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1.  American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology Screening Guidelines for the Prevention and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer 
An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from six working groups, and a recent symposium co-sponsored by the ACS, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (e.g., management of screen positives and screening interval for screen negatives) of women after screening, age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections.
doi:10.1097/LGT.0b013e31824ca9d5
PMCID: PMC3915715  PMID: 22418039
2.  American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology Screening Guidelines for the Prevention and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer 
An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from six working groups, and a recent symposium cosponsored by the ACS, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (e.g., management of screen positives and screening interval for screen negatives) of women after screening, age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections.
doi:10.3322/caac.21139
PMCID: PMC3801360  PMID: 22422631
3.  Cervical Cancer Prevention: New Tools and Old Barriers 
Cancer  2010;116(11):2531-2542.
Cervical cancer is the second most common female tumor worldwide and its incidence is disproportionately high (>80%) in the developing world. In the U.S., where Pap tests have reduced the annual incidence to approximately 11,000 cervical cancers, more than 60% of cases occur in medically-underserved populations as part of a complex of diseases linked to poverty, race/ethnicity, and/or health disparities. Because carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infections cause virtually all cervical cancer, two new approaches for cervical cancer prevention have emerged: 1) HPV vaccination to prevent infections in younger women (≤18 years old) and 2) carcinogenic HPV detection in older women (≥30 years old). Together, HPV vaccination and testing, if used in an age-appropriate manner, have the potential to transform cervical cancer prevention particularly among underserved populations. Yet significant barriers of access, acceptability, and adoption to any cervical cancer prevention strategy remain. Without understanding and addressing these obstacles, these promising new tools for cervical cancer prevention may be futile. We share our experiences in the delivery of cervical cancer prevention strategies to U.S. populations experiencing high cervical cancer burden: African-American women in South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi; Haitian immigrant women in Miami; Hispanic women in the U.S.-Mexico Border; Sioux/Native American women in the Northern Plains; white women in the Appalachia; and Vietnamese-American women in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Our goal is to inform future research and outreach efforts to reduce the burden of cervical cancer in underserved populations.
doi:10.1002/cncr.25065
PMCID: PMC2876205  PMID: 20310056
4.  The Filshie Clip for Laparoscopic Adnexal Surgery 
Background:
Gynecologic endoscopic procedures are increasingly common and require the ability to control large vascular structures.
Method:
The Filshie clip is a silicone-lined, titanium occlusive device, originally designed and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for surgical contraception. This device also has the potential for occluding vascular structures during laparoscopic surgery.
Experience and Results:
We describe a salpingectomy, an excision of bilateral hydrosalpinges, and a salpingooopherectomy. We performed all procedures laparoscopically using this device as the primary modality for assuring hemostasis.
Conclusion:
The Filshie clip is a useful and economical device for assuring hemostasis during gynecologic endoscopic surgery.
PMCID: PMC3015424  PMID: 11394433
Laparoscopy; Adnexal surgery; Filshie clip
5.  Evaluation of a Prototype Real-Time PCR Assay for Carcinogenic Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Detection and Simultaneous HPV Genotype 16 (HPV16) and HPV18 Genotyping▿  
Journal of Clinical Microbiology  2009;47(10):3344-3347.
Results from a prototype real-time PCR assay that separately detected human papillomavirus genotype 16 (HPV16), HPV18, and 12 other carcinogenic HPV genotypes in aggregate (cobas 4800 HPV test) and results from a PCR assay that detects 37 HPV genotypes individually (Linear Array) were compared using a convenience sample of cervical specimens (n = 531). The percentage of total agreement between the two assays was 94.7% (95% confidence interval, 92.5 to 96.5%). The Linear Array test was more likely than cobas 4800 HPV test to test positive for the 12 other carcinogenic HPV genotypes among women without evidence of cervical disease (P = 0.004).
doi:10.1128/JCM.00725-09
PMCID: PMC2756930  PMID: 19675214
6.  Laparoscopic Bowel Injuries Among Gynecologic Patients 
Bowel injury is an uncommon but recognized risk of operative laparoscopy. Because of the significant morbidity that can occur with this complication, it is important that clinicians be aware of its incidence, presentation, and management. This manuscript outlines the common causes of bowel injury, including herniation and traumatic bowel perforation. Management of laparoscopic bowel injuries is discussed and recommendations are made for avoidance of such complications.
doi:10.1155/DTE.3.241
PMCID: PMC2362572  PMID: 18493442

Results 1-6 (6)