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1.  Differentially Expressed Gene Transcripts Using RNA Sequencing from the Blood of Immunosuppressed Kidney Allograft Recipients 
PLoS ONE  2015;10(5):e0125045.
We performed RNA sequencing (RNAseq) on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to identify differentially expressed gene transcripts (DEGs) after kidney transplantation and after the start of immunosuppressive drugs. RNAseq is superior to microarray to determine DEGs because it’s not limited to available probes, has increased sensitivity, and detects alternative and previously unknown transcripts. DEGs were determined in 32 adult kidney recipients, without clinical acute rejection (AR), treated with antibody induction, calcineurin inhibitor, mycophenolate, with and without steroids. Blood was obtained pre-transplant (baseline), week 1, months 3 and 6 post-transplant. PBMCs were isolated, RNA extracted and gene expression measured using RNAseq. Principal components (PCs) were computed using a surrogate variable approach. DEGs post-transplant were identified by controlling false discovery rate (FDR) at < 0.01 with at least a 2 fold change in expression from pre-transplant. The top 5 DEGs with higher levels of transcripts in blood at week 1 were TOMM40L, TMEM205, OLFM4, MMP8, and OSBPL9 compared to baseline. The top 5 DEGs with lower levels at week 1 post-transplant were IL7R, KLRC3, CD3E, CD3D, and KLRC2 (Striking Image) compared to baseline. The top pathways from genes with lower levels at 1 week post-transplant compared to baseline, were T cell receptor signaling and iCOS-iCOSL signaling while the top pathways from genes with higher levels than baseline were axonal guidance signaling and LXR/RXR activation. Gene expression signatures at month 3 were similar to week 1. DEGs at 6 months post-transplant create a different gene signature than week 1 or month 3 post-transplant. RNAseq analysis identified more DEGs with lower than higher levels in blood compared to baseline at week 1 and month 3. The number of DEGs decreased with time post-transplant. Further investigations to determine the specific lymphocyte(s) responsible for differential gene expression may be important in selecting and personalizing immune suppressant drugs and may lead to targeted therapies.
PMCID: PMC4422721  PMID: 25946140
2.  The First Myriapod Genome Sequence Reveals Conservative Arthropod Gene Content and Genome Organisation in the Centipede Strigamia maritima 
Chipman, Ariel D. | Ferrier, David E. K. | Brena, Carlo | Qu, Jiaxin | Hughes, Daniel S. T. | Schröder, Reinhard | Torres-Oliva, Montserrat | Znassi, Nadia | Jiang, Huaiyang | Almeida, Francisca C. | Alonso, Claudio R. | Apostolou, Zivkos | Aqrawi, Peshtewani | Arthur, Wallace | Barna, Jennifer C. J. | Blankenburg, Kerstin P. | Brites, Daniela | Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador | Coyle, Marcus | Dearden, Peter K. | Du Pasquier, Louis | Duncan, Elizabeth J. | Ebert, Dieter | Eibner, Cornelius | Erikson, Galina | Evans, Peter D. | Extavour, Cassandra G. | Francisco, Liezl | Gabaldón, Toni | Gillis, William J. | Goodwin-Horn, Elizabeth A. | Green, Jack E. | Griffiths-Jones, Sam | Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J. P. | Gubbala, Sai | Guigó, Roderic | Han, Yi | Hauser, Frank | Havlak, Paul | Hayden, Luke | Helbing, Sophie | Holder, Michael | Hui, Jerome H. L. | Hunn, Julia P. | Hunnekuhl, Vera S. | Jackson, LaRonda | Javaid, Mehwish | Jhangiani, Shalini N. | Jiggins, Francis M. | Jones, Tamsin E. | Kaiser, Tobias S. | Kalra, Divya | Kenny, Nathan J. | Korchina, Viktoriya | Kovar, Christie L. | Kraus, F. Bernhard | Lapraz, François | Lee, Sandra L. | Lv, Jie | Mandapat, Christigale | Manning, Gerard | Mariotti, Marco | Mata, Robert | Mathew, Tittu | Neumann, Tobias | Newsham, Irene | Ngo, Dinh N. | Ninova, Maria | Okwuonu, Geoffrey | Ongeri, Fiona | Palmer, William J. | Patil, Shobha | Patraquim, Pedro | Pham, Christopher | Pu, Ling-Ling | Putman, Nicholas H. | Rabouille, Catherine | Ramos, Olivia Mendivil | Rhodes, Adelaide C. | Robertson, Helen E. | Robertson, Hugh M. | Ronshaugen, Matthew | Rozas, Julio | Saada, Nehad | Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro | Scherer, Steven E. | Schurko, Andrew M. | Siggens, Kenneth W. | Simmons, DeNard | Stief, Anna | Stolle, Eckart | Telford, Maximilian J. | Tessmar-Raible, Kristin | Thornton, Rebecca | van der Zee, Maurijn | von Haeseler, Arndt | Williams, James M. | Willis, Judith H. | Wu, Yuanqing | Zou, Xiaoyan | Lawson, Daniel | Muzny, Donna M. | Worley, Kim C. | Gibbs, Richard A. | Akam, Michael | Richards, Stephen
PLoS Biology  2014;12(11):e1002005.
Myriapods (e.g., centipedes and millipedes) display a simple homonomous body plan relative to other arthropods. All members of the class are terrestrial, but they attained terrestriality independently of insects. Myriapoda is the only arthropod class not represented by a sequenced genome. We present an analysis of the genome of the centipede Strigamia maritima. It retains a compact genome that has undergone less gene loss and shuffling than previously sequenced arthropods, and many orthologues of genes conserved from the bilaterian ancestor that have been lost in insects. Our analysis locates many genes in conserved macro-synteny contexts, and many small-scale examples of gene clustering. We describe several examples where S. maritima shows different solutions from insects to similar problems. The insect olfactory receptor gene family is absent from S. maritima, and olfaction in air is likely effected by expansion of other receptor gene families. For some genes S. maritima has evolved paralogues to generate coding sequence diversity, where insects use alternate splicing. This is most striking for the Dscam gene, which in Drosophila generates more than 100,000 alternate splice forms, but in S. maritima is encoded by over 100 paralogues. We see an intriguing linkage between the absence of any known photosensory proteins in a blind organism and the additional absence of canonical circadian clock genes. The phylogenetic position of myriapods allows us to identify where in arthropod phylogeny several particular molecular mechanisms and traits emerged. For example, we conclude that juvenile hormone signalling evolved with the emergence of the exoskeleton in the arthropods and that RR-1 containing cuticle proteins evolved in the lineage leading to Mandibulata. We also identify when various gene expansions and losses occurred. The genome of S. maritima offers us a unique glimpse into the ancestral arthropod genome, while also displaying many adaptations to its specific life history.
Author Summary
Arthropods are the most abundant animals on earth. Among them, insects clearly dominate on land, whereas crustaceans hold the title for the most diverse invertebrates in the oceans. Much is known about the biology of these groups, not least because of genomic studies of the fruit fly Drosophila, the water flea Daphnia, and other species used in research. Here we report the first genome sequence from a species belonging to a lineage that has previously received very little attention—the myriapods. Myriapods were among the first arthropods to invade the land over 400 million years ago, and survive today as the herbivorous millipedes and venomous centipedes, one of which—Strigamia maritima—we have sequenced here. We find that the genome of this centipede retains more characteristics of the presumed arthropod ancestor than other sequenced insect genomes. The genome provides access to many aspects of myriapod biology that have not been studied before, suggesting, for example, that they have diversified receptors for smell that are quite different from those used by insects. In addition, it shows specific consequences of the largely subterranean life of this particular species, which seems to have lost the genes for all known light-sensing molecules, even though it still avoids light.
PMCID: PMC4244043  PMID: 25423365
3.  Genetic Alterations Associated With Progression From Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia to Invasive Pancreatic Tumor 
Gastroenterology  2013;145(5):1098-1109.e1.
Background & Aims
Increasing grade of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) has been associated with progression to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, the mechanisms that control progression from PanINs to PDAC are not well understood. We investigated the genetic alterations involved in this process.
Genomic DNA samples from laser-capture microdissected PDACs and adjacent PanIN2 and PanIN3 lesions from 10 patients with pancreatic cancer were analyzed by exome sequencing.
Similar numbers of somatic mutations were identified in PanINs and tumors, but the mutational load varied greatly among cases. Ten of the 15 isolated PanINs shared more than 50% of somatic mutations with associated tumors. Mutations common to tumors and clonally related PanIN2 and PanIN3 lesions were identified as genes that could promote carcinogenesis. KRAS and TP53 were frequently altered in PanINs and tumors, but few other recurrently modified genes were detected. Mutations in DNA damage response genes were prevalent in all samples. Genes that encode proteins involved in gap junctions, the actin cytoskeleton, the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, axon guidance, and cell cycle regulation were among the earliest targets of mutagenesis in PanINs that progressed to PDAC.
Early-stage PanIN2 lesions appear to contain many of the somatic gene alterations required for PDAC development.
PMCID: PMC3926442  PMID: 23912084
pancreas; tumorigenesis; LCM; whole genome amplification
4.  Prediction of Cochlear Implant Performance by Genetic Mutation: The Spiral Ganglion Hypothesis 
Hearing research  2012;292(1-2):51-58.
Up to 7% of patients with severe-to-profound deafness do not benefit from cochlear implantation. Given the high surgical implantation and clinical management cost of cochlear implantation (> $1 million lifetime cost), prospective identification of the worst performers would reduce unnecessary procedures and healthcare costs. Because cochlear implants bypass the membranous labyrinth but rely on the spiral ganglion for functionality, we hypothesize that cochlear implant (CI) performance is dictated in part by the anatomic location of the cochlear pathology that underlies the hearing loss. As a corollary, we hypothesize that because genetic testing can identify sites of cochlear pathology, it may be useful in predicting CI performance.
29 adult CI recipients with idiopathic adult-onset severe-to-profound hearing loss were studied. DNA samples were subjected to solution-based sequence capture and massively parallel sequencing using the OtoSCOPE® platform. The cohort was divided into three CI performance groups (good, intermediate, poor) and genetic causes of deafness were correlated with audiometric data to determine whether there was a gene-specific impact on CI performance.
The genetic cause of deafness was determined in 3/29 (10%) individuals. The two poor performers segregated mutations in TMPRSS3, a gene expressed in the spiral ganglion, while the good performer segregated mutations in LOXHD1, a gene expressed in the membranous labyrinth. Comprehensive literature review identified other good performers with mutations in membranous labyrinth-expressed genes; poor performance was associated with spiral ganglion-expressed genes.
Our data support the underlying hypothesis that mutations in genes preferentially expressed in the spiral ganglion portend poor CI performance while mutations in genes expressed in the membranous labyrinth portend good CI performance. Although the low mutation rate in known deafness genes in this cohort likely relates to the ascertainment characteristics (postlingual hearing loss in adult CI recipients), these data suggest that genetic testing should be implemented as part of the CI evaluation to test this association prospectively.
PMCID: PMC3461332  PMID: 22975204
Cochlear implant performance; spiral ganglion; hearing loss; genetic testing; massively parallel sequencing
5.  Butterfly genome reveals promiscuous exchange of mimicry adaptations among species 
Dasmahapatra, Kanchon K | Walters, James R. | Briscoe, Adriana D. | Davey, John W. | Whibley, Annabel | Nadeau, Nicola J. | Zimin, Aleksey V. | Hughes, Daniel S. T. | Ferguson, Laura C. | Martin, Simon H. | Salazar, Camilo | Lewis, James J. | Adler, Sebastian | Ahn, Seung-Joon | Baker, Dean A. | Baxter, Simon W. | Chamberlain, Nicola L. | Chauhan, Ritika | Counterman, Brian A. | Dalmay, Tamas | Gilbert, Lawrence E. | Gordon, Karl | Heckel, David G. | Hines, Heather M. | Hoff, Katharina J. | Holland, Peter W.H. | Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle | Jiggins, Francis M. | Jones, Robert T. | Kapan, Durrell D. | Kersey, Paul | Lamas, Gerardo | Lawson, Daniel | Mapleson, Daniel | Maroja, Luana S. | Martin, Arnaud | Moxon, Simon | Palmer, William J. | Papa, Riccardo | Papanicolaou, Alexie | Pauchet, Yannick | Ray, David A. | Rosser, Neil | Salzberg, Steven L. | Supple, Megan A. | Surridge, Alison | Tenger-Trolander, Ayse | Vogel, Heiko | Wilkinson, Paul A. | Wilson, Derek | Yorke, James A. | Yuan, Furong | Balmuth, Alexi L. | Eland, Cathlene | Gharbi, Karim | Thomson, Marian | Gibbs, Richard A. | Han, Yi | Jayaseelan, Joy C. | Kovar, Christie | Mathew, Tittu | Muzny, Donna M. | Ongeri, Fiona | Pu, Ling-Ling | Qu, Jiaxin | Thornton, Rebecca L. | Worley, Kim C. | Wu, Yuan-Qing | Linares, Mauricio | Blaxter, Mark L. | Constant, Richard H. ffrench | Joron, Mathieu | Kronforst, Marcus R. | Mullen, Sean P. | Reed, Robert D. | Scherer, Steven E. | Richards, Stephen | Mallet, James | McMillan, W. Owen | Jiggins, Chris D.
Nature  2012;487(7405):94-98.
The evolutionary importance of hybridization and introgression has long been debated1. We used genomic tools to investigate introgression in Heliconius, a rapidly radiating genus of neotropical butterflies widely used in studies of ecology, behaviour, mimicry and speciation2-5 . We sequenced the genome of Heliconius melpomene and compared it with other taxa to investigate chromosomal evolution in Lepidoptera and gene flow among multiple Heliconius species and races. Among 12,657 predicted genes for Heliconius, biologically important expansions of families of chemosensory and Hox genes are particularly noteworthy. Chromosomal organisation has remained broadly conserved since the Cretaceous, when butterflies split from the silkmoth lineage. Using genomic resequencing, we show hybrid exchange of genes between three co-mimics, H. melpomene, H. timareta, and H. elevatus, especially at two genomic regions that control mimicry pattern. Closely related Heliconius species clearly exchange protective colour pattern genes promiscuously, implying a major role for hybridization in adaptive radiation.
PMCID: PMC3398145  PMID: 22722851
6.  High Frequency of PIK3R1 and PIK3R2 Mutations in Endometrial Cancer Elucidates a Novel Mechanism for Regulation of PTEN Protein Stability 
Cancer discovery  2011;1(2):170-185.
We demonstrate that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway aberrations occur in >80% of endometrioid endometrial cancers, with coordinate mutations of multiple PI3K pathway members being more common than predicted by chance. PIK3R1 (p85α) mutations occur at a higher rate in endometrial cancer than in any other tumor lineage, and PIK3R2 (p85β), not previously demonstrated to be a cancer gene, is also frequently mutated. The dominant activation event in the PI3K pathway appears to be PTEN protein loss. However, in tumors with retained PTEN protein, PI3K pathway mutations phenocopy PTEN loss, resulting in pathway activation. KRAS mutations are common in endometrioid tumors activating independent events from PI3K pathway aberrations. Multiple PIK3R1 and PIK3R2 mutations demonstrate gain of function including disruption of a novel mechanism of pathway regulation wherein p85α dimers bind and stabilize PTEN. Taken together, the PI3K pathway represents a critical driver of endometrial cancer pathogenesis and a novel therapeutic target.
PMCID: PMC3187555  PMID: 21984976
Endometrial Cancer; PTEN; PIK3CA; PIK3R1; PIK3R2
7.  Identification of genetic risk variants for deep vein thrombosis by multiplexed next-generation sequencing of 186 hemostatic/pro-inflammatory genes 
Next-generation DNA sequencing is opening new avenues for genetic association studies in common diseases that, like deep vein thrombosis (DVT), have a strong genetic predisposition still largely unexplained by currently identified risk variants. In order to develop sequencing and analytical pipelines for the application of next-generation sequencing to complex diseases, we conducted a pilot study sequencing the coding area of 186 hemostatic/proinflammatory genes in 10 Italian cases of idiopathic DVT and 12 healthy controls.
A molecular-barcoding strategy was used to multiplex DNA target capture and sequencing, while retaining individual sequence information. Genomic libraries with barcode sequence-tags were pooled (in pools of 8 or 16 samples) and enriched for target DNA sequences. Sequencing was performed on ABI SOLiD-4 platforms. We produced > 12 gigabases of raw sequence data to sequence at high coverage (average: 42X) the 700-kilobase target area in 22 individuals. A total of 1876 high-quality genetic variants were identified (1778 single nucleotide substitutions and 98 insertions/deletions). Annotation on databases of genetic variation and human disease mutations revealed several novel, potentially deleterious mutations. We tested 576 common variants in a case-control association analysis, carrying the top-5 associations over to replication in up to 719 DVT cases and 719 controls. We also conducted an analysis of the burden of nonsynonymous variants in coagulation factor and anticoagulant genes. We found an excess of rare missense mutations in anticoagulant genes in DVT cases compared to controls and an association for a missense polymorphism of FGA (rs6050; p = 1.9 × 10-5, OR 1.45; 95% CI, 1.22-1.72; after replication in > 1400 individuals).
We implemented a barcode-based strategy to efficiently multiplex sequencing of hundreds of candidate genes in several individuals. In the relatively small dataset of our pilot study we were able to identify bona fide associations with DVT. Our study illustrates the potential of next-generation sequencing for the discovery of genetic variation predisposing to complex diseases.
PMCID: PMC3305575  PMID: 22353194
Deep vein thrombosis; venous thromboembolism; next-generation sequencing; target capture; multiplexing; FGA; rs6025; heamostateome; DVT; VTE
8.  A genetic map of Xenopus tropicalis 
Developmental Biology  2011;354(1-2):1-8.
We present a genetic map for Xenopus tropicalis, consisting of 2886 Simple Sequence Length Polymorphism (SSLP) markers. Using a bioinformatics-based strategy, we identified unique SSLPs within the X. tropicalis genome. Scaffolds from X. tropicalis genome assembly 2.0 (JGI) were scanned for Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs); unique SSRs were then tested for amplification and polymorphisms using DNA from inbred Nigerian and Ivory Coast individuals. Thus identified, the SSLPs were genotyped against a mapping cross panel of DNA samples from 190 F2 individuals. Nearly 4000 SSLPs were genotyped, yielding a 2886-marker genetic map consisting of 10 major linkage groups between 73 and 132 cM in length, and 4 smaller linkage groups between 7 and 40 cM. The total effective size of the map is 1658 cM, and the average intermarker distance for each linkage group ranged from 0.27 to 0.75 cM. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) was carried out using probes for genes located on mapped scaffolds to assign linkage groups to chromosomes. Comparisons of this map with the X. tropicalis genome Assembly 4.1 (JGI) indicate that the map provides representation of a minimum of 66% of the X. tropicalis genome, incorporating 758 of the approximately 1300 scaffolds over 100,000 bp. The genetic map and SSLP marker database constitute an essential resource for genetic and genomic analyses in X. tropicalis.
Research highlights
► A genetic map of 2886 Simple Sequence Length Polymorphisms for Xenopus tropicalis. ► 10 major linkage groups corresponding to the 10 chromosomes, plus 4 minor linkage groups. ► Linkage groups are cytogenetically mapped to chromosomes by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization.
PMCID: PMC3098391  PMID: 21458440
Xenopus; X. tropicalis; Genetic map; Genome; Simple sequence length polymorphism
9.  Compound and Digenic Heterozygosity Contributes to Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy 
To define the genetic basis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.
Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), characterized by right ventricular fibrofatty replacement and arrhythmias, causes sudden death. Autosomal dominant Inheritance, reduced penetrance, and 7 desmosome-encoding causative genes are known. The basis of low penetrance is poorly understood.
ARVC probands and family members were enrolled, blood obtained, lymphoblastoid cell lines immortalized, DNA extracted, PCR amplification of desmosome-encoding genes performed, PCR products sequenced and diseased tissue samples studied for intercellular junction protein distribution using confocal immunofluorescence microscopy and antibodies against key proteins.
We identified 21 variants in plakophilin-2 (PKP2) in 38 of 198 probands (19%), including missense, nonsense, splice site, and deletion/insertion mutations. Pedigrees showed wide intra-familial variability (severe early-onset disease to asymptomatic individuals). In 9/38 probands, PKP2 variants were identified that were encoded in trans (compound heterozygosity). The 38 probands hosting PKP2 variants were screened for other desmosomal genes mutations; second variants (digenic heterozygosity) were identified in 16/38 subjects with PKP2 variants (42%) including desmoplakin (DSP, n=6), desmoglein-2 (DSG2, n=5), plakophilin-4 (PKP4, n=1), and desmocollin-2 (DSC2, n=1). Heterozygous mutations in non-PKP 2desmosomal genes occurred in 14/198 subjects (7%), including DSP (n=4), DSG2 (n=5), DSC2 (n=3), and junctional plakoglobin (JUP, n=2). All variants occurred in conserved regions; none were identified in 700 ethnic-matched controls.
Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated abnormalities of protein architecture.
These data suggest that the genetic basis of ARVC includes reduced penetrance with compound and digenic heterozygosity. Disturbed junctional cytoarchitecture in subjects with desmosomal mutations confirms that ARVC is a disease of the desmosome and cell junction.
PMCID: PMC2852685  PMID: 20152563
Arrhythmias; Cardiomyopathies; Desmosomes; Intercalated Disks; Genetic Mutations
10.  Understanding the development of human bladder cancer by using a whole-organ genomic mapping strategy 
The search for the genomic sequences involved in human cancers can be greatly facilitated by maps of genomic imbalances identifying the involved chromosomal regions, particularly those that participate in the development of occult preneoplastic conditions that progress to clinically aggressive invasive cancer. The integration of such regions with human genome sequence variation may provide valuable clues about their overall structure and gene content. By extension, such knowledge may help us understand the underlying genetic components involved in the initiation and progression of these cancers. We describe the development of a genome-wide map of human bladder cancer that tracks its progression from in situ precursor conditions to invasive disease. Testing for allelic losses using a genome-wide panel of 787 microsatellite markers was performed on multiple DNA samples, extracted from the entire mucosal surface of the bladder and corresponding to normal urothelium, in situ preneoplastic lesions, and invasive carcinoma. Using this approach, we matched the clonal allelic losses in distinct chromosomal regions to specific phases of bladder neoplasia and produced a detailed genetic map of bladder cancer development. These analyses revealed three major waves of genetic changes associated with growth advantages of successive clones and reflecting a stepwise conversion of normal urothelial cells into cancer cells. The genetic changes map to six regions at 3q22–q24, 5q22–q31, 9q21–q22, 10q26, 13q14, and 17p13, which may represent critical hits driving the development of bladder cancer. Finally, we performed high-resolution mapping using single nucleotide polymorphism markers within one region on chromosome 13q14, containing the model tumor suppressor gene RB1, and defined a minimal deleted region associated with clonal expansion of in situ neoplasia. These analyses provided new insights on the involvement of several non-coding sequences mapping to the region and identified novel target genes, termed forerunner (FR) genes, involved in early phases of cancer development.
PMCID: PMC2849658  PMID: 18458673
forerunner genes; whole-organ histologic and genetic mapping; high-resolution mapping with SNPs; dual-track pathway of bladder cancer development; apoptosis
11.  Somatic mutations affect key pathways in lung adenocarcinoma 
Ding, Li | Getz, Gad | Wheeler, David A. | Mardis, Elaine R. | McLellan, Michael D. | Cibulskis, Kristian | Sougnez, Carrie | Greulich, Heidi | Muzny, Donna M. | Morgan, Margaret B. | Fulton, Lucinda | Fulton, Robert S. | Zhang, Qunyuan | Wendl, Michael C. | Lawrence, Michael S. | Larson, David E. | Chen, Ken | Dooling, David J. | Sabo, Aniko | Hawes, Alicia C. | Shen, Hua | Jhangiani, Shalini N. | Lewis, Lora R. | Hall, Otis | Zhu, Yiming | Mathew, Tittu | Ren, Yanru | Yao, Jiqiang | Scherer, Steven E. | Clerc, Kerstin | Metcalf, Ginger A. | Ng, Brian | Milosavljevic, Aleksandar | Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L. | Osborne, John R. | Meyer, Rick | Shi, Xiaoqi | Tang, Yuzhu | Koboldt, Daniel C. | Lin, Ling | Abbott, Rachel | Miner, Tracie L. | Pohl, Craig | Fewell, Ginger | Haipek, Carrie | Schmidt, Heather | Dunford-Shore, Brian H. | Kraja, Aldi | Crosby, Seth D. | Sawyer, Christopher S. | Vickery, Tammi | Sander, Sacha | Robinson, Jody | Winckler, Wendy | Baldwin, Jennifer | Chirieac, Lucian R. | Dutt, Amit | Fennell, Tim | Hanna, Megan | Johnson, Bruce E. | Onofrio, Robert C. | Thomas, Roman K. | Tonon, Giovanni | Weir, Barbara A. | Zhao, Xiaojun | Ziaugra, Liuda | Zody, Michael C. | Giordano, Thomas | Orringer, Mark B. | Roth, Jack A. | Spitz, Margaret R. | Wistuba, Ignacio I. | Ozenberger, Bradley | Good, Peter J. | Chang, Andrew C. | Beer, David G. | Watson, Mark A. | Ladanyi, Marc | Broderick, Stephen | Yoshizawa, Akihiko | Travis, William D. | Pao, William | Province, Michael A. | Weinstock, George M. | Varmus, Harold E. | Gabriel, Stacey B. | Lander, Eric S. | Gibbs, Richard A. | Meyerson, Matthew | Wilson, Richard K.
Nature  2008;455(7216):1069-1075.
Determining the genetic basis of cancer requires comprehensive analyses of large collections of histopathologically well-classified primary tumours. Here we report the results of a collaborative study to discover somatic mutations in 188 human lung adenocarcinomas. DNA sequencing of 623 genes with known or potential relationships to cancer revealed more than 1,000 somatic mutations across the samples. Our analysis identified 26 genes that are mutated at significantly high frequencies and thus are probably involved in carcinogenesis. The frequently mutated genes include tyrosine kinases, among them the EGFR homologue ERBB4; multiple ephrin receptor genes, notably EPHA3; vascular endothelial growth factor receptor KDR; and NTRK genes. These data provide evidence of somatic mutations in primary lung adenocarcinoma for several tumour suppressor genes involved in other cancers—including NF1, APC, RB1 and ATM—and for sequence changes in PTPRD as well as the frequently deleted gene LRP1B. The observed mutational profiles correlate with clinical features, smoking status and DNA repair defects. These results are reinforced by data integration including single nucleotide polymorphism array and gene expression array. Our findings shed further light on several important signalling pathways involved in lung adenocarcinoma, and suggest new molecular targets for treatment.
PMCID: PMC2694412  PMID: 18948947
12.  Finishing a whole-genome shotgun: Release 3 of the Drosophila melanogaster euchromatic genome sequence 
Genome Biology  2002;3(12):research0079.1-79.14.
The Drosophila melanogaster genome was the first metazoan genome to be sequenced by whole-genome shotgun. Now, the sequence has been finished in a process designed to close gaps, improve sequence quality and validate the assembly.
The Drosophila melanogaster genome was the first metazoan genome to have been sequenced by the whole-genome shotgun (WGS) method. Two issues relating to this achievement were widely debated in the genomics community: how correct is the sequence with respect to base-pair (bp) accuracy and frequency of assembly errors? And, how difficult is it to bring a WGS sequence to the accepted standard for finished sequence? We are now in a position to answer these questions.
Our finishing process was designed to close gaps, improve sequence quality and validate the assembly. Sequence traces derived from the WGS and draft sequencing of individual bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) were assembled into BAC-sized segments. These segments were brought to high quality, and then joined to constitute the sequence of each chromosome arm. Overall assembly was verified by comparison to a physical map of fingerprinted BAC clones. In the current version of the 116.9 Mb euchromatic genome, called Release 3, the six euchromatic chromosome arms are represented by 13 scaffolds with a total of 37 sequence gaps. We compared Release 3 to Release 2; in autosomal regions of unique sequence, the error rate of Release 2 was one in 20,000 bp.
The WGS strategy can efficiently produce a high-quality sequence of a metazoan genome while generating the reagents required for sequence finishing. However, the initial method of repeat assembly was flawed. The sequence we report here, Release 3, is a reliable resource for molecular genetic experimentation and computational analysis.
PMCID: PMC151181  PMID: 12537568
13.  The genomes of two key bumblebee species with primitive eusocial organization 
Sadd, Ben M | Barribeau, Seth M | Bloch, Guy | de Graaf, Dirk C | Dearden, Peter | Elsik, Christine G | Gadau, Jürgen | Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis JP | Hasselmann, Martin | Lozier, Jeffrey D | Robertson, Hugh M | Smagghe, Guy | Stolle, Eckart | Van Vaerenbergh, Matthias | Waterhouse, Robert M | Bornberg-Bauer, Erich | Klasberg, Steffen | Bennett, Anna K | Câmara, Francisco | Guigó, Roderic | Hoff, Katharina | Mariotti, Marco | Munoz-Torres, Monica | Murphy, Terence | Santesmasses, Didac | Amdam, Gro V | Beckers, Matthew | Beye, Martin | Biewer, Matthias | Bitondi, Márcia MG | Blaxter, Mark L | Bourke, Andrew FG | Brown, Mark JF | Buechel, Severine D | Cameron, Rossanah | Cappelle, Kaat | Carolan, James C | Christiaens, Olivier | Ciborowski, Kate L | Clarke, David F | Colgan, Thomas J | Collins, David H | Cridge, Andrew G | Dalmay, Tamas | Dreier, Stephanie | du Plessis, Louis | Duncan, Elizabeth | Erler, Silvio | Evans, Jay | Falcon, Tiago | Flores, Kevin | Freitas, Flávia CP | Fuchikawa, Taro | Gempe, Tanja | Hartfelder, Klaus | Hauser, Frank | Helbing, Sophie | Humann, Fernanda C | Irvine, Frano | Jermiin, Lars S | Johnson, Claire E | Johnson, Reed M | Jones, Andrew K | Kadowaki, Tatsuhiko | Kidner, Jonathan H | Koch, Vasco | Köhler, Arian | Kraus, F Bernhard | Lattorff, H Michael G | Leask, Megan | Lockett, Gabrielle A | Mallon, Eamonn B | Antonio, David S Marco | Marxer, Monika | Meeus, Ivan | Moritz, Robin FA | Nair, Ajay | Näpflin, Kathrin | Nissen, Inga | Niu, Jinzhi | Nunes, Francis MF | Oakeshott, John G | Osborne, Amy | Otte, Marianne | Pinheiro, Daniel G | Rossié, Nina | Rueppell, Olav | Santos, Carolina G | Schmid-Hempel, Regula | Schmitt, Björn D | Schulte, Christina | Simões, Zilá LP | Soares, Michelle PM | Swevers, Luc | Winnebeck, Eva C | Wolschin, Florian | Yu, Na | Zdobnov, Evgeny M | Aqrawi, Peshtewani K | Blankenburg, Kerstin P | Coyle, Marcus | Francisco, Liezl | Hernandez, Alvaro G | Holder, Michael | Hudson, Matthew E | Jackson, LaRonda | Jayaseelan, Joy | Joshi, Vandita | Kovar, Christie | Lee, Sandra L | Mata, Robert | Mathew, Tittu | Newsham, Irene F | Ngo, Robin | Okwuonu, Geoffrey | Pham, Christopher | Pu, Ling-Ling | Saada, Nehad | Santibanez, Jireh | Simmons, DeNard | Thornton, Rebecca | Venkat, Aarti | Walden, Kimberly KO | Wu, Yuan-Qing | Debyser, Griet | Devreese, Bart | Asher, Claire | Blommaert, Julie | Chipman, Ariel D | Chittka, Lars | Fouks, Bertrand | Liu, Jisheng | O’Neill, Meaghan P | Sumner, Seirian | Puiu, Daniela | Qu, Jiaxin | Salzberg, Steven L | Scherer, Steven E | Muzny, Donna M | Richards, Stephen | Robinson, Gene E | Gibbs, Richard A | Schmid-Hempel, Paul | Worley, Kim C
Genome Biology  2015;16(1):76.
The shift from solitary to social behavior is one of the major evolutionary transitions. Primitively eusocial bumblebees are uniquely placed to illuminate the evolution of highly eusocial insect societies. Bumblebees are also invaluable natural and agricultural pollinators, and there is widespread concern over recent population declines in some species. High-quality genomic data will inform key aspects of bumblebee biology, including susceptibility to implicated population viability threats.
We report the high quality draft genome sequences of Bombus terrestris and Bombus impatiens, two ecologically dominant bumblebees and widely utilized study species. Comparing these new genomes to those of the highly eusocial honeybee Apis mellifera and other Hymenoptera, we identify deeply conserved similarities, as well as novelties key to the biology of these organisms. Some honeybee genome features thought to underpin advanced eusociality are also present in bumblebees, indicating an earlier evolution in the bee lineage. Xenobiotic detoxification and immune genes are similarly depauperate in bumblebees and honeybees, and multiple categories of genes linked to social organization, including development and behavior, show high conservation. Key differences identified include a bias in bumblebee chemoreception towards gustation from olfaction, and striking differences in microRNAs, potentially responsible for gene regulation underlying social and other traits.
These two bumblebee genomes provide a foundation for post-genomic research on these key pollinators and insect societies. Overall, gene repertoires suggest that the route to advanced eusociality in bees was mediated by many small changes in many genes and processes, and not by notable expansion or depauperation.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13059-015-0623-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
PMCID: PMC4414376  PMID: 25908251

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