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1.  ABCA7 loss-of-function variants, expression, and neurologic disease risk 
Neurology: Genetics  2017;3(1):e126.
Objective:
To investigate and characterize putative “loss-of-function” (LOF) adenosine triphosphate–binding cassette, subfamily A member 7 (ABCA7) mutations reported to associate with Alzheimer disease (AD) risk.
Methods:
We genotyped 6 previously reported ABCA7 putative LOF variants in 1,465 participants with AD, 381 participants with other neuropathologies (non-AD), and 1,043 controls and assessed the overall mutational burden for association with different diagnosis groups. We measured brain ABCA7 protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels using Western blot and quantitative PCR, respectively, in 11 carriers of the 3 most common variants, and sequenced all 47 ABCA7 exons in these participants to screen for other coding variants.
Results:
At least one of the investigated variants was identified in 45 participants with late-onset Alzheimer disease, 12 participants with other neuropathologies, and 11 elderly controls. Association analysis revealed a significantly higher burden of these variants in participants with AD (p = 5.00E-04) and those with other neuropathologies (p = 8.60E-03) when compared with controls. Concurrent analysis of brain ABCA7 mRNA and protein revealed lower protein but not mRNA in p.L1403fs carriers, lower mRNA but not protein in p.E709fs carriers, and additional deleterious mutations in some c.5570+5G>C carriers.
Conclusions:
Our results suggest that LOF may not be a common mechanism for these ABCA7 variants and expand the list of neurologic diseases enriched for them.
doi:10.1212/NXG.0000000000000126
PMCID: PMC5217615  PMID: 28097223
2.  Human whole genome genotype and transcriptome data for Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases 
Scientific Data  2016;3:160089.
Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS), conducted by our group and others, have identified loci that harbor risk variants for neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Human disease variants are enriched for polymorphisms that affect gene expression, including some that are known to associate with expression changes in the brain. Postulating that many variants confer risk to neurodegenerative disease via transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, we have analyzed gene expression levels in the brain tissue of subjects with AD and related diseases. Herein, we describe our collective datasets comprised of GWAS data from 2,099 subjects; microarray gene expression data from 773 brain samples, 186 of which also have RNAseq; and an independent cohort of 556 brain samples with RNAseq. We expect that these datasets, which are available to all qualified researchers, will enable investigators to explore and identify transcriptional mechanisms contributing to neurodegenerative diseases.
doi:10.1038/sdata.2016.89
PMCID: PMC5058336  PMID: 27727239
Neurodegeneration; Genetics of the nervous system; Genome-wide association studies; RNA sequencing
3.  Late-onset Alzheimer disease risk variants mark brain regulatory loci 
Neurology: Genetics  2015;1(2):e15.
Objective:
To investigate the top late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) risk loci detected or confirmed by the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project for association with brain gene expression levels to identify variants that influence Alzheimer disease (AD) risk through gene expression regulation.
Methods:
Expression levels from the cerebellum (CER) and temporal cortex (TCX) were obtained using Illumina whole-genome cDNA-mediated annealing, selection, extension, and ligation assay (WG-DASL) for ∼400 autopsied patients (∼200 with AD and ∼200 with non-AD pathologies). We tested 12 significant LOAD genome-wide association study (GWAS) index single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for cis association with levels of 34 genes within ±100 kb. We also evaluated brain levels of 14 LOAD GWAS candidate genes for association with 1,899 cis-SNPs. Significant associations were validated in a subset of TCX samples using next-generation RNA sequencing (RNAseq).
Results:
We identified strong associations of brain CR1, HLA-DRB1, and PILRB levels with LOAD GWAS index SNPs. We also detected other strong cis-SNPs for LOAD candidate genes MEF2C, ZCWPW1, and SLC24A4. MEF2C and SLC24A4, but not ZCWPW1 cis-SNPs, also associate with LOAD risk, independent of the index SNPs. The TCX expression associations could be validated with RNAseq for CR1, HLA-DRB1, ZCWPW1, and SLC24A4.
Conclusions:
Our results suggest that some LOAD GWAS variants mark brain regulatory loci, nominate genes under regulation by LOAD risk variants, and annotate these variants for their brain regulatory effects.
doi:10.1212/NXG.0000000000000012
PMCID: PMC4807909  PMID: 27066552
4.  Association of common KIBRA variants with episodic memory and AD risk 
Neurobiology of aging  2010;32(3):557.e1-557.e9.
KIBRA SNP rs17070145 was identified in a GWAS of memory performance, with some but not all follow-up studies confirming association of its T allele with enhanced memory. This allele was associated with reduced Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk in one study, which also found overexpression of KIBRA in memory-related brain regions of ADs. We genotyped rs17070145 and 14 additional SNPs in 2571 LOADs vs. 2842 controls, including African-Americans. We found significantly reduced risk for rs17070145 T allele in the older African-American subjects (p=0.007) and a suggestive effect in the older Caucasian series. Meta-analysis of this allele in >8000 subjects from our and published series showed a suggestive protective effect (p=0.07). Analysis of episodic memory in control subjects did not identify associations with rs17070145, though other SNPs showed significant associations in one series. KIBRA showed evidence of overexpression in the AD temporal cortex (p=0.06) but not cerebellum. These results suggest a modest role for KIBRA as a cognition and AD risk gene, and also highlight the multifactorial complexity of its genetic associations.
doi:10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2010.11.004
PMCID: PMC3065956  PMID: 21185624
Alzheimer's disease; Association studies in genetics; Case control studies

Results 1-4 (4)