osteoporosis, and mortality and are affected by age, smoking, and obesity. Because of serum testosterone's high heritability, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data in 8,938 men from seven cohorts and followed up the genome-wide significant findings in one in silico (n = 871) and two de novo replication cohorts (n = 4,620) to identify genetic loci significantly associated with serum testosterone concentration in men. All these loci were also associated with low serum testosterone concentration defined as <300 ng/dl. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) locus (17p13-p12) were identified as independently associated with serum testosterone concentration (rs12150660, p = 1.2×10−41 and rs6258, p = 2.3×10−22). Subjects with ≥3 risk alleles of these variants had 6.5-fold higher risk of having low serum testosterone than subjects with no risk allele. The rs5934505 polymorphism near FAM9B on the X chromosome was also associated with testosterone concentrations (p = 5.6×10−16). The rs6258 polymorphism in exon 4 of SHBG affected SHBG's affinity for binding testosterone and the measured free testosterone fraction (p<0.01). Genetic variants in the SHBG locus and on the X chromosome are associated with a substantial variation in testosterone concentrations and increased risk of low testosterone. rs6258 is the first reported SHBG polymorphism, which affects testosterone binding to SHBG and the free testosterone fraction and could therefore influence the calculation of free testosterone using law-of-mass-action equation.
Author Summary
Testosterone is the most important testicular androgen in men. Low serum testosterone concentrations are associated with cardiovascular morbidity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, osteoporosis, sarcopenia, and increased mortality risk. Thus, there is growing evidence that serum testosterone is a valuable biomarker of men's overall health status. Studies in male twins indicate that there is a strong heritability of serum testosterone. Here we perform a large-scale genome-wide association study to examine the effects of common genetic variants on serum testosterone concentrations. By examining 14,429 men, we show that genetic variants in the sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) locus and on the X chromosome are associated with a substantial variation in serum testosterone concentrations and increased risk of low testosterone. The reported associations may now be used in order to better understand the functional background of recently identified disease associations related to low testosterone. Importantly, we identified the first known genetic variant, which affects SHBG's affinity for binding testosterone and the free testosterone fraction and could therefore influence the calculation of free testosterone. This finding suggests that individual-based SHBG-testosterone affinity constants are required depending on the genotype of this single-nucleotide polymorphism.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1002313
PMCID: PMC3188559  PMID: 21998597
14.  Polymorphisms in LMNA and near a SERPINA gene cluster are associated with cognitive function in older people 
Neurobiology of aging  2008;31(9):1563-1568.
A recent genome-wide association (GWA) study of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) identified 15 novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) independent of ApoE. We hypothesized that variants associated with LOAD are also associated with poor cognitive function in elderly populations. We measured additive associations between the five most strongly associated LOAD SNPs and grouped Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores. Variants were genotyped in respondents (mean age 79yrs) from the Oxford Healthy Aging project (OHAP) and other sites of the MRC Cognitive Function and Aging Study (MRC-CFAS). In adjusted ordinal logistic models, two variants were associated with poorer cognitive function: rs11622883 (OR=1.14, 95%CI: 1.01 to 1.28, p=0.040) and rs505058 (OR=1.29, 95% CI: 1.02 to 1.64, p=0.036). These SNPs are close to a SERPINA gene cluster and within LMNA respectively. The mechanisms underlying the associations with cognitive impairment and LOAD require further elucidation, but both genes are interesting candidates for involvement in age-related cognitive impairment.
doi:10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2008.08.020
PMCID: PMC2975102  PMID: 18848371
Late-onset Alzheimer's disease; dementia; cognitive function; cognitive impairment; gene; single nucleotide polymorphism; ApoE; LMNA
15.  Allelic heterogeneity and more detailed analyses of known loci explain additional phenotypic variation and reveal complex patterns of association 
Human Molecular Genetics  2011;20(20):4082-4092.
The identification of multiple signals at individual loci could explain additional phenotypic variance (‘missing heritability’) of common traits, and help identify causal genes. We examined gene expression levels as a model trait because of the large number of strong genetic effects acting in cis. Using expression profiles from 613 individuals, we performed genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses to identify cis-expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), and conditional analysis to identify second signals. We examined patterns of association when accounting for multiple SNPs at a locus and when including additional SNPs from the 1000 Genomes Project. We identified 1298 cis-eQTLs at an approximate false discovery rate 0.01, of which 118 (9%) showed evidence of a second independent signal. For this subset of 118 traits, accounting for two signals resulted in an average 31% increase in phenotypic variance explained (Wilcoxon P< 0.0001). The association of SNPs with cis gene expression could increase, stay similar or decrease in significance when accounting for linkage disequilibrium with second signals at the same locus. Pairs of SNPs increasing in significance tended to have gene expression increasing alleles on opposite haplotypes, whereas pairs of SNPs decreasing in significance tended to have gene expression increasing alleles on the same haplotypes. Adding data from the 1000 Genomes Project showed that apparently independent signals could be potentially explained by a single association signal. Our results show that accounting for multiple variants at a locus will increase the variance explained in a substantial fraction of loci, but that allelic heterogeneity will be difficult to define without resequencing loci and functional work.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddr328
PMCID: PMC3177649  PMID: 21798870
16.  Eight Common Genetic Variants Associated with Serum DHEAS Levels Suggest a Key Role in Ageing Mechanisms 
PLoS Genetics  2011;7(4):e1002025.
Dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) is the most abundant circulating steroid secreted by adrenal glands—yet its function is unknown. Its serum concentration declines significantly with increasing age, which has led to speculation that a relative DHEAS deficiency may contribute to the development of common age-related diseases or diminished longevity. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data with 14,846 individuals and identified eight independent common SNPs associated with serum DHEAS concentrations. Genes at or near the identified loci include ZKSCAN5 (rs11761528; p = 3.15×10−36), SULT2A1 (rs2637125; p = 2.61×10−19), ARPC1A (rs740160; p = 1.56×10−16), TRIM4 (rs17277546; p = 4.50×10−11), BMF (rs7181230; p = 5.44×10−11), HHEX (rs2497306; p = 4.64×10−9), BCL2L11 (rs6738028; p = 1.72×10−8), and CYP2C9 (rs2185570; p = 2.29×10−8). These genes are associated with type 2 diabetes, lymphoma, actin filament assembly, drug and xenobiotic metabolism, and zinc finger proteins. Several SNPs were associated with changes in gene expression levels, and the related genes are connected to biological pathways linking DHEAS with ageing. This study provides much needed insight into the function of DHEAS.
Author Summary
Dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), mainly secreted by the adrenal gland, is the most abundant circulating steroid in humans. It shows a significant physiological decline after the age of 25 and diminishes about 95% by the age of 85 years, which has led to speculation that a relative DHEAS deficiency may contribute to the development of common age-related diseases or diminished longevity. Twin- and family-based studies have shown that there is a substantial genetic effect with heritability estimate of 60%, but no specific genes regulating serum DHEAS concentration have been identified to date. Here we take advantage of recent technical and methodological advances to examine the effects of common genetic variants on serum DHEAS concentrations. By examining 14,846 Caucasian individuals, we show that eight common genetic variants are associated with serum DHEAS concentrations. Genes at or near these genetic variants include BCL2L11, ARPC1A, ZKSCAN5, TRIM4, HHEX, CYP2C9, BMF, and SULT2A1. These genes have various associations with steroid hormone metabolism—co-morbidities of ageing including type 2 diabetes, lymphoma, actin filament assembly, drug and xenobiotic metabolism, and zinc finger proteins—suggesting a wider functional role for DHEAS than previously thought.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1002025
PMCID: PMC3077384  PMID: 21533175
17.  Common Variation in the FTO Gene Alters Diabetes-Related Metabolic Traits to the Extent Expected Given Its Effect on BMI 
Diabetes  2008;57(5):1419-1426.
OBJECTIVE
Common variation in the FTO gene is associated with BMI and type 2 diabetes. Increased BMI is associated with diabetes risk factors, including raised insulin, glucose, and triglycerides. We aimed to test whether FTO genotype is associated with variation in these metabolic traits.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
We tested the association between FTO genotype and 10 metabolic traits using data from 17,037 white European individuals. We compared the observed effect of FTO genotype on each trait to that expected given the FTO-BMI and BMI-trait associations.
RESULTS
Each copy of the FTO rs9939609 A allele was associated with higher fasting insulin (0.039 SD [95% CI 0.013–0.064]; P = 0.003), glucose (0.024 [0.001– 0.048]; P = 0.044), and triglycerides (0.028 [0.003– 0.052]; P = 0.025) and lower HDL cholesterol (0.032 [0.008 – 0.057]; P = 0.009). There was no evidence of these associations when adjusting for BMI. Associations with fasting alanine aminotransferase, γ-glutamyl-transferase, LDL cholesterol, A1C, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were in the expected direction but did not reach P < 0.05. For all metabolic traits, effect sizes were consistent with those expected for the per allele change in BMI. FTO genotype was associated with a higher odds of metabolic syndrome (odds ratio 1.17 [95% CI 1.10 –1.25]; P = 3 × 10−6).
CONCLUSIONS
FTO genotype is associated with metabolic traits to an extent entirely consistent with its effect on BMI. Sample sizes of >12,000 individuals were needed to detect associations at P < 0.05. Our findings highlight the importance of using appropriately powered studies to assess the effects of a known diabetes or obesity variant on secondary traits correlated with these conditions.
doi:10.2337/db07-1466
PMCID: PMC3073395  PMID: 18346983
18.  Genetic tests for common diseases: new insights, old concerns 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7644):590-593.
The clinical utility of newly identified genetic variants associated with common diseases needs evaluation
doi:10.1136/bmj.39506.601053.BE
PMCID: PMC2267938  PMID: 18340074
19.  Seropositivity to Cytomegalovirus, Inflammation, All-Cause and Cardiovascular Disease-Related Mortality in the United States 
PLoS ONE  2011;6(2):e16103.
Background
Studies have suggested that CMV infection may influence cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and mortality. However, there have been no large-scale examinations of these relationships among demographically diverse populations. The inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) is also linked with CVD outcomes and mortality and may play an important role in the pathway between CMV and mortality. We utilized a U.S. nationally representative study to examine whether CMV infection is associated with all-cause and CVD-related mortality. We also assessed whether CRP level mediated or modified these relationships.
Methodology/Principal Findings
Data come from subjects ≥25 years of age who were tested for CMV and CRP level and were eligible for mortality follow-up on December 31st, 2006 (N = 14153) in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III (1988–1994). Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for all-cause and CVD-related mortality by CMV serostatus. After adjusting for multiple confounders, CMV seropositivity remained statistically significantly associated with all-cause mortality (HR 1.19, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.41). The association between CMV and CVD-related mortality did not achieve statistical significance after confounder adjustment. CRP did not mediate these associations. However, CMV seropositive individuals with high CRP levels showed a 30.1% higher risk for all-cause mortality and 29.5% higher risk for CVD-related mortality compared to CMV seropositive individuals with low CRP levels.
Conclusions/Significance
CMV was associated with a significant increased risk for all-cause mortality and CMV seropositive subjects who also had high CRP levels were at substantially higher risk for both for all-cause and CVD-related mortality than subjects with low CRP levels. Future work should target the mechanisms by which CMV infection and low-level inflammation interact to yield significant impact on mortality.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0016103
PMCID: PMC3040745  PMID: 21379581
20.  Interleukin-18 Polymorphism and Physical Functioning in Older People: A Replication Study and Meta-Analysis 
Background
Levels of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-18 (IL-18) are raised in old age and are associated with reduced physical functioning. Previous studies have indicated that the C allele of the rs5744256 polymorphism in the IL-18 gene is strongly associated with reduced circulating IL-18 levels. This variant has previously been associated with improved locomotor performance in old age, but the finding requires independent replication.
Methods
We examined the association between the IL-18 polymorphism rs5744256 and physical functioning in three cohorts with a total of 4,107 participants aged 60–85 years: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, Caerphilly, and Boyd Orr. We meta-analyzed (N = 6,141) the results with data from the original paper reporting this association: Iowa-Established Populations for Epidemiological Study of the Elderly and InCHIANTI cohorts. Physical functioning was assessed by timed walks or the get up and go test. As locomotor performance tests differed between the cohorts and the distributions of times to complete the test (in seconds) were positively skewed, we used the reciprocal transformation and computed study-specific z scores.
Results
Based on the three new studies, the estimated linear regression coefficient per C allele was 0.011 (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: −0.04 to 0.06). A meta-analysis that pooled the data from all studies showed weak evidence of an effect, with a regression coefficient of 0.047 (95% CI: 0.010 to 0.083).
Conclusions
We did not replicate an association between the IL-18 rs5744256 polymorphism and the physical function in people aged 60–85 years. However, pooling data from all studies suggested a weak association of the C allele of the rs5744256 single nucleotide polymorphism on improving walking times in old age.
doi:10.1093/gerona/glp092
PMCID: PMC2981454  PMID: 19633236
Interleukin-18 polymorphism; IL-18; Ageing; Physical function; Gait speed; Walk time
21.  Daily Bisphenol A Excretion and Associations with Sex Hormone Concentrations: Results from the InCHIANTI Adult Population Study 
Environmental Health Perspectives  2010;118(11):1603-1608.
Background
Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high production volume chemical widely used in packaging for food and beverages. Numerous studies have demonstrated that BPA can alter endocrine function in animals, yet human studies remain limited.
Objective
We estimated daily excretion of BPA among adults and examined hypothesized associations with serum estrogen and testosterone concentrations.
Methods
We conducted cross-sectional analyses using data from the InCHIANTI Study, a prospective population-based study of Italian adults. Our study included 715 adults between 20 and 74 years old. BPA concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry in 24-hr urine samples. The main outcome measures were serum concentrations of total testosterone and 17β-estradiol.
Results
Geometric mean urinary BPA concentration was 3.59 ng/mL [95% confidence interval (CI), 3.42–3.77 ng/mL], and mean excretion was 5.63 μg/day (5th population percentile, 2.1 μg/day; 95th percentile, 16.4 μg/day). We found higher excretion rates among men, younger respondents, and those with increasing waist circumference (p = 0.013) and weight (p = 0.003). Higher daily BPA excretion was associated with higher total testosterone concentrations in men, in models adjusted for age and study site (p = 0.044), and in models additionally adjusted for smoking, measures of obesity, and urinary creatinine concentrations (β = 0.046; 95% CI, 0.015–0.076; p = 0.004). We found no associations with the other serum measures. We also found no associations with the primary outcomes among women, but we did find an association between BPA and SHBG concentrations in the 60 premenopausal women.
Conclusion
Higher BPA exposure may be associated with endocrine changes in men. The mechanisms involved in the observed cross-sectional association with total testosterone concentrations need to be clarified.
doi:10.1289/ehp.1002367
PMCID: PMC2974700  PMID: 20797929
endocrine disruption; androgen; antiandrogen; bisphenol A; human biomonitoring; health effects; InCHIANTI
22.  Circulating β-carotene levels and Type 2 diabetes: Cause or effect? 
Diabetologia  2009;52(10):2117-2121.
Aims and Hypothesis
Circulating β-carotene levels are inversely associated with type 2 diabetes risk, but the causal direction of this association is not certain. In this study we used a Mendelian Randomization approach to provide evidence for or against the causal role of the anti-oxidant vitamin β-carotene in type 2 diabetes.
Methods
We used a common polymorphism (rs6564851) near the β-carotene 15,15'-Monooxygenase 1 (BCMO1) gene that is strongly associated with circulating β-carotene levels (P = 2×10−24) - each G allele is associated with a 0.27 standard deviation increase in levels. We used data from the InCHIANTI study and the ULSAM study to estimate the association between β-carotene levels and type 2 diabetes. We next used a triangulation approach to estimate the expected effect of rs6564851 on type 2 diabetes risk, and compared this to the observed effect using data from 4549 type 2 diabetes cases and 5579 controls from the DIAGRAM consortium.
Results
A 0.27 standard deviation increase in β-carotene levels is associated with an odds ratio of 0.90 (0.86–0.95) for type 2 diabetes in the InCHIANTI study. This association is similar to that of the ULSAM study, OR (0.90 (0.84–0.97)). In contrast there was no association between rs6564851 and type 2 diabetes (OR 0.98 (0.93–1.04, P = 0.58), and this effect size was smaller than that expected given the known associations between rs6564851 and β-carotene levels and the associations between β-carotene levels and type 2 diabetes.
Conclusion
Our Mendelian Randomization studies are in keeping with randomized controlled trials that suggest β-carotene is not causally protective against type 2 diabetes.
doi:10.1007/s00125-009-1475-8
PMCID: PMC2746424  PMID: 19662379
type 2 diabetes; β-carotene; mendelian randomization
23.  The paraoxonase (PON1) Q192R polymorphism is not associated with poor health status or depression in the ELSA or InCHIANTI studies 
Background The human paraoxonase (PON1) protein detoxifies certain organophosphates, and the PON1 Q192R polymorphism (rs662) affects PON1 activity. Groups with higher dose exposure to organophosphate sheep dips or first Gulf War nerve toxins reported poorer health if they had 192R, and these associations have been used to exemplify Mendelian randomization analysis. However, a reported association of 192R with depression in a population-based study of older women recently cast doubt on the specificity of the higher dose findings. We aimed to examine associations between the PON1 Q192R polymorphism and self-reported poor health and depression in two independent population-based studies.
Methods We used logistic regression models to examine the associations in men and women aged 60–79 years from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA, n = 3158) and InCHIANTI (n = 761) population studies. Outcomes included the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale, self-rated general health status and (in ELSA only) diagnoses of depression.
Results The PON1 Q192R polymorphism was not associated with self-reported poor health {meta-analysis: odds ratio (OR) = 1.01 [confidence interval (CI) 0.91–1.13], P = 0.80} or depressive symptoms in either study or in meta-analyses [CES-D: OR = 1.01 (CI 0.87–1.17), P = 0.90]. There was also no association with histories of diagnosed depression in ELSA [OR = 1.03 (CI 0.82–1.30), P = 0.80].
Conclusions We found no evidence of an association between the PON1 Q192R polymorphism and poor general or mental health in two independent population-based studies. Neither the claimed Q192R association with depression in the general population nor its theoretical implications were supported.
doi:10.1093/ije/dyp265
PMCID: PMC2755129  PMID: 19651761
PON1 Q192R polymorphism; rs662; organophosphates; detoxification; paraoxonase activity; depression; Mendelian randomization
24.  The 9p21 Myocardial Infarction risk allele increases risk of Peripheral Artery Disease in older people 
Background
A common variant at chromosome 9p21 (tagged by the rs1333049 or rs10757278 SNP) is strongly associated with Myocardial Infarction (MI) and major arterial aneurysms. An association with Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) was also reported in a sample aged <75 years, but this disappeared on removal of respondents with a MI history, resulting in an odds ratio for PAD of 1.09 (p=0.075). We aimed to estimate the association of this variant with Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) and PAD in three older populations.
Methods and Results
We used data from the InCHIANTI, Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging and Health, Aging and Body Composition studies. In 2,630 Caucasian individuals (mean age 76.4 years) the C allele at rs1333049 was associated with lower mean ABI measures and with increased prevalence of PAD. These associations remained after removal of baseline and incident MI cases over a 6 year follow-up for both ABI (−0.017 ABI units, 95% CI: −0.03- −0.01, p=1.3×10−4) and PAD (per allele OR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.06–1.56, p=0.012). These associations also remained after adjustment for known atherosclerosis risk factors including Diabetes Mellitus, smoking, hypercholesterolemia and hypertension.
Conclusions
The C allele at rs1333049 is associated with an increased prevalence of Peripheral Arterial Disease and lower mean Ankle Brachial Index. This association was independent of the presence of diagnosed MI and atherosclerotic risk factors in 3 older Caucasian populations.
doi:10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.108.825935
PMCID: PMC2777723  PMID: 20031606
Genetics; Myocardial Infarction; Peripheral Vascular Disease; 9p21; CDKN2a/2b
25.  Association between Serum Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) and Thyroid Disease in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 
Environmental Health Perspectives  2010;118(5):686-692.
Background
Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, also known as C8) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are stable compounds with many industrial and consumer uses. Their persistence in the environment plus toxicity in animal models has raised concern over low-level chronic exposure effects on human health.
Objectives
We estimated associations between serum PFOA and PFOS concentrations and thyroid disease prevalence in representative samples of the U.S. general population.
Methods
Analyses of PFOA/PFOS versus disease status in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) for 1999–2000, 2003–2004, and 2005–2006 included 3,974 adults with measured concentrations for perfluorinated chemicals. Regression models were adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, smoking status, body mass index, and alcohol intake.
Results
The NHANES-weighted prevalence of reporting any thyroid disease was 16.18% (n = 292) in women and 3.06% (n = 69) in men; prevalence of current thyroid disease with related medication was 9.89% (n = 163) in women and 1.88% (n = 46) in men. In fully adjusted logistic models, women with PFOA ≥ 5.7 ng/mL [fourth (highest) population quartile] were more likely to report current treated thyroid disease [odds ratio (OR) = 2.24; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.38–3.65; p = 0.002] compared with PFOA ≤ 4.0 ng/mL (quartiles 1 and 2); we found a near significant similar trend in men (OR = 2.12; 95% CI, 0.93–4.82; p = 0.073). For PFOS, in men we found a similar association for those with PFOS ≥ 36.8 ng/mL (quartile 4) versus ≤ 25.5 ng/mL (quartiles 1 and 2: OR for treated disease = 2.68; 95% CI, 1.03–6.98; p = 0.043); in women this association was not significant.
Conclusions
Higher concentrations of serum PFOA and PFOS are associated with current thyroid disease in the U.S. general adult population. More work is needed to establish the mechanisms involved and to exclude confounding and pharmacokinetic explanations.
doi:10.1289/ehp.0901584
PMCID: PMC2866686  PMID: 20089479
C8; human population; PFOA; PFOS; thyroid disease

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