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1.  Metabolic Signatures of Adiposity in Young Adults: Mendelian Randomization Analysis and Effects of Weight Change 
PLoS Medicine  2014;11(12):e1001765.
In this study, Wurtz and colleagues investigated to what extent elevated body mass index (BMI) within the normal weight range has causal influences on the detailed systemic metabolite profile in early adulthood using Mendelian randomization analysis.
Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary
Background
Increased adiposity is linked with higher risk for cardiometabolic diseases. We aimed to determine to what extent elevated body mass index (BMI) within the normal weight range has causal effects on the detailed systemic metabolite profile in early adulthood.
Methods and Findings
We used Mendelian randomization to estimate causal effects of BMI on 82 metabolic measures in 12,664 adolescents and young adults from four population-based cohorts in Finland (mean age 26 y, range 16–39 y; 51% women; mean ± standard deviation BMI 24±4 kg/m2). Circulating metabolites were quantified by high-throughput nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics and biochemical assays. In cross-sectional analyses, elevated BMI was adversely associated with cardiometabolic risk markers throughout the systemic metabolite profile, including lipoprotein subclasses, fatty acid composition, amino acids, inflammatory markers, and various hormones (p<0.0005 for 68 measures). Metabolite associations with BMI were generally stronger for men than for women (median 136%, interquartile range 125%–183%). A gene score for predisposition to elevated BMI, composed of 32 established genetic correlates, was used as the instrument to assess causality. Causal effects of elevated BMI closely matched observational estimates (correspondence 87%±3%; R2 = 0.89), suggesting causative influences of adiposity on the levels of numerous metabolites (p<0.0005 for 24 measures), including lipoprotein lipid subclasses and particle size, branched-chain and aromatic amino acids, and inflammation-related glycoprotein acetyls. Causal analyses of certain metabolites and potential sex differences warrant stronger statistical power. Metabolite changes associated with change in BMI during 6 y of follow-up were examined for 1,488 individuals. Change in BMI was accompanied by widespread metabolite changes, which had an association pattern similar to that of the cross-sectional observations, yet with greater metabolic effects (correspondence 160%±2%; R2 = 0.92).
Conclusions
Mendelian randomization indicates causal adverse effects of increased adiposity with multiple cardiometabolic risk markers across the metabolite profile in adolescents and young adults within the non-obese weight range. Consistent with the causal influences of adiposity, weight changes were paralleled by extensive metabolic changes, suggesting a broadly modifiable systemic metabolite profile in early adulthood.
Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary
Editors' Summary
Background
Adiposity—having excessive body fat—is a growing global threat to public health. Body mass index (BMI, calculated by dividing a person's weight in kilograms by their height in meters squared) is a coarse indicator of excess body weight, but the measure is useful in large population studies. Compared to people with a lean body weight (a BMI of 18.5–24.9 kg/m2), individuals with higher BMI have an elevated risk of developing life-shortening cardiometabolic diseases—cardiovascular diseases that affect the heart and/or the blood vessels (for example, heart failure and stroke) and metabolic diseases that affect the cellular chemical reactions that sustain life (for example, diabetes). People become unhealthily fat by consuming food and drink that contains more energy (calories) than they need for their daily activities. So adiposity can be prevented and reversed by eating less and exercising more.
Why Was This Study Done?
Epidemiological studies, which record the patterns of risk factors and disease in populations, suggest that the illness and death associated with excess body weight is partly attributable to abnormalities in how individuals with high adiposity metabolize carbohydrates and fats, leading to higher blood sugar and cholesterol levels. Further, adiposity is also associated with many other deviations in the metabolic profile than these commonly measured risk factors. However, epidemiological studies cannot prove that adiposity causes specific changes in a person's systemic (overall) metabolic profile because individuals with high BMI may share other characteristics (confounding factors) that are the actual causes of both adiposity and metabolic abnormalities. Moreover, having a change in some aspect of metabolism could also lead to adiposity, rather than vice versa (reverse causation). Importantly, if there is a causal effect of adiposity on cardiometabolic risk factor levels, it might be possible to prevent the progression towards cardiometabolic diseases by weight loss. Here, the researchers use “Mendelian randomization” to examine whether increased BMI within the normal and overweight range is causally influencing the metabolic risk factors from many biological pathways during early adulthood. Because gene variants are inherited randomly, they are not prone to confounding and are free from reverse causation. Several gene variants are known to lead to modestly increased BMI. Thus, an investigation of the associations between these gene variants and risk factors across the systemic metabolite profile in a population of healthy individuals can indicate whether higher BMI is causally related to known and novel metabolic risk factors and higher cardiometabolic disease risk.
What Did the Researchers Do and Find?
The researchers measured the BMI of 12,664 adolescents and young adults (average BMI 24.7 kg/m2) living in Finland and the blood levels of 82 metabolites in these young individuals at a single time point. Statistical analysis of these data indicated that elevated BMI was adversely associated with numerous cardiometabolic risk factors. For example, elevated BMI was associated with raised levels of low-density lipoprotein, “bad” cholesterol that increases cardiovascular disease risk. Next, the researchers used a gene score for predisposition to increased BMI, composed of 32 gene variants correlated with increased BMI, as an “instrumental variable” to assess whether adiposity causes metabolite abnormalities. The effects on the systemic metabolite profile of a 1-kg/m2 increment in BMI due to genetic predisposition closely matched the effects of an observed 1-kg/m2 increment in adulthood BMI on the metabolic profile. That is, higher levels of adiposity had causal effects on the levels of numerous blood-based metabolic risk factors, including higher levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride-carrying lipoproteins, protein markers of chronic inflammation and adverse liver function, impaired insulin sensitivity, and elevated concentrations of several amino acids that have recently been linked with the risk for developing diabetes. Elevated BMI also causally led to lower levels of certain high-density lipoprotein lipids in the blood, a marker for the risk of future cardiovascular disease. Finally, an examination of the metabolic changes associated with changes in BMI in 1,488 young adults after a period of six years showed that those metabolic measures that were most strongly associated with BMI at a single time point likewise displayed the highest responsiveness to weight change over time.
What Do These Findings Mean?
These findings suggest that increased adiposity has causal adverse effects on multiple cardiometabolic risk markers in non-obese young adults beyond the effects on cholesterol and blood sugar. Like all Mendelian randomization studies, the reliability of the causal association reported here depends on several assumptions made by the researchers. Nevertheless, these findings suggest that increased adiposity has causal adverse effects on multiple cardiometabolic risk markers in non-obese young adults. Importantly, the results of both the causal effect analyses and the longitudinal study suggest that there is no threshold below which a BMI increase does not adversely affect the metabolic profile, and that a systemic metabolic profile linked with high cardiometabolic disease risk that becomes established during early adulthood can be reversed. Overall, these findings therefore highlight the importance of weight reduction as a key target for metabolic risk factor control among young adults.
Additional Information
Please access these websites via the online version of this summary at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1001765.
The Computational Medicine Research Team of the University of Oulu has a webpage that provides further information on metabolite profiling by high-throughput NMR metabolomics
The World Health Organization provides information on obesity (in several languages)
The Global Burden of Disease Study website provides the latest details about global obesity trends
The UK National Health Service Choices website provides information about obesity, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes (including some personal stories)
The American Heart Association provides information on all aspects of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and on keeping healthy; its website includes personal stories about heart attacks, stroke, and diabetes
The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has information on all aspects of overweight and obesity and information about heart disease, stroke, and diabetes
MedlinePlus provides links to other sources of information on heart disease, vascular disease, and obesity (in English and Spanish)
Wikipedia has a page on Mendelian randomization (note: Wikipedia is a free online encyclopedia that anyone can edit; available in several languages)
doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001765
PMCID: PMC4260795  PMID: 25490400
2.  Multiple Measures of Adiposity Are Associated with Mean Leukocyte Telomere Length in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(6):e99133.
Studies of leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and adiposity have produced conflicting results, and the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and telomere length throughout life remains unclear. We therefore tested association of adult LTL measured in 5,598 participants with: i) childhood growth measures (BMI and age at adiposity rebound (AR)); ii) change in BMI from childhood to adulthood and iii) adult BMI, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), body adiposity index (BAI). Childhood BMI at AR was positively associated with LTL at 31 years in women (P = 0.041). Adult BMI and WHR in both men (P = 0.025 and P = 0.049, respectively) and women (P = 0.029 and P = 0.008, respectively), and BAI in women (P = 0.021) were inversely associated with LTL at 31 years. An increase in standardised BMI between early childhood and adulthood was associated with shorter adult LTL in women (P = 0.008). We show that LTL is inversely associated with multiple measures of adiposity in both men and women. Additionally, BMI increase in women from childhood to adulthood is associated with shorter telomeres at age 31, potentially indicating accelerated biological ageing.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0099133
PMCID: PMC4053385  PMID: 24919187
3.  Stability of the Associations between Early Life Risk Indicators and Adolescent Overweight over the Evolving Obesity Epidemic 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(4):e95314.
Background
Pre- and perinatal factors and preschool body size may help identify children developing overweight, but these factors might have changed during the development of the obesity epidemic.
Objective
We aimed to assess the associations between early life risk indicators and overweight at the age of 9 and 15 years at different stages of the obesity epidemic.
Methods
We used two population-based Northern Finland Birth Cohorts including 4111 children born in 1966 (NFBC1966) and 5414 children born in 1985–1986 (NFBC1986). In both cohorts, we used the same a priori defined prenatal factors, maternal body mass index (BMI), birth weight, infant weight (age 5 months and 1 year), and preschool BMI (age 2–5 years). We used internal references in early childhood to define percentiles of body size (<50, 50–75, 75–90 and >90) and generalized linear models to study the association with overweight, according to the International Obesity Taskforce (IOTF) definitions, at the ages of 9 and 15 years.
Results
The prevalence of overweight at the age of 15 was 9% for children born in 1966 and 16% for children born in 1986. However, medians of infant weight and preschool BMI changed little between the cohorts, and we found similar associations between maternal BMI, infant weight, preschool BMI, and later overweight in the two cohorts. At 5 years, children above the 90th percentile had approximately a 12 times higher risk of being overweight at the age of 15 years compared to children below the 50th percentile in both cohorts.
Conclusions
The associations between early body size and adolescent overweight showed remarkable stability, despite the increase in prevalence of overweight over the 20 years between the cohorts. Using consequently defined internal percentiles may be a valuable tool in clinical practice.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0095314
PMCID: PMC3991687  PMID: 24748033
4.  Stress-related eating, obesity and associated behavioural traits in adolescents: a prospective population-based cohort study 
BMC Public Health  2014;14:321.
Background
Stress-related eating is associated with unhealthy eating and drinking habits and an increased risk of obesity among adults, but less is known about factors related to stress-driven eating behaviour among children and adolescents. We studied the prevalence of stress-related eating and its association with overweight, obesity, abdominal obesity, dietary and other health behaviours at the age of 16. Furthermore, we examined whether stress-related eating is predicted by early-life factors including birth size and maternal gestational health.
Methods
The study population comprised 3598 girls and 3347 boys from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 (NFBC1986). Followed up since their antenatal period, adolescents underwent a clinical examination, and their stress-related eating behaviour, dietary habits and other health behaviours were assessed using a postal questionnaire. We examined associations using cross-tabulations followed by latent class analysis and logistic regression to profile the adolescents and explain the risk of obesity with behavioural traits.
Results
Stress-related eating behaviour was more common among girls (43%) than among boys (15%). Compared with non-stress-driven eaters, stress-driven eaters had a higher prevalence of overweight, obesity and abdominal obesity. We found no significant associations between stress-eating and early-life factors. Among girls, tobacco use, shorter sleep, infrequent family meals and frequent consumption of chocolate, sweets, light sodas and alcohol were more prevalent among stress-driven eaters. Among boys, the proportions of those with frequent consumption of sausages, chocolate, sweets, hamburgers and pizza were greater among stress-driven eaters. For both genders, the proportions of those bingeing and using heavy exercise and strict diet for weight control were higher among stress-eaters. Besides a ‘healthy lifestyle’ cluster, latent class analysis revealed two other patterns (‘adverse habits’, ‘unbalanced weight control’) that significantly explained the risk of overweight among boys and girls.
Conclusions
Stress-related eating is highly prevalent among 16-year-old girls and is associated with obesity as well as adverse dietary and other health behaviours among both genders, but intrauterine conditions are seemingly uninvolved. In terms of obesity prevention and future health, adolescents who use eating as a passive way of coping could benefit from learning healthier strategies for stress and weight management.
doi:10.1186/1471-2458-14-321
PMCID: PMC3995503  PMID: 24708823
Adolescent; Body mass index; Cohort studies; Diet; Drinking behaviour; Health behaviour; Latent class analysis; Obesity; Psychological stress
5.  The effectiveness and applicability of different lifestyle interventions for enhancing wellbeing: the study design for a randomized controlled trial for persons with metabolic syndrome risk factors and psychological distress 
BMC Public Health  2014;14:310.
Background
Obesity and stress are among the most common lifestyle-related health problems. Most of the current disease prevention and management models are not satisfactorily cost-effective and hardly reach those who need them the most. Therefore, novel evidence-based controlled interventions are necessary to evaluate models for prevention and treatment based on self-management. This randomized controlled trial examines the effectiveness, applicability, and acceptability of different lifestyle interventions with individuals having symptoms of metabolic syndrome and psychological distress. The offered interventions are based on cognitive behavioral approaches, and are designed for enhancing general well-being and supporting personalized lifestyle changes.
Methods/Design
339 obese individuals reporting stress symptoms were recruited and randomized to either (1) a minimal contact web-guided Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-based (CBT) intervention including an approach of health assessment and coaching methods, (2) a mobile-guided intervention comprising of mindfulness, acceptance and value-based exercises, (3) a face-to-face group intervention using mindfulness, acceptance and value-based approach, or (4) a control group. The participants were measured three times during the study (pre = week 0, post = week 10, and follow-up = week 36). Psychological well-being, lifestyles and habits, eating behaviors, and user experiences were measured using online surveys. Laboratory measurements for physical well-being and general health were performed including e.g. liver function, thyroid glands, kidney function, blood lipids and glucose levels and body composition analysis. In addition, a 3-day ambulatory heart rate and 7-day movement data were collected for analyzing stress, recovery, physical activity, and sleep patterns. Food intake data were collected with a 48 -hour diet recall interview via telephone. Differences in the effects of the interventions would be examined using multiple-group modeling techniques, and effect-size calculations.
Discussion
This study will provide additional knowledge about the effects of three low intensity interventions for improving general well-being among individuals with obesity and stress symptoms. The study will show effects of two technology guided self-help interventions as well as effect of an acceptance and value–based brief group intervention. Those who might benefit from the aforesaid interventions will increase knowledge base to better understand what mechanisms facilitate effects of the interventions.
Trial registration
Current Clinical Trials NCT01738256, Registered 17 August, 2012.
doi:10.1186/1471-2458-14-310
PMCID: PMC4006637  PMID: 24708617
Lifestyle; Well-being; Obesity; Stress; Acceptance and Commitment Therapy; Cognitive behavioral therapy; Mobile application; Web-based intervention; Technology-aided interventions
6.  Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture 
Berndt, Sonja I. | Gustafsson, Stefan | Mägi, Reedik | Ganna, Andrea | Wheeler, Eleanor | Feitosa, Mary F. | Justice, Anne E. | Monda, Keri L. | Croteau-Chonka, Damien C. | Day, Felix R. | Esko, Tõnu | Fall, Tove | Ferreira, Teresa | Gentilini, Davide | Jackson, Anne U. | Luan, Jian’an | Randall, Joshua C. | Vedantam, Sailaja | Willer, Cristen J. | Winkler, Thomas W. | Wood, Andrew R. | Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie | Hu, Yi-Juan | Lee, Sang Hong | Liang, Liming | Lin, Dan-Yu | Min, Josine L. | Neale, Benjamin M. | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Yang, Jian | Albrecht, Eva | Amin, Najaf | Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L. | Cadby, Gemma | den Heijer, Martin | Eklund, Niina | Fischer, Krista | Goel, Anuj | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Huffman, Jennifer E. | Jarick, Ivonne | Johansson, Åsa | Johnson, Toby | Kanoni, Stavroula | Kleber, Marcus E. | König, Inke R. | Kristiansson, Kati | Kutalik, Zoltán | Lamina, Claudia | Lecoeur, Cecile | Li, Guo | Mangino, Massimo | McArdle, Wendy L. | Medina-Gomez, Carolina | Müller-Nurasyid, Martina | Ngwa, Julius S. | Nolte, Ilja M. | Paternoster, Lavinia | Pechlivanis, Sonali | Perola, Markus | Peters, Marjolein J. | Preuss, Michael | Rose, Lynda M. | Shi, Jianxin | Shungin, Dmitry | Smith, Albert Vernon | Strawbridge, Rona J. | Surakka, Ida | Teumer, Alexander | Trip, Mieke D. | Tyrer, Jonathan | Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V. | Vandenput, Liesbeth | Waite, Lindsay L. | Zhao, Jing Hua | Absher, Devin | Asselbergs, Folkert W. | Atalay, Mustafa | Attwood, Antony P. | Balmforth, Anthony J. | Basart, Hanneke | Beilby, John | Bonnycastle, Lori L. | Brambilla, Paolo | Bruinenberg, Marcel | Campbell, Harry | Chasman, Daniel I. | Chines, Peter S. | Collins, Francis S. | Connell, John M. | Cookson, William | de Faire, Ulf | de Vegt, Femmie | Dei, Mariano | Dimitriou, Maria | Edkins, Sarah | Estrada, Karol | Evans, David M. | Farrall, Martin | Ferrario, Marco M. | Ferrières, Jean | Franke, Lude | Frau, Francesca | Gejman, Pablo V. | Grallert, Harald | Grönberg, Henrik | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Hall, Alistair S. | Hall, Per | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Hayward, Caroline | Heard-Costa, Nancy L. | Heath, Andrew C. | Hebebrand, Johannes | Homuth, Georg | Hu, Frank B. | Hunt, Sarah E. | Hyppönen, Elina | Iribarren, Carlos | Jacobs, Kevin B. | Jansson, John-Olov | Jula, Antti | Kähönen, Mika | Kathiresan, Sekar | Kee, Frank | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Kivimaki, Mika | Koenig, Wolfgang | Kraja, Aldi T. | Kumari, Meena | Kuulasmaa, Kari | Kuusisto, Johanna | Laitinen, Jaana H. | Lakka, Timo A. | Langenberg, Claudia | Launer, Lenore J. | Lind, Lars | Lindström, Jaana | Liu, Jianjun | Liuzzi, Antonio | Lokki, Marja-Liisa | Lorentzon, Mattias | Madden, Pamela A. | Magnusson, Patrik K. | Manunta, Paolo | Marek, Diana | März, Winfried | Mateo Leach, Irene | McKnight, Barbara | Medland, Sarah E. | Mihailov, Evelin | Milani, Lili | Montgomery, Grant W. | Mooser, Vincent | Mühleisen, Thomas W. | Munroe, Patricia B. | Musk, Arthur W. | Narisu, Narisu | Navis, Gerjan | Nicholson, George | Nohr, Ellen A. | Ong, Ken K. | Oostra, Ben A. | Palmer, Colin N.A. | Palotie, Aarno | Peden, John F. | Pedersen, Nancy | Peters, Annette | Polasek, Ozren | Pouta, Anneli | Pramstaller, Peter P. | Prokopenko, Inga | Pütter, Carolin | Radhakrishnan, Aparna | Raitakari, Olli | Rendon, Augusto | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Rudan, Igor | Saaristo, Timo E. | Sambrook, Jennifer G. | Sanders, Alan R. | Sanna, Serena | Saramies, Jouko | Schipf, Sabine | Schreiber, Stefan | Schunkert, Heribert | Shin, So-Youn | Signorini, Stefano | Sinisalo, Juha | Skrobek, Boris | Soranzo, Nicole | Stančáková, Alena | Stark, Klaus | Stephens, Jonathan C. | Stirrups, Kathleen | Stolk, Ronald P. | Stumvoll, Michael | Swift, Amy J. | Theodoraki, Eirini V. | Thorand, Barbara | Tregouet, David-Alexandre | Tremoli, Elena | Van der Klauw, Melanie M. | van Meurs, Joyce B.J. | Vermeulen, Sita H. | Viikari, Jorma | Virtamo, Jarmo | Vitart, Veronique | Waeber, Gérard | Wang, Zhaoming | Widén, Elisabeth | Wild, Sarah H. | Willemsen, Gonneke | Winkelmann, Bernhard R. | Witteman, Jacqueline C.M. | Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R. | Wong, Andrew | Wright, Alan F. | Zillikens, M. Carola | Amouyel, Philippe | Boehm, Bernhard O. | Boerwinkle, Eric | Boomsma, Dorret I. | Caulfield, Mark J. | Chanock, Stephen J. | Cupples, L. Adrienne | Cusi, Daniele | Dedoussis, George V. | Erdmann, Jeanette | Eriksson, Johan G. | Franks, Paul W. | Froguel, Philippe | Gieger, Christian | Gyllensten, Ulf | Hamsten, Anders | Harris, Tamara B. | Hengstenberg, Christian | Hicks, Andrew A. | Hingorani, Aroon | Hinney, Anke | Hofman, Albert | Hovingh, Kees G. | Hveem, Kristian | Illig, Thomas | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Jöckel, Karl-Heinz | Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M. | Kiemeney, Lambertus A. | Kuh, Diana | Laakso, Markku | Lehtimäki, Terho | Levinson, Douglas F. | Martin, Nicholas G. | Metspalu, Andres | Morris, Andrew D. | Nieminen, Markku S. | Njølstad, Inger | Ohlsson, Claes | Oldehinkel, Albertine J. | Ouwehand, Willem H. | Palmer, Lyle J. | Penninx, Brenda | Power, Chris | Province, Michael A. | Psaty, Bruce M. | Qi, Lu | Rauramaa, Rainer | Ridker, Paul M. | Ripatti, Samuli | Salomaa, Veikko | Samani, Nilesh J. | Snieder, Harold | Sørensen, Thorkild I.A. | Spector, Timothy D. | Stefansson, Kari | Tönjes, Anke | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Uitterlinden, André G. | Uusitupa, Matti | van der Harst, Pim | Vollenweider, Peter | Wallaschofski, Henri | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Watkins, Hugh | Wichmann, H.-Erich | Wilson, James F. | Abecasis, Goncalo R. | Assimes, Themistocles L. | Barroso, Inês | Boehnke, Michael | Borecki, Ingrid B. | Deloukas, Panos | Fox, Caroline S. | Frayling, Timothy | Groop, Leif C. | Haritunian, Talin | Heid, Iris M. | Hunter, David | Kaplan, Robert C. | Karpe, Fredrik | Moffatt, Miriam | Mohlke, Karen L. | O’Connell, Jeffrey R. | Pawitan, Yudi | Schadt, Eric E. | Schlessinger, David | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Strachan, David P. | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Visscher, Peter M. | Di Blasio, Anna Maria | Hirschhorn, Joel N. | Lindgren, Cecilia M. | Morris, Andrew P. | Meyre, David | Scherag, André | McCarthy, Mark I. | Speliotes, Elizabeth K. | North, Kari E. | Loos, Ruth J.F. | Ingelsson, Erik
Nature genetics  2013;45(5):501-512.
Approaches exploiting extremes of the trait distribution may reveal novel loci for common traits, but it is unknown whether such loci are generalizable to the general population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with upper vs. lower 5th percentiles of body mass index, height and waist-hip ratio, as well as clinical classes of obesity including up to 263,407 European individuals, we identified four new loci (IGFBP4, H6PD, RSRC1, PPP2R2A) influencing height detected in the tails and seven new loci (HNF4G, RPTOR, GNAT2, MRPS33P4, ADCY9, HS6ST3, ZZZ3) for clinical classes of obesity. Further, we show that there is large overlap in terms of genetic structure and distribution of variants between traits based on extremes and the general population and little etiologic heterogeneity between obesity subgroups.
doi:10.1038/ng.2606
PMCID: PMC3973018  PMID: 23563607
7.  Preschool Weight and Body Mass Index in Relation to Central Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome in Adulthood 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(3):e89986.
Background
If preschool measures of body size routinely collected at preventive health examinations are associated with adult central obesity and metabolic syndrome, a focused use of these data for the identification of high risk children is possible. The aim of this study was to test the associations between preschool weight and body mass index (BMI) and adult BMI, central obesity and metabolic alterations.
Methods
The Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (NFBC1966) (N = 4111) is a population-based cohort. Preschool weight (age 5 months and 1 year) and BMI (age 2–5 years) were studied in relation to metabolic syndrome as well as BMI, waist circumference, lipoproteins, blood pressure, and fasting glucose at the age of 31 years. Linear regression models and generalized linear regression models with log link were used.
Results
Throughout preschool ages, weight and BMI were significantly linearly associated with adult BMI and waist circumference. Preschool BMI was inversely associated with high-density lipoprotein levels from the age of 3 years. Compared with children in the lower half of the BMI range, the group of children with the 5% highest BMI at the age of 5 years had a relative risk of adult obesity of 6.2(95% CI:4.2–9.3), of adult central obesity of 2.4(95% CI:2.0–2.9), and of early onset adult metabolic syndrome of 2.5(95% CI:1.7–3.8).
Conclusions
High preschool BMI is consistently associated with adult obesity, central obesity and early onset metabolic syndrome. Routinely collected measures of body size in preschool ages can help to identify children in need of focused prevention due to their increased risk of adverse metabolic alterations in adulthood.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0089986
PMCID: PMC3940896  PMID: 24595022
8.  Body mass index and overweight in relation to residence distance and population density: experience from the Northern Finland birth cohort 1966 
BMC Public Health  2013;13:938.
Background
The effect of urban sprawl on body weight in Finland is not well known. To provide more information, we examined whether body mass index (BMI) and the prevalence of overweight are associated with an individual’s distance to the local community centre and population density in his/her resident area.
Methods
The sample consisted of 5363 men and women, members of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (NFBC), who filled in a postal questionnaire and attended a medical checkup in 1997, at the age of 31 years. Body mass index (BMI; kg/m2) and the prevalence of overweight (BMI ≥ 25.0 kg/m2) were regressed on each subject’s road distance to the resident commune’s centre and on population density in the 1 km2 geographical grid in which he/she resided, using a generalized additive model. Adjustments were made for sex, marital status, occupational class, education, leisure-time and occupational physical activity, alcohol consumption and smoking.
Results
The mean BMI among the subjects was 24.7 kg/m2, but it increased by increasing road distance (by 1.3 kg/m2 from 5–10 to 20–184 km) and by decreasing population density (by 1.7 kg/m2 from 1000–19,192 to 1–5 inhabitants/km2). The respective increases in overweight (overall prevalence 41%) were 13 per cent units for distance and 14 per cent units for population density. Adjusted regressions based on continuous explanatory variables showed an inverse L-shaped pattern with a mean BMI of 24.6 kg/m2 at distances shorter than 5 km and a rise of 2.6 kg/m2 at longer distances, and an increase of 2.5 kg/m2 from highest to lowest population density. The associations with road distance were stronger for women than men, while the sex difference in association with population density remained indeterminate.
Conclusions
We conclude that young adults in Northern Finland who live far away from local centres or in the most sparsely populated areas are fatter than those who live close to local centres or in densely populated areas. The likely explanations include variations in everyday physical activity in different residential environments, although causality of the associations remains to be confirmed.
doi:10.1186/1471-2458-13-938
PMCID: PMC3851578  PMID: 24103455
Body mass index; Overweight; Medical geography; Urban/rural; Population density; Finland
9.  Meal Frequencies Modify the Effect of Common Genetic Variants on Body Mass Index in Adolescents of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(9):e73802.
Recent studies suggest that meal frequencies influence the risk of obesity in children and adolescents. It has also been shown that multiple genetic loci predispose to obesity already in youth. However, it is unknown whether meal frequencies could modulate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the risk of obesity. We examined the effect of two meal patterns on weekdays –5 meals including breakfast (regular) and ≤4 meals with or without breakfast (meal skipping) – on the genetic susceptibility to increased body mass index (BMI) in Finnish adolescents. Eight variants representing 8 early-life obesity-susceptibility loci, including FTO and MC4R, were genotyped in 2215 boys and 2449 girls aged 16 years from the population-based Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986. A genetic risk score (GRS) was calculated for each individual by summing the number of BMI-increasing alleles across the 8 loci. Weight and height were measured and dietary data were collected using self-administered questionnaires. Among meal skippers, the difference in BMI between high-GRS and low-GRS (<8 and ≥8 BMI-increasing alleles) groups was 0.90 (95% CI 0.63,1.17) kg/m2, whereas in regular eaters, this difference was 0.32 (95% CI 0.06,0.57) kg/m2 (pinteraction  = 0.003). The effect of each MC4R rs17782313 risk allele on BMI in meal skippers (0.47 [95% CI 0.22,0.73] kg/m2) was nearly three-fold compared with regular eaters (0.18 [95% CI -0.06,0.41] kg/m2) (pinteraction  = 0.016). Further, the per-allele effect of the FTO rs1421085 was 0.24 (95% CI 0.05,0.42) kg/m2 in regular eaters and 0.46 (95% CI 0.27,0.66) kg/m2 in meal skippers but the interaction between FTO genotype and meal frequencies on BMI was significant only in boys (pinteraction  = 0.015). In summary, the regular five-meal pattern attenuated the increasing effect of common SNPs on BMI in adolescents. Considering the epidemic of obesity in youth, the promotion of regular eating may have substantial public health implications.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0073802
PMCID: PMC3769374  PMID: 24040077
10.  The Role of Adiposity in Cardiometabolic Traits: A Mendelian Randomization Analysis 
Fall, Tove | Hägg, Sara | Mägi, Reedik | Ploner, Alexander | Fischer, Krista | Horikoshi, Momoko | Sarin, Antti-Pekka | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Ladenvall, Claes | Kals, Mart | Kuningas, Maris | Draisma, Harmen H. M. | Ried, Janina S. | van Zuydam, Natalie R. | Huikari, Ville | Mangino, Massimo | Sonestedt, Emily | Benyamin, Beben | Nelson, Christopher P. | Rivera, Natalia V. | Kristiansson, Kati | Shen, Huei-yi | Havulinna, Aki S. | Dehghan, Abbas | Donnelly, Louise A. | Kaakinen, Marika | Nuotio, Marja-Liisa | Robertson, Neil | de Bruijn, Renée F. A. G. | Ikram, M. Arfan | Amin, Najaf | Balmforth, Anthony J. | Braund, Peter S. | Doney, Alexander S. F. | Döring, Angela | Elliott, Paul | Esko, Tõnu | Franco, Oscar H. | Gretarsdottir, Solveig | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Heikkilä, Kauko | Herzig, Karl-Heinz | Holm, Hilma | Hottenga, Jouke Jan | Hyppönen, Elina | Illig, Thomas | Isaacs, Aaron | Isomaa, Bo | Karssen, Lennart C. | Kettunen, Johannes | Koenig, Wolfgang | Kuulasmaa, Kari | Laatikainen, Tiina | Laitinen, Jaana | Lindgren, Cecilia | Lyssenko, Valeriya | Läärä, Esa | Rayner, Nigel W. | Männistö, Satu | Pouta, Anneli | Rathmann, Wolfgang | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Ruokonen, Aimo | Savolainen, Markku J. | Sijbrands, Eric J. G. | Small, Kerrin S. | Smit, Jan H. | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Syvänen, Ann-Christine | Taanila, Anja | Tobin, Martin D. | Uitterlinden, Andre G. | Willems, Sara M. | Willemsen, Gonneke | Witteman, Jacqueline | Perola, Markus | Evans, Alun | Ferrières, Jean | Virtamo, Jarmo | Kee, Frank | Tregouet, David-Alexandre | Arveiler, Dominique | Amouyel, Philippe | Ferrario, Marco M. | Brambilla, Paolo | Hall, Alistair S. | Heath, Andrew C. | Madden, Pamela A. F. | Martin, Nicholas G. | Montgomery, Grant W. | Whitfield, John B. | Jula, Antti | Knekt, Paul | Oostra, Ben | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Penninx, Brenda W. J. H. | Davey Smith, George | Kaprio, Jaakko | Samani, Nilesh J. | Gieger, Christian | Peters, Annette | Wichmann, H.-Erich | Boomsma, Dorret I. | de Geus, Eco J. C. | Tuomi, TiinaMaija | Power, Chris | Hammond, Christopher J. | Spector, Tim D. | Lind, Lars | Orho-Melander, Marju | Palmer, Colin Neil Alexander | Morris, Andrew D. | Groop, Leif | Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Salomaa, Veikko | Vartiainen, Erkki | Hofman, Albert | Ripatti, Samuli | Metspalu, Andres | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Stefansson, Kari | Pedersen, Nancy L. | McCarthy, Mark I. | Ingelsson, Erik | Prokopenko, Inga
PLoS Medicine  2013;10(6):e1001474.
In this study, Prokopenko and colleagues provide novel evidence for causal relationship between adiposity and heart failure and increased liver enzymes using a Mendelian randomization study design.
Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary
Background
The association between adiposity and cardiometabolic traits is well known from epidemiological studies. Whilst the causal relationship is clear for some of these traits, for others it is not. We aimed to determine whether adiposity is causally related to various cardiometabolic traits using the Mendelian randomization approach.
Methods and Findings
We used the adiposity-associated variant rs9939609 at the FTO locus as an instrumental variable (IV) for body mass index (BMI) in a Mendelian randomization design. Thirty-six population-based studies of individuals of European descent contributed to the analyses.
Age- and sex-adjusted regression models were fitted to test for association between (i) rs9939609 and BMI (n = 198,502), (ii) rs9939609 and 24 traits, and (iii) BMI and 24 traits. The causal effect of BMI on the outcome measures was quantified by IV estimators. The estimators were compared to the BMI–trait associations derived from the same individuals. In the IV analysis, we demonstrated novel evidence for a causal relationship between adiposity and incident heart failure (hazard ratio, 1.19 per BMI-unit increase; 95% CI, 1.03–1.39) and replicated earlier reports of a causal association with type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, and hypertension (odds ratio for IV estimator, 1.1–1.4; all p<0.05). For quantitative traits, our results provide novel evidence for a causal effect of adiposity on the liver enzymes alanine aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transferase and confirm previous reports of a causal effect of adiposity on systolic and diastolic blood pressure, fasting insulin, 2-h post-load glucose from the oral glucose tolerance test, C-reactive protein, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (all p<0.05). The estimated causal effects were in agreement with traditional observational measures in all instances except for type 2 diabetes, where the causal estimate was larger than the observational estimate (p = 0.001).
Conclusions
We provide novel evidence for a causal relationship between adiposity and heart failure as well as between adiposity and increased liver enzymes.
Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary
Editors' Summary
Cardiovascular disease (CVD)—disease that affects the heart and/or the blood vessels—is a major cause of illness and death worldwide. In the US, for example, coronary heart disease—a CVD in which narrowing of the heart's blood vessels by fatty deposits slows the blood supply to the heart and may eventually cause a heart attack—is the leading cause of death, and stroke—a CVD in which the brain's blood supply is interrupted—is the fourth leading cause of death. Globally, both the incidence of CVD (the number of new cases in a population every year) and its prevalence (the proportion of the population with CVD) are increasing, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. This increasing burden of CVD is occurring in parallel with a global increase in the incidence and prevalence of obesity—having an unhealthy amount of body fat (adiposity)—and of metabolic diseases—conditions such as diabetes in which metabolism (the processes that the body uses to make energy from food) is disrupted, with resulting high blood sugar and damage to the blood vessels.
Why Was This Study Done?
Epidemiological studies—investigations that record the patterns and causes of disease in populations—have reported an association between adiposity (indicated by an increased body mass index [BMI], which is calculated by dividing body weight in kilograms by height in meters squared) and cardiometabolic traits such as coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure (a condition in which the heart is incapable of pumping sufficient amounts of blood around the body), diabetes, high blood pressure (hypertension), and high blood cholesterol (dyslipidemia). However, observational studies cannot prove that adiposity causes any particular cardiometabolic trait because overweight individuals may share other characteristics (confounding factors) that are the real causes of both obesity and the cardiometabolic disease. Moreover, it is possible that having CVD or a metabolic disease causes obesity (reverse causation). For example, individuals with heart failure cannot do much exercise, so heart failure may cause obesity rather than vice versa. Here, the researchers use “Mendelian randomization” to examine whether adiposity is causally related to various cardiometabolic traits. Because gene variants are inherited randomly, they are not prone to confounding and are free from reverse causation. It is known that a genetic variant (rs9939609) within the genome region that encodes the fat-mass- and obesity-associated gene (FTO) is associated with increased BMI. Thus, an investigation of the associations between rs9939609 and cardiometabolic traits can indicate whether obesity is causally related to these traits.
What Did the Researchers Do and Find?
The researchers analyzed the association between rs9939609 (the “instrumental variable,” or IV) and BMI, between rs9939609 and 24 cardiometabolic traits, and between BMI and the same traits using genetic and health data collected in 36 population-based studies of nearly 200,000 individuals of European descent. They then quantified the strength of the causal association between BMI and the cardiometabolic traits by calculating “IV estimators.” Higher BMI showed a causal relationship with heart failure, metabolic syndrome (a combination of medical disorders that increases the risk of developing CVD), type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, increased blood levels of liver enzymes (an indicator of liver damage; some metabolic disorders involve liver damage), and several other cardiometabolic traits. All the IV estimators were similar to the BMI–cardiovascular trait associations (observational estimates) derived from the same individuals, with the exception of diabetes, where the causal estimate was higher than the observational estimate, probably because the observational estimate is based on a single BMI measurement, whereas the causal estimate considers lifetime changes in BMI.
What Do These Findings Mean?
Like all Mendelian randomization studies, the reliability of the causal associations reported here depends on several assumptions made by the researchers. Nevertheless, these findings provide support for many previously suspected and biologically plausible causal relationships, such as that between adiposity and hypertension. They also provide new insights into the causal effect of obesity on liver enzyme levels and on heart failure. In the latter case, these findings suggest that a one-unit increase in BMI might increase the incidence of heart failure by 17%. In the US, this corresponds to 113,000 additional cases of heart failure for every unit increase in BMI at the population level. Although additional studies are needed to confirm and extend these findings, these results suggest that global efforts to reduce the burden of obesity will likely also reduce the occurrence of CVD and metabolic disorders.
Additional Information
Please access these websites via the online version of this summary at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1001474.
The American Heart Association provides information on all aspects of cardiovascular disease and tips on keeping the heart healthy, including weight management (in several languages); its website includes personal stories about stroke and heart attacks
The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has information on heart disease, stroke, and all aspects of overweight and obesity (in English and Spanish)
The UK National Health Service Choices website provides information about cardiovascular disease and obesity, including a personal story about losing weight
The World Health Organization provides information on obesity (in several languages)
The International Obesity Taskforce provides information about the global obesity epidemic
Wikipedia has a page on Mendelian randomization (note: Wikipedia is a free online encyclopedia that anyone can edit; available in several languages)
MedlinePlus provides links to other sources of information on heart disease, on vascular disease, on obesity, and on metabolic disorders (in English and Spanish)
The International Association for the Study of Obesity provides maps and information about obesity worldwide
The International Diabetes Federation has a web page that describes types, complications, and risk factors of diabetes
doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001474
PMCID: PMC3692470  PMID: 23824655
11.  FTO genotype is associated with phenotypic variability of body mass index 
Yang, Jian | Loos, Ruth J. F. | Powell, Joseph E. | Medland, Sarah E. | Speliotes, Elizabeth K. | Chasman, Daniel I. | Rose, Lynda M. | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Mägi, Reedik | Waite, Lindsay | Smith, Albert Vernon | Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M. | Monda, Keri L. | Hadley, David | Mahajan, Anubha | Li, Guo | Kapur, Karen | Vitart, Veronique | Huffman, Jennifer E. | Wang, Sophie R. | Palmer, Cameron | Esko, Tõnu | Fischer, Krista | Zhao, Jing Hua | Demirkan, Ayşe | Isaacs, Aaron | Feitosa, Mary F. | Luan, Jian’an | Heard-Costa, Nancy L. | White, Charles | Jackson, Anne U. | Preuss, Michael | Ziegler, Andreas | Eriksson, Joel | Kutalik, Zoltán | Frau, Francesca | Nolte, Ilja M. | Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V. | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Jacobs, Kevin B. | Verweij, Niek | Goel, Anuj | Medina-Gomez, Carolina | Estrada, Karol | Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer Lynn | Sanna, Serena | Sidore, Carlo | Tyrer, Jonathan | Teumer, Alexander | Prokopenko, Inga | Mangino, Massimo | Lindgren, Cecilia M. | Assimes, Themistocles L. | Shuldiner, Alan R. | Hui, Jennie | Beilby, John P. | McArdle, Wendy L. | Hall, Per | Haritunians, Talin | Zgaga, Lina | Kolcic, Ivana | Polasek, Ozren | Zemunik, Tatijana | Oostra, Ben A. | Junttila, M. Juhani | Grönberg, Henrik | Schreiber, Stefan | Peters, Annette | Hicks, Andrew A. | Stephens, Jonathan | Foad, Nicola S. | Laitinen, Jaana | Pouta, Anneli | Kaakinen, Marika | Willemsen, Gonneke | Vink, Jacqueline M. | Wild, Sarah H. | Navis, Gerjan | Asselbergs, Folkert W. | Homuth, Georg | John, Ulrich | Iribarren, Carlos | Harris, Tamara | Launer, Lenore | Gudnason, Vilmundur | O’Connell, Jeffrey R. | Boerwinkle, Eric | Cadby, Gemma | Palmer, Lyle J. | James, Alan L. | Musk, Arthur W. | Ingelsson, Erik | Psaty, Bruce M. | Beckmann, Jacques S. | Waeber, Gerard | Vollenweider, Peter | Hayward, Caroline | Wright, Alan F. | Rudan, Igor | Groop, Leif C. | Metspalu, Andres | Khaw, Kay Tee | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Borecki, Ingrid B. | Province, Michael A. | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Tardif, Jean-Claude | Huikuri, Heikki V. | Cupples, L. Adrienne | Atwood, Larry D. | Fox, Caroline S. | Boehnke, Michael | Collins, Francis S. | Mohlke, Karen L. | Erdmann, Jeanette | Schunkert, Heribert | Hengstenberg, Christian | Stark, Klaus | Lorentzon, Mattias | Ohlsson, Claes | Cusi, Daniele | Staessen, Jan A. | Van der Klauw, Melanie M. | Pramstaller, Peter P. | Kathiresan, Sekar | Jolley, Jennifer D. | Ripatti, Samuli | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | de Geus, Eco J. C. | Boomsma, Dorret I. | Penninx, Brenda | Wilson, James F. | Campbell, Harry | Chanock, Stephen J. | van der Harst, Pim | Hamsten, Anders | Watkins, Hugh | Hofman, Albert | Witteman, Jacqueline C. | Zillikens, M. Carola | Uitterlinden, André G. | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Zillikens, M. Carola | Kiemeney, Lambertus A. | Vermeulen, Sita H. | Abecasis, Goncalo R. | Schlessinger, David | Schipf, Sabine | Stumvoll, Michael | Tönjes, Anke | Spector, Tim D. | North, Kari E. | Lettre, Guillaume | McCarthy, Mark I. | Berndt, Sonja I. | Heath, Andrew C. | Madden, Pamela A. F. | Nyholt, Dale R. | Montgomery, Grant W. | Martin, Nicholas G. | McKnight, Barbara | Strachan, David P. | Hill, William G. | Snieder, Harold | Ridker, Paul M. | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Stefansson, Kari | Frayling, Timothy M. | Hirschhorn, Joel N. | Goddard, Michael E. | Visscher, Peter M.
Nature  2012;490(7419):267-272.
There is evidence across several species for genetic control of phenotypic variation of complex traits1–4, such that the variance among phenotypes is genotype dependent. Understanding genetic control of variability is important in evolutionary biology, agricultural selection programmes and human medicine, yet for complex traits, no individual genetic variants associated with variance, as opposed to the mean, have been identified. Here we perform a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of phenotypic variation using 170,000 samples on height and body mass index (BMI) in human populations. We report evidence that the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs7202116 at the FTO gene locus, which is known to be associated with obesity (as measured by mean BMI for each rs7202116 genotype)5–7, is also associated with phenotypic variability. We show that the results are not due to scale effects or other artefacts, and find no other experiment-wise significant evidence for effects on variability, either at loci other than FTO for BMI or at any locus for height. The difference in variance for BMI among individuals with opposite homozygous genotypes at the FTO locus is approximately 7%, corresponding to a difference of 0.5 kilograms in the standard deviation of weight. Our results indicate that genetic variants can be discovered that are associated with variability, and that between-person variability in obesity can partly be explained by the genotype at the FTO locus. The results are consistent with reported FTO by environment interactions for BMI8, possibly mediated by DNA methylation9,10. Our BMI results for other SNPs and our height results for all SNPs suggest that most genetic variants, including those that influence mean height or mean BMI, are not associated with phenotypic variance, or that their effects on variability are too small to detect even with samples sizes greater than 100,000.
doi:10.1038/nature11401
PMCID: PMC3564953  PMID: 22982992
12.  Pubertal Timing and Growth Influences Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Adult Males and Females 
Diabetes Care  2012;35(4):850-856.
OBJECTIVE
Early pubertal onset in females is associated with increased risk for adult obesity and cardiovascular disease, but whether this relationship is independent of preceding childhood growth events is unclear. Furthermore, the association between male puberty and adult disease remains unknown. To clarify the link between puberty and adult health, we evaluated the relationship between pubertal timing and risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in both males and females from a large, prospective, and randomly ascertained birth cohort from Northern Finland.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
Pubertal timing was estimated based on pubertal height growth in 5,058 subjects (2,417 males and 2,641 females), and the relationship between puberty and body weight, glucose and lipid homeostasis, and blood pressure at age 31 years was evaluated with linear regression modeling.
RESULTS
Earlier pubertal timing associated with higher adult BMI, fasting insulin, diastolic blood pressure, and decreased HDL cholesterol in both sexes (P < 0.002) and with higher total serum cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides in males. The association with BMI and diastolic blood pressure remained statistically significant in both sexes, as did the association with insulin levels and HDL cholesterol concentrations in males after adjusting for covariates reflecting both fetal and childhood growth including childhood BMI.
CONCLUSIONS
We demonstrate independent association between earlier pubertal timing and adult metabolic syndrome-related derangements both in males and females. The connection emphasizes that the mechanisms advancing puberty may also contribute to adult metabolic disorders.
doi:10.2337/dc11-1365
PMCID: PMC3308310  PMID: 22338106
13.  Rare Genomic Structural Variants in Complex Disease: Lessons from the Replication of Associations with Obesity 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(3):e58048.
The limited ability of common variants to account for the genetic contribution to complex disease has prompted searches for rare variants of large effect, to partly explain the ‘missing heritability’. Analyses of genome-wide genotyping data have identified genomic structural variants (GSVs) as a source of such rare causal variants. Recent studies have reported multiple GSV loci associated with risk of obesity. We attempted to replicate these associations by similar analysis of two familial-obesity case-control cohorts and a population cohort, and detected GSVs at 11 out of 18 loci, at frequencies similar to those previously reported. Based on their reported frequencies and effect sizes (OR≥25), we had sufficient statistical power to detect the large majority (80%) of genuine associations at these loci. However, only one obesity association was replicated. Deletion of a 220 kb region on chromosome 16p11.2 has a carrier population frequency of 2×10−4 (95% confidence interval [9.6×10−5–3.1×10−4]); accounts overall for 0.5% [0.19%–0.82%] of severe childhood obesity cases (P = 3.8×10−10; odds ratio = 25.0 [9.9–60.6]); and results in a mean body mass index (BMI) increase of 5.8 kg.m−2 [1.8–10.3] in adults from the general population. We also attempted replication using BMI as a quantitative trait in our population cohort; associations with BMI at or near nominal significance were detected at two further loci near KIF2B and within FOXP2, but these did not survive correction for multiple testing. These findings emphasise several issues of importance when conducting rare GSV association, including the need for careful cohort selection and replication strategy, accurate GSV identification, and appropriate correction for multiple testing and/or control of false discovery rate. Moreover, they highlight the potential difficulty in replicating rare CNV associations across different populations. Nevertheless, we show that such studies are potentially valuable for the identification of variants making an appreciable contribution to complex disease.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0058048
PMCID: PMC3595275  PMID: 23554873
14.  Body mass index is associated with lumbar disc degeneration in young Finnish males: subsample of Northern Finland birth cohort study 1986 
Background
The role of environmental factors in lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration (DD) in young adults is largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether body mass index (BMI), smoking, and physical activity are associated with lumbar DD among young adults.
Methods
The Oulu Back Study (OBS) is a subpopulation of the 1986 Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC 1986) and it originally included 2,969 children. The OBS subjects received a postal questionnaire, and those who responded (N = 1,987) were invited to the physical examination. The participants (N = 874) were invited to lumbar MRI study. A total of 558 young adults (325 females and 233 males) underwent MRI that used a 1.5-T scanner at the mean age of 21. Each lumbar intervertebral disc was graded as normal (0), mildly (1), moderately (2), or severely (3) degenerated. We calculated a sum score of the lumbar DD, and analyzed the associations between environmental risk factors (smoking, physical activity and weight-related factors assessed at 16 and 19 years) and DD using ordinal logistic regression, the results being expressed as cumulative odds ratios (COR). All analyses were stratified by gender.
Results
Of the 558 subjects, 256 (46%) had no DD, 117 (21%) had sum score of one, 93 (17%) sum score of two, and 92 (17%) sum score of three or higher. In the multivariate ordinal logistic regression model, BMI at 16 years (highest vs. lowest quartile) was associated with DD sum score among males (COR 2.35; 95% CI 1.19-4.65) but not among females (COR 1.29; 95% CI 0.72-2.32). Smoking of at least four pack-years was associated with DD among males, but not among females (COR 2.41; 95% CI 0.99-5.86 and 1.59; 95% 0.67-3.76, respectively). Self-reported physical activity was not associated with DD.
Conclusions
High BMI at 16 years was associated with lumbar DD at 21 years among young males but not among females. High pack-years of smoking showed a comparable association in males, while physical activity had no association with DD in either gender. These results suggest that environmental factors are associated with DD among young males.
doi:10.1186/1471-2474-14-87
PMCID: PMC3599904  PMID: 23497297
Disc degeneration; Smoking; Body mass index; Physical activity; Waist circumference; Young adult
15.  Association of Abdominal Obesity with Lumbar Disc Degeneration – A Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(2):e56244.
Purpose
To evaluate whether midsagittal (abdominal) obesity in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), waist circumference (WC) and body fat percentage are associated with lumbar disc degeneration in early adulthood.
Methods
We obtained the lumbar MRI (1.5-T scanner) of 325 females and 233 males at a mean age of 21 years. Lumbar disc degeneration was evaluated using Pfirrmann classification. We analysed the associations of MRI measures of obesity (abdominal diameter (AD), sagittal diameter (SAD), ventral subcutaneous thickness (VST), and dorsal subcutaneous thickness (DST)), WC and body fat percentage with disc degeneration sum scores using ordinal logistic regression.
Results
A total of 155 (48%) females and 147 (63%) males had disc degeneration. AD and SAD were associated with a disc degeneration sum score of ≥3 compared to disc degeneration sum score of 0–2 (OR 1.67; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20–2.33 and OR 1.40; 95% CI 1.12–1.75, respectively) among males, but we found no association among females. WC was also associated with disc degeneration among males (OR 1.03 per one cm; 95% CI 1.00–1.05), but not among females.
Conclusion
Measures of abdominal obesity in MRI and waist circumference were associated with disc degeneration among 21-year-old males.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0056244
PMCID: PMC3571955  PMID: 23418543
16.  Estimation of Newborn Risk for Child or Adolescent Obesity: Lessons from Longitudinal Birth Cohorts 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(11):e49919.
Objectives
Prevention of obesity should start as early as possible after birth. We aimed to build clinically useful equations estimating the risk of later obesity in newborns, as a first step towards focused early prevention against the global obesity epidemic.
Methods
We analyzed the lifetime Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 (NFBC1986) (N = 4,032) to draw predictive equations for childhood and adolescent obesity from traditional risk factors (parental BMI, birth weight, maternal gestational weight gain, behaviour and social indicators), and a genetic score built from 39 BMI/obesity-associated polymorphisms. We performed validation analyses in a retrospective cohort of 1,503 Italian children and in a prospective cohort of 1,032 U.S. children.
Results
In the NFBC1986, the cumulative accuracy of traditional risk factors predicting childhood obesity, adolescent obesity, and childhood obesity persistent into adolescence was good: AUROC = 0·78[0·74–0.82], 0·75[0·71–0·79] and 0·85[0·80–0·90] respectively (all p<0·001). Adding the genetic score produced discrimination improvements ≤1%. The NFBC1986 equation for childhood obesity remained acceptably accurate when applied to the Italian and the U.S. cohort (AUROC = 0·70[0·63–0·77] and 0·73[0·67–0·80] respectively) and the two additional equations for childhood obesity newly drawn from the Italian and the U.S. datasets showed good accuracy in respective cohorts (AUROC = 0·74[0·69–0·79] and 0·79[0·73–0·84]) (all p<0·001). The three equations for childhood obesity were converted into simple Excel risk calculators for potential clinical use.
Conclusion
This study provides the first example of handy tools for predicting childhood obesity in newborns by means of easily recorded information, while it shows that currently known genetic variants have very little usefulness for such prediction.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0049919
PMCID: PMC3509134  PMID: 23209618
17.  Genome-Wide Association Studies of Asthma in Population-Based Cohorts Confirm Known and Suggested Loci and Identify an Additional Association near HLA 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(9):e44008.
Rationale
Asthma has substantial morbidity and mortality and a strong genetic component, but identification of genetic risk factors is limited by availability of suitable studies.
Objectives
To test if population-based cohorts with self-reported physician-diagnosed asthma and genome-wide association (GWA) data could be used to validate known associations with asthma and identify novel associations.
Methods
The APCAT (Analysis in Population-based Cohorts of Asthma Traits) consortium consists of 1,716 individuals with asthma and 16,888 healthy controls from six European-descent population-based cohorts. We examined associations in APCAT of thirteen variants previously reported as genome-wide significant (P<5x10−8) and three variants reported as suggestive (P<5×10−7). We also searched for novel associations in APCAT (Stage 1) and followed-up the most promising variants in 4,035 asthmatics and 11,251 healthy controls (Stage 2). Finally, we conducted the first genome-wide screen for interactions with smoking or hay fever.
Main Results
We observed association in the same direction for all thirteen previously reported variants and nominally replicated ten of them. One variant that was previously suggestive, rs11071559 in RORA, now reaches genome-wide significance when combined with our data (P = 2.4×10−9). We also identified two genome-wide significant associations: rs13408661 near IL1RL1/IL18R1 (PStage1+Stage2 = 1.1x10−9), which is correlated with a variant recently shown to be associated with asthma (rs3771180), and rs9268516 in the HLA region (PStage1+Stage2 = 1.1x10−8), which appears to be independent of previously reported associations in this locus. Finally, we found no strong evidence for gene-environment interactions with smoking or hay fever status.
Conclusions
Population-based cohorts with simple asthma phenotypes represent a valuable and largely untapped resource for genetic studies of asthma.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0044008
PMCID: PMC3461045  PMID: 23028483
18.  Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure 
Wain, Louise V | Verwoert, Germaine C | O’Reilly, Paul F | Shi, Gang | Johnson, Toby | Johnson, Andrew D | Bochud, Murielle | Rice, Kenneth M | Henneman, Peter | Smith, Albert V | Ehret, Georg B | Amin, Najaf | Larson, Martin G | Mooser, Vincent | Hadley, David | Dörr, Marcus | Bis, Joshua C | Aspelund, Thor | Esko, Tõnu | Janssens, A Cecile JW | Zhao, Jing Hua | Heath, Simon | Laan, Maris | Fu, Jingyuan | Pistis, Giorgio | Luan, Jian’an | Arora, Pankaj | Lucas, Gavin | Pirastu, Nicola | Pichler, Irene | Jackson, Anne U | Webster, Rebecca J | Zhang, Feng | Peden, John F | Schmidt, Helena | Tanaka, Toshiko | Campbell, Harry | Igl, Wilmar | Milaneschi, Yuri | Hotteng, Jouke-Jan | Vitart, Veronique | Chasman, Daniel I | Trompet, Stella | Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L | Alizadeh, Behrooz Z | Chambers, John C | Guo, Xiuqing | Lehtimäki, Terho | Kühnel, Brigitte | Lopez, Lorna M | Polašek, Ozren | Boban, Mladen | Nelson, Christopher P | Morrison, Alanna C | Pihur, Vasyl | Ganesh, Santhi K | Hofman, Albert | Kundu, Suman | Mattace-Raso, Francesco US | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Sijbrands, Eric JG | Uitterlinden, Andre G | Hwang, Shih-Jen | Vasan, Ramachandran S | Wang, Thomas J | Bergmann, Sven | Vollenweider, Peter | Waeber, Gérard | Laitinen, Jaana | Pouta, Anneli | Zitting, Paavo | McArdle, Wendy L | Kroemer, Heyo K | Völker, Uwe | Völzke, Henry | Glazer, Nicole L | Taylor, Kent D | Harris, Tamara B | Alavere, Helene | Haller, Toomas | Keis, Aime | Tammesoo, Mari-Liis | Aulchenko, Yurii | Barroso, Inês | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Galan, Pilar | Hercberg, Serge | Lathrop, Mark | Eyheramendy, Susana | Org, Elin | Sõber, Siim | Lu, Xiaowen | Nolte, Ilja M | Penninx, Brenda W | Corre, Tanguy | Masciullo, Corrado | Sala, Cinzia | Groop, Leif | Voight, Benjamin F | Melander, Olle | O’Donnell, Christopher J | Salomaa, Veikko | d’Adamo, Adamo Pio | Fabretto, Antonella | Faletra, Flavio | Ulivi, Sheila | Del Greco, M Fabiola | Facheris, Maurizio | Collins, Francis S | Bergman, Richard N | Beilby, John P | Hung, Joseph | Musk, A William | Mangino, Massimo | Shin, So-Youn | Soranzo, Nicole | Watkins, Hugh | Goel, Anuj | Hamsten, Anders | Gider, Pierre | Loitfelder, Marisa | Zeginigg, Marion | Hernandez, Dena | Najjar, Samer S | Navarro, Pau | Wild, Sarah H | Corsi, Anna Maria | Singleton, Andrew | de Geus, Eco JC | Willemsen, Gonneke | Parker, Alex N | Rose, Lynda M | Buckley, Brendan | Stott, David | Orru, Marco | Uda, Manuela | van der Klauw, Melanie M | Zhang, Weihua | Li, Xinzhong | Scott, James | Chen, Yii-Der Ida | Burke, Gregory L | Kähönen, Mika | Viikari, Jorma | Döring, Angela | Meitinger, Thomas | Davies, Gail | Starr, John M | Emilsson, Valur | Plump, Andrew | Lindeman, Jan H | ’t Hoen, Peter AC | König, Inke R | Felix, Janine F | Clarke, Robert | Hopewell, Jemma C | Ongen, Halit | Breteler, Monique | Debette, Stéphanie | DeStefano, Anita L | Fornage, Myriam | Mitchell, Gary F | Smith, Nicholas L | Holm, Hilma | Stefansson, Kari | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Samani, Nilesh J | Preuss, Michael | Rudan, Igor | Hayward, Caroline | Deary, Ian J | Wichmann, H-Erich | Raitakari, Olli T | Palmas, Walter | Kooner, Jaspal S | Stolk, Ronald P | Jukema, J Wouter | Wright, Alan F | Boomsma, Dorret I | Bandinelli, Stefania | Gyllensten, Ulf B | Wilson, James F | Ferrucci, Luigi | Schmidt, Reinhold | Farrall, Martin | Spector, Tim D | Palmer, Lyle J | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Pfeufer, Arne | Gasparini, Paolo | Siscovick, David | Altshuler, David | Loos, Ruth JF | Toniolo, Daniela | Snieder, Harold | Gieger, Christian | Meneton, Pierre | Wareham, Nicholas J | Oostra, Ben A | Metspalu, Andres | Launer, Lenore | Rettig, Rainer | Strachan, David P | Beckmann, Jacques S | Witteman, Jacqueline CM | Erdmann, Jeanette | van Dijk, Ko Willems | Boerwinkle, Eric | Boehnke, Michael | Ridker, Paul M | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Chakravarti, Aravinda | Abecasis, Goncalo R | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Newton-Cheh, Christopher | Levy, Daniel | Munroe, Patricia B | Psaty, Bruce M | Caulfield, Mark J | Rao, Dabeeru C | Tobin, Martin D | Elliott, Paul | van Duijn, Cornelia M
Nature genetics  2011;43(10):1005-1011.
Numerous genetic loci influence systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans 1-3. We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N=74,064) and follow-up studies (N=48,607), we identified at genome-wide significance (P= 2.7×10-8 to P=2.3×10-13) four novel PP loci (at 4q12 near CHIC2/PDGFRAI, 7q22.3 near PIK3CG, 8q24.12 in NOV, 11q24.3 near ADAMTS-8), two novel MAP loci (3p21.31 in MAP4, 10q25.3 near ADRB1) and one locus associated with both traits (2q24.3 near FIGN) which has recently been associated with SBP in east Asians. For three of the novel PP signals, the estimated effect for SBP was opposite to that for DBP, in contrast to the majority of common SBP- and DBP-associated variants which show concordant effects on both traits. These findings indicate novel genetic mechanisms underlying blood pressure variation, including pathways that may differentially influence SBP and DBP.
doi:10.1038/ng.922
PMCID: PMC3445021  PMID: 21909110
19.  Temperament Clusters in a Normal Population: Implications for Health and Disease 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(7):e33088.
Background
The object of this study was to identify temperament patterns in the Finnish population, and to determine the relationship between these profiles and life habits, socioeconomic status, and health.
Methods/Principal Findings
A cluster analysis of the Temperament and Character Inventory subscales was performed on 3,761 individuals from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 and replicated on 2,097 individuals from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study. Clusters were formed using the k-means method and their relationship with 115 variables from the areas of life habits, socioeconomic status and health was examined.
Results
Four clusters were identified for both genders. Individuals from Cluster I are characterized by high persistence, low extravagance and disorderliness. They have healthy life habits, and lowest scores in most of the measures for psychiatric disorders. Cluster II individuals are characterized by low harm avoidance and high novelty seeking. They report the best physical capacity and highest level of income, but also high rate of divorce, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Individuals from Cluster III are not characterized by any extreme characteristic. Individuals from Cluster IV are characterized by high levels of harm avoidance, low levels of exploratory excitability and attachment, and score the lowest in most measures of health and well-being.
Conclusions
This study shows that the temperament subscales do not distribute randomly but have an endogenous structure, and that these patterns have strong associations to health, life events, and well-being.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0033088
PMCID: PMC3399883  PMID: 22815673
20.  Factors associated with parental recognition of a child's overweight status - a cross sectional study 
BMC Public Health  2011;11:665.
Background
Very few studies have evaluated the association between a child's lifestyle factors and their parent's ability to recognise the overweight status of their offspring. The aim of this study was to analyze the factors associated with a parent's ability to recognise their own offspring's overweight status.
Methods
125 overweight children out of all 1,278 school beginners in Northern Finland were enrolled.
Weight and height were measured in health care clinics. Overweight status was defined by BMI according to internationally accepted criteria. A questionnaire to be filled in by parents was delivered by the school nurses. The parents were asked to evaluate their offspring's weight status. The child's eating habits and physical activity patterns were also enquired about. Factor groups of food and physical activity habits were formed by factor analysis. Binary logistic regression was performed using all variables associated with recognition of overweight status in univariate analyses. The significant risk factors in the final model are reported using odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
Results
Fifty-seven percent (69/120) of the parents of the overweight children considered their child as normal weight. Child's BMI was positively associated with parental recognition of overweight (OR 3.59, CI 1.8 to 7.0). Overweight boys were less likely to be recognised than overweight girls (OR 0.14, CI 0.033 to 0.58). Child's healthy diet (OR 0.22, CI 0.091 to 0.54) and high physical activity (OR 0.29, CI 0.11 to 0.79) were inversely related to parental recognition of overweight status.
Conclusions
Child's healthy eating habits and physical activity are inversely related to parental recognition of their offspring's overweight. These should be taken into account when planning prevention and treatment strategies for childhood obesity.
doi:10.1186/1471-2458-11-665
PMCID: PMC3173349  PMID: 21864365
overweight status; children; recognition; parents
21.  Associations between pre-pregnancy obesity and asthma symptoms in adolescents 
Background
The high prevalence of children's asthma symptoms, worldwide, is unexplained. We examined the relation between maternal pre-pregnancy weight and body mass index (BMI), and asthma symptoms in adolescents.
Methods
Data from 6945 adolescents born within the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 were used. Prospective antenatal and birth outcome data, including maternal pre-pregnancy weight and BMI, and asthma symptoms in adolescent offspring at age 15–16 years, were employed. Logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the associations between relevant prenatal factors and asthma symptoms during adolescence.
Results
Current wheeze (within the past year) was reported by 10.6% of adolescents, and physician-diagnosed asthma by 6.0%. High maternal pre-pregnancy BMI was a significant predictor of wheeze in the adolescents (increase per kilogram per square metre unit; 2.7%, 95% CI 0.9 to 4.4 for ever wheeze; 3.5%, 95% CI 1.3 to 5.8 for current wheeze), and adjusting for potential confounders further increased the risk (2.8%, 95% CI 0.5 to 5.1; 4.7%, 95% CI 1.9 to 7.7, respectively). High maternal pre-pregnancy weight, in the top tertile, also significantly increased the odds of current wheeze in the adolescent by 20% (95% CI 4 to 39), and adjusting for potential confounders further increased the risk (OR=1.52, 95% CI 1.19 to 1.95). Results were similar for current asthma. Furthermore, these significant associations were observed only among adolescents without parental history of atopy but not among those with parental history of atopy.
Conclusions
The association demonstrated here between maternal pre-pregnancy overweight and obesity, and asthma symptoms in adolescents suggests that increase in asthma may be partly related to the rapid rise in obesity in recent years.
doi:10.1136/jech.2011.133777
PMCID: PMC3412048  PMID: 21844604
Asthma; wheeze; prevalence; adolescent; maternal pre-pregnancy weight; BMI; obesity
22.  Risks of Overweight and Abdominal Obesity at Age 16 Years Associated With Prenatal Exposures to Maternal Prepregnancy Overweight and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus 
Diabetes Care  2010;33(5):1115-1121.
OBJECTIVE
The associations of prenatal exposures to maternal prepregnancy overweight and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) with offspring overweight are controversial. Research estimating risk for offspring overweight due to these exposures, separately and concomitantly, is limited.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
Prevalence of overweight and abdominal obesity at age 16 years and odds ratios (ORs) for prenatal exposures to maternal prepregnancy overweight and GDM were estimated in participants of the prospective longitudinal Northern Finland Birth Cohort of 1986 (N = 4,168).
RESULTS
The prevalence and estimates of risk for overweight and abdominal obesity were highest in those exposed to both maternal prepregnancy overweight and GDM (overweight prevalence 40% [OR 4.05], abdominal obesity prevalence 25.7% [3.82]). Even in offspring of mothers with a normal oral glucose tolerance test during pregnancy, maternal prepregnancy overweight is associated with increased risk for these outcomes (overweight prevalence 27.9% [2.56], abdominal obesity prevalence 19.5% [2.60]). In offspring of women with prepregnancy normal weight, the prevalence or risks of the outcomes were not increased by prenatal exposure to GDM. These estimates of risk were adjusted for parental prepregnancy smoking, paternal overweight, and offspring sex and size at birth.
CONCLUSIONS
Maternal prepregnancy overweight is an independent risk factor for offspring overweight and abdominal obesity at age 16 years. The risks are highest in offspring with concomitant prenatal exposure to maternal prepregnancy overweight and GDM, whereas the risks associated with GDM are only small.
doi:10.2337/dc09-1871
PMCID: PMC2858187  PMID: 20427685
23.  Meta-analysis identifies 13 new loci associated with waist-hip ratio and reveals sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fat distribution 
Heid, Iris M. | Jackson, Anne U. | Randall, Joshua C. | Winkler, Thomas W. | Qi, Lu | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Zillikens, M. Carola | Speliotes, Elizabeth K. | Mägi, Reedik | Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie | White, Charles C. | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | Harris, Tamara B. | Berndt, Sonja I. | Ingelsson, Erik | Willer, Cristen J. | Weedon, Michael N. | Luan, Jian'an | Vedantam, Sailaja | Esko, Tõnu | Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O. | Kutalik, Zoltán | Li, Shengxu | Monda, Keri L. | Dixon, Anna L. | Holmes, Christopher C. | Kaplan, Lee M. | Liang, Liming | Min, Josine L. | Moffatt, Miriam F. | Molony, Cliona | Nicholson, George | Schadt, Eric E. | Zondervan, Krina T. | Feitosa, Mary F. | Ferreira, Teresa | Allen, Hana Lango | Weyant, Robert J. | Wheeler, Eleanor | Wood, Andrew R. | Estrada, Karol | Goddard, Michael E. | Lettre, Guillaume | Mangino, Massimo | Nyholt, Dale R. | Purcell, Shaun | Vernon Smith, Albert | Visscher, Peter M. | Yang, Jian | McCaroll, Steven A. | Nemesh, James | Voight, Benjamin F. | Absher, Devin | Amin, Najaf | Aspelund, Thor | Coin, Lachlan | Glazer, Nicole L. | Hayward, Caroline | Heard-Costa, Nancy L. | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Johansson, Åsa | Johnson, Toby | Kaakinen, Marika | Kapur, Karen | Ketkar, Shamika | Knowles, Joshua W. | Kraft, Peter | Kraja, Aldi T. | Lamina, Claudia | Leitzmann, Michael F. | McKnight, Barbara | Morris, Andrew P. | Ong, Ken K. | Perry, John R.B. | Peters, Marjolein J. | Polasek, Ozren | Prokopenko, Inga | Rayner, Nigel W. | Ripatti, Samuli | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Robertson, Neil R. | Sanna, Serena | Sovio, Ulla | Surakka, Ida | Teumer, Alexander | van Wingerden, Sophie | Vitart, Veronique | Zhao, Jing Hua | Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine | Chines, Peter S. | Fisher, Eva | Kulzer, Jennifer R. | Lecoeur, Cecile | Narisu, Narisu | Sandholt, Camilla | Scott, Laura J. | Silander, Kaisa | Stark, Klaus | Tammesoo, Mari-Liis | Teslovich, Tanya M. | John Timpson, Nicholas | Watanabe, Richard M. | Welch, Ryan | Chasman, Daniel I. | Cooper, Matthew N. | Jansson, John-Olov | Kettunen, Johannes | Lawrence, Robert W. | Pellikka, Niina | Perola, Markus | Vandenput, Liesbeth | Alavere, Helene | Almgren, Peter | Atwood, Larry D. | Bennett, Amanda J. | Biffar, Reiner | Bonnycastle, Lori L. | Bornstein, Stefan R. | Buchanan, Thomas A. | Campbell, Harry | Day, Ian N.M. | Dei, Mariano | Dörr, Marcus | Elliott, Paul | Erdos, Michael R. | Eriksson, Johan G. | Freimer, Nelson B. | Fu, Mao | Gaget, Stefan | Geus, Eco J.C. | Gjesing, Anette P. | Grallert, Harald | Gräßler, Jürgen | Groves, Christopher J. | Guiducci, Candace | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Hassanali, Neelam | Havulinna, Aki S. | Herzig, Karl-Heinz | Hicks, Andrew A. | Hui, Jennie | Igl, Wilmar | Jousilahti, Pekka | Jula, Antti | Kajantie, Eero | Kinnunen, Leena | Kolcic, Ivana | Koskinen, Seppo | Kovacs, Peter | Kroemer, Heyo K. | Krzelj, Vjekoslav | Kuusisto, Johanna | Kvaloy, Kirsti | Laitinen, Jaana | Lantieri, Olivier | Lathrop, G. Mark | Lokki, Marja-Liisa | Luben, Robert N. | Ludwig, Barbara | McArdle, Wendy L. | McCarthy, Anne | Morken, Mario A. | Nelis, Mari | Neville, Matt J. | Paré, Guillaume | Parker, Alex N. | Peden, John F. | Pichler, Irene | Pietiläinen, Kirsi H. | Platou, Carl G.P. | Pouta, Anneli | Ridderstråle, Martin | Samani, Nilesh J. | Saramies, Jouko | Sinisalo, Juha | Smit, Jan H. | Strawbridge, Rona J. | Stringham, Heather M. | Swift, Amy J. | Teder-Laving, Maris | Thomson, Brian | Usala, Gianluca | van Meurs, Joyce B.J. | van Ommen, Gert-Jan | Vatin, Vincent | Volpato, Claudia B. | Wallaschofski, Henri | Walters, G. Bragi | Widen, Elisabeth | Wild, Sarah H. | Willemsen, Gonneke | Witte, Daniel R. | Zgaga, Lina | Zitting, Paavo | Beilby, John P. | James, Alan L. | Kähönen, Mika | Lehtimäki, Terho | Nieminen, Markku S. | Ohlsson, Claes | Palmer, Lyle J. | Raitakari, Olli | Ridker, Paul M. | Stumvoll, Michael | Tönjes, Anke | Viikari, Jorma | Balkau, Beverley | Ben-Shlomo, Yoav | Bergman, Richard N. | Boeing, Heiner | Smith, George Davey | Ebrahim, Shah | Froguel, Philippe | Hansen, Torben | Hengstenberg, Christian | Hveem, Kristian | Isomaa, Bo | Jørgensen, Torben | Karpe, Fredrik | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Laakso, Markku | Lawlor, Debbie A. | Marre, Michel | Meitinger, Thomas | Metspalu, Andres | Midthjell, Kristian | Pedersen, Oluf | Salomaa, Veikko | Schwarz, Peter E.H. | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Valle, Timo T. | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Arnold, Alice M. | Beckmann, Jacques S. | Bergmann, Sven | Boerwinkle, Eric | Boomsma, Dorret I. | Caulfield, Mark J. | Collins, Francis S. | Eiriksdottir, Gudny | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Gyllensten, Ulf | Hamsten, Anders | Hattersley, Andrew T. | Hofman, Albert | Hu, Frank B. | Illig, Thomas | Iribarren, Carlos | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Kao, W.H. Linda | Kaprio, Jaakko | Launer, Lenore J. | Munroe, Patricia B. | Oostra, Ben | Penninx, Brenda W. | Pramstaller, Peter P. | Psaty, Bruce M. | Quertermous, Thomas | Rissanen, Aila | Rudan, Igor | Shuldiner, Alan R. | Soranzo, Nicole | Spector, Timothy D. | Syvanen, Ann-Christine | Uda, Manuela | Uitterlinden, André | Völzke, Henry | Vollenweider, Peter | Wilson, James F. | Witteman, Jacqueline C. | Wright, Alan F. | Abecasis, Gonçalo R. | Boehnke, Michael | Borecki, Ingrid B. | Deloukas, Panos | Frayling, Timothy M. | Groop, Leif C. | Haritunians, Talin | Hunter, David J. | Kaplan, Robert C. | North, Kari E. | O'Connell, Jeffrey R. | Peltonen, Leena | Schlessinger, David | Strachan, David P. | Hirschhorn, Joel N. | Assimes, Themistocles L. | Wichmann, H.-Erich | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Stefansson, Kari | Cupples, L. Adrienne | Loos, Ruth J.F. | Barroso, Inês | McCarthy, Mark I. | Fox, Caroline S. | Mohlke, Karen L. | Lindgren, Cecilia M.
Nature genetics  2010;42(11):949-960.
Waist-hip ratio (WHR) is a measure of body fat distribution and a predictor of metabolic consequences independent of overall adiposity. WHR is heritable, but few genetic variants influencing this trait have been identified. We conducted a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies for WHR adjusted for body-mass-index (up to 77,167 participants), following up 16 loci in an additional 29 studies (up to 113,636 subjects). We identified 13 novel loci in or near RSPO3, VEGFA, TBX15-WARS2, NFE2L3, GRB14, DNM3-PIGC, ITPR2-SSPN, LY86, HOXC13, ADAMTS9, ZNRF3-KREMEN1, NISCH-STAB1, and CPEB4 (P 1.9 × 10−9 to 1.8 × 10−40), and the known signal at LYPLAL1. Seven of these loci exhibited marked sexual dimorphism, all with a stronger effect on WHR in women than men (P for sex-difference 1.9 × 10−3 to 1.2 × 10−13). These findings provide evidence for multiple loci that modulate body fat distribution, independent of overall adiposity, and reveal powerful gene-by-sex interactions.
doi:10.1038/ng.685
PMCID: PMC3000924  PMID: 20935629
genome-wide association; waist-hip-ratio; body fat distribution; central obesity; meta-analysis; genetics; visceral adipose tissue; metabolism; body composition; Expression Quantitative Trait Loci; sex difference
24.  Meta-analysis identifies 13 new loci associated with waist-hip ratio and reveals sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fat distribution 
Heid, Iris M | Jackson, Anne U | Randall, Joshua C | Winkler, Thomas W | Qi, Lu | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Zillikens, M Carola | Speliotes, Elizabeth K | Mägi, Reedik | Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie | White, Charles C | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | Harris, Tamara B | Berndt, Sonja I | Ingelsson, Erik | Willer, Cristen J | Weedon, Michael N | Luan, Jian’An | Vedantam, Sailaja | Esko, Tõnu | Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O | Kutalik, Zoltán | Li, Shengxu | Monda, Keri L | Dixon, Anna L | Holmes, Christopher C | Kaplan, Lee M | Liang, Liming | Min, Josine L | Moffatt, Miriam F | Molony, Cliona | Nicholson, George | Schadt, Eric E | Zondervan, Krina T | Feitosa, Mary F | Ferreira, Teresa | Allen, Hana Lango | Weyant, Robert J | Wheeler, Eleanor | Wood, Andrew R | Estrada, Karol | Goddard, Michael E | Lettre, Guillaume | Mangino, Massimo | Nyholt, Dale R | Purcell, Shaun | Smith, Albert Vernon | Visscher, Peter M | Yang, Jian | McCarroll, Steven A | Nemesh, James | Voight, Benjamin F | Absher, Devin | Amin, Najaf | Aspelund, Thor | Coin, Lachlan | Glazer, Nicole L | Hayward, Caroline | Heard-costa, Nancy L | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Johansson, Åsa | Johnson, Toby | Kaakinen, Marika | Kapur, Karen | Ketkar, Shamika | Knowles, Joshua W | Kraft, Peter | Kraja, Aldi T | Lamina, Claudia | Leitzmann, Michael F | McKnight, Barbara | Morris, Andrew P | Ong, Ken K | Perry, John R B | Peters, Marjolein J | Polasek, Ozren | Prokopenko, Inga | Rayner, Nigel W | Ripatti, Samuli | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Robertson, Neil R | Sanna, Serena | Sovio, Ulla | Surakka, Ida | Teumer, Alexander | van Wingerden, Sophie | Vitart, Veronique | Zhao, Jing Hua | Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine | Chines, Peter S | Fisher, Eva | Kulzer, Jennifer R | Lecoeur, Cecile | Narisu, Narisu | Sandholt, Camilla | Scott, Laura J | Silander, Kaisa | Stark, Klaus | Tammesoo, Mari-Liis | Teslovich, Tanya M | Timpson, Nicholas John | Watanabe, Richard M | Welch, Ryan | Chasman, Daniel I | Cooper, Matthew N | Jansson, John-Olov | Kettunen, Johannes | Lawrence, Robert W | Pellikka, Niina | Perola, Markus | Vandenput, Liesbeth | Alavere, Helene | Almgren, Peter | Atwood, Larry D | Bennett, Amanda J | Biffar, Reiner | Bonnycastle, Lori L | Bornstein, Stefan R | Buchanan, Thomas A | Campbell, Harry | Day, Ian N M | Dei, Mariano | Dörr, Marcus | Elliott, Paul | Erdos, Michael R | Eriksson, Johan G | Freimer, Nelson B | Fu, Mao | Gaget, Stefan | Geus, Eco J C | Gjesing, Anette P | Grallert, Harald | Gräßler, Jürgen | Groves, Christopher J | Guiducci, Candace | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Hassanali, Neelam | Havulinna, Aki S | Herzig, Karl-Heinz | Hicks, Andrew A | Hui, Jennie | Igl, Wilmar | Jousilahti, Pekka | Jula, Antti | Kajantie, Eero | Kinnunen, Leena | Kolcic, Ivana | Koskinen, Seppo | Kovacs, Peter | Kroemer, Heyo K | Krzelj, Vjekoslav | Kuusisto, Johanna | Kvaloy, Kirsti | Laitinen, Jaana | Lantieri, Olivier | Lathrop, G Mark | Lokki, Marja-Liisa | Luben, Robert N | Ludwig, Barbara | McArdle, Wendy L | McCarthy, Anne | Morken, Mario A | Nelis, Mari | Neville, Matt J | Paré, Guillaume | Parker, Alex N | Peden, John F | Pichler, Irene | Pietiläinen, Kirsi H | Platou, Carl G P | Pouta, Anneli | Ridderstråle, Martin | Samani, Nilesh J | Saramies, Jouko | Sinisalo, Juha | Smit, Jan H | Strawbridge, Rona J | Stringham, Heather M | Swift, Amy J | Teder-Laving, Maris | Thomson, Brian | Usala, Gianluca | van Meurs, Joyce B J | van Ommen, Gert-Jan | Vatin, Vincent | Volpato, Claudia B | Wallaschofski, Henri | Walters, G Bragi | Widen, Elisabeth | Wild, Sarah H | Willemsen, Gonneke | Witte, Daniel R | Zgaga, Lina | Zitting, Paavo | Beilby, John P | James, Alan L | Kähönen, Mika | Lehtimäki, Terho | Nieminen, Markku S | Ohlsson, Claes | Palmer, Lyle J | Raitakari, Olli | Ridker, Paul M | Stumvoll, Michael | Tönjes, Anke | Viikari, Jorma | Balkau, Beverley | Ben-Shlomo, Yoav | Bergman, Richard N | Boeing, Heiner | Smith, George Davey | Ebrahim, Shah | Froguel, Philippe | Hansen, Torben | Hengstenberg, Christian | Hveem, Kristian | Isomaa, Bo | Jørgensen, Torben | Karpe, Fredrik | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Laakso, Markku | Lawlor, Debbie A | Marre, Michel | Meitinger, Thomas | Metspalu, Andres | Midthjell, Kristian | Pedersen, Oluf | Salomaa, Veikko | Schwarz, Peter E H | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Valle, Timo T | Wareham, Nicholas J | Arnold, Alice M | Beckmann, Jacques S | Bergmann, Sven | Boerwinkle, Eric | Boomsma, Dorret I | Caulfield, Mark J | Collins, Francis S | Eiriksdottir, Gudny | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Gyllensten, Ulf | Hamsten, Anders | Hattersley, Andrew T | Hofman, Albert | Hu, Frank B | Illig, Thomas | Iribarren, Carlos | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Kao, W H Linda | Kaprio, Jaakko | Launer, Lenore J | Munroe, Patricia B | Oostra, Ben | Penninx, Brenda W | Pramstaller, Peter P | Psaty, Bruce M | Quertermous, Thomas | Rissanen, Aila | Rudan, Igor | Shuldiner, Alan R | Soranzo, Nicole | Spector, Timothy D | Syvanen, Ann-Christine | Uda, Manuela | Uitterlinden, André | Völzke, Henry | Vollenweider, Peter | Wilson, James F | Witteman, Jacqueline C | Wright, Alan F | Abecasis, Gonçalo R | Boehnke, Michael | Borecki, Ingrid B | Deloukas, Panos | Frayling, Timothy M | Groop, Leif C | Haritunians, Talin | Hunter, David J | Kaplan, Robert C | North, Kari E | O’connell, Jeffrey R | Peltonen, Leena | Schlessinger, David | Strachan, David P | Hirschhorn, Joel N | Assimes, Themistocles L | Wichmann, H-Erich | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | van Duijn, Cornelia M | Stefansson, Kari | Cupples, L Adrienne | Loos, Ruth J F | Barroso, Inês | McCarthy, Mark I | Fox, Caroline S | Mohlke, Karen L | Lindgren, Cecilia M
Nature genetics  2010;42(11):949-960.
Waist-hip ratio (WHR) is a measure of body fat distribution and a predictor of metabolic consequences independent of overall adiposity. WHR is heritable, but few genetic variants influencing this trait have been identified. We conducted a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies for WHR adjusted for body mass index (comprising up to 77,167 participants), following up 16 loci in an additional 29 studies (comprising up to 113,636 subjects). We identified 13 new loci in or near RSPO3, VEGFA, TBX15-WARS2, NFE2L3, GRB14, DNM3-PIGC, ITPR2-SSPN, LY86, HOXC13, ADAMTS9, ZNRF3-KREMEN1, NISCH-STAB1 and CPEB4 (P = 1.9 × 10−9 to P = 1.8 × 10−40) and the known signal at LYPLAL1. Seven of these loci exhibited marked sexual dimorphism, all with a stronger effect on WHR in women than men (P for sex difference = 1.9 × 10−3 to P = 1.2 × 10−13). These findings provide evidence for multiple loci that modulate body fat distribution independent of overall adiposity and reveal strong gene-by-sex interactions.
doi:10.1038/ng.685
PMCID: PMC3000924  PMID: 20935629
25.  Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal eighteen new loci associated with body mass index 
Speliotes, Elizabeth K. | Willer, Cristen J. | Berndt, Sonja I. | Monda, Keri L. | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Jackson, Anne U. | Allen, Hana Lango | Lindgren, Cecilia M. | Luan, Jian’an | Mägi, Reedik | Randall, Joshua C. | Vedantam, Sailaja | Winkler, Thomas W. | Qi, Lu | Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie | Heid, Iris M. | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Stringham, Heather M. | Weedon, Michael N. | Wheeler, Eleanor | Wood, Andrew R. | Ferreira, Teresa | Weyant, Robert J. | Segré, Ayellet V. | Estrada, Karol | Liang, Liming | Nemesh, James | Park, Ju-Hyun | Gustafsson, Stefan | Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O. | Yang, Jian | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | Esko, Tõnu | Feitosa, Mary F. | Kutalik, Zoltán | Mangino, Massimo | Raychaudhuri, Soumya | Scherag, Andre | Smith, Albert Vernon | Welch, Ryan | Zhao, Jing Hua | Aben, Katja K. | Absher, Devin M. | Amin, Najaf | Dixon, Anna L. | Fisher, Eva | Glazer, Nicole L. | Goddard, Michael E. | Heard-Costa, Nancy L. | Hoesel, Volker | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Johansson, Åsa | Johnson, Toby | Ketkar, Shamika | Lamina, Claudia | Li, Shengxu | Moffatt, Miriam F. | Myers, Richard H. | Narisu, Narisu | Perry, John R.B. | Peters, Marjolein J. | Preuss, Michael | Ripatti, Samuli | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Sandholt, Camilla | Scott, Laura J. | Timpson, Nicholas J. | Tyrer, Jonathan P. | van Wingerden, Sophie | Watanabe, Richard M. | White, Charles C. | Wiklund, Fredrik | Barlassina, Christina | Chasman, Daniel I. | Cooper, Matthew N. | Jansson, John-Olov | Lawrence, Robert W. | Pellikka, Niina | Prokopenko, Inga | Shi, Jianxin | Thiering, Elisabeth | Alavere, Helene | Alibrandi, Maria T. S. | Almgren, Peter | Arnold, Alice M. | Aspelund, Thor | Atwood, Larry D. | Balkau, Beverley | Balmforth, Anthony J. | Bennett, Amanda J. | Ben-Shlomo, Yoav | Bergman, Richard N. | Bergmann, Sven | Biebermann, Heike | Blakemore, Alexandra I.F. | Boes, Tanja | Bonnycastle, Lori L. | Bornstein, Stefan R. | Brown, Morris J. | Buchanan, Thomas A. | Busonero, Fabio | Campbell, Harry | Cappuccio, Francesco P. | Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine | Chen, Yii-Der Ida | Chen, Chih-Mei | Chines, Peter S. | Clarke, Robert | Coin, Lachlan | Connell, John | Day, Ian N.M. | Heijer, Martin den | Duan, Jubao | Ebrahim, Shah | Elliott, Paul | Elosua, Roberto | Eiriksdottir, Gudny | Erdos, Michael R. | Eriksson, Johan G. | Facheris, Maurizio F. | Felix, Stephan B. | Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela | Folsom, Aaron R. | Friedrich, Nele | Freimer, Nelson B. | Fu, Mao | Gaget, Stefan | Gejman, Pablo V. | Geus, Eco J.C. | Gieger, Christian | Gjesing, Anette P. | Goel, Anuj | Goyette, Philippe | Grallert, Harald | Gräßler, Jürgen | Greenawalt, Danielle M. | Groves, Christopher J. | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Guiducci, Candace | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Hassanali, Neelam | Hall, Alistair S. | Havulinna, Aki S. | Hayward, Caroline | Heath, Andrew C. | Hengstenberg, Christian | Hicks, Andrew A. | Hinney, Anke | Hofman, Albert | Homuth, Georg | Hui, Jennie | Igl, Wilmar | Iribarren, Carlos | Isomaa, Bo | Jacobs, Kevin B. | Jarick, Ivonne | Jewell, Elizabeth | John, Ulrich | Jørgensen, Torben | Jousilahti, Pekka | Jula, Antti | Kaakinen, Marika | Kajantie, Eero | Kaplan, Lee M. | Kathiresan, Sekar | Kettunen, Johannes | Kinnunen, Leena | Knowles, Joshua W. | Kolcic, Ivana | König, Inke R. | Koskinen, Seppo | Kovacs, Peter | Kuusisto, Johanna | Kraft, Peter | Kvaløy, Kirsti | Laitinen, Jaana | Lantieri, Olivier | Lanzani, Chiara | Launer, Lenore J. | Lecoeur, Cecile | Lehtimäki, Terho | Lettre, Guillaume | Liu, Jianjun | Lokki, Marja-Liisa | Lorentzon, Mattias | Luben, Robert N. | Ludwig, Barbara | Manunta, Paolo | Marek, Diana | Marre, Michel | Martin, Nicholas G. | McArdle, Wendy L. | McCarthy, Anne | McKnight, Barbara | Meitinger, Thomas | Melander, Olle | Meyre, David | Midthjell, Kristian | Montgomery, Grant W. | Morken, Mario A. | Morris, Andrew P. | Mulic, Rosanda | Ngwa, Julius S. | Nelis, Mari | Neville, Matt J. | Nyholt, Dale R. | O’Donnell, Christopher J. | O’Rahilly, Stephen | Ong, Ken K. | Oostra, Ben | Paré, Guillaume | Parker, Alex N. | Perola, Markus | Pichler, Irene | Pietiläinen, Kirsi H. | Platou, Carl G.P. | Polasek, Ozren | Pouta, Anneli | Rafelt, Suzanne | Raitakari, Olli | Rayner, Nigel W. | Ridderstråle, Martin | Rief, Winfried | Ruokonen, Aimo | Robertson, Neil R. | Rzehak, Peter | Salomaa, Veikko | Sanders, Alan R. | Sandhu, Manjinder S. | Sanna, Serena | Saramies, Jouko | Savolainen, Markku J. | Scherag, Susann | Schipf, Sabine | Schreiber, Stefan | Schunkert, Heribert | Silander, Kaisa | Sinisalo, Juha | Siscovick, David S. | Smit, Jan H. | Soranzo, Nicole | Sovio, Ulla | Stephens, Jonathan | Surakka, Ida | Swift, Amy J. | Tammesoo, Mari-Liis | Tardif, Jean-Claude | Teder-Laving, Maris | Teslovich, Tanya M. | Thompson, John R. | Thomson, Brian | Tönjes, Anke | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | van Meurs, Joyce B.J. | van Ommen, Gert-Jan | Vatin, Vincent | Viikari, Jorma | Visvikis-Siest, Sophie | Vitart, Veronique | Vogel, Carla I. G. | Voight, Benjamin F. | Waite, Lindsay L. | Wallaschofski, Henri | Walters, G. Bragi | Widen, Elisabeth | Wiegand, Susanna | Wild, Sarah H. | Willemsen, Gonneke | Witte, Daniel R. | Witteman, Jacqueline C. | Xu, Jianfeng | Zhang, Qunyuan | Zgaga, Lina | Ziegler, Andreas | Zitting, Paavo | Beilby, John P. | Farooqi, I. Sadaf | Hebebrand, Johannes | Huikuri, Heikki V. | James, Alan L. | Kähönen, Mika | Levinson, Douglas F. | Macciardi, Fabio | Nieminen, Markku S. | Ohlsson, Claes | Palmer, Lyle J. | Ridker, Paul M. | Stumvoll, Michael | Beckmann, Jacques S. | Boeing, Heiner | Boerwinkle, Eric | Boomsma, Dorret I. | Caulfield, Mark J. | Chanock, Stephen J. | Collins, Francis S. | Cupples, L. Adrienne | Smith, George Davey | Erdmann, Jeanette | Froguel, Philippe | Grönberg, Henrik | Gyllensten, Ulf | Hall, Per | Hansen, Torben | Harris, Tamara B. | Hattersley, Andrew T. | Hayes, Richard B. | Heinrich, Joachim | Hu, Frank B. | Hveem, Kristian | Illig, Thomas | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Kaprio, Jaakko | Karpe, Fredrik | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Kiemeney, Lambertus A. | Krude, Heiko | Laakso, Markku | Lawlor, Debbie A. | Metspalu, Andres | Munroe, Patricia B. | Ouwehand, Willem H. | Pedersen, Oluf | Penninx, Brenda W. | Peters, Annette | Pramstaller, Peter P. | Quertermous, Thomas | Reinehr, Thomas | Rissanen, Aila | Rudan, Igor | Samani, Nilesh J. | Schwarz, Peter E.H. | Shuldiner, Alan R. | Spector, Timothy D. | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Uda, Manuela | Uitterlinden, André | Valle, Timo T. | Wabitsch, Martin | Waeber, Gérard | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Watkins, Hugh | Wilson, James F. | Wright, Alan F. | Zillikens, M. Carola | Chatterjee, Nilanjan | McCarroll, Steven A. | Purcell, Shaun | Schadt, Eric E. | Visscher, Peter M. | Assimes, Themistocles L. | Borecki, Ingrid B. | Deloukas, Panos | Fox, Caroline S. | Groop, Leif C. | Haritunians, Talin | Hunter, David J. | Kaplan, Robert C. | Mohlke, Karen L. | O’Connell, Jeffrey R. | Peltonen, Leena | Schlessinger, David | Strachan, David P. | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Wichmann, H.-Erich | Frayling, Timothy M. | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Abecasis, Gonçalo R. | Barroso, Inês | Boehnke, Michael | Stefansson, Kari | North, Kari E. | McCarthy, Mark I. | Hirschhorn, Joel N. | Ingelsson, Erik | Loos, Ruth J.F.
Nature genetics  2010;42(11):937-948.
Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but the underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity-susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index (BMI) and ~2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals, with targeted follow-up of 42 SNPs in up to 125,931 additional individuals. We confirmed 14 known obesity-susceptibility loci and identified 18 new loci associated with BMI (P<5×10−8), one of which includes a copy number variant near GPRC5B. Some loci (MC4R, POMC, SH2B1, BDNF) map near key hypothalamic regulators of energy balance, and one is near GIPR, an incretin receptor. Furthermore, genes in other newly-associated loci may provide novel insights into human body weight regulation.
doi:10.1038/ng.686
PMCID: PMC3014648  PMID: 20935630

Results 1-25 (41)