PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-7 (7)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  miRNA profiling, detection of BRAF V600E mutation and RET-PTC1 translocation in patients from Novosibirsk oblast (Russia) with different types of thyroid tumors 
BMC Cancer  2016;16:201.
Background
The postoperative typing of thyroid lesions, which is instrumental in adequate patient treatment, is currently based on histologic examination. However, it depends on pathologist’s qualification and can be difficult in some cases. Numerous studies have shown that molecular markers such as microRNAs and somatic mutations may be useful to assist in these cases, but no consensus exists on the set of markers that is optimal for that purpose. The aim of the study was to discriminate between different thyroid neoplasms by RT-PCR, using a limited set of microRNAs selected from literature.
Methods
By RT-PCR we evaluated the relative levels of 15 microRNAs (miR-221, −222, −146b, −181b, −21, −187, −199b, −144, −192, −200a, −200b, −205, −141, −31, −375) and the presence of BRAF(V600E) mutation and RET-PTC1 translocation in surgically resected lesions from 208 patients from Novosibirsk oblast (Russia) with different types of thyroid neoplasms. Expression of each microRNA was normalized to adjacent non-tumor tissue. Three pieces of lesion tissue from each patient (39 goiters, 41 follicular adenomas, 16 follicular thyroid cancers, 108 papillary thyroid cancers, 4 medullary thyroid cancers) were analyzed independently to take into account method variation.
Results
The diagnostic classifier based on profiling of 13 microRNAs was proposed, with total estimated accuracy varying from 82.7 to 99 % for different nodule types. Relative expression of six microRNAs (miR-146b, −21, −221, −222, 375, −199b) appeared significantly different in BRAF(V600E)-positive samples (all classified as papillary thyroid carcinomas) compared to BRAF(V600E)-negative papillary carcinoma samples.
Conclusions
The results confirm practical feasibility of using molecular markers for typing of thyroid neoplasms and clarification of controversial cases.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2240-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2240-2
PMCID: PMC4784369  PMID: 26960768
Thyroid cancer; microRNA; BRAF; RET-PTC1; Real-time PCR
2.  ArrayExpress update—simplifying data submissions 
Nucleic Acids Research  2014;43(Database issue):D1113-D1116.
The ArrayExpress Archive of Functional Genomics Data (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress) is an international functional genomics database at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) recommended by most journals as a repository for data supporting peer-reviewed publications. It contains data from over 7000 public sequencing and 42 000 array-based studies comprising over 1.5 million assays in total. The proportion of sequencing-based submissions has grown significantly over the last few years and has doubled in the last 18 months, whilst the rate of microarray submissions is growing slightly. All data in ArrayExpress are available in the MAGE-TAB format, which allows robust linking to data analysis and visualization tools and standardized analysis. The main development over the last two years has been the release of a new data submission tool Annotare, which has reduced the average submission time almost 3-fold. In the near future, Annotare will become the only submission route into ArrayExpress, alongside MAGE-TAB format-based pipelines. ArrayExpress is a stable and highly accessed resource. Our future tasks include automation of data flows and further integration with other EMBL-EBI resources for the representation of multi-omics data.
doi:10.1093/nar/gku1057
PMCID: PMC4383899  PMID: 25361974
3.  ArrayExpress update—trends in database growth and links to data analysis tools 
Nucleic Acids Research  2012;41(Database issue):D987-D990.
The ArrayExpress Archive of Functional Genomics Data (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress) is one of three international functional genomics public data repositories, alongside the Gene Expression Omnibus at NCBI and the DDBJ Omics Archive, supporting peer-reviewed publications. It accepts data generated by sequencing or array-based technologies and currently contains data from almost a million assays, from over 30 000 experiments. The proportion of sequencing-based submissions has grown significantly over the last 2 years and has reached, in 2012, 15% of all new data. All data are available from ArrayExpress in MAGE-TAB format, which allows robust linking to data analysis and visualization tools, including Bioconductor and GenomeSpace. Additionally, R objects, for microarray data, and binary alignment format files, for sequencing data, have been generated for a significant proportion of ArrayExpress data.
doi:10.1093/nar/gks1174
PMCID: PMC3531147  PMID: 23193272
4.  ArrayExpress update—an archive of microarray and high-throughput sequencing-based functional genomics experiments 
Nucleic Acids Research  2010;39(Database issue):D1002-D1004.
The ArrayExpress Archive (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress) is one of the three international public repositories of functional genomics data supporting publications. It includes data generated by sequencing or array-based technologies. Data are submitted by users and imported directly from the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus. The ArrayExpress Archive is closely integrated with the Gene Expression Atlas and the sequence databases at the European Bioinformatics Institute. Advanced queries provided via ontology enabled interfaces include queries based on technology and sample attributes such as disease, cell types and anatomy.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkq1040
PMCID: PMC3013660  PMID: 21071405
5.  Modeling sample variables with an Experimental Factor Ontology 
Bioinformatics  2010;26(8):1112-1118.
Motivation: Describing biological sample variables with ontologies is complex due to the cross-domain nature of experiments. Ontologies provide annotation solutions; however, for cross-domain investigations, multiple ontologies are needed to represent the data. These are subject to rapid change, are often not interoperable and present complexities that are a barrier to biological resource users.
Results: We present the Experimental Factor Ontology, designed to meet cross-domain, application focused use cases for gene expression data. We describe our methodology and open source tools used to create the ontology. These include tools for creating ontology mappings, ontology views, detecting ontology changes and using ontologies in interfaces to enhance querying. The application of reference ontologies to data is a key problem, and this work presents guidelines on how community ontologies can be presented in an application ontology in a data-driven way.
Availability: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/efo
Contact: malone@ebi.ac.uk
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btq099
PMCID: PMC2853691  PMID: 20200009
6.  ArrayExpress update—from an archive of functional genomics experiments to the atlas of gene expression 
Nucleic Acids Research  2008;37(Database issue):D868-D872.
ArrayExpress http://www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress consists of three components: the ArrayExpress Repository—a public archive of functional genomics experiments and supporting data, the ArrayExpress Warehouse—a database of gene expression profiles and other bio-measurements and the ArrayExpress Atlas—a new summary database and meta-analytical tool of ranked gene expression across multiple experiments and different biological conditions. The Repository contains data from over 6000 experiments comprising approximately 200 000 assays, and the database doubles in size every 15 months. The majority of the data are array based, but other data types are included, most recently—ultra high-throughput sequencing transcriptomics and epigenetic data. The Warehouse and Atlas allow users to query for differentially expressed genes by gene names and properties, experimental conditions and sample properties, or a combination of both. In this update, we describe the ArrayExpress developments over the last two years.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkn889
PMCID: PMC2686529  PMID: 19015125
7.  A Dual Origin of the Xist Gene from a Protein-Coding Gene and a Set of Transposable Elements 
PLoS ONE  2008;3(6):e2521.
X-chromosome inactivation, which occurs in female eutherian mammals is controlled by a complex X-linked locus termed the X-inactivation center (XIC). Previously it was proposed that genes of the XIC evolved, at least in part, as a result of pseudogenization of protein-coding genes. In this study we show that the key XIC gene Xist, which displays fragmentary homology to a protein-coding gene Lnx3, emerged de novo in early eutherians by integration of mobile elements which gave rise to simple tandem repeats. The Xist gene promoter region and four out of ten exons found in eutherians retain homology to exons of the Lnx3 gene. The remaining six Xist exons including those with simple tandem repeats detectable in their structure have similarity to different transposable elements. Integration of mobile elements into Xist accompanies the overall evolution of the gene and presumably continues in contemporary eutherian species. Additionally we showed that the combination of remnants of protein-coding sequences and mobile elements is not unique to the Xist gene and is found in other XIC genes producing non-coding nuclear RNA.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0002521
PMCID: PMC2430539  PMID: 18575625

Results 1-7 (7)