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author:("Hou, lifing")
1.  Associations between S-adenosylmethionine, S-adenosylhomocysteine, and colorectal adenoma risk are modified by sex 
Methionine metabolism is an important component of one-carbon metabolism. S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), the methyl donor for nearly all methylation reactions, is irreversibly converted to S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), an inhibitor of methyltransferases, some of which are key enzymes for methylation. Changes in DNA methylation are common in colorectal cancers. We evaluated plasma SAM and SAH with colorectal adenoma risk in a matched case-control study conducted among individuals undergoing routine colonoscopy. 216 cases were individually matched to polyp-free controls in a 1:1 ratio on age (± 5 years), sex, race (white/non-white), study site (academic medical center/VA hospital) and date of sample collection (± 60 days). Sex-specific quantiles were evaluated based on the control distribution due to vastly different metabolite levels by sex. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Among males, both higher SAM (OR = 0.38, 95% CI: 0.18-0.77, p for trend = 0.007) and higher SAH (OR = 0.45, 95% CI: 0.22-0.91, p for trend = 0.02) were associated with statistically significantly decreased risks of colorectal adenoma in comparison to lowest plasma SAM or SAH tertile. Conversely, among females, both higher SAM and higher SAH were associated with increased risk of colorectal adenoma, which was statistically significant for SAH (OR = 5.18, 95% CI: 1.09-24.62, p for trend = 0.04). The difference in these associations between men and women was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The ratio of SAM/SAH was not associated with colorectal adenoma risk among males or females. These findings suggest SAM and SAH may be involved in the development of colorectal adenoma and the association may be modified by sex.
PMCID: PMC4300688  PMID: 25628954
Methionine; colorectal adenoma; S-adenosylmethionine; S-adenosylhomocysteine; epidemiology; biomarker; sex difference
2.  Dietary Intake of Fiber, Fruit, and Vegetables Decrease the Risk of Incident Kidney Stones in Women: A Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Report 
The Journal of urology  2014;192(6):1694-1699.
Purpose
We evaluated the relationship between dietary fiber, fruit, and vegetable intake, and the risk of kidney stone formation.
Methods
Overall, 83,922 postmenopausal women from the WHI Observational Study were included and followed prospectively. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses evaluated the associations between total dietary fiber, fruits, and vegetable intake, and the risk of incident kidney stone formation adjusting for nephrolithiasis risk factors (age, race/ethnicity, geographic region, diabetes mellitus, calcium supplementation, hormone therapy use, body mass index, calibrated caloric intake, and dietary water, sodium, animal protein, and calcium intake). Women with a prior history of kidney stones (3,471 women) were analyzed separately.
Results
Mean age was 64±7 years, 85% of women were Caucasian and 2,937 women (3.5%) experienced a kidney stone occurrence in 8 years median follow-up. In women with no history of kidney stones, higher total dietary fiber (6-26% decreased risk, p<0.001), higher fruit intake (12-25% decreased risk, p<0.001), and higher vegetable intake (9-22% decreased risk, p=0.002) were associated with a decreased risk of incident kidney stone formation in separate adjusted models. In women with a history of stones, there were no significant protective effects of fiber, fruits, or vegetable intake on the risk of kidney stone recurrence.
Conclusions
Greater dietary intake of fiber, fruits and vegetables were each associated with a reduced risk of incident kidney stones in postmenopausal women. The protective effects were independent of other known risk factors for kidney stones. In contrast, there was no reduction in risk in women with a history of stones.
doi:10.1016/j.juro.2014.05.086
PMCID: PMC4241174  PMID: 24859445
nutrition; diet; fiber; fruit; vegetables; healthy lifestyle; kidney stones; nephrolithiasis; urinary calculi; dietary fiber
3.  A-clustering: a novel method for the detection of co-regulated methylation regions, and regions associated with exposure 
Bioinformatics  2013;29(22):2884-2891.
Motivation: DNA methylation is a heritable modifiable chemical process that affects gene transcription and is associated with other molecular markers (e.g. gene expression) and biomarkers (e.g. cancer or other diseases). Current technology measures methylation in hundred of thousands, or millions of CpG sites throughout the genome. It is evident that neighboring CpG sites are often highly correlated with each other, and current literature suggests that clusters of adjacent CpG sites are co-regulated.
Results: We develop the Adjacent Site Clustering (A-clustering) algorithm to detect sets of neighboring CpG sites that are correlated with each other. To detect methylation regions associated with exposure, we propose an analysis pipeline for high-dimensional methylation data in which CpG sites within regions identified by A-clustering are modeled as multivariate responses to environmental exposure using a generalized estimating equation approach that assumes exposure equally affects all sites in the cluster. We develop a correlation preserving simulation scheme, and study the proposed methodology via simulations. We study the clusters detected by the algorithm on high dimensional dataset of peripheral blood methylation of pesticide applicators.
Availability: We provide the R package Aclust that efficiently implements the A-clustering and the analysis pipeline, and produces analysis reports. The package is found on http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/tamar-sofer/packages/
Contact: tsofer@hsph.harvard.edu
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btt498
PMCID: PMC3810849  PMID: 23990415
5.  Air pollution exposure and lung function in highly exposed subjects in Beijing, China: a repeated-measure study 
Background
Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) has been associated with reduced lung function. Elemental components of PM have been suggested to have critical roles in PM toxicity, but their contribution to respiratory effects remains under-investigated. We evaluated the effects of traffic-related PM2.5 and its elemental components on lung function in two highly exposed groups of healthy adults in Beijing, China.
Methods
The Beijing Truck Driver Air Pollution Study (BTDAS) included 60 truck drivers and 60 office workers evaluated in 2008. On two days separated by 1-2 weeks, we measured lung function at the end of the work day, personal PM2.5, and nine elemental components of PM2.5 during eight hours of work, i.e., elemental carbon (EC), potassium (K), sulfur (S), iron (Fe), silicon (Si), aluminum (Al), zinc (Zn), calcium (Ca), and titanium (Ti). We used covariate-adjusted mixed-effects models including PM2.5 as a covariate to estimate the percentage change in lung function associated with an inter-quartile range (IQR) exposure increase.
Results
The two groups had high and overlapping exposure distributions with mean personal PM2.5 of 94.6 μg/m3 (IQR: 48.5-126.6) in office workers and 126.8 μg/m3 (IQR: 73.9-160.5) in truck drivers. The distributions of the nine elements showed group-specific profiles and generally higher levels in truck drivers. In all subjects combined, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) did not significantly correlate with PM2.5. However, FEV1 showed negative associations with concentrations of four elements: Si (-3.07%, 95% CI: -5.00; -1.11, IQR: 1.54), Al (-2.88%, 95% CI: -4.91; -0.81, IQR: 0.86), Ca (-1.86%, 95% CI: -2.95; -0.76, IQR: 1.33), and Ti (-2.58%, 95% CI: -4.44; -0.68, IQR: 0.03), and FVC showed negative associations with concentrations of three elements: Si (-3.23%, 95% CI: -5.61; -0.79), Al (-3.26%, 95% CI: -5.73; -0.72), and Ca (-1.86%, 95% CI: -3.23; -0.47). In stratified analysis, Si, Al, Ca, and Ti showed associations with lung function only among truck drivers, and no significant association among office workers.
Conclusion
Selected elemental components of PM2.5 showed effects on lung function that were not found in analyses of particle levels alone.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12989-014-0051-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s12989-014-0051-7
PMCID: PMC4192276  PMID: 25272992
Lung function; Metals; Particulate matter; Traffic exposure; FEV1; FVC
6.  BLOOLD METHYLMICS IN RESPONSE TO ARSENIC EXPOSURE IN A LOW–EXPOSED US POPULATION 
Exposure to arsenic (As) has been associated with cancers, CVD, and neurological disorder. To explore the possible underlying epigenetic mechanisms, a genome-wide study was conducted in low exposed healthy individuals. This study was nested within a prospective study of Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) by randomly selecting 46 non-smoker and non-diabetic White participants with low (N=23) and high (N=23) As exposure. based on toenail total As measures at examination year 2. We conducted methylomic profiling of white blood cell DNA collected at examination year 15 using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Multivariate linear regression models were fitted to evaluate the associations between As exposure status and DNA methylation levels at each CpG site. We identified 29 CpG sites with methylation levels associated with As exposure status at a nominal p-value less than 0.0001. Some genes are known to be involved in cancers, CVD, and neurological disorder. Pathway analyses further revealed several canonical pathways relevant to the etiology of As-associated diseases. We demonstrated that As exposure is prospectively associated with DNA methylation levels in a number of genes implicated in As-associated diseases. Further studies are required for elucidating the role of epigenetic alterations in the pathogenesis of these diseases.
doi:10.1038/jes.2013.89
PMCID: PMC4167014  PMID: 24368509
arsenic exposure; methylomic profiling; prospective association
7.  Pharmacogenomic Discovery Delineating the Genetic Basis of Drug Response 
Current genetic medicine reports  2013;1(3):143-149.
Personalized medicine has the promise to tailor medical care based on the patient’s genetic make-up and clinical variables such as gender, race and exposure to environmental stimuli. Recent progress in pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic studies has suggested that drug response to therapeutic treatments is likely a complex trait influenced by a variety of genetic and non-genetic factors. Identifying molecular targets (e.g., genetic variants) delineating the genetic basis of drug response could help understand the complex nature of drug response. The last decade has witnessed significant advances in genome-wide profiling technologies for genetic/epigenetic variations and gene expression. As an unbiased, cell-based model for pharmacogenomic discovery, a tremendous resource of whole-genome molecular targets has been accumulated for the HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) during the past decade. The current progress, particularly in cancer pharmacogenomics, using the LCL model was reviewed to illustrate the potential impact of systems biology approaches on pharmacogenomic discovery.
doi:10.1007/s40142-013-0019-1
PMCID: PMC3763832  PMID: 24015375
pharmacogenetics; pharmacogenomics; drug response; gene expression; genetic variation; copy number polymorphism; microRNA; DNA methylation; stsytems biology; lymphoblastoid cell lines
8.  Impact of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol on cardiovascular outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies 
Aims
To estimate the prospective association of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among individuals with type 2 diabetes.
Methods
We used extensive literature searching strategies to locate prospective cohort studies that reported LDL cholesterol levels as a risk factor for incidence of cardiovascular events. We conducted meta-analytic procedures for two outcomes: incident CVD and CVD mortality.
Results
A total of 16 studies were included in this analysis with a mean follow-up range of 4.8–11 years. The pooled relative risk associated with a 1 mmol/L increase in LDL cholesterol among patients with type 2 diabetes was 1.30 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19 to 1.43) for incident CVD, and 1.50 (95% CI, 1.25 to 1.80) for CVD mortality, respectively. Subgroup analyses showed that for incident CVD, the pooled relative risk was 1.28 (95% CI, 1.17 to 1.41) for 7 studies adjusted for blood pressure and/or glucose concentration (or insulin concentration, glycated hemoglobin) and 1.40 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.86) for 3 studies that did not adjust for these variables.
Conclusions
Our study demonstrates that LDL cholesterol was associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular outcomes among patients with type 2 diabetes, independently from other conventional risk factors.
doi:10.1016/j.diabres.2013.07.009
PMCID: PMC4141536  PMID: 23932206
type 2 diabetes; meta-analysis; low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; cardiovascular outcomes
9.  Influence of multiple APOE genetic variants on cognitive function in a cohort of older men – results from the Normative Aging Study 
BMC Psychiatry  2014;14(1):223.
Background
APOE is the biomarker with the greatest known influence on cognitive function; however, the effect of complex haplotypes involving polymorphisms rs449647, rs405509, rs440446, rs429358 and rs7412 has never been studied in older populations.
Methods
We evaluated APOE polymorphisms using multiplex PCR for genotyping and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) to evaluate cognitive function in 819 individuals from VA Normative Aging Study.
Results
Combinatorial analysis of all polymorphisms and individual analysis of polymorphisms rs449647, rs405509, rs440446 and rs7412 did not show any association with cognitive performance. Polymorphism rs429358 was associated with better cognitive performance (odds of MMSE ≤ 25 = 0.63, 95% CI 0.42-0.95; p = 0.03) in the oldest subsample (5th quintile of age) (odds of MMSE ≤ 25 = 0.34; 95% CI 0.13-0.86; p = 0.02). APOE allele ε4 was also associated with better cognitive performance (odds of MMSE ≤ 25 = 0.61, 95% CI 0.40-0.94; p = 0.02), also in the oldest subsample (odds of MMSE ≤ 25 = 0.35, 95% CI 0.14-0.90; p = 0.03).
Conclusions
These results suggest a beneficial effect of polymorphism rs429358 in the oldest men.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12888-014-0223-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s12888-014-0223-x
PMCID: PMC4149270  PMID: 25085564
APOE; Epsilon; Alleles; Haplotypes; Cognitive decline; Aging; Genetic variants
10.  Mitochondrial haplogroups modify the effect of black carbon on age-related cognitive impairment 
Environmental Health  2014;13:42.
Background
Traffic-related air pollution has been linked with impaired cognition in older adults, possibly due to effects of oxidative stress on the brain. Mitochondria are the main source of cellular oxidation. Haplogroups in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mark individual differences in oxidative potential and are possible determinants of neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate whether mtDNA haplogroups determined differential susceptibility to cognitive effects of long-term exposure to black carbon (BC), a marker of traffic-related air pollution.
Methods
We investigated 582 older men (72 ± 7 years) in the VA Normative Aging Study cohort with ≤4 visits per participant (1.8 in average) between 1995–2007. Low (≤25) Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) was used to assess impaired cognition in multiple domains. We fitted repeated-measure logistic regression using validated-LUR BC estimated in the year before their first visit at the participant’s address.
Results
Mitochondrial haplotyping identified nine haplogroups phylogenetically categorized in four clusters. BC showed larger effect on MMSE in Cluster 4 carriers, including I, W and X haplogroups, [OR = 2.7; 95% CI (1.3-5.6)], moderate effect in Cluster 1, including J and T haplogroups [OR = 1.6; 95% CI: (0.9-2.9)], and no effect in Cluster 2 (H and V haplogroups) [OR = 1.1; 95% CI: (0.8-1.5)] or Cluster 3 (K and U haplogroups) [OR = 1.0; 95% CI: (0.6-1.6)]. BC effect varied only moderately across the I, X, and W haplogroups or across the J and T haplogroups.
Conclusions
The association of BC with impaired cognition was worsened in carriers of phylogenetically-related mtDNA haplogroups in Cluster 4. No BC effects were detected in Cluster 2 and 3 carriers. MtDNA haplotypes may modify individual susceptibility to the particle cognitive effects.
doi:10.1186/1476-069X-13-42
PMCID: PMC4049407  PMID: 24884505
mtDNA haplogroups; Air pollution; Black carbon; Cognitive decline; Mini-mental state examination
11.  Altered Methylation in Tandem Repeat Element and Elemental Component Levels in Inhalable Air Particles 
Exposure to particulate matter (PM) has been associated with lung cancer risk in epidemiology investigations. Elemental components of PM have been suggested to have critical roles in PM toxicity, but the molecular mechanisms underlying their association with cancer risks remain poorly understood. DNA methylation has emerged as a promising biomarker for environmental-related diseases, including lung cancer. In this study, we evaluated the effects of PM elemental components on methylation of three tandem repeats in a highly-exposed population in Beijing, China. The Beijing Truck Driver Air Pollution Study was conducted shortly before the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games (June 15-July 27, 2008) and included 60 truck drivers and 60 office workers. On two days separated by 1-2 weeks, we measured blood DNA methylation of SATα, NBL2, D4Z4, and personal exposure to eight elemental components in PM2.5, including aluminum (Al), silicon (Si), sulfur (S), potassium (K), calcium (Ca) titanium (Ti), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn). We estimated the associations of individual elemental component with each tandem repeat methylation in generalized estimating equations (GEE) models adjusted for PM2.5 mass and other covariates. Out of the eight examined elements, NBL2 methylation was positively associated with concentrations of Si (0.121, 95%CI: 0.030; 0.212, FDR=0.047) and Ca (0.065, 95%CI: 0.014; 0.115, FDR=0.047) in truck drivers. In office workers, SATα methylation was positively associated with concentrations of S (0.115, 95%CI: 0.034; 0.196, FDR=0.042). PM-associated differences in blood tandem-repeat methylation may help detect biological effects of the exposure and identify individuals who may eventually experience higher lung cancer risk.
doi:10.1002/em.21829
PMCID: PMC4001244  PMID: 24273195
Tandem repeats; DNA methylation; lung cancer
12.  Association between Sleep Quality and C-Reactive Protein: Results from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005-2008 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(3):e92607.
Objective
Our objective was to explore the association between poor sleep quality and hs_CRP in an adult U.S. population.
Methods
This study focused on 9,317 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2005–2008 who were aged 20–85 years, completed a sleep disorder questionnaire, and had available information on serum hs_CRP. Sleep quality was classified into three categories (good, moderate, poor) based on the responses of participants to the NHANES sleep disorder questionnaire. High CRP was defined as hs-CRP >1 md/dL. Linear regression model was applied to investigate the association between poor sleep quality and log-transformed hs_CRP. And logistic regression model was fitted to evaluate the association between sleep quality and the risk of high CRP.
Results
Females were more likely to report poor sleep quality than males (26% vs. 19%, p<0.0001). Each sleep disorder was significantly associated with increased hs_CRP and correlative to other sleep disorders. In fully-adjusted linear regression model, poor sleep quality was significantly associated with elevated hs_CRP (log transformed) among the overall sample and in females only (β = 0.10, se = 0.03, p<0.01 and β = 0.13, se = 0.04, p<0.01, respectively). In fully-adjusted logistics regression model, poor sleep quality was linked with risk of high CRP(OR: 1.42, 95%CI: 1.15–1.76 in overall sample and OR: 1.59, 95%CI: 1.18–2.14 in females, respectively).
Conclusion
We found that poor sleep quality was independently associated with elevated hs_CRP in females but not in males in a U.S. adult population.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0092607
PMCID: PMC3963926  PMID: 24663098
13.  Maternal OGTT Glucose Levels at 26–30 Gestational Weeks with Offspring Growth and Development in Early Infancy 
BioMed Research International  2014;2014:516980.
Aims. We aim to evaluate the association of maternal gestational oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) glucose concentrations with anthropometry in the offspring from birth to 12 months in Tianjin, China. Methods. A total of 27,157 pregnant women underwent OGTT during 26–30 weeks gestation, and their children had body weight/length measured from birth to 12 months old. Results. Maternal OGTT glucose concentrations at 26–30 gestational weeks were positively associated with Z-scores for birth length-for-gestational age and birth weight-for-length. Compared with infants born to mothers with normal glucose tolerance, infants born to mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus (impaired glucose tolerance/new diabetes) had higher mean values of Z-scores for birth length-for-gestational age (0.07/0.23; normal group −0.08) and birth weight-for-length (0.27/0.57; normal group −0.001), smaller changes in mean values of Z-scores for length-for-age (0.75/0.62; normal group 0.94) and weight-for-length (0.18/−0.17; normal group 0.37) from birth to month 3, and bigger changes in mean values in Z-scores for weight-for-length (0.07/0.12; normal group 0.02) from month 9 to 12. Conclusions. Abnormal maternal glucose tolerance during pregnancy was associated with higher birth weight and birth length, less weight and length gain in the first 3 months of life, and more weight gain in the months 9–12 of life.
doi:10.1155/2014/516980
PMCID: PMC3943263  PMID: 24689042
14.  Maternal Prepregnancy Body Mass Index and Gestational Weight Gain on Pregnancy Outcomes 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(12):e82310.
Objective
The aim of the present study was to evaluate the single and joint associations of maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) with pregnancy outcomes in Tianjin, China.
Methods
Between June 2009 and May 2011, health care records of 33,973 pregnant women were collected and their children were measured for birth weight and birth length. The independent and joint associations of prepregnancy BMI and GWG based on the Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines with the risks of pregnancy and neonatal outcomes were examined by using Logistic Regression.
Results
After adjustment for all confounding factors, maternal prepregnancy BMI was positively associated with risks of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), pregnancy-induced hypertension, caesarean delivery, preterm delivery, large-for-gestational age infant (LGA), and macrosomia, and inversely associated with risks of small-for-gestational age infant (SGA) and low birth weight. Maternal excessive GWG was associated with increased risks of pregnancy-induced hypertension, caesarean delivery, LGA, and macrosomia, and decreased risks of preterm delivery, SGA, and low birth weight. Maternal inadequate GWG was associated with increased risks of preterm delivery and SGA, and decreased risks of LGA and macrosomia, compared with maternal adequate GWG. Women with both prepregnancy obesity and excessive GWG had 2.2–5.9 folds higher risks of GDM, pregnancy-induced hypertension, caesarean delivery, LGA, and macrosomia compared with women with normal prepregnancy BMI and adequate GWG.
Conclusions
Maternal prepregnancy obesity and excessive GWG were associated with greater risks of pregnancy-induced hypertension, caesarean delivery, and greater infant size at birth. Health care providers should inform women to start the pregnancy with a BMI in the normal weight category and limit their GWG to the range specified for their prepregnancy BMI.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0082310
PMCID: PMC3869661  PMID: 24376527
15.  Recreational physical activity, body mass index and survival in women with colorectal cancer 
Cancer causes & control : CCC  2012;23(12):1939-1948.
Background and purpose
Previous studies have shown that physical inactivity and obesity are risk factors for the development of colorectal cancer. However, controversy exists regarding the influence of these factors on survival in colorectal cancer patients. We evaluated the impact of recreational physical activity and body mass index (BMI) before and after colorectal cancer diagnosis on disease-specific mortality and all-cause mortality.
Patients and Methods
This prospective cohort study included 1339 women enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative study who were diagnosed with colorectal cancer subsequent to study enrolment. BMI and recreational physical activity were measured before cancer diagnosis at study entry (pre-diagnostic) and after diagnosis at study follow-up interviews (post-diagnostic). We used Cox regression to estimate the association between pre- and post-diagnostic exposures and survival after colorectal cancer diagnosis.
Results
Among women diagnosed with colorectal cancer, 265 (13%) deaths occurred during a median study follow-up of 11.9 years, of which 171 (65%) were attributed to colorectal cancer. Compared with women reporting no pre-diagnostic recreational physical activity, those reporting activity levels of ≥18 MET-hours/week had significantly lower colorectal cancer-specific mortality (hazard ratio (HR)=0.68; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.41–1.13) and all-cause mortality (HR=0.63; 95% CI: 0.42–0.96). Similar inverse associations were seen for post-diagnostic recreational physical activity. Neither pre- nor post-diagnostic BMI were associated with mortality after colorectal cancer diagnosis.
Conclusion
Recreational physical activity before and after CR colorectal cancer C diagnosis, but not BMI, is associated with more favourable survival.
doi:10.1007/s10552-012-0071-2
PMCID: PMC3499635  PMID: 23053793
Physical activity; body mass index; colorectal cancer; survival; postmenopausal
17.  AIR POLLUTION EXPOSURE AND TELOMERE LENGTH IN HIGHLY EXPOSED SUBJECTS IN BEIJING, CHINA: A REPEATED-MEASURE STUDY 
Environment international  2012;48:10.1016/j.envint.2012.06.020.
Background
Ambient particular matter (PM) exposure has been associated with short- and long-term effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD). Telomere length (TL) is a biomarker of CVD risk that is modified by inflammation and oxidative stress, two key pathways for PM effects. Whether PM exposure modifies TL is largely unexplored.
Objectives
To investigate effects of PM on blood TL in a highly-exposed population.
Methods
We measured blood TL in 120 blood samples from truck drivers and 120 blood samples from office workers in Beijing, China. We measured personal PM2.5 and Elemental Carbon (EC, a tracer of traffic particles) using light-weight monitors. Ambient PM10 was obtained from local monitoring stations. We used covariate-adjusted regression models to estimate percent changes in TL per an interquartile-range increase in exposure.
Results
Covariate-adjusted TL was higher in drivers (mean=0.87, 95%CI: 0.74; 1.03) than in office workers (mean=0.79, 95%CI: 0.67; 0.93; p=0.001). In all participants combined, TL increased in association with personal PM2.5 (+5.2%, 95%CI: 1.5; 9.1; p=0.007), personal EC (+4.9%, 95%CI: 1.2; 8.8; p=0.01), and ambient PM10 (+7.7%, 95%CI: 3.7; 11.9; p<0.001) on examination days. In contrast, average ambient PM10 over the 14 days before the examinations was significantly associated with shorter TL (−9.9%, 95%CI: −17.6; −1.5; p=0.02).
Conclusions
Short-term exposure to ambient PM is associated with increased blood TL, consistent with TL roles during acute inflammatory responses. Longer exposures may shorten TL as expected after prolonged pro-oxidant exposures. The observed TL alterations may participate in the biological pathways of short- and long-term PM effects.
doi:10.1016/j.envint.2012.06.020
PMCID: PMC3821920  PMID: 22871507
Particulate Matter; Personal Monitoring; Telomere length; Traffic pollution; China
18.  Genome-wide study of DNA methylation alterations in response to Diazinon exposure in vitro 
Pesticide exposure has repeatedly been associated with cancers. However, molecular mechanisms are largely undetermined. In this study, we examined whether exposure to diazinon, a common organophosphate that has been associated with cancers, could induce DNA methylation alterations. We conducted genome-wide DNA methylation analyses on DNA samples obtained from human hematopoietic K562 cell exposed to diazinon and ethanol using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip. Bayesian-adjusted t-tests were used to identify differentially methylated gene promoter CpG sites. We identified 1069 CpG sites in 984 genes with significant methylation changes in diazinon-treated cells. Gene ontology analysis demonstrated that some genes are tumor suppressor genes, such as TP53INP1 (3.0-fold, q-value<0.001) and PTEN (2.6-fold, q-value<0.001), some genes are in cancer-related pathways, such as HDAC3 (2.2-fold, q-value=0.002), and some remain functionally unknown. Our results provided direct experimental evidence that diazinon may modify gene promoter DNA methylation levels, which may play a pathological role in cancer development.
doi:10.1016/j.etap.2012.07.012
PMCID: PMC3514648  PMID: 22964155
Diazinon exposure; DNA methylation alteration; carcinogenesis
19.  Remaining Lifetime Risk for Cancer Death at Selected Ages by Sex and Smoking status: The Lifetime Risk Pooling Project 
Cancer causes & control : CCC  2012;23(10):1729-1737.
Background
Understanding how sex and tobacco exposure may modify lifetime risks for cancer mortality is important for effective communication of risk in targeted public health messages.
Objective
To determine lifetime risk estimates for cancer death associated with sex and smoking status in the United States.
Methods
A pooled cohort design using ten well-defined epidemiologic cohorts including middle-aged and older individuals was used to estimate the lifetime risk for cancer death at selected index ages, with death from non-cancer causes as the competing risk, by sex and smoking status.
Results
There were a total of 11,317 cancer-related deaths. At age 45 years, the lifetime risk of cancer death for male smokers is 27.7% (95% CI 24.0% to 31.4%) compared to 15.8% (95% CI 12.7% to 18.9%) for male non-smokers. At age 45 years, the lifetime risk of cancer death for female smokers is 21.7% (95% CI 18.8% to 24.6%) compared to 13.2% (95% CI 11.0% to 15.4%) for female non-smokers. Remaining lifetime risk for cancer death declined with age, and men have a greater risk for cancer death compared to women. Adjustment for competing risk of death, particularly representing cardiovascular mortality, yielded a greater change in lifetime risk estimates for men and smokers compared to women and non-smokers.
Conclusions
At the population level the lifetime risk for cancer death remains significantly higher for smokers compared to non-smokers, regardless of sex. These estimates may provide clinicians with useful information for counseling individual patients and highlight the need for continued public health efforts related to smoking cessation.
doi:10.1007/s10552-012-9959-0
PMCID: PMC3542389  PMID: 22825072
Tobacco; Smoking; Cancer; Lifetime Risk; Cancer mortality; Sex
20.  Repetitive element hypomethylation in blood leukocyte DNA and cancer incidence, prevalence and mortality in elderly individuals: the Normative Aging Study 
Cancer causes & control : CCC  2010;22(3):437-447.
Background
Global genomic hypomethylation is a common epigenetic event in cancer that mostly results from hypomethylation of repetitive DNA elements. Case-control studies have associated blood leukocyte DNA hypomethylation with several cancers. Because samples in case-control studies are collected after disease development, whether DNA hypomethylation is causal or just associated with cancer development is still unclear.
Methods
In 722 elderly subjects from the Normative Aging Study cohort, we examined whether DNA methylation in repetitive elements (Alu, LINE-1) was associated with cancer incidence (30 new cases, median follow-up: 89 months), prevalence (205 baseline cases), and mortality (28 deaths, median follow-up: 85 months). DNA methylation was measured by bisulfite pyrosequencing.
Results
Individuals with low LINE-1 methylation (
Conclusion
These findings suggest that individuals with lower repetitive element methylation are at high risk of developing and dying from cancer.
doi:10.1007/s10552-010-9715-2
PMCID: PMC3752839  PMID: 21188491
Repetitive elements; DNA methylation; Epigenetics; Blood; Cancer risk
Although pesticides are subject to extensive carcinogenicity testing before regulatory approval, pesticide exposure has repeatedly been associated with various cancers. This suggests that pesticides may cause cancer via non-mutagenicity mechanisms. The present study provides evidence to support the hypothesis that pesticide-induced cancer may be mediated in part by epigenetic mechanisms. We examined whether exposure to 7 commonly used pesticides (i.e., fonofos, parathion, terbufos, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, malathion, and phorate) induces DNA methylation alterations in vitro. We conducted genome-wide DNA methylation analyses on DNA samples obtained from the human hematopoietic K562 cell line exposed to ethanol (control) and several OPs using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip. Bayesian-adjusted t-tests were used to identify differentially methylated gene promoter CpG sites. In this report, we present our results on three pesticides (fonofos, parathion, and terbufos) that clustered together based on principle component analysis and hierarchical clustering. These three pesticides induced similar methylation changes in the promoter regions of 712 genes, while also exhibiting their own OP-specific methylation alterations. Functional analysis of methylation changes specific to each OP, or common to all three OPs, revealed that differential methylation was associated with numerous genes that are involved in carcinogenesis-related processes. Our results provide experimental evidence that pesticides may modify gene promoter DNA methylation levels, suggesting that epigenetic mechanisms may contribute to pesticide-induced carcinogenesis. Further studies in other cell types and human samples are required, as well as determining the impact of these methylation changes on gene expression.
doi:10.1002/em.21718
PMCID: PMC3753688  PMID: 22847954
Pesticide exposure; DNA methylation alteration; Carcinogenesis
Mutation research  2011;714(0):105-112.
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short single-stranded non-coding molecules that function as negative regulators to silence or suppress gene expression. Aberrant miRNA expression has been implicated in a several cellular processes and pathogenic pathways of a number of diseases. Evidence is rapidly growing that miRNA regulation of gene expression may be affected by environmental chemicals. These environmental exposures include those that have frequently been associated with chronic diseases, such as heavy metals, air pollution, bisphenol A, and cigarette smoking. In this article, we review the published data on miRNAs in relation to the exposure to several environmental chemicals, and discuss the potential mechanisms that may link environmental chemicals to miRNA alterations. We further discuss the challenges in environmental-miRNA research and possible future directions. The cumulating evidence linking miRNAs to environmental chemicals, coupled with the unique regulatory role of miRNAs in gene expression, makes miRNAs potential biomarkers for better understanding the mechanisms of environmental diseases.
doi:10.1016/j.mrfmmm.2011.05.004
PMCID: PMC3739302  PMID: 21609724
MicroRNAs; Epigenetic; Environmental chemicals
Environmental Health Perspectives  2013;121(8):919-924.
Background: Telomere length (TL) in surrogate tissues may be influenced by environmental exposures.
Objective: We aimed to determine whether lifetime pesticides use is associated with buccal cell TL.
Methods: We examined buccal cell TL in relation to lifetime use of 48 pesticides for 1,234 cancer-free white male pesticide applicators in the Agricultural Health Study (AHS), a prospective cohort study of 57,310 licensed pesticide applicators. Participants provided detailed information on lifetime use of 50 pesticides at enrollment (1993–1997). Buccal cells were collected from 1999 to 2006. Relative telomere length (RTL) was measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. We used linear regression modeling to evaluate the associations between specific pesticides and the logarithm of RTL, adjusting for age at buccal cell collection, state of residence, applicator license type, chewing tobacco use, and total lifetime days of all pesticide use.
Results: The mean RTL for participants decreased significantly in association with increased lifetime days of pesticide use for alachlor (p = 0.002), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D; p = 0.004), metolachlor (p = 0.01), trifluralin (p = 0.05), permethrin (for animal application) (p = 0.02), and toxaphene (p = 0.04). A similar pattern of RTL shortening was observed with the metric lifetime intensity-weighted days of pesticide use. For dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), we observed significant RTL shortening for lifetime intensity-weighted days (p = 0.04), but not for lifetime days of DDT use (p = 0.08). No significant RTL lengthening was observed for any pesticide.
Conclusion: Seven pesticides previously associated with cancer risk in the epidemiologic literature were inversely associated with RTL in buccal cell DNA among cancer-free pesticide applicators. Replication of these findings is needed because we cannot rule out chance or fully rule out bias.
doi:10.1289/ehp.1206432
PMCID: PMC3734498  PMID: 23774483
Agricultural Health Study; cancer-free subjects; occupational exposures; pesticides; telomere length
Background
Repetitive elements take up >40% of the human genome and can change distribution through transposition, thus generating subfamilies. Repetitive element DNA methylation has associated with several diseases and environmental exposures, including exposure to airborne pollutants. No systematic analysis has yet been conducted to examine the effects of exposures across different repetitive element subfamilies. The purpose of the study is to evaluate sensitivity of DNA methylation in differentially‒evolved LINE, Alu, and HERV subfamilies to different types of airborne pollutants.
Methods
We sampled a total of 120 male participants from three studies (20 high-, 20 low-exposure in each study) of steel workers exposed to metal-rich particulate matter (measured as PM10) (Study 1); gas-station attendants exposed to air benzene (Study 2); and truck drivers exposed to traffic-derived elemental carbon (Study 3). We measured methylation by bisulfite-PCR-pyrosequencing in 10 differentially‒evolved repetitive element subfamilies.
Results
High-exposure groups exhibited subfamily-specific methylation differences compared to low-exposure groups: L1PA2 showed lower DNA methylation in steel workers (P=0.04) and gas station attendants (P=0.03); L1Ta showed lower DNA methylation in steel workers (P=0.02); AluYb8 showed higher DNA methylation in truck drivers (P=0.05). Within each study, dose–response analyses showed subfamily-specific correlations of methylation with exposure levels. Interaction models showed that the effects of the exposures on DNA methylation were dependent on the subfamily evolutionary age, with stronger effects on older LINEs from PM10 (p‒interaction=0.003) and benzene (p‒interaction=0.04), and on younger Alus from PM10 (p-interaction=0.02).
Conclusions
The evolutionary age of repetitive element subfamilies determines differential susceptibility of DNA methylation to airborne pollutants.
doi:10.1186/1743-8977-10-28
PMCID: PMC3717285  PMID: 23855992
Environment; Exposures; DNA methylation; Repetitive elements; Subfamily
Background
Mitochondria have small mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecules independent from the nuclear DNA, a separate epigenetic machinery that generates mtDNA methylation, and are primary sources of oxidative-stress generation in response to exogenous environments. However, no study has yet investigated whether mitochondrial DNA methylation is sensitive to pro-oxidant environmental exposures.
Methods
We sampled 40 male participants (20 high-, 20 low-exposure) from each of three studies on airborne pollutants, including investigations of steel workers exposed to metal-rich particulate matter (measured as PM1) in Brescia, Italy (Study 1); gas-station attendants exposed to air benzene in Milan, Italy (Study 2); and truck drivers exposed to traffic-derived Elemental Carbon (EC) in Beijing, China (Study 3). We have measured DNA methylation from buffy coats of the participants. We measured methylation by bisulfite-Pyrosequencing in three mtDNA regions, i.e., the transfer RNA phenylalanine (MT-TF), 12S ribosomal RNA (MT-RNR1) gene and “D-loop” control region. All analyses were adjusted for age and smoking.
Results
In Study 1, participants with high metal-rich PM1 exposure showed higher MT-TF and MT-RNR1 methylation than low-exposed controls (difference = 1.41, P = 0.002); MT-TF and MT-RNR1 methylation was significantly associated with PM1 exposure (beta = 1.35, P = 0.025); and MT-RNR1 methylation was positively correlated with mtDNA copy number (r = 0.36; P = 0.02). D-loop methylation was not associated with PM1 exposure. We found no effects on mtDNA methylation from air benzene (Study 2) and traffic-derived EC exposure (Study 3).
Conclusions
Mitochondrial MT-TF and MT-RNR1 DNA methylation was associated with metal-rich PM1 exposure and mtDNA copy number. Our results suggest that locus-specific mtDNA methylation is correlated to selected exposures and mtDNA damage. Larger studies are needed to validate our observations.
doi:10.1186/1743-8977-10-18
PMCID: PMC3660297  PMID: 23656717
Air pollutants; Mitochondria; DNA methylation

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